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Diets For Diabetes

Diets For Type 2 Diabetes And High Cholesterol

Diets For Type 2 Diabetes And High Cholesterol

People with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) have a metabolic abnormality called insulin resistance in which body tissues respond sluggishly to the hormone insulin. This leads to high blood sugar and abnormal blood fat levels. People with T2DM commonly have high levels of triglycerides and "bad" cholesterol, or low-density lipoprotein, and low levels of "good" cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein. High blood sugar along with blood fat abnormalities increases the risk of heart disease and stroke among people with diabetes 2- to 4-fold, warns the American Heart Association. Fortunately, both blood sugar and blood fat levels can be improved with diet. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends individualized nutrition plans that meet certain guidelines rather than specific diets. Calorie restriction is important, however, for people with T2DM who are overweight. Video of the Day A Mediterranean diet refers to eating patterns of olive-growing countries along the Mediterranean sea, such as Spain, Greece and southern Italy. The diet emphasizes consumption of olive oil, fruits, vegetables, beans, grains, nuts and seeds. Moderate intake of poultry, fish, seafood, eggs, cheese and yogurt also characterizes the diet, while intake of red meat and sweets is limited. Wine with meals is common with a traditional Mediterranean diet, but may not be included if weight loss is a goal. An August 2015 "BMJ Open" article reviewed the pooled evidence from published research examining the effects of the Mediterranean diet on T2DM and prediabetes management. The authors reported that several studies showed the diet significantly reduced total cholesterol and increased HDL. Several studies also showed that following a Mediterranean diet led to weight loss, which itself is a factor in lowering Continue reading >>

Nutrition Guidelines For Diabetes Management

Nutrition Guidelines For Diabetes Management

If you have diabetes, it is important to eat well to help keep yourself healthy. Nutrition care should be personalized for each person based on blood glucose (sugar) level, blood lipid (fat) levels, risk factors for heart disease and high blood pressure, exercise habits, and food preferences. For most people, general guidelines for diabetes are as follows: Aim to maintain a healthy weight Exercise moderately for about 30 minutes at least five times per week Get your carbohydrates mainly from fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and low-fat or skim dairy products Limit saturated fats, trans fats, and dietary cholesterol Do not use low-carbohydrate diets to control diabetes Weight If you currently have prediabetes, controlling your weight can help prevent you from getting type 2 diabetes. If you already have diabetes, controlling your weight can help you improve your blood sugar levels. A healthy eating pattern, combined with regular physical activity, can help people who are overweight lose weight and keep it off. Frequently, this will also lead to improvements in blood lipid levels. Diets for weight loss Individuals must find a healthy eating pattern that they can continue for a lifetime in order to successfully achieve weight loss and weight maintenance. No best diet exists because different things work for different people. However, changing eating and exercise behaviors is essential for successful weight loss. To lose weight, a deficit (decrease) of approximately 500 calories per day is generally recommended. A combination of eating and drinking fewer calories, and burning more calories through physical activity can create this deficit, and help you lose weight. Generally, about 1 hour per day of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise, such as brisk walking, along Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About A Diabetic Diet

Everything You Need To Know About A Diabetic Diet

Not only are 86 million Americans prediabetic, but 90% of them don't even know they have it, the Centers for Disease Control reports. What's more, doctors diagnose as many as 1.5 million new cases of diabetes each year, according to the American Diabetes Association. Whether you're at risk, prediabetic or following a diabetic diet as suggested by your doctor, a few simple strategies can help control blood sugar and potentially reverse the disease entirely. Plus, implementing just a few of these dietary changes can have other beneficial effects like weight loss, all without sacrificing flavor or feeling deprived. First, let's start with the basics. What is diabetes? There are two main forms of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that's usually diagnosed during childhood. Environmental and genetic factors can lead to the destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. That's the hormone responsible for delivering glucose (sugar) to your cells for metabolism and storage. In contrast, type 2 diabetes is often diagnosed in adulthood and caused by a variety of lifestyle factors like obesity, physical inactivity and high cholesterol. Typically, type 2 diabetics still have functioning beta cells, meaning that they're still producing insulin. However, the peripheral tissues become less sensitive to the hormone, and the liver produces more glucose, causing high blood sugar. When left unmanaged, type 2 diabetics may stop producing insulin altogether. While you may have some symptoms of high blood sugar (nausea, lethargy, frequent thirst and/or urination), a clinical diagnosis of diabetes or prediabetes requires a repeat test of your blood sugar levels. How does a diabetic diet help? Unlike many other health conditions, the incredible th Continue reading >>

How To Eat When You Have Gout And Diabetes

How To Eat When You Have Gout And Diabetes

1 Avoid purine-rich foods. Since uric acid is produced from the metabolism of purine in the body, it is best to avoid foods that contain purine. Urate crystals accumulate in the joints if uric acid is elevated and this can aggravate joint pain in gout. Also, uric acid elevation can increase insulin resistance which is a condition wherein the body do not respond to the function of insulin[1]. This can further elevate the blood sugar levels of a person, leading to diabetic symptoms. Purine-rich foods are mackerel, anchovies, organ meats, dried beans, peas, canned goods, instant noodles, wine and beer. 2 Avoid foods rich in fructose. Foods rich in fructose consume a lot of adenosine triphosphate (or ATP) when metabolized. This ATP is an energy-supplying molecule that the cells in the body use. Over-consumption of ATP leads to its depletion and results in the generation of substances such as lactic acid and uric acid, thereby increasing the levels of uric acid in the blood. Also, fructose is considered a sugar. Consuming foods rich in fructose can elevate the blood sugar of a person and lead to occurrence of symptoms. Foods to avoid are apples, bananas, pears, agave, melons, asparagus, beans, broccoli, cabbage, onion, tomato, peanuts, raisins, figs, carbonated drinks, fruit drinks, ketchup, canned goods, chocolate, pastries and breakfast cereals. 3 Avoid alcohol. Alcohol interferes with the removal of uric acid from the body. When alcohol is converted to lactic acid, it reduces the amount of uric acid that is eliminated from the body through the kidneys. This is because the lactic acid competes with the uric acid in terms of being removed by the kidneys through urine. Increased levels of ethanol (alcohol) in the body increase the body's production of uric acid by increasing Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diets & Diabetes

Low-carb Diets & Diabetes

Today's Dietitian Vol. 18 No. 8 P. 24 Research shows they're effective in managing blood glucose in many patients, but they may not work for everyone. Toby Smithson, MSNW, RDN, LDN, CDE, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in the late 1960s when the exchange system was used to plan meals for people with diabetes. Smithson and her mother attended classes where she received an exchange booklet. "The exchange system was how I learned about meal planning," Smithson remembers. The exchange system organizes foods into lists by the amount of carbohydrate, protein, fat, and calories they contain. In the 1960s, experts were recommending that carbohydrate intake be limited to 40% of total calories—which was twice as much as previous recommendations. Advice on meal planning approaches and recommended carbohydrate intake for people with diabetes has gone through several cycles. In the 1990s, experts recommended using carbohydrate counting for meal planning and individualizing carbohydrate content of meals. As a dietitian, certified diabetes educator, and an individual living with diabetes, Smithson stays abreast of the latest diabetes research. After reading several studies on the benefits of low-carbohydrate diets for people with diabetes, she decided to "play around" with the carbohydrate content of her own diet. Smithson found that she was always hungry on the low-carbohydrate diet and observed no significant change in her triglycerides or HDL cholesterol. This isn't to say that Smithson's usual diet was high in carbohydrate, as she averages about 135 g per day. Smithson says, "I'm a hard dietitian on myself." She's diligent with monitoring her carbohydrate intake, uses very little insulin, and is proud to say she controls her blood sugar well and has no diabetes complications. Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

How to choose food If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," says Andrews. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, says Andrews. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabete Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Following a type 2 diabetes diet doesn’t mean you have to give up all the things you love — you can still enjoy a wide range of foods and, in some cases, even help reverse type 2 diabetes. Indeed, creating a diet for diabetes is a balancing act: It includes a variety of healthy carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. The trick is ultimately choosing the right combination of foods that will help keep your blood sugar level in your target range and avoid big swings that can cause diabetes symptoms — from the frequent urination and thirst of high blood sugar to the fatigue, dizziness, headaches, and mood changes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). The Basics of the Type 2 Diabetes Diet: What Should You Eat? To follow a healthy diet for type 2 diabetes, you must first understand how different foods affect your blood sugar. Carbohydrates, which are found to the largest degree in grains, bread, pasta, milk, sweets, fruit, and starchy vegetables, are broken down into glucose in the blood faster than other types of food, which raises blood sugar, potentially leading to hyperglycemia. Protein and fats do not directly impact blood sugar, but both should be consumed in moderation to keep calories down and weight in a healthy range. To hit your blood sugar level target, eat a variety of foods but monitor portions for foods with a high carbohydrate content, says Alison Massey, RD, CDE, the director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. “[Foods high in carbohydrates] have the most impact on blood sugar level. This is why some people with diabetes count their carbohydrates at meals and snacks,” she says. How Many Carbs Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), you can calculate Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

In this article we will cover what a Ketogenic diet is and if you can manage your diabetes while on this diet. Ketogenic diet for diabetics is a highly controversial topic, but we will break down everything here for you! As a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), I have to tell you from the start I will have a biased view here. Sorry, but I feel that I need to be completely honest right up front! I will however, present all the evidence that is available currently on the subject. As a CDE, I have been taught to follow the American Diabetes Association Dietary Guidelines for Americans which is low in carbohydrates, high in fiber, with fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. The Ketogenic Diet this article will be discussing is much lower in carbohydrates, in order to promote the state of nutritional ketosis, or the fat burning state for weight loss. What is a Ketogenic Diet? The Ketogenic Diet is a low carbohydrate diet, consisting initially of less than 20 carbohydrates per day. Not per meal, yes, you heard me correctly, per day. It is not for the faint of heart and yes I am writing from experience. Of course I have tried it! Hasn’t everybody in America at some point who has wanted to lose weight? Does it work you ask? Of course it does! The problem is how long can you keep it up? Your body uses the carbohydrates you eat for energy, so if we restrict how many carbohydrates we eat, the body has to get its fuel source from fat. A byproduct of this fat burning state are ketones which are produced; this is called nutritional ketosis. You can determine if you are in this fat burning state by purchasing urine ketone testing strips from your local pharmacy. The Ketogenic Diet with Diabetes Some precautions must be made clear; this diet is not appropriate for people with any Continue reading >>

Eat Well!

Eat Well!

When you have diabetes, deciding what, when, and how much to eat may seem challenging. So, what can you eat, and how can you fit the foods you love into your meal plan? Eating healthy food at home and choosing healthy food when eating out are important in managing your diabetes. The first step is to work with your doctor or dietitian to make a meal plan just for you. As soon as you find out you have diabetes, ask for a meeting with your doctor or dietitian to discuss how to make and follow a meal plan. During this meeting, you will learn how to choose healthier foods—a variety of vegetables and fruits, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat dairy foods, lean meats, and other proteins. You will also learn to watch your portion sizes and what to drink while staying within your calorie, fat, and carbohydrate (carbs) limits. You can still enjoy food while eating healthy. But how do you do that? Here are a few tips to help you when eating at home and away from home. Eating Healthy Portions An easy way to know portion sizes is to use the “plate method.” Looking at your basic 9-inch dinner plate[PDF – 14 MB], draw an imaginary line down the middle of the plate, and divide one side in half. Fill the largest section with non-starchy vegetables, like salad, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and carrots. In one of the smaller sections, put a grain or starchy food such as bread, noodles, rice, corn or potatoes. In the other smaller section, put your protein, like fish, chicken, lean beef, tofu, or cooked dried beans. Learn more at Create Your Plate, an interactive resource from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) that shows how a healthy plate should look. This tool allows you to select different foods and see the portion sizes you should use in planning your meal Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Restriction

Carbohydrate Restriction

An Option for Diabetes Management As diabetes becomes more prevalent, there are also an increasing number of books and websites devoted to diets that claim to control it. Typing “eating for diabetes” into the “Books” section of Amazon’s search engine will retrieve more than 1,000 results. Just as there is more than one way to lose weight, there are multiple eating plans to manage diabetes. Of the many options, low-carbohydrate diets have been around the longest, and over the years considerable research has demonstrated their effectiveness in controlling blood glucose levels. However, they are still controversial. Before the discovery of insulin in 1921, doctors tried numerous types of diets, including diets with less than 10 grams of carbohydrate per day, to try to manage blood glucose levels in their patients with diabetes. For people with milder diabetes (the terms Type 1 and Type 2 were not yet used), a diet that was very low in carbohydrate and high in fat and calories could result in reasonably good health, sometimes for many years. But this diet was not helpful for people (particularly children) with severe diabetes. For them, it was found that cutting back severely on all food kept them alive longer, but their quality of life was low due to constant hunger and emaciation. Once injectable insulin was available, carbohydrate — and food generally — could be consumed in greater amounts. Over the years, recommendations from various health organizations have called for consuming a larger percentage of daily intake from carbohydrate based on research suggesting that high intakes of dietary cholesterol and saturated fat may lead to heart disease. Since people with diabetes are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, many dietitians and doctors began r Continue reading >>

Meal Plans: What Kids With Diabetes Need To Know

Meal Plans: What Kids With Diabetes Need To Know

Meal Plans: What Kids With Diabetes Need to Know KidsHealth / For Kids / Meal Plans: What Kids With Diabetes Need to Know en espaolPlanes de alimentacin: lo que deben saber los nios con diabetes Kids who have diabetes don't need to be on strict diets, but they do need to pay attention to when they eat and what's on their plates. Why? Because it helps them keep their blood sugar levels in check. Meal plans help people with diabetes eat right and stay healthy. What's a meal plan? Let's find out. Because healthy meals are so important, your diabetes health care team will probably give you a meal plan to follow. Meal plans don't tell you exactly which foods to eat, but they might give you general information like which food groups to pick and when you should eat. Don't worry that this plan will include stuff you don't like. Your meal plan will include the foods that you already eat and like. The team will probably ask you to write down all the foods you eat in a food diary for a few days so that they know your tastes. Your meal plan will help you think about healthy meals, but it also might help you reach other health goals. For example, if you need to lose weight, then the plan may suggest that you watch the number of calories and fat grams you eat to help you reach your goal. Your parents or other grown-ups might make most of the meal-planning decisions. But if they ask for your advice, try to keep things balanced. For instance, two baked potatoes don't make a balanced meal. But you could have half a baked potato along with some grilled chicken and some broccoli. Top it off with a dessert of fresh berries, and you have a great balanced meal. There are three types of meal plans. Your diabetes health care team, including your doctor, will help you decide which one is best Continue reading >>

25 Diabetic Foods For Stable Blood Glucose And Overall Health

25 Diabetic Foods For Stable Blood Glucose And Overall Health

Sticking to a diet of diabetic foods is one natural way to help manage your condition and feel as good as possible all day long. If you’re tired of the cycle of eating foods that spike your blood sugar levels, this list will help you avoid those foods and crowd them out with better, more healthy choices. 1. Spinach and Kale Spinach and kale are very similar to each other in terms of how they’re handled by the body and the amount of nutrition they provide. Diabetics can enjoy as much of either one as they care for, and there really isn’t a huge advantage of one over the other. You’ll be getting both Vitamin A and Vitamin C from each, as well as potassium, magnesium, and iron. Baby spinach and baby kale are very much alike in terms of usability, each having their own taste which is their major difference. You can use spinach and kale interchangeably in green smoothie recipes, but kale gets the edge in the snack department because it’s so easy to make kale chips that taste great and won’t leave you filled with regret when you’re done snacking. Eating Nutrient Dense Foods If you’re looking for some of the most nutrient dense foods on the planet you can’t go wrong with spinach and kale. Once for once they provide more vitamins and minerals than just about any other food, including other vegetables and fruit. 2. Beans Beans are a great addition to most any meal because they’ll help to stabilize your blood sugar, rather than have a detrimental effect or no effect at all. Foods like this are important because they can help balance out other foods that aren’t necessarily diabetic-friendly, and they can reduce the amount of insulin needed to bring your levels back to normal. Beans are easy enough to add to a meal, and many recipes call for beans as part of t Continue reading >>

Gluten-free Diets Are Not Actually Linked To Diabetes

Gluten-free Diets Are Not Actually Linked To Diabetes

In the pantheon of fad diets, there is perhaps none more hated on than gluten-free. And despite how annoying fad dieters are (if I hear one more person order a salad because they’re ‘gluten-free’ and then ask for croutons…), it’s not unreasonable to want to avoid foods that might possibly be bad for you. But is gluten actually bad for people who don’t have a problem with it? There’s no real evidence that avoiding gluten leads to tangible health benefits, assuming that you don’t have celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity. But there also haven’t been many studies that actually asked that question—there’s just not much information out there. On Thursday we got some preliminary answers...kind of. Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done People who eat low gluten diets are at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes, according to results presented on Thursday at the American Heart Association Meeting. It’s crucial to point out here that these researchers weren’t looking at people on gluten-free diets. The researchers were only studying associations between eating less gluten and getting diabetes. Their study size was massive—199,794 people—because they looked at data f Continue reading >>

High Protein Foods Make People With Type 2 Diabetes Manage Blood Sugar

High Protein Foods Make People With Type 2 Diabetes Manage Blood Sugar

Across the country, more than 29 million Americans have diabetes and another 86 million have prediabetes, forecasting a future of higher rates. But new research presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes’ annual meeting may reverse that trend, as it’s found a protein-laden diet regimen may help type 2 diabetes patients improve their blood sugar levels. Over the course of six weeks, 37 participants diagnosed with type 2 diabetes were fed either a diet high in animal protein or plant protein. While the animal diet consisted of a combination of meat and dairy foods, the plant diet was bereft of any animal product, although both diets included the same number of calories. Researchers measured each participant’s blood sugar levels and liver fat before and after the experiment to see if there were any changes from the diet intervention. Both groups saw an improvement in their blood sugar (glucose) levels and liver fat, but only those who were part of the animal protein group experienced an improvement in insulin sensitivity. Insulin is a hormone responsible for lowering blood sugar levels and allowing glucose to enter the cells of the body for storage. Diabetes is a disease that occurs when insulin doesn’t function properly and sugar accumulates in the blood, resulting in several problems ranging from high blood pressure to vision loss. Those who are insulin sensitive only need a small amount of insulin to keep their glucose within a normal range, while those who are insulin-resistant need more insulin to keep levels in check. While animal protein dieters experienced improved insulin sensitivity, participants who ate plant-based protein saw an improvement in their kidney function. Normally, waste products from protein-rich foods are filtered in ti Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Diabetes

The Ketogenic Diet And Diabetes

The ketogenic diet was originally developed almost 100 years ago to treat epilepsy. Nowadays, it is used as a nutrition plan by health-conscious men and women to optimize body composition and athletic performance. Recent research suggests that high fat, very-low carb diets have another benefit: They may help control glucose, triglycerides, insulin, and body weight in people with diabetes. The research below shows the ketogenic diet may be an effective tool you can use to manage symptoms of Diabetes, alongside exercise and medication. Cutting through the Fat: What is Diabetes? Before we get to research, we need to review some basic medical terminology. Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases in which the body has elevated blood levels its main energy source: a sugar called glucose. There are two reasons why this occurs. In some people, there is insufficient production of a chemical called insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that lower levels of glucose in the blood. People who suffer from low insulin levels have type I diabetes and they comprise approximately 5 to 10% of all diabetics. [1] Type I diabetes is usually inherited and type I diabetics usually have to inject insulin to maintain proper levels of blood glucose. The other 90% to 95% of people with diabetes are type II diabetics. [1] In this version, the body doesn’t produce enough insulin for proper function or cells in the body do not react to insulin and take in sugar from the blood. Type 2 diabetes is not inherited. However, lifestyle factors such as high body weight, poor exercise and eating habits all increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. [2] It can be managed by improving dietary and lifestyle habits and also using proper medication. [2] Diabetes results in a higher concentration of s Continue reading >>

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