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Diet Soda Gestational Diabetes

Should Pregnant Women Stop Drinking Diet Soda?

Should Pregnant Women Stop Drinking Diet Soda?

Should pregnant women stop drinking diet soda? By Marilisa Racco National Online Journalist, Smart Living Global News WATCH: Researchers have linked daily diet soda consumption during pregnancy to a 60 per cent higher likelihood of giving birth to a baby with a high birth weight compared to women who didn't drink diet soda. Doctors have been warning about the dangers of diet soda for a long time. We know consumption is linked to an increased risk of Type 2 diabetes, headaches, tooth erosion, osteoporosis and depression . Now, a new study has shown that women who drink diet soda during pregnancy are more likely to put their kids at risk of obesity. Published in the International Journal of Epidemiology , researchers found that daily diet soda consumption increased womens risk of delivering a high birth weight baby by 60 per cent versus women who never touch the stuff. This study was also the first to follow these kids up to age seven and determined that they were almost twice as likely to be obese. READ MORE: The kids are not alright: how can we improve our childrens health? Researchers worked off the Danish National Birth Cohort involving 918 mothers who had gestational diabetes (the most common metabolic pregnancy complication that affects approximately 16 per cent of pregnancies worldwide and up to 20 per cent in Canada), and found that a total of 45 per cent of women drank diet soda during their pregnancy, nineper cent did so daily. Study author Dr. Cuilin Zhang, a senior investigator in the epidemiology branch of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, says the artificial sweeteners in diet sodas are the likely culprit. The high-intensity artificial sweeteners may exacerbate glucose intolerance, compared to regular sugar, she says to Global Ne Continue reading >>

Study: Diet Soda During Pregnancy Could Mean An Overweight Child Later

Study: Diet Soda During Pregnancy Could Mean An Overweight Child Later

NOTE: *Content is property of Cleveland Clinic and for news media use only. Please email [email protected] to request a password to enable download. CLEVELAND Many women who are pregnant worry about what is safe and whats not safe to drink while expecting. A recent study said that women with gestational diabetes who drink diet soda during their pregnancy could be putting their children at risk for weight gain. Salena Zanotti, M.D., of Cleveland Clinic did not take part in the study, but said previous studies have shown that drinking diet soda in moderation during pregnancy is generally safe, but this most recent study is the first to look at the potential impact long-term. Researchers looked at data from more than 900 pregnant women with gestational diabetes between 1996 and 2002. About nine percent of the women surveyed drank at least one diet soda per day. Looking at those women and their children, did they have a higher risk of obesity? And what they found, when they looked up to seven years which is a long time so far for these studies that their infants, especially the boys, had a higher risk of being overweight and being obese, said Dr. Zanotti. Researchers said the women who consumed diet soda were 60 percent more likely to have babies with a high birth weight compared with women who did not drink any diet soda during pregnancy. Likewise, the children born to the women who drank water instead of sweetened beverages were 17 percent less likely to be overweight by age seven. Dr. Zanotti said what remains to be determined is whether the diet soda alone was the problem, or whether the women who drank diet soda also ate diets high in fat and sugar. She said sometimes pregnant women will eat sugary and high fat foods and think that its okay if theyre drinking diet soda, Continue reading >>

9 Gestational Diabetes Dos And Don’ts

9 Gestational Diabetes Dos And Don’ts

1 / 10 Tips for a Healthy Pregnancy With a Gestational Diabetes Diet Pregnancy already comes with a long list of things that you should and shouldn’t do to achieve the best outcomes for you and your baby. But if you’ve been diagnosed with gestational diabetes (diabetes that develops during pregnancy), then you need to learn some more dos and don’ts to keep your blood sugar under control and make sure that diabetes doesn’t harm your pregnancy. You will need to learn about a gestational diabetes diet — foods and lifestyle habits that help stabilize your blood sugar — as well as, possibly, gestational diabetes treatment. This may include diabetes medications your doctor prescribes during pregnancy to keep your blood glucose under control. It is possible to have a healthy pregnancy with gestational diabetes, but you must take care of yourself to reduce your risk of the following: An overly large baby Cesarean delivery (C-section) Miscarriage Preeclampsia (pregnancy-related high blood pressure) Preterm delivery Stillbirth Other poor health outcomes for your baby Long-term health effects for you Controlling your blood glucose is important for everyone, young and old. But for pregnant women, good blood sugar control is important before, during, and after pregnancy to reduce the chance of diabetes complications. According to the Mayo Clinic, good blood sugar control during pregnancy can help prevent or reduce these risks: Prevent complications for the baby Prevent complications for the mother Reduce the risk of birth defects Reduce the risk of excess fetal growth Reduce the risk of miscarriage and stillbirth Reduce the risk of premature birth To keep blood glucose under control during pregnancy, it’s important to check your blood sugar level frequently. If you are Continue reading >>

Is Diet Soda Safe For Diabetes?

Is Diet Soda Safe For Diabetes?

Managing blood sugar levels is an everyday goal for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While eating sugar doesn’t cause either type of diabetes, keeping tabs on carbohydrate and sugar intake is an important part of managing both types of diabetes. Eating healthfully can also reduce your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is linked to the development of type 2 diabetes. In fact, obesity is one of the leading causes of type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one-third of American adults are considered obese. Obesity puts you at risk for diabetes, as well as other troublesome conditions. Eating processed foods that are high in sugar, unhealthy fats, and empty calories increases your risk of gaining too much weight. Drinking sugary drinks is also a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. If you are working to keep your blood sugar in check or manage your weight, you might choose diet soda. Low in calories and sugar, diet sodas appear to be a good alternative to sugary drinks. Diet coke and A&W’s diet root beer, for example, claim to be entirely sugar-free. Unfortunately, even though they contain no actual sugar, they are loaded with artificial sweeteners and other unhealthy additives. At one time, there was much debate over the safety of artificial sweeteners. Many feared that these sweeteners caused certain types of cancer. Studies performed in the 1970s suggested that the artificial sweetener saccharin was linked to bladder cancer. Since that time, however, saccharin has been deemed safe. Both the National Cancer Institute and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) consider the sweetener nontoxic. Aspartame, another common yet controversial sweetener, has also gained clearance fo Continue reading >>

Drinks And Gestational Diabetes

Drinks And Gestational Diabetes

Staying well hydrated is very important during pregnancy and even more so if you have diabetes whilst pregnant. Drinking water doesn't directly lower blood sugar levels, but it does flush excess sugar out of your system and so staying hydrated will help control and stabilise blood sugar levels. Ideally you should be drinking around 3 litres (10 -12 glasses) at least, a day. You will need to drink even more during warmer weather or if you are exercising. We recommend drinking a glass of water with AND in between every meal and snack during the day. Tea, coffee and fizzy drinks containing caffeine should not be included as part of your recommended daily fluid intake as they are diuretics. Diuretics make you urinate more frequently, causing you to lose water. If you don’t like the taste of water then you could try carbonated water with lemon and lime added to it, or some sugar free squash. Be careful when choosing drinking squash which has ‘no added sugar’, it means exactly that, no ADDED sugar, but will still contain natural sugars. Check labels for the lowest total carbs for the best choices. Drinks suitable for a GD diet Water, carbonated or still. Beware of flavoured waters that may contain sugar. Tea & coffee, decaffeinated or remember to include within your recommended daily intake Diet/Zero/No added sugar carbonated drinks No added sugar diluting squash (watch out for high juice or squashes with natural or concentrate fruit juices added) Raspberry leaf tea As a treat - Highlights, Options or Choc Shot hot chocolate with added whipped cream! Diet, no added sugar and zero carbonated drinks There are many alternatives to well loved, original full sugar drinks such as the following: Dr Pepper > Dr Pepper Zero Coke > Diet Coke or Coke Zero (please note that Coke Li Continue reading >>

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes diagnosed during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in about 7 percent of all pregnancies. It usually arises in the second half of pregnancy and goes away as soon as the baby is born. However, if gestational diabetes is not treated, you may experience complications. The first step in treating gestational diabetes is to modify your diet to help keep your blood sugar level in the normal range, while still eating a healthy diet. Most women with well-controlled blood sugar deliver healthy babies without any complications. One way of keeping your blood sugar levels in normal range is by monitoring the amount of carbohydrates in your diet. Carbohydrate foods digest and turn into blood glucose (a type of sugar). Glucose in the blood is necessary because it is the fuel for your body and nourishment your baby receives from you. However, it's important that glucose levels stay within target. Carbohydrates in Food Carbohydrates are found in the following foods: Milk and yogurt Fruits and juices Rice, grains, cereals and pasta Breads, tortillas, crackers, bagels and rolls Dried beans, split peas and lentils Potatoes, corn, yams, peas and winter squash Sweets and desserts, such as sugar, honey, syrups, pastries, cookies, soda and candy also typically have large amounts of carbohydrate. Carbohydrates in foods are measured in units called grams. You can count how many carbohydrates are in foods by reading food labels and learning the exchange lists. The two most important pieces of information on food labels for a carbohydrate-controlled diet is the serving size and grams of total carbohydrate in each serving. Dietary Recommendations It is important to be meet with a registered dietitian to have your diet assessed. The dietitian will calcula Continue reading >>

Study: Drinking Diet Soda While Pregnant May Influence Childs Weight

Study: Drinking Diet Soda While Pregnant May Influence Childs Weight

A new study published in the International Journal of Epidemiology found a correlation between drinking artificially sweetened beverages, gestational diabetes, and childhood obesity. Expecting mothers who test positive for gestational diabetes and drink at least one diet beverage daily while pregnant may negatively influence the weight of their children. Researchers compiled data on women who tested positive for gestational diabetes and regularly consumed artificially sweetened diet drinks. Approximately 9% of study participants drank one or more diet beverages daily. Scientists found that the combination of gestational diabetes and diet drinks increased the chances of the children becoming overweight or obese by age seven. Related: Study: Global Warming May Affect Gestational Diabetes Rates Obesity is on the rise in the U.S., especially in regards to children. This treatable condition carries major health risks, and contributes to serious conditions as children age including diabetes, heart issues, and stroke. The studys authors examined data from 918 expecting mothers who tested positive for gestational diabetes. They analyzed source material from 1996 through 2002, collected by the Danish National Birth Cohort. Researchers divided pregnant mothers into two groups: those who consumed diet drinks, and those who drank only water. The women completed detailed questionnaires on their dietary habits, and researchers tracked the weight of their children. The results show that the children in the first group have increased risks of childhood obesity. Specifically, for women who drank one or more artificially sweetened beverages daily, their babies were 60% more likely to have a high birth weight; however by age seven these children nearly doubled their chances of being over Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Link To Sugary Drinks?

Gestational Diabetes: Link To Sugary Drinks?

Gestational Diabetes: Link to Sugary Drinks? Study: Shows Women Who Drink Lots of Sugar-Sweetened Cola May Be More Likely to Get Gestational Diabetes June 8, 2009 -- Women who drink five or more sugar-sweetened colas per week may be more likely to develop gestational diabetes if they get pregnant , according to a new study. The study was presented on June 6 in New Orleans at the American Diabetes Association's 69th annual scientific sessions meeting. Data came from more than 13,400 female U.S. nurses who took part in the Nurses Health Study II. All participants had at least one pregnancy between 1991 and 2001. While pregnant, most of the women didn't develop gestational diabetes, but 860 of the women did. Compared to women who reported drinking less than one sugar-sweetened beverage per month, women who reported drinking five or more sugar-sweetened beverages per month were 22% more likely to report gestational diabetes. Colas were the only sugar-sweetened beverages linked to gestational diabetes. The findings held regardless of other factors including age, race, number of previous pregnancies, physical activity , smoking , alcohol intake, BMI before pregnancy , and total calorie consumption, according to the researchers, who included Liwei Chen, MD, PhD, assistant professor at Louisiana State University's School of Public Health. In a separate analysis, Chen's team also found that women who reported high consumption of whole fruits and "moderate" consumption of fruit juices before pregnancy were less likely to develop gestational diabetes . Chen and colleagues aren't saying that sugary colas cause gestational diabetes, or that fruits and fruit juices prevent gestational diabetes. Observational studies like these can show associations, but not cause and effect. The Ame Continue reading >>

Drinking Diet Soda, Is It Good For You?

Drinking Diet Soda, Is It Good For You?

Should you be drinking diet soda? Is diet soda good for you? When diet sodas first appeared in the 50s and 60s, people thought of them as healthy alternatives to standard sugary drinks. This new development may have been especially hopeful for people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who were looking for options to enjoy sweet beverages while minimizing their sugar intake. But, as with many new products, the pros of diet soda came along with many cons. In recent years, controversy has continued to build about whether the alternative sweeteners used in diet sodas are good for you, and whether or not you should be drinking diet soda. Here well take a look at the pros and cons of diet soda : Most artificial sweeteners do not contain the carbs that soda sweetened with sugar does. Reducing carbohydrate intake is an important part of a healthy diet, especially for people with diabetes. Artificial sweeteners may curb your sugar cravings , depending on which ones you use. On the other hand, certain artificial sweeteners may stimulate the appetite and increase cravings so its important to be aware of how your body reacts. Diet sodas inherently have fewer calories than most traditional sugar sweetened drinks. (But they arent exactly filled with healthy nutrition either.) If you were going to drink a sugary soda, then a diet soda may be a good alternative. However, its not going to be better than waterwhich contains no calories. Even if a product does not contain sugar or calories, it can still contribute to gaining weight. In fact, the term diet soda is a bit of a misnomer as many people who drink it are likely to gain weight rather than lose it. This may be related to the appetite-stimulant properties of most artificial sweeteners. Since obesity and weight gain are often considere Continue reading >>

Diet Soda In Pregnancy Is Linked To Overweight Babies

Diet Soda In Pregnancy Is Linked To Overweight Babies

Well | Diet Soda in Pregnancy Is Linked to Overweight Babies Diet Soda in Pregnancy Is Linked to Overweight Babies Drinking diet soda and other artificially sweetened beverages during pregnancy is associated with having overweight 1-year-olds, according to a new report. Canadian researchers studied 3,033 mothers who delivered healthy singletons between 2009 and 2012 and had completed diet questionnaires during their pregnancies. They then examined the babies when they were a year old. Almost 30 percent of the women drank artificially sweetened beverages during pregnancy. After controlling for maternal body mass index, age, breastfeeding duration, maternal smoking, maternal diabetes, timing of the introduction of solid foods and other factors, they found that compared with women who drank no diet beverages, those who drank, on average, one can of diet soda a day doubled the risk of having an overweight 1-year-old. The study, in JAMA Pediatrics, found no association with infant birth weight, suggesting that the effect is on postnatal, not fetal, growth. The mothers consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks was not associated with increased risk for overweight babies. This is an association, and not a causal link, said the lead author, Meghan B. Azad, an assistant professor at the University of Manitoba. But it certainly raises the question of whether artificial sweeteners are harmless. Its not time to ban them or tell everyone not to consume them, but theres no great benefit to consuming these drinks, so theres no harm in avoiding them. A version of this article appears in print on 05/17/2016, on page D4 of the NewYork edition with the headline: Childbirth; Diet Soda and Heavy Babies. Continue reading >>

Big News On Diet Coke & Premature Births

Big News On Diet Coke & Premature Births

When I was pregnant, I wasn't allowed many vices. Of course I wasn't drinking alcohol, and I don't drink coffee anyway, and rarely have caffeine except through my made-up fifth food group, chocolate. Because I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes , chocolate and any other sugary indulgences were out (as was white flour, which nixed most restaurant pastas, breads and pizzas). So, my special treatone I don't think I could have given upwas caffeine-free Diet Coke. That was and still is my drug of choice. My doctor assured me aspartame found in Diet Coke was fine in moderation for pregnant women (limiting it in the same way you would coffee). But over the years there has been researchmostly in ratsthat has linked diet sodas to everything from allergic reactions to cancer and even premature births. Not exactly soothing to hear! So, I was pleased to read a study by the European Food Safety Authority (the equivalent of our FDA) has reiterated what we in the US have been told all alongthat aspartame in Diet Coke is safe for consumption during pregnancy. [Note: one exception is moms-to-be who have a genetic disease called phenylketonuria, or PKU. These moms need to avoid aspartame completely because PKU prevents them from breaking down the phenylalanine.] Oh, and The National Cancer Institute says there's no scientific evidence that any of the artificial sweeteners approved for use in the United States cause cancer or birth defects . Phew! According to an article in the Daily Mail , "concerns about artificial sweeteners, such as aspartame, have centered on the fact that they contain methanol.Methanol is a nerve toxin, which can be metabolized in the body to form formic acid, which is another nerve toxin, as well as formaldehyde, which is the chemical used to preserve dead bo Continue reading >>

Diet Soda Ok For Gestational Diabetes??

Diet Soda Ok For Gestational Diabetes??

Hi soooo, I really wanted soda and remember my doc saying the artificial sweeteners weren't terrible once and a while... Anyone know if it's ok to have diet soda on the GD diet? Yep. You're good. As long as it's not an everyday thing there is nothing wrong with it :) If you do a little online research about the connection between artificial sweeteners and diabetes you will learn a ton! I would never ingest such a toxic chemical, I can physically feel the difference if a waitress serves me a diet instead of a regular. That stuffs no good for you. It shouldn't make your sugar spike. Drink the soda if you want it. I have GD as well. The specialist told me aspartame is approved for pregnancy. I wouldn't make a habit of diet soda but go ahead and satisfy your craving! It's nice when a craving is that easy to satisfy:) Should be ok, but remember that diet drinks make u wanna crave sugar more! Ok thanks! I never drank soda before pregnancy and I was a diet soda "hater" because of the artificial sweetener and all the bad data... But if it is an easy fix to not spike my sugar during this small window of time of GD I think I am in :) I was specifically told NOT to drink any kind of sodas by my GD dietician (no big hardship for since I gave them up 3 years ago as part of my TTC regime). I drink only water and milk...am REALLY missing fruit juice ! I knew someone with GD and she was told only pop that was diet-caffeine-dark liquid and sugar free. I do coke zero every so often have has great #s. I don't like diet pop but this stuff is not half bad. Continue reading >>

Diet Soda And Diabetes: Things To Consider

Diet Soda And Diabetes: Things To Consider

Diabetes is a condition characterized by high amounts of sugar in the blood. These high blood sugar levels are a result of the body's inability to either produce or use a hormone called insulin. Insulin's role is to move sugar from the blood and into the cells of the body where it is used to make energy. Contents of this article: Sugary sodas and diabetes Diabetes is marked by high blood sugar, known medically as hyperglycemia. As such, drinks which have a lot of sugar in them should be avoided as they cause spikes in blood sugar. There are three major types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. The immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. There is no direct cause of type 1 diabetes. Factors that can increase the risk of type 1 diabetes include: Drinking cow's milk at an early age may also play a role in type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. The body is unable to use insulin fully or make enough of it to keep up with sugar intake. Type 2 diabetes shows links to: Inactivity Genes Age Family history of type 2 diabetes Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes affects women during pregnancy. If the body cannot make enough insulin to carry the sugar to cells to be used or if there is insulin resistance present, the woman may be diagnosed with gestational diabetes. One recent study posted in the BMJ found a link between drinking sugary drinks and the risk of type two diabetes. Another study posted in Diabetes Care found that people who drink 1-2 sugar-sweetened drinks every day have a 26 percent greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who do not. Other things to consider about sugar-sweetened sodas: Plaque loves soda: The bacteria that make Continue reading >>

Diet Coke And Other Sugar Free Drinks

Diet Coke And Other Sugar Free Drinks

I don't drink coffee or tea (only peppermint) and am generally a healthy eater, although I probably eat far too much chocolate.However, Diet Coke has always been my vice.Since this pregnancy I have hardly had any but have given in on the odd occasion when I have been exhausted and just felt the craving was too much. I just felt like something fizzy so was looking at a suger free lemonade but that has preservatives 950, 952 and 961 so whilst not aspartame.. i am sure the preservatives aren't much better.I don't really like sugary drinks.. and sparkling mineral doesn't always cut it.Is it really that bad to drink the occasional Diet Coke? The problem with diet coke is the aspartame and the caffeine. If it is just every now and then I wouldn't worry about it at all. (but I'd probably drink a regular coke not a diet one.. do they taste the same?) The fake sugar is more of an issue than the caffeine. But the odd diet coke now and again isn't a huge issue but I wouldn't be having it every day. I really don't think a diet coke every few days is going to hurt. I told my OB I was having a can of full-strength Coke every day and he didn't bat an eyelid. Have you tried different types / brands of sparkling mineral water? I have found some really do it for me, and others taste gross And, if I need a bit more flavour to it, I add a little bit of cordial to the sparkling water instead But then, I just don't like the flavour of most soft drinks, esp coke. Also, if I wanted to avoid the caffeine, I'd probably just go for a normal lemonade - not sugar free / diet Fizzy soda water with lime cordial = excellent When I weaned myself off coke I used to drink soda water with tart cranberry juice in it.yum! You could try just adding a squeeze of lemon juice. I found that helped... especially Continue reading >>

Sugary Cola Drinks Linked To Higher Risk Of Gestational Diabetes

Sugary Cola Drinks Linked To Higher Risk Of Gestational Diabetes

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Sugary cola drinks linked to higher risk of gestational diabetes Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Researchers have found for the first time that drinking more than 5 servings of sugar- sweetened cola a week prior to pregnancy appears to significantly elevate the risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy. Researchers from LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Public Health, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), Harvard School of Public Health, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, have found for the first time that drinking more than 5 servings of sugar- sweetened cola a week prior to pregnancy appears to significantly elevate the risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy. Liwei Chen, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Public Health, is the lead author of the paper that will be published in the December 2009 issue of Diabetes Care. The research team studied a group of 13,475 women from the Nurses' Health Study II. During 10 years of follow-up, 860 incident GDM cases were identified. After adjustment for known risk factors for GDM including age, family history of diabetes, parity, physical activity, smoking status, sugar-sweetened beverage intake, alcohol intake, prepregnancy BMI, and Western dietary pattern, intake of sugar-sweetened cola was positively associated with the risk of GDM. No significant association was found for other sugar-sweetened beverages or diet beverages. "Compared with women who consumed less than 1 serving per month, those who consumed more than 5 servings per week of sugar-sweetened cola had a 22% greater Continue reading >>

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