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Diets For Type 1 Diabetics To Lose Weight

Lose Weight With Type 1 Diabetes

Lose Weight With Type 1 Diabetes

WRITTEN BY: Cliff Scherb Editor’s Note: Cliff Scherb, Founder of Glucose Advisors and TriStar Athletes LLC, is a nutrition and fitness expert. He consults through virtually teaching his decision support system – Engine1 the app and its methodologies to aspiring T1 individuals and athletes. Cliff also creates custom training programs and insulin plans for endurance athletes, using Training Stress Modeling and real-time coaching. To inquire about coaching openings, FB LIVE sessions, and general questions please email [email protected] Losing weight can be difficult — add Type 1 diabetes to the mix with its daily management demands — and it’s even more of a challenge. I know, because I’ve been a Type 1 diabetic for 29 years and I’m also an endurance athlete. The internet is saturated in advice on how to lose weight with or without Type 1, so it’s hard to know what is worth while and what will just waste your time — or worse, can negatively impact your health. I’m not going to declare all out war on carbohydrates, or tell you can or can’t drink your calories in the form of olive oil, or feast and fast with cayenne peppers and maple syrup. No, the real distilled learning from my years of consulting and data analysis shows that a balanced, low-insulin diet with nutrient timing and activity is the best way to lose weight with Type 1 diabetes. It also helps you maintain brain and body function as well as energy levels. If you are reading this you’ve probably already given this some thought and know why it’s important to lose weight and/or lean out, but I maintain it’s all about performance! Performing means living a longer or healthier life or if you’re an athlete, it can also translate to beating out your competition. Things that Impact w Continue reading >>

Real Life Testimonial: Controlling Type 1 Diabetes With The Paleo Diet

Real Life Testimonial: Controlling Type 1 Diabetes With The Paleo Diet

Real Life Testimonial: Controlling Type 1 Diabetes with the Paleo diet This is part of an ongoing series of real life success stories from people all over the world who have been impacted by the Paleo lifestyle and The Paleo Solution. Read Kyp’s story below. My name is Kyp and I am a type 1 diabetic born on the 5th of May 1990 and diagnosed early August 2009. I wanted to contact you in regards to how eating a low carb paleo diet has helped me with my type 1 diabetes. Late 2008-August 2009. Over the course of the past nine months I had changed from a chubby 102 kilogram teenager who plays too many video games and ate too many Big Macs to several months later becoming a muscular and active (6 gym sessions per week) 92 kilogram young man. I thought that by adhering to the nutritional recommendations I was doing everything in my power to achieve an enlightened state of health. I simultaneously continued to lean out, six months later becoming a frail and disturbingly lean 70 kilogram male who looked like he needed to be sat down, force fed and watched to ensure he did not try to regurgitate what he had just swallowed. I had been losing weight at a steady pace, somewhere in the vicinity of none at all to half a kilo per week until June. Once June hit my weight began to drop at an alarming rate, anywhere from 1 to 2 and a half kilos per week. Me being me I put this down to my increased effort with my highly intensive physical labour in the mornings, eating a ‘healthy’ diet full of whole grains, milk for calcium and protein, lots of potatoes and pasta in the evenings with some red or white meat, and an increased frequency of cardio vascular exercise. I was drinking gallons of water per day which I thought was due to the amount of exercise I was doing and I had began to Continue reading >>

The Best 7-day Diabetes Meal Plan

The Best 7-day Diabetes Meal Plan

This 1,200-calorie meal plan makes it easy to follow a diabetes diet with healthy and delicious foods that help to balance blood sugar. The simple meals and snacks in this 7-day plan feature complex carbohydrates (think whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables), lean protein and healthy fats. We limited refined carbohydrates (like white bread, white pasta and white rice) as well as added sugars, which can spike your blood sugar quickly. We've also cut back on saturated fats and sodium, as they can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing 2-3 carb servings (30-45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1 carb serving (15 grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be difficult—choose a variety of nutritious foods, as we do in this meal plan, and add in daily exercise for a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Day 1 Breakfast (294 calories, 41 g carbohydrates) • 1/2 cup oats cooked in 1/2 cup each 2% milk and water • 1 medium plum, chopped • 4 walnut halves, chopped Top oats with plum and walnuts. A.M. Snack (96 calories, 18 g carbohydrates) • 3/4 cup blueberries • 1/4 nonfat plain Greek yogurt Top blueberries with yogurt. Lunch (319 calories, 37 g carbohydrates) Turkey & Apple Cheddar Melt • 2 slices whole-wheat bread • 2 tsp. whole-grain mustard, divided • 1/2 medium apple, sliced • 2 oz. low-sodium deli turkey • 2 Tbsp. shredded Cheddar cheese, divided • 1 cup mixed greens Top one slice of bread with 1 tsp. mustard, apple, turkey and 1 Tbsp. cheese. Top the other Continue reading >>

Low Carb For Diabetes

Low Carb For Diabetes

To celebrate World Diabetes Day, this is a guest post “Low Carb For Diabetes”, from an eminent Low Carb Diabetes Educator, Kelley Pounds RN. Kelley is a registered nurse, certified diabetes educator and certified insulin pump trainer that conducts a very successful diabetes education program in her community, specifically working with patients that have been unable to achieve their blood glucose and A1c goals with standard advice (Type 1 and Type 2). See below for details of her diabetes programs. Medical Disclaimer -Before embarking on any change in diet or activity, I highly recommend a physical exam and thorough healthcare screening with your primary healthcare provider. This article should not be construed as medical advice, nor should it be substituted for medical advice from your healthcare provider. By continuing to read this article, you assume all responsibilities and risks for instituting lifestyle management of your diabetes. Many with Diabetes are confused by the conflicting dietary advice they receive. And no wonder. The dietary advice given to those with diabetes has been extremely poor. For decades, people with diabetes have been told center their diet around carbohydrates, many being counseled to consume 250+ grams of carbohydrates per day. No person needs to consume 250+ grams of carbohydrates per day, let alone the very people who are unable to effectively process them, those with diabetes. Eating this much carbohydrates daily would mean that one would HAVE to be consuming a great deal of sugar or refined, processed foods. It would be extremely difficult to consume this amount of carbohydrates while EATING REAL FOOD. Further, many are told “calories from sugar can be substituted equally for other carbohydrates as part of a healthy balanced diet f Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And The Ketogenic Diet

Type 1 Diabetes And The Ketogenic Diet

For thousands of years, something has been sneaking up on children and robbing them of their ability to control their blood sugar levels. The culprit is an autoimmune condition called Type 1 Diabetes, and its incidence has been increasing in both the United States and in other western countries. But there is no need to worry. This sneaky disease has left us with enough clues to diagnose it, manage it, and potentially reverse it. How to Know If It Is Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is most commonly diagnosed in children between the ages of 10 and 14, although many children can present with symptoms at ages as young as two years old. The incidence is approximately 1.5 times higher in American non-Hispanic white people compared with African American or Hispanic individuals. Risk Factors for Type 1 Diabetes The three most well-researched risk factors for type 1 diabetes include: Family history. Anyone with a parent or sibling with type 1 diabetes has a slightly increased risk of developing the condition. Genetics. Specific genes can increase the risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Age. Although type 1 diabetes can appear at any age, it is diagnosed in two prominent peaks. The first peak occurs in children between 4 and 7 years old, and the second is in children between 10 and 14 years old. However, these aren’t the only three risk factors. Recent research has found that type 1 diabetics tend to have a different balance of bacteria in their microbiome then non-susceptible individuals. Vitamin D deficiency, gut health issues, and dairy intolerance are also linked to a greater risk of type 1 diabetes as well. Having all of these risk factors, however, does not mean that you will have type 1 diabetes. Its symptoms will provide us with a clearer picture. Symptoms of Type 1 Dia Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Diet Pills

Type 1 Diabetes And Diet Pills

Thank you for taking time to address my question.I have been a diabetic for 26yrs (I am presently 29), and have tried desperately to lose weight.I have been on different types of insulin (currently prescribed Humolog and Lantis), and have tried working with nurses specifically involed with diabetic nutrition, but, it seems like an endless cycle in regards to losing substantial weight.So, I am hoping someone out there can help me.I'm looking for information on the effect of diet pills on type 1 diabetic's.Specifically, I'm thinking of trying a product called cylaris.If anyone can give me any type of information, good or bad, or otherwise, I would truly appreciate it.Thanks again! Hi.I'm not a medical professional, just the parent of a kid with diabetes.To be upfront, I've never taken weight loss pills, no one in my family has, so I have no knowledge about them and am usually skeptical about their claims.With any such pill, though, I wouldn't do anything without first checking with my doctor (both personal and endo) about the effects.I did a search for info on cylaris, and the weight loss predictions sound like marketing hype.I can't find anywhere that their study proving their results is actually published.I can't find any information on how it actually works on your body, so it's hard to say what the effects on your diabetes control would be. Looking at the ingredients, it's made of herbs and soy and vitamins that you can get through FDA approved vitamin supplements.Their claims aren't fact-checked by anyone.Just a word of caution before you spend your hard-earned money on something which may not work.Regardless, the first thing I'd do is talk to your doctor about that pill. Continue reading >>

How To Create The Right Diabetes Type 2 Diet Plan For You

How To Create The Right Diabetes Type 2 Diet Plan For You

The term "diabetic diet" is a thing of the past. Nowadays, people with diabetes do not have any strange food restrictions the way we once thought. It's not necessary to avoid fruit, eat zero carbohydrates or buy diet food. But, what we do know is that individualized meal plans that are fiber rich and modified in carbohydrates work best for those persons with diabetes. We also know that meal plans do not have to be boring or monotonous. You can say goodbye to steamed broccoli and boiled chicken and welcome a variety of foods, cuisines and diet types. Whether you are vegetarian, vegan, or trying to eat low-carbohydrate, today, you can craft a plan that works for you if you have the right tools. Keys to a Successful Diabetes Diet Plan Monitor Your Carbohydrates Carbohydrates are the nutrient that impact blood sugars the most. If you have diabetes, it's important to monitor your carbohydrate intake so that you may discover which foods work best for your blood sugars. Some people with diabetes benefit from following a consistent carbohydrate diet for which they eat the same amount of carbohydrates at the same time daily. Ask your registered dietitian or certified diabetes educator if you'd benefit from eating a fixed amount of carbohydrates at your meals. In the meantime, start learning more about carbohydrates today: Stock Up on Non-Starchy Vegetables By stocking up on non-starchy vegetables, you'll increase the volume of food at your meals which can help to reduce total calorie intake. You'll also increase your fiber intake, which can help to reduce cholesterol and lose weight. Reduce Your Sodium Intake A diet that is rich in sodium can increase your risk of developing hypertension (high blood pressure), which is a risk factor for developing heart disease. Because people w Continue reading >>

Meal Plan For A Diabetic Bodybuilder

Meal Plan For A Diabetic Bodybuilder

Diabetes, or as it's fully called Diabetes Mellitus, is in fact two completely different diseases type 1 and type 2. From a nutritional point of view each should be treated differently, and meal plans for each can be viewed though the relevant links here where you can also read more about the conditions. The plan below is aimed at a type 1 diabetic, i.e. who replies on injections of insulin to control their blood sugar levels, and who is looking to increase their muscle size and strength. The individual will more likely be on an insulin regimen which allows for some flexibility by having one injection of long acting insulin per day and an appropriate dose of super-fast acting insulin prior to a meal. Regular meals and snacks are encouraged, especially in respect of slow-released low glycaemic carbohydrate foods as the basis of each meal and snack. If you do not control your own insulin regimen, then speak to your doctor or diabetes specialist nurse. See our Glycaemic Index Tables for GI values of foods. Many diabetics feel they cannot make notable muscle and strength gains due to their condition, but there is no reason at all why a diabetic cannot make just as good gains as a non diabetic. There is nothing revolutionary and special about a diet for type 1 diabetics; it's simply based on the healthy eating guidelines which everyone should be following, so simply incorporate concepts applicable to muscle growth, and the results will be fruitful. So called 'diabetic products' such as special chocolates, cakes, biscuits, etc are not recommended. Eating a range of low fat, low sugar, high fibre 'ordinary' foods is far better. Many of these 'diabetic products' are no lower in fat or calories and are normally more expensive. Some contain the sweetener sorbitol which can cause Continue reading >>

Losing Weight Can Reverse Diabetes Without Drugs

Losing Weight Can Reverse Diabetes Without Drugs

Putting a person with type 2 diabetes on an intensive weight loss programme can reverse the disease with no need for medication, according to a landmark study. The findings could revolutionise the way it is treated, researchers said, benefiting both patients and the NHS. Almost half of the participants in a weight-loss programme that used low-calorie shakes and soups were in remission after 12 months, despite some having had type 2 diabetes for six years. Almost one in ten adults in Britain has type 2 diabetes and the condition costs the NHS about £14 billion a year. Mike Lean from the University of Glasgow, lead researcher of the Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (Direct), said: “Putting type 2 diabetes into remission as early as possible after… Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet For Type 2 Diabetes: Does It Work?

Ketogenic Diet For Type 2 Diabetes: Does It Work?

Type 2 diabetes is a condition affecting blood sugar levels that can be managed by following a healthful diet and maintaining a healthy weight. People who are obese can reduce their risk of developing diabetes by eating a balanced, nutritious diet. Following a diet that is full of vitamins and minerals and low in added sugars and unhealthful fats can help people to lose some of the extra weight. People who lose 5-10 percent of their body weight can lower their risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent. For people with diabetes or people with pre-diabetes, losing the same amount of body weight can help provide a noticeable improvement in blood sugar. For some people, the ketogenic diet is an effective way to control their diabetes. It has been shown to lower blood glucose levels as well as reduce weight. Contents of this article: What is the ketogenic diet? Foods containing carbohydrates, such as bread, pasta, and fruit, are the body's main fuel source. The body breaks the food down and uses the resulting sugar (glucose) for energy. A ketogenic diet is a high-fat, very low carbohydrate diet. It was initially developed and recommended for children with epilepsy. The diet recommends that people eat 30 grams (g) of carbohydrates or below per day. The goal is to eat 3 to 4 g of fat for every 1 g of carbohydrate and protein. Impact on blood sugar levels Because the ketogenic diet restricts carbohydrates, there is not enough sugar available for the body to use as fuel, so it resorts to using fat. The process of breaking down fat is called "ketosis," and it produces a fuel source called ketones. A ketogenic diet helps some people with type 2 diabetes because it allows the body to maintain glucose levels at a low but healthy level. The reduced amount of carbohydrates in the diet Continue reading >>

What Should I Eat?

What Should I Eat?

People with diabetes should follow the Australian Dietary Guidelines. Eating the recommended amount of food from the five food groups will provide you with the nutrients you need to be healthy and prevent chronic diseases such as obesity and heart disease. Australian Dietary Guidelines: To help manage your diabetes: Eat regular meals and spread them evenly throughout the day Eat a diet lower in fat, particularly saturated fat If you take insulin or diabetes tablets, you may need to have between meal snacks It is important to recognise that everyone’s needs are different. All people with diabetes should see an Accredited Practising Dietitian in conjunction with their diabetes team for individualised advice. Read our position statement 'One Diet Does Not Fit All'. Matching the amount of food you eat with the amount of energy you burn through activity and exercise is important. Putting too much fuel in your body can lead to weight gain. Being overweight or obese can make it difficult to manage your diabetes and can increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and cancer. Limit foods high in energy such as take away foods, sweet biscuits, cakes, sugar sweetened drinks and fruit juice, lollies, chocolate and savoury snacks. Some people have a healthy diet but eat too much. Reducing your portion size is one way to decrease the amount of energy you eat. Being active has many benefits. Along with healthy eating, regular physical activity can help you to manage your blood glucose levels, reduce your blood fats (cholesterol and triglycerides) and maintain a healthy weight. Learn more about exercise and maintaining a healthy weight. Fats have the highest energy (kilojoule or calorie) content of all foods. Eating too much fat can make you put on weight, which may make it more diffi Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Treatment For Diabetes Type 1

Ketogenic Treatment For Diabetes Type 1

Before the invention of insulin in the 1920's, ketogenic diets were the main treatment for type 1 diabetes (T1D). In 1923, Osler and McCrae in the Principles and Practice of Medicine recommended that a diabetic diet contain about 5% carbohydrate, 20% protein, and 75% fat. The current guidelines call for higher carbohydrate and lower fat intake and this is problematic for adults and children with T1D. As a result of this higher carb intake, blood sugar spikes after meals, which requires a large dose of insulin to bring it down. These higher doses of insulin put T1D patients in danger of severe low blood sugar episodes (hypoglycemia). We call this the blood sugar roller coaster. Switching to a low-carb, fat-burning ketogenic diet stops the blood sugar spike/crash cycle, because when carbohydrate intake is reduced, basal blood sugars stay normal and steady, and less insulin is needed at mealtime. Smaller doses of insulin mean there is less danger of driving blood sugar too low. Coauthored with Dr. Keith Runyan, a physician who successfully treats his own T1D with a ketogenic diet (his average HbA1c is 5.0), The Ketogenic Diet for Type 1 Diabetes provides practical information on: How to adapt and reduce insulin therapy dosage with the diet How a ketogenic diet helps control blood sugar and minimize long term diabetic complications How the diet helps protect against hypoglycemia Special considerations for children with Type 1 diabetes (carbs are NOT essential !) The myths about saturated fat intake and ketoacidosis How to start the diet, monitor progress and treat side effects What foods to choose, which to avoid and how much to eat Tips on cooking, dining out,traveling and where to find recipes The Ketogenic Diet for Type 1 Diabetes eBook is an electronic book in Acrobat P Continue reading >>

How Low Can You Go? Expert Advice On Low Carb Diets And Diabetes

How Low Can You Go? Expert Advice On Low Carb Diets And Diabetes

Can blood sugar be better managed by following a ketogenic diet? An expert explains the benefits and the risks. Low-carb diets seem to have made a comeback—Atkins, Paleo and more recently the ketogenic diet—all follow a low carbohydrate regimen and claim greater weight loss and even improved glycemia in people with diabetes. While there is no doubt that carbohydrate restriction has the most significant improvement in blood glucose (since foods that contain carbohydrates can spike blood sugar after meals or snacks), the question remains:What is the “ideal” grams of carbohydrate for people with diabetes to consume? According to the American Diabetes Association 2017 Standards of Care, “there is no single ideal dietary distribution of calories among carbohydrates, fats, and proteins for people with diabetes." The previous recommendation of 45-60% of calories from carbs is no longer supported by evidence. Instead, the distribution of carbs, protein and fat should be individualized "while keeping total calorie and metabolic goals in mind.” What works for one person with diabetes, might not work for another. Still, ketogenic diets have gained popularity thanks to celebrities like Lebron James and Kim Kardashian claiming superior athletic performance, mental well-being, and faster weight loss. The medical community is even testing the effects of the ketogenic diet on cancer, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The ketogenic diet seems to be trending now, but is this diet really safe for people with diabetes? Here's what the research says: What is the Ketogenic Diet? Believe it or not, ketogenic diets go back to the 1920’s and remain one of the oldest treatments for epilepsy in children. Researchers don’t know why this diet works, but it’s shown to decrease s Continue reading >>

Diabulimia: Skipping Insulin To Lose Weight

Diabulimia: Skipping Insulin To Lose Weight

A dangerous eating disorder is affecting thousands of teenage girls and women with type 1 diabetes. Sometimes called “diabulimia,” the common practice of skipping or reducing insulin to lose weight is putting lives at risk. “We think more than 10 percent of young women with type 1 diabetes are regularly omitting insulin to control their weight,” says William Polonsky, PhD, a diabetes educator and chief executive officer of the Behavioral Diabetes Institute in San Diego. But since it’s a secretive disorder, the percentage is probably much higher, he says. A recent report in the World Journal of Diabetes estimates that between 30 to 40 percent of teens and young adults with type 1 diabetes skip insulin after meals in order to lose weight. What Is Diabulimia? You won’t find diabulimia in medical books because it’s not a recognized condition. It’s a term now used in the media to describe the eating disorder bulimia among type 1 diabetics. Bulimia is a disorder in which a person eats and then purges, usually by vomiting or abusing laxatives. In diabulimia, the tool used to purge calories is simply to cut back on insulin. “It’s extraordinarily successful and quite addictive,” says Polonsky. “But it can harm you terribly in the near-to-long term. It is so scary and hard to treat.” Diabetes: The Insulin and Weight Loss Connection People with type 1 diabetes need daily insulin doses to live. In this type of diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t produce insulin, the hormone the body needs to absorb glucose (sugar) and use it as energy or store it as fat. If insulin is used appropriately, the glucose is absorbed from the blood into the body’s tissues and used (or stored). Without insulin, the glucose builds up in the blood and is excreted in the urine. This Continue reading >>

How To Lose Weight When You Live With Diabetes

How To Lose Weight When You Live With Diabetes

Losing weight can be difficult for anyone, and living with diabetes definitely doesn’t make it easier. However, there ARE people who set out to lose weight and end up so extraordinarily successful that you wonder if they have some inside information you don’t. That information EXISTS. I’m here to give you the rundown on how to successfully lose weight when you live with diabetes. In this post, I will go through: How to set realistic goals How many calories to eat How much protein, carbs, and fat to eat How much to exercise How blood glucose control affects your weight Without further ado…lets GET TO IT! Temper expectations at the start People these days have this intensive need for instant gratification. They want that 15 lbs gone by yesterday! While I’m all for efficiency, I’m going to be short and sweet and show reality with a pop quiz: True or false: it took more than a week to gain the weight you are trying to lose. The answer is undeniably “True”. So if it took you X number of months to gain weight, why would it take you a week or two to lose it? It doesn’t. It takes time and some concerted effort. Don’t expect to lose all of the weight immediately, but know that with proper habit formation and consistency, you WILL see the results you are after. The general rule for healthy weight loss is to aim for A MAX of 1-2 lbs. per week. It’s also quite common for people living with diabetes to take as long as 2-3 weeks before seeing any weight loss at all on a new diet. “Why?” you ask. Changing caloric intake and workout routines may require a reduction of insulin (or other diabetes medication) as well as diet manipulation, which takes a little trial and error to adjust. BE PATIENT. Once the ball is rolling, a slow and controlled weight loss makes Continue reading >>

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