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Dinner Recipes For Diabetics Type 2

The Ultimate Anti-diabetes Diet

The Ultimate Anti-diabetes Diet

One of America's most common killer diseases, type 2 diabetes, jeopardizes the health, quality of life, and longevity of nearly 24 million Americans, according to the American Diabetes Association, and that number continues to rise. New cases have doubled over the past 30 years, and because the disease occurs gradually and often with no obvious symptoms, many people don't even know they have it. People who are overweight are at higher risk because fat interferes with the body's ability to use insulin, the crux of the disease. But a solution to the problem is within reach: a groundbreaking eating plan not only helps prevent this chronic disease, but actually reverses it while also promoting weight loss. Focusing on plant-based meals,the revolutionary plan was developed by Vegetarian Times former Ask the Doc columnist, Neal Barnard, MD, and is backed by the results of his long-term study. Your doctor may not tell you about this diet: dietitians generally counsel overweight diabetics to cut calories, reduce serving sizes, and avoid starchy carbohydrates that raise blood sugar levels. But Barnard's team at the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine and scientists at George Washington University and the University of Toronto thought this might be the wrong approach, considering that carbohydrate-rich rice, legumes, and root vegetables are staples throughout Asia and Africa, where most people are thin and diabetes rates are low. Barnard and his team studied a group of diabetics, comparing the effects of a diet based on standard recommendations versus a vegan-style diet with no limits on calories, carbs, or portions, and just three rules: eliminate meat, dairy, and eggs; minimize fat and oil; and favor low-glycemic foods (such as beans, vegetables, brown rice, and oatme Continue reading >>

15 Delicious Diabetes-friendly Dinner Ideas

15 Delicious Diabetes-friendly Dinner Ideas

For many people, dinner is a time to sit down as a family and reconnect — and it turns out that this routine is good for your health. Studies have shown that eating alone in front of the TV and eating on the go are associated with greater incidences of obesity and type 2 diabetes in both children and adults. Now that you are working to manage your type 2 diabetes, it’s even more important to sit down with people you care about and enjoy a well-planned meal together. Here are 15 tasty, diabetes-friendly dinner recipes to get you started. Tip: When dinner is served, take the time to teach your family members about the healthy-plate method and the other smart-eating tips you’ve learned. You’ll be contributing to their ongoing health as well as your own — and teaching your kids good habits now may even prevent them from developing type 2 diabetes themselves. Learn more healthy habits in Step 5. Continue reading >>

Clean Eating For Diabetics

Clean Eating For Diabetics

Because I talk a lot about my blood sugar issues here, I get a lot of questions from diabetic readers. And the question I’m asked most frequently is, “Is clean eating okay for diabetics?” Because I’m not a medical professional, I do not want to inadvertently give medical advice. Please remember, this is the internet. You should be getting your medical advice from a medical professional. I also want to be sure that the information I post in this article is accurate. So for this blog post, I’m collaborating with Jessica Biehn, RD. We have worked together on this blog post to ensure that the information is current and correct. Jessica is a clean eater as well. This is what Jessica has to say on the topic: There are THREE types of diabetes: Type 1 Diabetes is an autoimmune condition where the pancreas does not produce insulin, a hormone needed to convert sugar and other carbohydrates into energy. This type of diabetes is typically diagnosed in children and young adults. Type 2 Diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Although most often diagnosed in adults, it is becoming increasingly prevalent in children. In Type 2 Diabetes, insulin is not utilized properly in the body, causing high blood glucose levels and poor metabolism. Lifestyle is often very influential in the development of this disease. Gestational Diabetes is diagnosed in pregnant women who have abnormal blood glucose levels. For this post, we will concentrate primarily on Type 2 Diabetes. There are several risk factors that increase the chance of developing Type 2 Diabetes. These include obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, race, age, familial history, and others.1 Additionally, more studies are emerging and are suggesting that a diet of processed foods may significantly contribute to the development o Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Because certain foods, such as carbohydrates, directly impact your blood sugars, your diet is one of the most important factors in managing diabetes. Carbohydrates are found in foods such as: starches, fruit, milk/yogurt, legumes, sweets, and candy. When metabolized carbohydrates turn into sugar (glucose), which is the body's primary source of energy. Insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, takes glucose from the blood stream to the cells to use for energy. When you have diabetes, managing blood sugar can be difficult either because your pancreas isn't making enough insulin or the insulin it makes isn't being used efficiently. This typically happens when you are overweight. Eating too much can contribute to weight gain and obesity, making your body more resistant to insulin. Learning how to eat a balanced, modified carbohydrate diet, can help you to lose weight and manage your blood sugars. Everyone with diabetes needs to manage their carbohydrate intake. Whether they do this simply by reducing their carbohydrate intake, counting carbohydrates, or eating a consistent carbohydrate diet, modifying carbohydrates can lead to weight loss, blood sugar control, and often a reduction in triglycerides (a type of fat that can increase your risk for heart disease). In addition, most people with type 2 diabetes need to lose weight. In order to lose weight, we need to reduce our overall calorie intake. By increasing fiber, reducing overall portions, reducing intake of high-calorie foods, such as sweets and fast foods, and choosing the right kinds of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, people with type 2 diabetes can lose weight. There are many types of meal plans that can help you lose weight. Spend some time understanding some of the best ways to eat for diabetes to get you jum Continue reading >>

Some Foods To Stay Away From:

Some Foods To Stay Away From:

This includes hot dogs, bologna, salami, bacon, and sausage products with more than 8 grams of fat per ounce. Canned soups and broths Unless they are labeled as low sodium or low fat, it’s better to prepare these yourself and it’s easy with a slow cooker. Prepared mixes for pasta and rice These are usually high in sodium. Make your own sauces instead, using fresh, natural ingredients. Continue reading >>

Chicken Veggie Stir Fry + The Pre-diabetes Diet Plan

Chicken Veggie Stir Fry + The Pre-diabetes Diet Plan

Eating for overall good health and diabetes prevention just got a whole lot easier with this family-pleasing recipe for Chicken Veggie Stir Fry. Over 80 million Americans of all ages have pre-diabetes, which puts them at risk for developing type 2 diabetes—a disease that can lead to blindness, kidney failure, and blood vessel damage. Obesity, inactivity, a low fiber diet, and a high intake of sugar-sweetened beverages are common risk factors for diabetes. To the rescue is registered dietitian, Hillary Wright, M.Ed, RD whose new book, The Pre-Diabetes Diet Plan outlines simple eating and exercise strategies aimed at reversing and preventing diabetes. As part of her pre-diabetes diet plan, Hillary recommends filling half your plate with non-starchy vegetables, 25% with a lean protein food, and the remaining 25% with a starchy veggie or whole grain. She’s not anti carb, but instead, she emphasizes the Two Qs: quality (whole grain) and quantity (not too much). I served our stir fry with whole grain brown rice and stuck to a 2/3 cup portion. Continue reading >>

Low-carbohydrate Mini Omelets

Low-carbohydrate Mini Omelets

Need an easy breakfast recipe that is low carb, kid friendly and easy to make? When you are preparing meals for someone with diabetes, it is easy to get caught up in the list of things that need to be avoided or consumed in moderation. Don’t get me wrong, that list is quite lengthy, but the good news is that the list of healthy foods that are also low in carbohydrates and even zero carbohydrates is pretty hefty as well. When I meal plan complete meals for my type-1 diabetic son, I am always trying to incorporate low and zero carbohydrate options. When the entire meal consists of these foods, I feel as though I have won the lottery. Take these mini omelets for example; they are made with eggs, milk, veggies, meat of choice, and topped with shredded cheddar cheese. All of these ingredients have either low or zero carbohydrates. I cooked mine in a brownie pan, and they became perfect individual portions! Each square has a pretty even amount of eggs, milk, veggies, meat, and cheese; each individual serving is virtually carbohydrate free. For insulin dosage purposes, I calculate one portion as 2 carbohydrates. I’ve found a brand of bread with as little as 7 grams of carbohydrates, so I add a piece of toast, making the entire meal roughly 9 carbohydrates. Include some fresh blueberries, strawberries, apple slices, or yogurt, and you still have a very low-carbohydrate meal. Make these for breakfast, brunch, or pack them for lunch. Low-Carbohydrate Mini Omelets makes 12 individual portions in muffin tins or brownie squares. Ingredients 12 eggs 3/4 c. milk Veggies (green pepper, red pepper, onions, mushrooms, tomatoes, etc.) Meat (diced ham, turkey sausage, bacon, etc.) Shredded cheddar cheese (for topping) Instructions Whisk together milk and eggs. Pour into the 12 wells, f Continue reading >>

What Is A Balanced Diet For Diabetes?

What Is A Balanced Diet For Diabetes?

Whether you are living with diabetes or not, eating well is important. The foods you choose to eat in your daily diet make a difference not only to managing diabetes, but also to how well you feel and how much energy you have every day. How much you need to eat and drink is based on your age, gender, how active you are and the goals you are looking to achieve. Portion sizes have grown in recent years, as the plates and bowls we use have got bigger. Use smaller crockery to cut back on your portion sizes, while making the food on your plate look bigger. No single food contains all the essential nutrients you need in the right proportion. That’s why you need to consume foods from each of the main food groups to eat well. Fruit and Vegetables Naturally low in fat and calories and packed full of vitamins, minerals and fibre, fruit and vegetables add flavour and variety to every meal. They may also help protect against stroke, heart disease, high blood pressure and some cancers. Try: adding an extra handful of vegetables to your dishes when cooking – peas to rice, spinach to lamb or onions to chicken. Starchy Foods Potatoes, rice, pasta, bread, chapattis, naan and plantain all contain carbohydrate, which is broken down into glucose and used by your cells as fuel. Better options of starchy foods – such as wholegrain bread, wholewheat pasta and basmati, brown or wild rice – contain more fibre, which helps to keep your digestive system working well. They are generally more slowly absorbed (that is, they have a lower glycaemic index, or GI), keeping you feeling fuller for longer. Try: potatoes any way you like – but don’t fry them – with the skin left on for valuable fibre. Dairy foods Milk, cheese and yogurt contain calcium, which is vital for growing children as i Continue reading >>

Top 8 Easiest & Best Snacks For A Diabetic

Top 8 Easiest & Best Snacks For A Diabetic

We all get hungry in between meals. So instead of reaching for those chips and nasty saltine crackers, opt for one of these easy tasty snacks instead. They are all low in carbs and perfectly diabetic friendly – of course! 1. Olives Olives make the perfect snack. They are full of healthy monounsaturated fats and contain all the same benefits extra virgin olive oil offers – the ability to lower blood glucose, increase insulin sensitivity, lower cholesterol, reduced risk of heart disease and just improve overall health. When it comes to diabetes, monounsaturated fats are the best types of fats to eat – you'll also find this type of fat in avocados and nuts. Olives are a great source of antioxidants – vitamin E, flavonoids, and polyphenolic compounds that all reduce oxidative stress and inflammation. Just grab a handful, chew them slowly and thoroughly, and your hunger pangs will soon be entirely satisfied. Nutrition Facts: 10 olives: Calories (Energy): 50g Fat: 4.70g Carbohydrate: 2.80g Fiber: 1g Sugar: 0g Protein: 0.40g. 2. Cucumber Cucumbers are low in calories – being mostly made up of water, which makes them perfect for quenching thirst and hunger. According to Organic Facts: “The flesh of cucumbers is rich in vitamins A, C, and folic acid while the hard skin of cucumbers is rich in fiber and a range of minerals include magnesium, molybdenum, and potassium.” Tip: Cucumber rounds make the perfect cracker replacement. They are crisp, provide a firm base, and aren't overly powerful on taste. So you can top them with whatever you like for a super healthy diabetic snack. Or, even use them as crackers for dips. The idea is to replace your processed crackers with cucumber crackers instead (see recipe below). Nutrition Facts: Half cup slices: Calories (Energy): 8 Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dinner Recipes

Diabetic Dinner Recipes

Find healthy, delicious diabetic dinner recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell. Getting dinner on the table is easier when it's already planned out for you. Enjoy a month off from meal planning with 30 days of delicious, diabetes-friendly dinners to help you keep your blood sugar levels in check. The recipes in this plan limit carbohydrates, saturated fat and sodiumfactors that can negatively impact your diabetes if you eat too muchand can still be enjoyed by the whole family. Managing diabetes never tasted so good! Potatoes were first to benefit from the Hasselback techinique--making thin slices crosswise toward the bottom of the vegetable, but not all the way through, so the potato becomes fanned, seasoned and baked until crisp. Here we've adapted the concept to garlic bread and updated it with cheese for an easy and completely mouthwatering cheesy bread side dish. ADVERTISEMENT 2 ADVERTISEMENT These homemade sausage balls are a healthy riff on the original--we add riced cauliflower for moisture and a veggie boost, whole-wheat flour stands in for prepared biscuit mix, and sharp Cheddar adds flavor. Serve these sausage balls for brunch, as an appetizer, or mix them with your favorite marinara for dinner. Of all the vegetables in the supermarket, cabbage gives you some of the best value for your dollar. It's inexpensive and low in calories, but packed with nutritional benefits (vitamin C, fiber, cancer-fighting phytochemicals). This easy vegetable side dish gets a boost of flavor from shallot, caraway seeds and a delicious finish of crisp bacon. This good-for-your-gut-health food gets super-silky when slowly cooked in the oven. Serve these flavorful braised leeks with roast chicken or fish. 1 With a whopping 19 grams of protein, this one-dish meal wi Continue reading >>

If You Have Pre-diabetes Or Diabetes, These 8 Foods Can Help Manage Your Blood Sugar

If You Have Pre-diabetes Or Diabetes, These 8 Foods Can Help Manage Your Blood Sugar

Today I want to talk to you about something that affects over 1 million Americans nationwide. Every year we are spending around 300 billion dollars on this illness and it was the 7th leading cause of death in 2010. Today I want to talk to you about Type 2 DIABETES. Chances are you or someone you know has personal experience with this. It can be – Debilitating. Frustrating. Uncomfortable. Not only that, but diabetes is a precursor to more serious health complications like heart attacks, strokes, infertility, blindness, amputations, etc. Scary! Do you or someone you love suffer from this all-too common condition? Well, you don’t have to suffer forever and you certainly don’t have to suffer alone. A lot of people in our community have been able to overcome – or greatly reduce their symptoms – by making lifestyle and dietary changes. And I want this for you too! Sharon’s Story One of our amazing Fitlifers, Sharon, wrote in telling us her story. She is a mother of 2 and is constantly putting everyone ahead of herself, which caused her health to decline. After years of neglecting her own needs – including her diet – she gained weight and after a trip to the doctor, it was confirmed that Sharon – once vibrant, healthy and energetic – had type 2 diabetes. Devastated, Sharon searched the internet for natural ways to improve her health to avoid medications and really get her body back on track. She began juicing and fueling her body with WHOLE foods. She started walking every day and instead of giving into her family’s requests for junk food and the sweets they’d grown accustomed to, she decided that this journey back to health had to be all or nothing. It was hard at first and her kids were not happy…. But overtime, they all began to feel better and the Continue reading >>

What's For Dinner? Diabetic Dinner Menus

What's For Dinner? Diabetic Dinner Menus

Planning dinner doesn't have to be a headache with this personal diabetes menu. Take a look at this list of delicious diabetic meals that are made to fit into the recommended daily carb allowance. Planning dinner doesn't have to be a headache with this personal diabetes menu. Take a look at this list of delicious diabetic meals that are made to fit into the recommended daily carb allowance. Planning dinner doesn't have to be a headache with this personal diabetes menu. Take a look at this list of delicious diabetic meals that are made to fit into the recommended daily carb allowance. Planning dinner doesn't have to be a headache with this personal diabetes menu. Take a look at this list of delicious diabetic meals that are made to fit into the recommended daily carb allowance. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Meal Plan Recipes

Diabetes Meal Plan Recipes

It's not always easy to follow your diabetes meal plan day after day, but these delicious recipes may help. Appetizer recipes Beverage recipes Bread recipes Breakfast recipes Dessert recipes Main dish recipes Salad recipes Sandwich recipes Sauce and dressing recipes Side dish recipes Soup recipes Vegetable recipes Continue reading >>

Easy Greek Chicken

Easy Greek Chicken

Quick and easy meals are great any time of the year! Here’s a tasty chicken breast recipe you can make on the weekend, then use all week long in wraps, salads, sandwiches and other easy meals. Spend more time at the pool or the ball game and less time cooking! Be sure to check your herbs to make sure they are fresh and still in date. This will ensure you receive maximum flavor and health benefits! Updated 3/27/15- This recipe is featured in my new ebook! The 28 Day Diabetes Diet Meal Planner: Lower Carb Menus & Easy Recipes is the perfect way to stay on track with your diet- whether you have Type 2 diabetes or just want to watch your carb intake. In this newest ebook, I wanted to make meal planning and cooking super easy so that even people who have no previous cooking experience could make healthy and delicious recipes. This particular recipe is really a “base” recipe that you can build lots of meal on. For example, in the photo above, I am using the Greek chicken in a salad. I’ve also included other ways you can use this recipe such as pita wraps, chicken salad, etc. You can cook up a batch of this chicken and have a good variety of meals to enjoy for several days. If your life is busy and hectic at mealtime, this will make meal prep and cooking a breeze! P.S. Check out my Greek Yogurt Tzatziki Dip recipe! Continue reading >>

15 Breakfast Recipes For Type 2 Diabetes

15 Breakfast Recipes For Type 2 Diabetes

Drop Scones Drop scones, also called Scotch pancakes, are easy to make and perfect for a healthy breakfast on the weekend, or even as a simple dessert. Served with creamy low-fat vanilla yogurt and sweet, succulent berries, they are quite irresistible. Blueberry Popovers Similar to Yorkshire puddings, popovers are a much-loved treat, and the sweet version here is perfect for breakfast or brunch. The batter is baked, and the blueberry popovers are served with sweet, fresh berries to add extra vitamin C. Apple and Hazelnut Drop Scones Drop scones are an almost instant snack or breakfast treat. The thick batter is made by simply stirring together a few basic pantry ingredients, and the scones cook in minutes. Here they are flavoured with diced apple and toasted hazelnuts. Top with a little light maple syrup and enjoy warm from the pan. Breakfast Muffins Muffins are perfect for breakfast, providing the energy boost the body needs to start the day. This particular breakfast muffin recipe is packed full of good ingredients that add fibre, vitamins and minerals, too. Summer Berry Muffins Fresh summer berries add delicious flavour, colour and nutrition to these tempting berry muffins. They are best fresh from the oven, but are also good once cooled-an ideal addition to a lunchbox, or for breakfast on the go. Apricot-Pecan Muffins Packed with fresh fruit and nuts, and delicately spiced with cinnamon, these homemade apricot and pecan muffins are lower in fat and sugar than store-bought muffins, and contain no trans fats or preservatives. Cinnamon-Raisin Bread This whole-wheat bread loaf studded with raisins tastes good plain or with a little light butter or margarine spread on it. It’s also wonderful toasted for breakfast, when the gentle aroma of warm cinnamon makes a soothing Continue reading >>

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