diabetestalk.net

Diet Soda And Diabetes Research

The New Dangers Of Diet Soda

The New Dangers Of Diet Soda

Common wisdom is that diet soda is better than regular soda, but new research shows that diet soda may cause serious health issues—especially if you are a woman over 60. Each week, a new study seems to pop up linking a diet soda habit with increased risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and other bad things. The latest study, presented at the American College of Cardiology’s annual scientific meeting, found that older women who drank two or more diet sodas a day, compared to older women who rarely or never drank them, were 30 percent more likely to have a cardiovascular “event”, such as a heart attack. The study looked at 60,000 women (average age 63) over nearly 9 years. No wonder Diet Coke sales dropped nearly 7 percent last year. Devil in a can? Beelzebub in a bottle? Actually, that’s far from proven. These studies show association, not cause. And not all studies find harm. At the Harvard School of Public Health, for example, researchers report no association between diet soda and weight gain, diabetes, or heart disease. Says Vasanti Malik, Sc.D., a research associate at the nutrition department of the Harvard School of Public Health, “The verdict is still out on long-term health consequences of diet soda consumption.” So is diet soda to blame for serious heath risks? Truth is, we just don’t know — yet. It’s hard to reach conclusions between people with weight problems (and often, metabolic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes) since these people tend to drink more diet sodas because they’re trying to lose weight. It may be that the obesity is “causing” the diet soda consumption, not the other way around. In the most recent heart disease and women study, for example, “it is likely that the women who started drinking more diet so Continue reading >>

Why Diet Soda Is Bad For You

Why Diet Soda Is Bad For You

By now you’ve probably heard that the idea of diet soda being healthier than regular soda is nothing more than a myth. Sure, regular soda is far from healthy, but diet soda could be even more dangerous. This news is mind-boggling for most and may leave them wondering “why?” or “how?”. The truth about diet soda Fortunately, we have the truth about diet soda and what makes it so dangerous. It leads to more weight gain Before recent studies were released on the dangers of diet soda, many individuals who wanted to lose weight would swap their regular soda for diet. You can only imagine their surprise when they not only failed to lose weight, but actually ended up gaining more! So, how exactly does diet soda contribute to weight gain? It’s simple: while diet soda doesn’t contain real sugar or calories it does contain a lot of additives and artificial ingredients including sweeteners. These ingredients are full of unnatural chemicals that can cause your body to crave more high-calorie and sugar-laden foods. Artificial sweeteners may also confuse your body into miscalculating the number of calories you are actually consuming which can then cause your metabolism to slow down, making it more challenging to burn off calories and lose weight. It has been linked to type-2 diabetes Think diet soda is safe for diabetics due to the lack of sugar? Think again. The artificial sweeteners in diet soda can actually cause a spike in blood sugar and insulin levels which in turn can lead to diabetic shock for those who have already been diagnosed with diabetes. Don’t have diabetes? You’re not out of danger, either. Diet soda may greatly increase your risk of developing type-2 diabetes. As previously mentioned, diet soda can cause weight gain and a lower metabolism rate. Thes Continue reading >>

Diet Soda And Diabetes: Things To Consider

Diet Soda And Diabetes: Things To Consider

Diabetes is a condition characterized by high amounts of sugar in the blood. These high blood sugar levels are a result of the body's inability to either produce or use a hormone called insulin. Insulin's role is to move sugar from the blood and into the cells of the body where it is used to make energy. Contents of this article: Sugary sodas and diabetes Diabetes is marked by high blood sugar, known medically as hyperglycemia. As such, drinks which have a lot of sugar in them should be avoided as they cause spikes in blood sugar. There are three major types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. The immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. There is no direct cause of type 1 diabetes. Factors that can increase the risk of type 1 diabetes include: Drinking cow's milk at an early age may also play a role in type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. The body is unable to use insulin fully or make enough of it to keep up with sugar intake. Type 2 diabetes shows links to: Inactivity Genes Age Family history of type 2 diabetes Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes affects women during pregnancy. If the body cannot make enough insulin to carry the sugar to cells to be used or if there is insulin resistance present, the woman may be diagnosed with gestational diabetes. One recent study posted in the BMJ found a link between drinking sugary drinks and the risk of type two diabetes. Another study posted in Diabetes Care found that people who drink 1-2 sugar-sweetened drinks every day have a 26 percent greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who do not. Other things to consider about sugar-sweetened sodas: Plaque loves soda: The bacteria that make Continue reading >>

Two Diet Drinks A Day Could Double The Risk Of Diabetes, Study Finds

Two Diet Drinks A Day Could Double The Risk Of Diabetes, Study Finds

Two fizzy drinks a day could double the risk of diabetes - even if they are diet versions - a Swedish study has found. Research by the Karolinska Institute on 2,800 adults found that those who consumed at least two 200ml servings of soft drinks daily were 2.4 times as likely to suffer from a form of type 2 diabetes. Many fizzy drinks are sold in 330ml cans, meaning that one and a half cans would be enough to double the risk. Those who drank a litre of such drinks saw a 10-fold rise in their chance of suffering from the condition. The increased risks were the same regardless of whether the drinks were sugary or artificially sweetened, the research published in the European Journal of Endocrinology found. Researchers said the sugary drinks may have induced insulin resistance, triggering the cases of diabetes. The artificial sweeteners in the diet drinks may stimulate and distort appetite, they said, increasing food intake, and encouraging a sweet tooth. Such sweeteners might also affect microbes in the gut leading to glucose intolerance. The research was a retrospective study, which relied on participants to recall their diet habits. Josefin Edwall Löfvenborg, lead author, said soft drinks might influence glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, leading to the increased risk of latent auto-immune diabetes, a form of type 2 diabetes. “In this study we were surprised by the increased risk in developing autoimmune diabetes by drinking soft drinks,” he said. We next plan on investigating what could counter this risk.” More research was needed into the impact of diet drinks he said. It was also possible that those consuming low calorie drinks may have switched to them after a long history of drinking sugary versions, which could explain the link with diabetes, he add Continue reading >>

Is Drinking Diet Soda A Health Risk?

Is Drinking Diet Soda A Health Risk?

May 5, 2017 -- About one in five Americans drinks diet soda every day, according to the CDC. Is that a good thing? Numerous studies over the past several years have reported links between diet soda and weight gain, diabetes, heart problems, and other health issues. Most recently, headlines sounded alarms about a higher chance of dementia and stroke among diet soda drinkers . That may sound worrisome, but experts say you don’t need to clear the diet drinks out of your fridge just yet. Many questions must be answered before we’ll know whether diet soda raises your chance of health problems. Diet Soda, Dementia and Stroke Boston University researcher Matthew Pase, PhD, and colleagues examined 10 years of health information from nearly 3,000 American adults over 45 to count the number who had a stroke. They did the same for nearly 1,500 American adults over 60 to determine how many developed dementia. After accounting for a variety of things that could influence their health, such as age, physical activity, and waist size, the researchers found that diet soda drinkers nearly tripled their odds of stroke and dementia, compared with those who drank no diet soda. Scary, right? Not necessarily, says Pase. Only 81, or 5%, of the people in the study were diagnosed with dementia, and only 97, or 3%, had a stroke. “At the end of the day, we’re talking about small numbers of people,” says Pase. “I don’t think that people should be alarmed.” Pase also makes clear that his study’s results, published in April in the journal Stroke, don’t explain the link. Do diet sodas cause health problems like stroke and dementia? Or do people who have higher chances of getting such health problems choose to drink diet soda, perhaps to try to cut sugar and calories in their diets? Continue reading >>

Diet Sodas Might Not Raise Diabetes Risk

Diet Sodas Might Not Raise Diabetes Risk

(Reuters Health) - Drinking colas and other sugary drinks is tied to an increased risk of so-called pre-diabetes, a precursor to full-blown disease, but diet soda is not, a recent study suggests. Previous studies on the link between diet sodas and diabetes have been mixed; some research pointing to a potential connection has suggested this relationship may be explained at least in part by soda drinkers being overweight or obese. In the current study, however, adults who routinely consumed at least one can of soda or other sugar-sweetened beverages a day were 46 percent more likely to develop elevated blood sugar levels than people who rarely or never drink cola. “Emphasis should be placed on substituting sugar-sweetened beverages with water, unsweetened teas, or coffee,” said senior study author Nicola McKeown, a nutrition researcher at Tufts University in Boston. “For daily consumers of sugary drinks, kicking the habit may be a difficult challenge, and incorporating an occasional diet soda, while increasing fluids from other sources, may be the best strategy to ultimately remove sugar-sweetened beverages from the diet,” McKeown added by email. Globally, about one in nine adults have diabetes, and the disease will be the seventh leading cause of death by 2030, according to the World Health Organization. Most of these people have Type 2, or adult-onset, diabetes, which happens when the body can’t properly use or make enough of the hormone insulin to convert blood sugar into energy. People with blood sugar levels that are slightly elevated, but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis, are sometimes described as having “pre-diabetes” because many will go on to develop diabetes. In the current study, researchers examined data collected on 1,685 middle-aged ad Continue reading >>

The Awful Truth About Diet Soda And Weight Gain, According To Science

The Awful Truth About Diet Soda And Weight Gain, According To Science

Does diet soda make people gain weight? originally appeared on Quora: the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights. Sweet taste without the calories sounds like a perfect example of no pain, all gain but unfortunately cumulative data suggests otherwise. A poster child for unintended consequences, diet soda (Diet drink) typically contains a type of non-caloric artificial sweetener, a sugar substitute called Aspartame, e.g., NutraSweet or Equal (sweetener). Unintended consequences in the form of not just weight gain but also increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus type 2, hypertension and metabolic syndrome, all vigorously disputed, of course (see some examples in references 1, 2), which brings us to the glaring caveat we need to keep front and center when considering the science about artificial sweeteners. Historically the food and beverage industry has funded nutrition research so substantially that the ensuing entrenched conflict of interest renders the phrase "nutrition science" an oxymoron (3). North America currently leads in sales and consumption of diet beverages (see below from 4): Artificial sweetener consumption patterns tend to change rapidly in response to widespread perception of harm attendant to one type of artificial sweetener or another. U.S. artificial sweetener consumption, for example, moved from cyclamate in the 1960s to saccharin, e.g. Sweet'n Low, to aspartame, which reigned supreme for several decades until being upstaged in the 2010s by sucralose, e.g. Splenda, mainly because it's highly stable in food (5) while acesulfame potassium (Ace-K), e.g., Sunett, Sweet & Safe, Sweet One, is also increasing in use. Pepsi embodies such rapid change. In 2015 it changed its U.S. Die Continue reading >>

Tufts Study Absolves Diet Soda In Prediabetes, But Sugary Beverages Are Linked

Tufts Study Absolves Diet Soda In Prediabetes, But Sugary Beverages Are Linked

Studies of the effect of diet soda on diabetes and obesity have produced mixed results. While sugary beverages have been linked to diabetes and obesity, the evidence has been mixed on diet drinks. A new study from Tufts University finds that regular consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with a greater incidence of insulin resistance and a higher risk of developing prediabetes among middle-aged adults, while the same was not true with diet soda.1 The findings, published in the Journal of Nutrition earlier this month, involved an analysis of 1685 adults over a 14-year period. Data were culled from the Framingham Heart Study’s Offspring Cohort, a program of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute that tracks multiple generations for lifestyle characteristics that cause cardiovascular disease. Diet soda has not always fared well in studies examining connections to diabetes and obesity. One 2015 study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found that greater diet soda intake was linked to higher levels of abdominal fat in adults 65 years or older.2 Other studies suggest that those who drink diet soda believe they can justify consuming higher amounts of high-calorie foods. In the new study, however, consumption of diet soda was not associated with prediabetes or insulin resistance over an extended period among participants who were 51.9 years on average when the study began; 59.6% of the participants were women. The group had an average body mass index (BMI) of 26.3, which is past the CDC cut-off for overweight. The researchers found that sugar-sweetened beverage intake was linked to incident prediabetes, with those who consumed the most sugary beverages—more than 3 servings a day, or a median of 6 servings a week—having a 46% Continue reading >>

Study: Drinking Too Much Diet Soda Linked To Alzheimer’s

Study: Drinking Too Much Diet Soda Linked To Alzheimer’s

Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine found that people who drink lots of sugary beverages — including sodas and fruit juices — have poorer memory and smaller overall brain volumes. But diet soda presents its own set of problems. “People drinking diet soda daily were almost three times as likely to develop stroke and dementia,” said study author Matthew Pase, PhD, fellow in the department of neurology at BUSM. “This included a higher risk of ischemic stroke, where blood vessels in the brain become obstructed, and Alzheimer’s disease.” As part of the Framingham Heart Study, researchers monitored 2,888 participants age 45 and over for the development of a stroke and 1,484 participants age 60 and older for dementia for 10 years. After excluding preexisting conditions including diabetes and high blood pressure, diet soda consumption was still associated with the risk of dementia. “We know that sugary beverages are associated with poorer health outcomes,” said Pase. However, “diet sodas might not necessarily be a healthy alternative to sugar sweetened beverages.” Researchers are not recommending a return to sugary beverages as they present similar brain deficiencies as well as obesity and diabetes. But you may want to grab a bottle of water as an alternative to any soda. “It’s important to realize that our study cannot draw cause and effect between beverage intake and the risk of stroke or the risk of dementia,” said Pase. “However, we advise that people are cautious about their intake of diet sodas.” These results of these studies appear separately in the journals Alzheimer’s & Dementia and Stroke. -By Brad Broker Continue reading >>

Diet Sodas May Be Tied To Stroke, Dementia Risk

Diet Sodas May Be Tied To Stroke, Dementia Risk

(CNN)Gulping down an artificially sweetened beverage not only may be associated with health risks for your body, but also possibly your brain, a new study suggests. Artificially sweetened drinks, such as diet sodas, were tied to a higher risk of stroke and dementia in the study, which published in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke on Thursday. The study sheds light only on an association, as the researchers were unable to determine an actual cause-and-effect relationship between sipping artificially sweetened drinks and an increased risk for stroke and dementia. Therefore, some experts caution that the findings should be interpreted carefully. No connection was found between those health risks and other sugary beverages, such as sugar-sweetened sodas, fruit juice and fruit drinks. "We have little data on the health effects of diet drinks and this is problematic because diet drinks are popular amongst the general population," said Matthew Pase, a senior research fellow in the department of neurology at Boston University School of Medicine and lead author of the new study. "More research is needed to study the health effects of diet drinks so that consumers can make informed choices concerning their health," he said. The new study involved data on 2,888 adults older than 45 and 1,484 adults older than 60 from the town of Framingham, Massachusetts. The data came from the Framingham Heart Study, a project of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and Boston University. In the older-than-45 group, the researchers measured for stroke and in the older-than-60 group, they measured for dementia. "The sample sizes are different because we studied people of different ages," Pase said. "Dementia is rare in people under the age of 60 and so we focused only on th Continue reading >>

Diet Soda Can Increase Risk Of Dementia And Stroke, Study Finds

Diet Soda Can Increase Risk Of Dementia And Stroke, Study Finds

A new study finds one more reason to skip artifically sweetened drinks. USA TODAY The quest to trim waistlines using artificial sweeteners could be backfiring, as researchers found artificially sweetened drinks like diet soda can increase a person's likelihood of stroke and dementia. A study published in the American Heart Association journal Stroke found a daily diet soda puts a person at three times the risk of dementia and stroke compared to someone who drinks less than one a week. It's another blow to diet soda, which has been the subject of recent unflattering studies. Purdue University found in 2013 it doesn't actually help us lose weight. Another 2007 study discovered those who drink diet soda are no less at risk of heart disease than those who drink regular soda. In fact, the Stroke study found drinking sugary drinks such as soda and fruit juice, doesn’t increase a person's risk of stroke and dementia. Researchers caution that's not a call to go buy sugary drinks, which Harvard has linked to type 2 diabetes and heart disease. "Although we did not find an association between stroke or dementia and the consumption of sugary drinks, this certainly does not mean they are a healthy option," explained Dr. Matthew Pase, study author and a senior fellow at the Boston University School of Medicine. "We recommend that people drink water on a regular basis instead of sugary or artificially sweetened beverages." Over seven years, researchers studied thousands of people over the age of 45 from the area of Framingham, Mass., on their drinking and eating habits. Researchers followed-up a decade later to see who had experienced a stroke or dementia. The data was adjusted for a number of factors, including age, sex and caloric intake. The study only tracked the trend between a Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Do Diet Sodas Cause Diabetes?

Do Diet Sodas Cause Diabetes?

I’m confused by news that drinks containing artificial sweeteners can lead to diabetes. I know you advise against the use of artificial sweeteners, but does this study mean that we should drink “regular” instead of diet sodas? You will be much better off not drinking any sodas at all. The results of the study connecting artificial sweeteners with metabolic syndrome, a collection of conditions that together dramatically increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes, by no means vindicate sugar. Instead, they suggest that artificial sweeteners are as bad for health as too much sugar. The study, from Israel, showed that artificial sweeteners altered the collection of bacteria (known as the microbiome) in the digestive tract in a way that caused blood glucose levels to rise higher than expected and to fall more slowly than they otherwise would. This finding may solve the longstanding mystery of why drinking artificially sweetened diet sodas doesn’t lead to weight loss. It also strongly suggests that the use of artificial sweeteners has been contributing to the worldwide obesity epidemic and rising rates of type 2 diabetes. To arrive at their conclusions, the Israeli researchers gave 10-week old mice water sweetened with saccharin, sucralose or aspartame, plain water, or sugar-sweetened water. After one week, the mice that received the artificially sweetened water had developed glucose intolerance, the first step on the path to metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. With glucose intolerance, the body cannot easily handle large amounts of sugar. The researchers next gave the mice antibiotics, which killed the bacteria in the animals’ digestive systems. The glucose intolerance disappeared, supporting the hypothesis that this condition is caused by a change Continue reading >>

Diet Drinks Are Associated With Weight Gain, New Research Suggests

Diet Drinks Are Associated With Weight Gain, New Research Suggests

The United States is the world's largest consumer of sugar, and the nation's top nutrition panel recently recommended that Americans cut down on consuming the sweet stuff. So our panelists tested five alternative sweeteners--stevia, sucralose, tagatose, yacón powder and xylitol--to see how they compare with sugar. (The Washington Post) Over the past decade, Americans have soured on artificial sweeteners. Once heralded as sweet substitutes for sugar without as many belt-busting calories, people once couldn't get enough sucralose and aspartame. But recently, people have started looking at the molecules with increasing suspicion, amid studies that linked them to increased belly fat — and bogus but widespread rumors that they led to things much worse. But their draw remained because of the simplest of math equations: Fewer calories means fewer pounds. Both the American Diabetes Association and the American Heart Association gave their stamp of approval to artificial sweeteners with statements listed on their websites in 2014, and Americans ate it up. But an international group of researchers has tried to figure out whether low-calorie sweeteners really live up to their promise over time. Meghan Azad, a researcher at the University of Manitoba, and others reviewed dozens of studies about the long-term health effects of sugar substitutes, trying to see whether there was a prevailing trend. There was, and you may want to have a drink before you hear about it. Maybe a sugary one. The study found that not only were artificial sweeteners dodgy when it came to weight management, but people who drank them routinely had an increased body mass index and risk of developing cardiovascular disease. “I think originally it was calories were the problem, and we’ve made something tha Continue reading >>

Does Drinking Soda Really Give You Diabetes?

Does Drinking Soda Really Give You Diabetes?

Chugging too much soda won’t just give you a gut: Soda might also raise your risk of developing prediabetes as well, a new study published in The Journal of Nutrition suggests. In a study of over 1,600 people, those who drank regular soda more than 3 times a week were 46 percent more likely to develop prediabetes—a disease where your blood sugar is elevated, but not quite at the diabetes threshold—over a 14-year period than those who didn’t drink any of the beverage. Even just one 12-ounce can of soda more than three times a week is enough to raise your health risk. This link between soda and prediabetes persisted even after the researchers adjusted for potential factors that may be skewing the relationship, like calorie consumption, physical activity levels, and body mass indexes (BMI). (Here are 15 ways to cut hundreds of calories a day.) One possible reason is that the sugar content of regular soda may overwhelm the drinker’s system with excess glucose and fructose, says lead study author Nicola McKeown, Ph.D., of Tufts University. The extra sugar rush raises the amount of sugar in your body in the short-term. But it can also mess with your system long-term, by changing the way the pancreas releases insulin, a hormone that allows your body to absorb glucose for energy. As a result, you can develop insulin resistance, a condition where your body needs higher and higher amounts of insulin to function, says McKeown. When your body can’t churn out enough insulin to keep up with that demand, the glucose builds up in your blood, and you can develop prediabetes, and eventually diabetes. Diet soda, on the other hand, doesn’t contain sugar, which may be why the study saw no link between the consumption of that kind of soft drink and prediabetes risk. (Still, oth Continue reading >>

More in diabetic diet