diabetestalk.net

Diet Soda And Diabetes Research

Diet Sodas And Diabetes?

Diet Sodas And Diabetes?

In the 1980s, throughout the development of sucralose (Splenda), more than 100 studies were conducted to assess its effect on human health, including its potential to impact blood glucose, or blood sugar. There was no impact. As a result, Splenda was determined safe, including for persons with diabetes, by the U.S. Federal Drug Administration, the World Health Organization, and virtually every other leading health organization worldwide. Gut sweet taste receptors But in recent years, the discovery of gut sweet taste receptors in the body have led some to question Splenda’s safety. It appears that Splenda activates these receptors. But would activating them mean anything? Would doing so raise blood sugar? The data suggest not. Clinical trials conducted since the FDA’s approval of Splenda have significantly added to the conclusion that Splenda does not affect blood sugar levels.1,2,3 But the hysteria continued. Some anti-Splenda crusaders have argued that most of the studies involved just one dose of the sugar substitute. Splenda, diet sodas, and diabetes? | New research So this year, scientists from Leicester Clinical Research Centre in the United Kingdom decided to create an air-tight case against the Splenda-phobic crowd. They conducted an impeccably-designed, randomized controlled trial4 that investigated the effect of Splenda intake three times per day for 12 weeks. The amount of Splenda consumed was pretty hefty – the equivalent of five cans of diet soda each day. Forty-seven healthy men with no personal or family histories of diabetes participated in the study. Half of the group was randomly selected to be the Splenda consumers. The other half took a placebo. The study evaluated key measures in the prevention and control of type 2 diabetes, including: HbA1c, Continue reading >>

‘sugar-free’ And ‘diet’ Sodas Linked To Diabetes: Study

‘sugar-free’ And ‘diet’ Sodas Linked To Diabetes: Study

The prospective study followed more than 65,000 European women for over 14 years, tracking their consumption of sugar-sweetened and artificially-sweetened (or sugar free) sodas and juices. Published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the research finds that a higher than average intake of both sugar-sweetened and sugar free sodas is linked to an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes. However, rather surprisingly, the authors also found that those consuming diet soda had an even higher incidence than those drinking ‘regular’ sugar sweetened soda. Led by Françoise Clavel-Chapelon from France's National Institute of Health and Medical Research, the research team said they cannot currently rule out the possibility that factors other than artificially sweetened beverages consumption, “that we did not control for” are responsible for the association with diabetes. “Randomized trials are required to prove a causal link between artificially sweetened beverages consumption and type 2 diabetes,”​ they said. Study details​ The research tracked 66,118 women for more than 14 years, assessing their beverage habits using self-reported questionnaires that monitored consumption of 100% juice, sugar-sweetened drinks and artificially sweetened drinks. By the end of the study period, 1,369 of the women were diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, the researchers revealed. Clavel-Chapelon and his team revealed that both diet and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption was linked with a higher risk of developing diabetes. However, when comparing diabetes risk between the diet soda drinkers and regular soda drinkers, the diet drinkers had an even higher risk, they said. Meanwhile, the women who only reported drinking 100% juice did not have an increased risk of diabetes. So Continue reading >>

Is Drinking Diet Soda A Health Risk?

Is Drinking Diet Soda A Health Risk?

May 5, 2017 -- About one in five Americans drinks diet soda every day, according to the CDC. Is that a good thing? Numerous studies over the past several years have reported links between diet soda and weight gain, diabetes, heart problems, and other health issues. Most recently, headlines sounded alarms about a higher chance of dementia and stroke among diet soda drinkers . That may sound worrisome, but experts say you don’t need to clear the diet drinks out of your fridge just yet. Many questions must be answered before we’ll know whether diet soda raises your chance of health problems. Diet Soda, Dementia and Stroke Boston University researcher Matthew Pase, PhD, and colleagues examined 10 years of health information from nearly 3,000 American adults over 45 to count the number who had a stroke. They did the same for nearly 1,500 American adults over 60 to determine how many developed dementia. After accounting for a variety of things that could influence their health, such as age, physical activity, and waist size, the researchers found that diet soda drinkers nearly tripled their odds of stroke and dementia, compared with those who drank no diet soda. Scary, right? Not necessarily, says Pase. Only 81, or 5%, of the people in the study were diagnosed with dementia, and only 97, or 3%, had a stroke. “At the end of the day, we’re talking about small numbers of people,” says Pase. “I don’t think that people should be alarmed.” Pase also makes clear that his study’s results, published in April in the journal Stroke, don’t explain the link. Do diet sodas cause health problems like stroke and dementia? Or do people who have higher chances of getting such health problems choose to drink diet soda, perhaps to try to cut sugar and calories in their diets? Continue reading >>

Diet Soda And Diabetes: Things To Consider

Diet Soda And Diabetes: Things To Consider

Diabetes is a condition characterized by high amounts of sugar in the blood. These high blood sugar levels are a result of the body's inability to either produce or use a hormone called insulin. Insulin's role is to move sugar from the blood and into the cells of the body where it is used to make energy. Contents of this article: Sugary sodas and diabetes Diabetes is marked by high blood sugar, known medically as hyperglycemia. As such, drinks which have a lot of sugar in them should be avoided as they cause spikes in blood sugar. There are three major types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. The immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. There is no direct cause of type 1 diabetes. Factors that can increase the risk of type 1 diabetes include: Drinking cow's milk at an early age may also play a role in type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. The body is unable to use insulin fully or make enough of it to keep up with sugar intake. Type 2 diabetes shows links to: Inactivity Genes Age Family history of type 2 diabetes Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes affects women during pregnancy. If the body cannot make enough insulin to carry the sugar to cells to be used or if there is insulin resistance present, the woman may be diagnosed with gestational diabetes. One recent study posted in the BMJ found a link between drinking sugary drinks and the risk of type two diabetes. Another study posted in Diabetes Care found that people who drink 1-2 sugar-sweetened drinks every day have a 26 percent greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who do not. Other things to consider about sugar-sweetened sodas: Plaque loves soda: The bacteria that make Continue reading >>

Diet Coke Won’t Stop You Getting Diabetes: Two Glasses Of Calorie-free Drinks A Day 'doubles The Risk'

Diet Coke Won’t Stop You Getting Diabetes: Two Glasses Of Calorie-free Drinks A Day 'doubles The Risk'

Many of us have ditched our favourite sugary drinks for their diet alternative in a bid to boost our health and keep off the pounds. But it seems that diet drinks can be just as bad for you, according to a study. Scientists found drinking just two glasses of diet drinks a day more than doubles the risk of developing diabetes. They believe that calorie-free drinks make us feel hungrier, prompting us to crave sugar-laden snacks. And they also suspect that artificial sweeteners interfere with the bacteria in our gut – which may trigger diabetes. The team from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden studied 2,874 adults who had completed a year-long diary about their intake of drinks. Those who had two or more sweetened drinks a day were 2.4 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. This included sugary beverages and artificially sweetened ones, such as Diet Coke or sugar free cordials. Having five or more sugar-free drinks a day increased the risk by 4.5 times. In fact, the researchers found that artificially–sweetened drinks were almost as bad as those laden with sugar. They established that every 200ml glass of a sugary fizzy drink consumed each day increased the risk of type 2 diabetes by 21 per cent. Meanwhile every diet drink increased the risk by 18 per cent, according to the findings published in the European Journal of Endocrinology. Lead researcher Josefin Löfvenborg said diet drinks may ‘stimulate the appetite’, leading to weight gain. She added that artificial sweeteners may cause chemical reactions within fat tissue and with bacteria in the gut. This can lead to the body becoming less tolerant of glucose – a form of sugar – triggering type 2 diabetes. She said: ‘One hypothesis is that consumption of diet soft drinks may stimulate appetite making u Continue reading >>

Diet Sodas Might Not Raise Diabetes Risk

Diet Sodas Might Not Raise Diabetes Risk

(Reuters Health) - Drinking colas and other sugary drinks is tied to an increased risk of so-called pre-diabetes, a precursor to full-blown disease, but diet soda is not, a recent study suggests. Previous studies on the link between diet sodas and diabetes have been mixed; some research pointing to a potential connection has suggested this relationship may be explained at least in part by soda drinkers being overweight or obese. In the current study, however, adults who routinely consumed at least one can of soda or other sugar-sweetened beverages a day were 46 percent more likely to develop elevated blood sugar levels than people who rarely or never drink cola. “Emphasis should be placed on substituting sugar-sweetened beverages with water, unsweetened teas, or coffee,” said senior study author Nicola McKeown, a nutrition researcher at Tufts University in Boston. “For daily consumers of sugary drinks, kicking the habit may be a difficult challenge, and incorporating an occasional diet soda, while increasing fluids from other sources, may be the best strategy to ultimately remove sugar-sweetened beverages from the diet,” McKeown added by email. Globally, about one in nine adults have diabetes, and the disease will be the seventh leading cause of death by 2030, according to the World Health Organization. Most of these people have Type 2, or adult-onset, diabetes, which happens when the body can’t properly use or make enough of the hormone insulin to convert blood sugar into energy. People with blood sugar levels that are slightly elevated, but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis, are sometimes described as having “pre-diabetes” because many will go on to develop diabetes. In the current study, researchers examined data collected on 1,685 middle-aged ad Continue reading >>

Do Diet Sodas Increase Risk Of Dementia And Stroke?

Do Diet Sodas Increase Risk Of Dementia And Stroke?

You might want to think twice before popping the top on a can of diet soda. A new study published in the May issue of Stroke, the journal of the American Heart Association, found a connection between drinking artificially sweetened beverages and an increased risk of stroke and dementia. Researchers tracked more than 4,000 people for a decade and found that those who guzzled at least one artificially sweetened beverage daily were three times as likely to develop stroke and dementia within a decade as those who drank diet drinks less than once a week. Lead researcher Matthew Pase, a neurologist at Boston University School of Medicine, is quick to point out that the study showed an association, not clear cause and effect. However, he did say that based on the results, “we advise people to exercise caution when it comes to drinking diet soda or other artificially sweetened beverages.” Diet drinks, once touted as healthier alternatives to sugar-sweetened beverages, especially for those with diabetes and obesity, have come under fire recently. Previous research on diet drinks The Stroke study is part of a growing body of research pointing to the possible health effects of diet drinks. Additional research released this month found that artificial sweeteners could promote fat accumulation in cells; and a 2013 study linked artificially sweetened beverages with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Interestingly, researchers found no link between drinking regular soda or other sugary drinks and the risk of stroke or dementia, but again, Pase urged caution when interpreting the findings. Among study participants, Pase explained, few drank regular soda; those who did consumed, on average, three regular sodas per week — far fewer than the number of diet sodas Continue reading >>

The New Dangers Of Diet Soda

The New Dangers Of Diet Soda

Common wisdom is that diet soda is better than regular soda, but new research shows that diet soda may cause serious health issues—especially if you are a woman over 60. Each week, a new study seems to pop up linking a diet soda habit with increased risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and other bad things. The latest study, presented at the American College of Cardiology’s annual scientific meeting, found that older women who drank two or more diet sodas a day, compared to older women who rarely or never drank them, were 30 percent more likely to have a cardiovascular “event”, such as a heart attack. The study looked at 60,000 women (average age 63) over nearly 9 years. No wonder Diet Coke sales dropped nearly 7 percent last year. Devil in a can? Beelzebub in a bottle? Actually, that’s far from proven. These studies show association, not cause. And not all studies find harm. At the Harvard School of Public Health, for example, researchers report no association between diet soda and weight gain, diabetes, or heart disease. Says Vasanti Malik, Sc.D., a research associate at the nutrition department of the Harvard School of Public Health, “The verdict is still out on long-term health consequences of diet soda consumption.” So is diet soda to blame for serious heath risks? Truth is, we just don’t know — yet. It’s hard to reach conclusions between people with weight problems (and often, metabolic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes) since these people tend to drink more diet sodas because they’re trying to lose weight. It may be that the obesity is “causing” the diet soda consumption, not the other way around. In the most recent heart disease and women study, for example, “it is likely that the women who started drinking more diet so Continue reading >>

Diet Sodas May Be Tied To Stroke, Dementia Risk

Diet Sodas May Be Tied To Stroke, Dementia Risk

(CNN)Gulping down an artificially sweetened beverage not only may be associated with health risks for your body, but also possibly your brain, a new study suggests. Artificially sweetened drinks, such as diet sodas, were tied to a higher risk of stroke and dementia in the study, which published in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke on Thursday. The study sheds light only on an association, as the researchers were unable to determine an actual cause-and-effect relationship between sipping artificially sweetened drinks and an increased risk for stroke and dementia. Therefore, some experts caution that the findings should be interpreted carefully. No connection was found between those health risks and other sugary beverages, such as sugar-sweetened sodas, fruit juice and fruit drinks. "We have little data on the health effects of diet drinks and this is problematic because diet drinks are popular amongst the general population," said Matthew Pase, a senior research fellow in the department of neurology at Boston University School of Medicine and lead author of the new study. "More research is needed to study the health effects of diet drinks so that consumers can make informed choices concerning their health," he said. The new study involved data on 2,888 adults older than 45 and 1,484 adults older than 60 from the town of Framingham, Massachusetts. The data came from the Framingham Heart Study, a project of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and Boston University. In the older-than-45 group, the researchers measured for stroke and in the older-than-60 group, they measured for dementia. "The sample sizes are different because we studied people of different ages," Pase said. "Dementia is rare in people under the age of 60 and so we focused only on th Continue reading >>

Should You Ditch Diet Sodas?

Should You Ditch Diet Sodas?

The debate about which foods belong in a “healthy diet” (and which don’t) is ongoing – especially when it comes to diabetes. Are carbs the enemy? Should you cut out gluten? Should you sign up for that 21-day detox? And, one of the most controversial questions: Should you drink diet soda? While many organizations, such as the ADA and AND take a fairly neutral stance on artificial sweeteners found in diet sodas, stating that there is room for nutritive sweeteners (non-caloric, alternative sweeteners) in an otherwise healthy diet, I personally take a more conservative approach with my clients. Nutritional science is still a relatively new scientific field, relative to other bodies of scientific research, leaving a lot to still be discovered about long-term effects of many processed foods that have not even been around for a century. In general, I am an advocate for whole foods—foods that are as minimally processed as possible and provide an abundance of nutritive value to those that consume them. Within this logic, since diet sodas fall short of providing any nutritional value, they should be treated more as a novelty than a dietary staple. If you are still on the fence about consuming diet sodas regularly, here are some things to consider before picking up that sugar-free cola: Even “natural” sugar alternatives are processed Some sodas get their sweetness from more natural sources than others – but this doesn’t necessarily mean it’s good for you. Stevia, for instance, is a sugar substitute derived from the stevia plant, which has been used for over a thousand years by native tribes in South America to sweeten foods and teas. Unfortunately, the stevia that is found in your local grocery store is a cousin far removed from the traditional stevia leaf vers Continue reading >>

Why Diet Soda Is Bad For You

Why Diet Soda Is Bad For You

By now you’ve probably heard that the idea of diet soda being healthier than regular soda is nothing more than a myth. Sure, regular soda is far from healthy, but diet soda could be even more dangerous. This news is mind-boggling for most and may leave them wondering “why?” or “how?”. The truth about diet soda Fortunately, we have the truth about diet soda and what makes it so dangerous. It leads to more weight gain Before recent studies were released on the dangers of diet soda, many individuals who wanted to lose weight would swap their regular soda for diet. You can only imagine their surprise when they not only failed to lose weight, but actually ended up gaining more! So, how exactly does diet soda contribute to weight gain? It’s simple: while diet soda doesn’t contain real sugar or calories it does contain a lot of additives and artificial ingredients including sweeteners. These ingredients are full of unnatural chemicals that can cause your body to crave more high-calorie and sugar-laden foods. Artificial sweeteners may also confuse your body into miscalculating the number of calories you are actually consuming which can then cause your metabolism to slow down, making it more challenging to burn off calories and lose weight. It has been linked to type-2 diabetes Think diet soda is safe for diabetics due to the lack of sugar? Think again. The artificial sweeteners in diet soda can actually cause a spike in blood sugar and insulin levels which in turn can lead to diabetic shock for those who have already been diagnosed with diabetes. Don’t have diabetes? You’re not out of danger, either. Diet soda may greatly increase your risk of developing type-2 diabetes. As previously mentioned, diet soda can cause weight gain and a lower metabolism rate. Thes Continue reading >>

Think Your Eliminating Diabetes With Diet Sodas? Think Again!

Think Your Eliminating Diabetes With Diet Sodas? Think Again!

Most people already know that drinking a lot of sugary sodas could increase their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. For that reason, many soda drinkers have turned to the diet versions of their favorite fizzy beverages as a way to stay healthier while still enjoying that great flavor. Well, a new diabetes clinical study conducted by Inserm could have many people rethinking the benefit they are getting from drinking diet soda. The results of this study have been published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, and they have been generating a bit of hype in the medical community. It seems that there could be a legitimate association between the consumption of diet soda and an elevated risk of type 2 diabetes. Tracking Women’s Beverage Habits for 14 Years For this diabetes clinical trial, researchers enrolled 66,118 women and tracked their beverage habits for more than 14 years. In order to do this successfully, they asked all of their participants to inform them whenever they would drink any 100 percent juice, sugar-sweetened sodas, and artificially sweetened drinks. By the time the study was completed, 1,369 of these women had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Researchers discovered that these women would drink more diet sodas than sugar-sweetened drinks on average. On a weekly basis, this was broken down to 328 milliliters of sugar-sweetened beverages and 568 milliliters of artificially sweetened beverages. Diet Soda and an Elevated Risk of Diabetes It now seems that the consumption of both diet and sugar-sweetened beverages has been linked with an elevated risk of developing diabetes. While this may be surprising on its own, researchers have discovered that the dietary habits of these diet drinkers could lead to an even higher risk of diabetes when compa Continue reading >>

Is Diet Soda Ok For People With Diabetes?

Is Diet Soda Ok For People With Diabetes?

Susan B. Sloane, BS, RPh, CDE, has been a registered pharmacist for more than 20 years and a Certified Diabetes Educator for more than 15 years. Her two sons were diagnosed with diabetes, and since then, she has been dedicated to promoting wellness and optimal outcomes as a patient advocate, information expert, educator, and corporate partner. “I’ll have a burger and a diet cola, please!” No matter where we eat out these days, from fast food to fine dining, you hear this order a lot. I know I sometimes feel like I can consume more calories at a meal because I chose the diet beverage, but how accurate is that way of thinking? Should we be drinking as much diet soda as we do? First, to be clear, there is no absolute right or wrong about food or beverage consumption. I provide information I hope is useful to your own lifestyle. I always say that education is the best prescription. The power of soda Just to give you some idea of the popularity of soft drinks, our country produces 10.4 billion gallons of soft drinks yearly. Diet soda is often paired with unhealthy food choices, such as burgers and pizza. My husband is a pizza lover who cannot eat pizza without diet soda. He says the pizza tastes better with soda, and after all, it’s “diet” soda. But if the food actually tastes better to him, will he eat more pizza than he normally would with say, water as a beverage? This is a question that has actually been posed in studies. Do diet beverages allow and/or cause us to eat more calories? Data presented recently at the American Diabetes Association’s scientific sessions suggest that diet soft drinks may actually contribute to weight gain. One theory as to why this may happen is that your brain tastes something sweet, which triggers a release of insulin and elicit Continue reading >>

Diet Soda Intake Linked To Increase Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Diet Soda Intake Linked To Increase Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is the development of insulin resistance in the body. This causes high levels of glucose in the blood. Over time, high levels of glucose can lead to serious complications such as heart and blood vessel disease, blindness, and kidney disease. The development of type 2 diabetes is strongly influenced by being overweight and by dietary choices. Diet sodas are a common option for people who are trying to cut down on sugar and calories in their diet. However, some studies have suggested that diet sodas may not be completely harmless. Researchers from the University of Texas Health Sciences Center wanted to determine if there was an association between diet soda and the development of type 2 diabetes. The study, published in the journal Diabetes Care, suggested that heavy diet soda drinkers may actually increase their risk of type 2 diabetes. About the Study This study collected information from a larger study called the Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). The MESA study followed 6,814 individuals. A food frequency questionnaire and a fasting blood glucose test were collected at the start of the study and during three follow-up appointments scheduled at two-year intervals. The results showed that the risk of type 2 diabetes increased as the intake of diet soda increased. Researchers also considered other factors that are known to influence the development of diabetes, such as age, physical activity, and waist circumference. Even after accounting for these factors, when compared to those who never drink diet sodas, the risk of type 2 diabetes increased by: 25% in those who drank one or more servings per week but less than one serving per day 38% in those who drank one or more servings per day How Does This Affect You? This study was based on an observ Continue reading >>

Diet Drinks Are Associated With Weight Gain, New Research Suggests

Diet Drinks Are Associated With Weight Gain, New Research Suggests

The United States is the world's largest consumer of sugar, and the nation's top nutrition panel recently recommended that Americans cut down on consuming the sweet stuff. So our panelists tested five alternative sweeteners--stevia, sucralose, tagatose, yacón powder and xylitol--to see how they compare with sugar. (The Washington Post) Over the past decade, Americans have soured on artificial sweeteners. Once heralded as sweet substitutes for sugar without as many belt-busting calories, people once couldn't get enough sucralose and aspartame. But recently, people have started looking at the molecules with increasing suspicion, amid studies that linked them to increased belly fat — and bogus but widespread rumors that they led to things much worse. But their draw remained because of the simplest of math equations: Fewer calories means fewer pounds. Both the American Diabetes Association and the American Heart Association gave their stamp of approval to artificial sweeteners with statements listed on their websites in 2014, and Americans ate it up. But an international group of researchers has tried to figure out whether low-calorie sweeteners really live up to their promise over time. Meghan Azad, a researcher at the University of Manitoba, and others reviewed dozens of studies about the long-term health effects of sugar substitutes, trying to see whether there was a prevailing trend. There was, and you may want to have a drink before you hear about it. Maybe a sugary one. The study found that not only were artificial sweeteners dodgy when it came to weight management, but people who drank them routinely had an increased body mass index and risk of developing cardiovascular disease. “I think originally it was calories were the problem, and we’ve made something tha Continue reading >>

More in diabetic diet