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Diet Pills For Diabetics Type 1

Lose Weight With Type 1 Diabetes

Lose Weight With Type 1 Diabetes

WRITTEN BY: Cliff Scherb Editor’s Note: Cliff Scherb, Founder of Glucose Advisors and TriStar Athletes LLC, is a nutrition and fitness expert. He consults through virtually teaching his decision support system – Engine1 the app and its methodologies to aspiring T1 individuals and athletes. Cliff also creates custom training programs and insulin plans for endurance athletes, using Training Stress Modeling and real-time coaching. To inquire about coaching openings, FB LIVE sessions, and general questions please email [email protected] Losing weight can be difficult — add Type 1 diabetes to the mix with its daily management demands — and it’s even more of a challenge. I know, because I’ve been a Type 1 diabetic for 29 years and I’m also an endurance athlete. The internet is saturated in advice on how to lose weight with or without Type 1, so it’s hard to know what is worth while and what will just waste your time — or worse, can negatively impact your health. I’m not going to declare all out war on carbohydrates, or tell you can or can’t drink your calories in the form of olive oil, or feast and fast with cayenne peppers and maple syrup. No, the real distilled learning from my years of consulting and data analysis shows that a balanced, low-insulin diet with nutrient timing and activity is the best way to lose weight with Type 1 diabetes. It also helps you maintain brain and body function as well as energy levels. If you are reading this you’ve probably already given this some thought and know why it’s important to lose weight and/or lean out, but I maintain it’s all about performance! Performing means living a longer or healthier life or if you’re an athlete, it can also translate to beating out your competition. Things that Impact w Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medications And Diet: Synergistic Success

Diabetes Medications And Diet: Synergistic Success

It's a tricky balancing act - using diabetes medications to keep blood sugar at just the right level. You're coasting along, trying to "eat right," when suddenly you're confronted with a crisis -- sharing a very large pizza. It's so difficult turning away from pizza -- yet you face the inevitable blood sugar spike, with your diabetes drugs faltering under the carb load. If you're taking insulin, the mealtime dosage will need lots of attention. There's also the weight gain issue: Too many calories pack on the pounds, which worsens blood sugar control. It's serious business, keeping blood sugar and diabetes under control. There are too many health complications at stake to take it lightly. Over time, those blood sugar spikes take a toll on all your major organs and nerves throughout your body. It's nothing to take lightly. But good blood sugar control can prevent the worst complications of diabetes. In recent years, new drugs that treat diabetes and various types of insulin have helped improve the management of diabetes and greatly improve blood sugar control. Some medication used to treat diabetes help drop weight and reduce blood cholesterol levels. But they can't do the work alone, diabetes experts say. Lifestyle changes are essential -- a healthy diet, regular exercise, and weight loss -- in letting diabetes medications do their job, says David Nathan, MD, chief of the Diabetes Center at Massachusetts General Hospital and a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. "If you have type 2 diabetes, your pancreas is still trying to release insulin," Nathan explains. "But if you have a rapid rise in blood sugar, it just can't keep up with the demand. With diabetes medicines, it's the same thing. They will work better if you don't challenge the pancreas -- if you don' Continue reading >>

My Diet Pills Cured My Diabetes

My Diet Pills Cured My Diabetes

Xenical - the slimmer's so-called 'wonder drug' - has just been made available to all on the NHS. Jenny Sandford, 50, has lost 19 per cent of her bodyweight through taking the pill. Here, Jenny, who lives in Aberdeen with husband Tony, 52, an oil service company executive, and their three children, Christian, 25, Jonathan, 22, and Victoria,17, explains why she describes the pill as 'the best slap on the wrist I could ever have'. Before my first child was born, I never had a weight problem. In my teens I'd been slim, and even into my mid-20s I was just 91/2st and a size 12 - perfect for my height of 5ft 7in. Even when I was pregnant I didn't put on too much weight, but once I was at home with my baby, the weight started creeping on. Coffee mornings, snacking, eating leftovers and having my favourite chocolate biscuits on hand all contributed to my downfall. I enrolled in slimming classes, but I would be enthusiastic for two or three weeks and then that would be that. Between having my second and third children, my weight went up to 11st, and after Victoria was born I was around the 13st mark. To be honest, I found it very difficult to concentrate on dieting with three young children to look after. I continued to enjoy my chocolate and biscuits and eating all the leftovers. By the time I was 40, I was 14st and was shocked when I was diagnosed as having Type 2 diabetes. The only reason I had visited the doctor was because I'd had recurrent bouts of thrush. These, I then learned, are a common symptom of high blood-sugar levels. To be told that excess weight puts such a strain on the pancreas that it cannot produce enough insulin was the final straw. My consultant gave me some insulin-stimulating tablets and told me that if I lost weight my blood-sugar would probably revert Continue reading >>

Two New Weight-loss Drugs Available For Patients With Diabetes

Two New Weight-loss Drugs Available For Patients With Diabetes

With the FDA approval and coverage of new prescription weight-loss drugs last year, healthcare professionals have two more options to consider when treating obesity. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009–2010 saw this major public health challenge affect more than one-third of adults and almost 17% of children and adolescents. Obesity places individuals at increased risk for several chronic diseases, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Weight loss in patients with diabetes has been associated with improved glycemic control and improved lipid profiles. Although healthcare professionals have counseled patients about diet and exercise as the main approach for weight reduction, some patients continue to struggle and may seek alternative methods beyond caloric restriction and the treadmill. Lorcaserin approval In June 2012, FDA approved lorcaserin (Belviq, Arena Pharmaceuticals/ Eisai), a serotonin 2C receptor agonist, indicated as an adjunct to diet and increased physical activity for chronic weight management in adult patients who are obese or overweight and have at least one weight-related comorbidity (e.g., hypertension, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes). This was the first weight-loss prescription approved in 13 years, since FDA approved orlistat, a reversible inhibitor of gastrointestinal lipases. Lorcaserin was approved on the basis of data from three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials lasting from 52 to 104 weeks. At one year, approximately 47% of patients without diabetes in studies 1 and 2 lost ≥5% body weight, and approximately 22% achieved a loss of 10% body weight or more. In the third study, 37.5% of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus lost ≥5% body weight and about 16% achieved Continue reading >>

Diet Pills For Diabetics

Diet Pills For Diabetics

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Hi everyone. Talked to the nurse today and she said she would talk to the Dr about writing me a Script for diet pills( I've gained 25 pounds in a very short times since taking shots) b/c of some of my other health issues working out everyday is just not possiable. anyways. does anyone know of a Diet pills I may beable to research and talk to her about? I wouldn't take diet pills. Anything that makes you nervous and jittery is not safe. Diet pills put more wear and tear on your heart. You need to make a permanent change in your life, and pills can't be that answer. Be healthy and don't worry so much about being skinny. Lose the weight in a healthy and safe manner. Eat less and take every opportunity you can to walk further, take stairs, etc. I saw you sticking your tongue out at me!!! I wouldn't take diet pills. Anything that makes you nervous and jittery is not safe. Diet pills put more wear and tear on your heart. You need to make a permanent change in your life, and pills can't be that answer. Be healthy and don't worry so much about being skinny. Lose the weight in a healthy and safe manner. Eat less and take every opportunity you can to walk further, take stairs, etc. I saw you sticking your tongue out at me!!! I agree 100%. Its a simple equation. You take in more than you burn off you gain weight. You take in less you lose weight. To many people want a "magic" pill to do the work for them. Change your eating habits. On a diet pill once you lose the weight you go off the pills and gain the weight right back. Do it the old fashioned way. Hard work. I don't recommend "diet" pills...for one Continue reading >>

New Pill In The Works For Type 1 Patients

New Pill In The Works For Type 1 Patients

Protein that lowers blood sugar may be new oral diabetic agent for type 1 patients…. Note: The following article was adapted from an original article, Insulin’s Little Helper: A New Pill for Type 1 Diabetes? SOGA, a protein that lowers blood glucose, is missing in type 1 patients. SOGA is released when insulin is released and works by blocking the production of glucose when food is being consumed. The protein begins to work when eating so excess glucose is not produced. This does not occur in diabetic patients. In both type 1 and 2 patients the body overproduces the amount of glucose it actually needs. Every person produces the excess glucose to different degrees. The developer is working on a drug that will stop the body’s production of its own glucose. The new drug would stimulate the SOGA production to decrease the glucose production, lowering blood glucose levels. This protein is released at the same time as insulin, and it blocks the production of glucose from the liver when food is being consumed. The liver continually pumps out small amounts of sugar to keep glucose levels stable but when food is being consumed, there’s no need for extra glucose, so SOGA usually kicks in. The body is really overproducing the amount of glucose it needs. The body of a type 1 or type 2 PWD overproduces glucose to different degrees. So the reason blood sugar goes so high after a meal is that patients are getting a double infusion of blood sugar, one from their own body’s production and one coming from the food. Now, focusing on SOGA, the investigators are working on a drug that would stop the production of the body’s own glucose, akin to how a statin works to lower the body’s own production of cholesterol. Just like insulin, SOGA can’t be ingested, so the drug would b Continue reading >>

How To Lose Weight When You Live With Diabetes

How To Lose Weight When You Live With Diabetes

Losing weight can be difficult for anyone, and living with diabetes definitely doesn’t make it easier. However, there ARE people who set out to lose weight and end up so extraordinarily successful that you wonder if they have some inside information you don’t. That information EXISTS. I’m here to give you the rundown on how to successfully lose weight when you live with diabetes. In this post, I will go through: How to set realistic goals How many calories to eat How much protein, carbs, and fat to eat How much to exercise How blood glucose control affects your weight Without further ado…lets GET TO IT! Temper expectations at the start People these days have this intensive need for instant gratification. They want that 15 lbs gone by yesterday! While I’m all for efficiency, I’m going to be short and sweet and show reality with a pop quiz: True or false: it took more than a week to gain the weight you are trying to lose. The answer is undeniably “True”. So if it took you X number of months to gain weight, why would it take you a week or two to lose it? It doesn’t. It takes time and some concerted effort. Don’t expect to lose all of the weight immediately, but know that with proper habit formation and consistency, you WILL see the results you are after. The general rule for healthy weight loss is to aim for A MAX of 1-2 lbs. per week. It’s also quite common for people living with diabetes to take as long as 2-3 weeks before seeing any weight loss at all on a new diet. “Why?” you ask. Changing caloric intake and workout routines may require a reduction of insulin (or other diabetes medication) as well as diet manipulation, which takes a little trial and error to adjust. BE PATIENT. Once the ball is rolling, a slow and controlled weight loss makes Continue reading >>

Can An Add-on Pill For Type 1 Diabetes Improve A1c And Weight Loss?

Can An Add-on Pill For Type 1 Diabetes Improve A1c And Weight Loss?

Trial results testing sotagliflozin and Farxiga in type 1 diabetes show greater A1c lowering and weight loss, plus continued conversation about small risk of DKA Potential “add-on” (adjunctive) treatments for type 1 diabetes played a starring role at the 2017 EASD conference. Key trial results were announced for two non-insulin drugs that come in pill form, offering people with type 1 diabetes an exciting new option to manage blood sugars. The DEPICT 1 examined the use of Farxiga, a once-daily pill (an SGLT-2 inhibitor) currently approved for treating type 2 diabetes but not type 1, while the inTandem3 study tested an SGLT-1/2 dual inhibitor, sotagliflozin, also a once-daily pill that has not yet been approved. While these studies are not meant to be compared to each other given the general lack of standardization in the world of trial design, they both add to the excitement about the possibility of adjunct therapies for people with type 1. Both studies reported A1c reductions and weight loss – great for the push to approve add-on therapies for type 1 – along with continued discussion about diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). With these phase 3 trial results, the companies may now choose to submit the drugs to the FDA and pursue an “indication” for use in type 1 diabetes. The pills are taken once daily and work independent of insulin, meaning they won’t require complicated dosing. Glucose is only excreted through the urine when blood sugars are high, and then the drugs stop working when glucose levels come down. Read more below! Jump to a section: DEPICT 1 DEPICT 1 followed 833 participants with type 1 diabetes for 24 weeks; on average, they had an A1c of 8.5% and a daily insulin dose of 60 units. In addition to their regular insulin therapy, study participants e Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes - Medications

Type 1 Diabetes - Medications

Insulin helps keep your blood sugar level tightly controlled and within a target range. It can be taken by an injection, or through an insulin pump. Rapid-acting insulin is also available as a powder that you inhale. Usually people who have type 1 diabetes take a combination of types of insulin, such as a long-acting insulin once or twice a day and a rapid-acting insulin before each meal. The amount and type of insulin needed varies for each person. The amount and type of insulin you need changes over time, depending on age, hormones (such as during rapid growth or pregnancy), and changes in exercise routine. You may need higher doses of insulin during times of illness or emotional stress. Learn about insulin: Know the dose of each type of insulin you take, when you take the doses, how long it takes for each type of insulin to start working (onset), when it will have its greatest effect (peak), and how long it will work (duration). Never skip a dose of insulin without the advice of your doctor. You may also take an amylinomimetic, such as pramlintide (Symlin). This medicine is only used with insulin, but it's given in a separate shot. If small amounts of protein are found when your urine is tested, you may be in the early stage of diabetic nephropathy. You may be given an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB). Talk to your doctor about whether you should take low-dose aspirin. Daily low-dose aspirin (81 milligrams) may help prevent heart problems if you are at risk for heart attack or stroke. You may need one or more medicines to lower blood pressure. You also may need to take medicine to lower your cholesterol. Treating high blood pressure and high cholesterol may help prevent complications from diabetes. You may need Continue reading >>

Symlin Up Close: Diabetes Forecast

Symlin Up Close: Diabetes Forecast

Shelley Almburg, 49, was first diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 16. She uses an insulin pump to maintain her blood glucose. But Almburg was finding that her glucose still sometimes spiked after eating. And, over the years, she put on some extra weight. So she decided to look into Symlin. "I thought it would keep my blood sugars more even," she says, "and I really wanted to see how the weight-loss thing worked, too." Symlin, or pramlintide, is an injectable synthetic version of the hormone amylin and is prescribed to people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes who use mealtime insulin but who have not achieved adequate blood glucose control. Symlin offers another benefit as well, the "weight-loss thing" Almburg alluded to: It makes some people feel fuller after eating. Consequently, they eat less and lose weight. Not everyone who uses Symlin will lose weight. But for some, weight loss on the drug can be significant: 5 percent of body weight or more. Almburg's doctor added Symlin to her medication regimen in November 2006. At the time, she was carrying about 165 pounds on her 5'1" frame, placing her weight in the obese range. "Probably in 3 months, I lost 21 pounds," she says. "It worked really fast!" Amylin, the hormone that Symlin replaces, is normally secreted along with insulin by the beta cells in the pancreas. Diabetes damages or destroys these cells, reducing or eliminating production of both insulin and amylin, which causes blood glucose levels to rise. Symlin, which is injected at mealtimes either before or along with insulin (but never in the same syringeit must be injected separately), slows digestion and in turn, delays the release of glucose into the bloodstream. The drug also suppresses secretion of glucagon, a pancreatic hormone that triggers Continue reading >>

New Type Of Diabetes Drug Drops Weight With Blood Sugar

New Type Of Diabetes Drug Drops Weight With Blood Sugar

June 25, 2010 – A new class of diabetes drug lowers blood sugar -- and weight -- by increasing the amount of sugar released in the urine. Now the first of these so-called SGLT2 inhibitors has been tested in a phase III clinical trial. It's dapagliflozin, being jointly developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb and AstraZeneca. Study leader Clifford J. Bailey, PhD, is professor of clinical science at Aston University in Birmingham, England. "It works through an entirely different mechanism than any other diabetes drugs currently available," Bailey tells WebMD. "And you can add it on to other treatments and get an additional benefit. Plus as far as we can see, it can be used at any stage in the disease process." And that's not all. Because dapagliflozin makes the body excrete excess sugar, it makes diabetes patients lose weight. Metformin helps patients lose weight, too, but those adding dapagliflozin to metformin lost about 4 and 1/2 more pounds than those taking metformin alone in the 24-week study. The lost weight was not just water. Patients taking dapagliflozin had smaller waistlines, so the lost weight appears to have been fat. Might this new diabetes drug work as a weight loss pill? No, says Bailey. "The weight loss effect of the drug becomes less and less as the blood-sugar level comes to near normal," he notes. "Therefore the weight loss potential of this drug is very small at normal blood-sugar levels." Weight loss isn't dapagliflozin's only extra benefit. It lowers blood pressure, too. Another plus is that the oral medication is taken only once a day. And the drug does not lower blood sugar to dangerously low levels -- yet another plus. On the down side, patients taking dapagliflozin had an increased risk of genital infections. People with diabetes already are at high Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Diet Pills

Type 1 Diabetes And Diet Pills

Thank you for taking time to address my question.I have been a diabetic for 26yrs (I am presently 29), and have tried desperately to lose weight.I have been on different types of insulin (currently prescribed Humolog and Lantis), and have tried working with nurses specifically involed with diabetic nutrition, but, it seems like an endless cycle in regards to losing substantial weight.So, I am hoping someone out there can help me.I'm looking for information on the effect of diet pills on type 1 diabetic's.Specifically, I'm thinking of trying a product called cylaris.If anyone can give me any type of information, good or bad, or otherwise, I would truly appreciate it.Thanks again! Hi.I'm not a medical professional, just the parent of a kid with diabetes.To be upfront, I've never taken weight loss pills, no one in my family has, so I have no knowledge about them and am usually skeptical about their claims.With any such pill, though, I wouldn't do anything without first checking with my doctor (both personal and endo) about the effects.I did a search for info on cylaris, and the weight loss predictions sound like marketing hype.I can't find anywhere that their study proving their results is actually published.I can't find any information on how it actually works on your body, so it's hard to say what the effects on your diabetes control would be. Looking at the ingredients, it's made of herbs and soy and vitamins that you can get through FDA approved vitamin supplements.Their claims aren't fact-checked by anyone.Just a word of caution before you spend your hard-earned money on something which may not work.Regardless, the first thing I'd do is talk to your doctor about that pill. Continue reading >>

Low Carb And Weight Loss In Type 1 Diabetes

Low Carb And Weight Loss In Type 1 Diabetes

Tweet In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t automatically respond to meals by releasing insulin, this has to be done manually through taking injections or through bolus doses via insulin pump. If you’re looking to lose weight, this can give an advantage, in a way, as it allows you to review exactly how much insulin you’re taking each day. By contrast, people without type 1 diabetes have no good way of knowing how much insulin they have in their body. A good rule of thumb is that the more units of insulin you take per day, the more likely you are to put on weight. See also more general advice in our guide to weight loss on a low-carb diet Less insulin intake, improved weight management Say Jill and Michelle are roughly the same height and both have type 1 diabetes. Jill is taking 50 units per day and Michelle is taking 100 units per day. Generally speaking, it’s more likely that Jill will be finding it easier to manage her weight than Michelle. So, if you’re looking to lose weight, one way to achieve this is to modify your diet, or eating habits, so that you take less insulin whilst maintaining good blood control. Warning note: We need to make an important safety note that reducing your insulin whilst letting glucose levels go high for long periods of time is not a good idea at all. Doing this will lead to a much greater risk of very serious health problems such as retinopathy, neuropathy and kidney disease. Reducing insulin intake safely There are a number of ways insulin intake can be reduced in a safe way: Lower your carbohydrate intake Lower your protein intake -if you eat a lot of protein Increase physical activity Reduce snacking Out of these, reducing carbohydrate intake is likely to have the greatest effect. Lowering insulin doses should only be done if Continue reading >>

Pills To Lose Weight For Type 2 Diabetes

Pills To Lose Weight For Type 2 Diabetes

Obesity is a known risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The reasons for this are complex but include insulin resistance -- a problem with how the body responds to insulin, the hormone that normally helps metabolize blood sugar for energy. Weight loss has been established as the main way to reduce insulin resistance in people with both obesity and diabetes. Over the years, various medications in pill and injection form have been released that aim to help with weight loss and can benefit those with T2DM. While these interventions may help some individuals, a healthy lifestyle consisting of a balanced diet and regular exercise is the best long-term solution for losing weight with diabetes. Diabetes Medications -- Pills Certain medications prescribed for diabetes have the additional benefit of helping people lose weight. However, they have not been recommended for use as weight-loss medications alone. One example is metformin (Glucophage), the most common pill used to treat T2DM. Metformin is a member of the biguanide class of drugs, which act in multiple ways to lower blood sugar levels. It is not clear exactly how metformin causes weight loss, but a study in the April 2012 "Diabetes Care" showed that people with diabetes who took metformin for two years lost an average of 2 to 3 kg. Low blood sugar and gastrointestinal upset are possible side effects of metformin. Diabetes Medications -- Injectables Other diabetes drugs that aid weight loss are only available in injectable form. Exanatide (Byetta) and liraglutide (Victoza) are members of the drug class called incretin mimetics, also known as GLP-1 agonists. They treat T2DM by stimulating the pancreas to release insulin, thereby lowering blood sugar. They promote weight loss by decreasing appetite and slowing Continue reading >>

Are Diet Pills Safe To Use If I Have Diabetes?

Are Diet Pills Safe To Use If I Have Diabetes?

Diet pills are not recommended as a safe way to lose weight for anyone including people with diabetes. The ingredients in diet pills vary and some of the ingredients can have a negative effect on blood sugar levels. Some diet pills contain a large dose of caffeine which has been shown to raise blood sugar levels in people with Type 2 diabetes. The best method for losing weight is to reduce your calorie intake and increase your physical activity. Some steps to get started on a healthy weight loss regimen are as follows: do not skip meals-eat three meals/day; add more low carbohydrate containing vegetables to your meals; stay away from sugar sweetened beverages due to their higher calorie and lower nutrition content; watch your portion sizes of foods-use a 9 inch plate; increase your physical activity with doing things you enjoy like dancing or taking your kids or dog for a walk. Continue reading >>

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