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Diet For Hypoglycemia Without Diabetes

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Introduction Hypoglycemia is a condition when the blood sugar, or glucose, is too low. It is not a disease in and of itself, but an indicator of another health problem. Diabetics sometimes experience hypoglycemia when the pancreas overreacts to repeated high sugar intake by producing too much insulin. The excess insulin lowers blood sugar too much as the body strives to achieve proper glucose/insulin balance. Individuals without diabetes can also experience symptoms of hypoglycemia. Insulin is required to shuttle glucose into cells to be used as energy. This is particularly harmful to the brain, the most sensitive organ to blood sugar levels, which requires glucose solely as an energy source to think clearly. Hypoglycemia causes a change in the way the brain functions. Small fluctuations disturb one's feeling of well-being. Large fluctuations cause feelings of depression, anxiety, mood swings, fatigue and even aggressive behavior. Sugar balance is also needed for muscle contractions, the digestive function and nerve health. Hypoglycemia may also be a sign of adrenal fatigue. The adrenal hormone, cortisol, helps keep blood sugars at adequate levels. When the adrenals are fatigued, however, cortisol and blood sugar levels drop. Low blood sugar, in turn, can further stress the adrenals, creating a vicious cycle. Timing of meals and types of food become essential for balancing blood sugars. High quality protein intake becomes crucial. top Common Symptoms Manic/depressive psychological states; irritability; restlessness and insomnia; anxiety, depression and a feeling of going crazy; dizziness, general shakiness and trembling; ravenous hunger and craving for sweets; heart problems; lethargy or hyperactivity; nausea; blurry vision; frequent headaches or migraines; unusual nigh Continue reading >>

What Is Hypoglycemia?

What Is Hypoglycemia?

Hypoglycemia is a dangerous condition in which your blood sugar drops perilously low. Low blood sugar will most often make you feel shaky and weak. In extreme cases, you could lose consciousness and slip into a coma. People develop hypoglycemia for different reasons, but those with diabetes run the greatest risk of developing the condition. Glucose and Hypoglycemia Your body uses glucose as its main fuel source. Glucose is derived from food, and it's delivered to cells through the bloodstream. The body uses different hormones to regulate the amount of glucose in your blood. Glucagon, cortisol, and epinephrine are some hormones that help regulate glucose. Your body uses another hormone called insulin to help your cells absorb glucose and burn it for fuel. If your blood sugar level drops below a certain point, your body can develop various symptoms and sensations. For people with diabetes, this typically happens when blood sugar drops below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), although the exact level may vary from person to person. Causes of Hypoglycemia Low blood sugar often happens in people with diabetes who are using insulin or other medicines that increase insulin production or its actions. Too much insulin can make your blood glucose drop too low. Low blood sugar can happen if: Your body's supply of glucose is used up too quickly. Glucose is released into your bloodstream too slowly. There's too much insulin in your bloodstream. Hypoglycemia Symptoms Although no two people will have the exact same symptoms of low blood sugar, there are some common signs to watch out for: Sudden, intense hunger Dizziness or light-headedness Excessive sweating (often sudden and without regard to temperature) Shaking or tremors Sudden feelings of anxiety Irritability, mood swings, and Continue reading >>

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia refers to an abnormally low level of sugar, or glucose, in the blood. Hypoglycemia is not a disease in itself, it is a sign of a health problem. The brain uses a lot of energy and needs glucose to function. Because the brain cannot store or manufacture glucose, it needs a continuous supply. Signs of low blood sugar include hunger, trembling, heart racing, nausea, and sweating. Hypoglycemia is commonly linked with diabetes, but many other conditions can also cause low blood sugar. This article will discuss the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of hypoglycemia, and the difference between hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. We will also look at how to prevent it. Here are some key points about hypoglycemia. More detail is in the main article. Hypoglycemia is not a disease but a symptom of another condition. Early symptoms include hunger, sweating, and trembling. A common cause is diabetes. Alcohol abuse and kidney disorders can also lower blood sugar levels. What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition where there is not enough glucose, or sugar, in the blood. Levels of blood sugar are below 4 mmol/L (72mg/dL). Adults and children with mild hypoglycemia may experience the following early symptoms: hunger tremor or trembling sweating irritability a pale face heart palpitations accelerated heart rate tingling lips dizziness weakness Severe hypoglycemia is sometimes called diabetic shock. It may involve: concentration problems confusion irrational and disorderly behavior, similar to intoxication inability to eat or drink Complications If a person does not take action when symptoms of hypoclycemia appear, it can lead to: A person who regularly experiences hypoglycemia may become unaware that it is happening. They will not notice the warning signs, and this can lea Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Author: Frank W. Jackson, M.D. Purpose Hypoglycemia is the term for a blood glucose level that is lower than normal. When foods are digested in the body, they are broken down into many nutrients. These nutrients are absorbed into the bloodstream to be used in performing various body functions. One of these nutrients is glucose, a sugar that provides fuel to the body. The process that regulates the amount of sugar in the blood is complex. Adrenaline is a part of this complicated process. Everyone has experienced a rush of adrenaline at some time — that “love-at-first-sight” feeling, or the pounding heart after narrowly escaping an accident. Adrenaline is produced by the adrenal glands located on top of the kidneys. The sudden release of adrenaline is what causes the symptoms of hypoglycemia — apprehension, hunger, sweating, rapid heartbeat, and faintness. Hypoglycemia can occur from certain illnesses, such as liver disease and some types of tumors. These conditions cause a type of hypoglycemia called organic hypoglycemia. They usually require specific medical treatment or surgery. There is another type of hypoglycemia. In some people, the body simply responds differently to the digestion of foods. Some foods are digested and absorbed rapidly, resulting in a burst of glucose entering the bloodstream. In most people the body adjusts smoothly. It would be like two children trying to balance a see-saw. There may be a slight teetering or swinging up and down as the children shift their weight to achieve the balance. In some people, however, the response is like an actively rocking see-saw swinging up and down. The body over-reacts and sets the process in motion to reduce blood glucose. The result is a glucose level that is too low. Then the body releases adrenaline, i Continue reading >>

Reactive Hypoglycemia - Hypos After Eating

Reactive Hypoglycemia - Hypos After Eating

Tweet Reactive hypoglycemia is the general term for having a hypo after eating, which is when blood glucose levels become dangerously low following a meal. Also known as postprandial hypoglycemia, drops in blood sugar are usually recurrent and occur within four hours after eating. Reactive hypoglycemia can occur in both people with and without diabetes, and is thought to be more common in overweight individuals or those who have had gastric bypass surgery. What are the causes of reactive hypoglycemia? Scientists believe reactive hypoglycemia to be the result of too much insulin being produced and released by the pancreas following a large carbohydrate-based meal. This excess insulin production and secretion continues after the glucose derived from the meal has been digested, causing the amount of glucose in the bloodstream to fall to a lower-than-normal level. What causes this increase in pancreatic activity is unclear. One possible explanation is that in rare cases, a benign (non-cancerous) tumour in the pancreas may cause an overproduction of insulin, or too much glucose may be used up by the tumour itself. Another is that reactive hypoglycemia is caused by deficiencies in glucagon secretion. In the U.S. the National Institutes of Health (NIH) states that "the causes of most cases of reactive hypoglycemia are still open to debate". Signs and symptoms of reactive hypoglycemia Symptoms of reactive hypoglycemia can include: Anxiety Blurred vision Confusion Fatigue Headaches Heart palpitations Increased hunger Irritability Light-headedness Sleeping problems Sweating Weakness When talking about the signs of reactive hypoglycemia, it's important to note that many of these symptoms can be experienced without actually having low blood sugar. In fact, it is rare for such sympt Continue reading >>

4 Clues You Have Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

4 Clues You Have Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is often thought about as part of diabetes, but there is also non-diabetic hypoglycemia. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia is just as equally problematic. When blood sugar is too low, the cause is not as important as realizing the impact. Some of the effects of hypoglycemia are immediate while others take time to manifest, resulting in long term deficits in your health. What is Non-Diabetic Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, which again is the same as low blood sugar, is most often thought about in diabetics. This group of individuals often uses medications, including insulin, to lower their glucose, which is often high. When their glucose drops too low as a result of the medication, they are considered in a hypoglycemic state. However, an entire different segment of the population deals with non-diabetic hypoglycemia. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia occurs for reasons that are almost the exact opposite of why someone would develop diabetes. While diabetes arises as a result of excess carbohydrates in the diet, non-diabetic hypoglycemia occurs from a lack of carbohydrates in the diet. Carbohydrates are essential as the preferred energy source for our body. Yes, the total amount of carbohydrate and the source should factor in, but carbohydrates are necessary. In addition to not eating enough carbohydrates, insufficient production of hormones and neurotransmitters (nervous system communicators) can lead to non-diabetic hypoglycemia. Contrary to common medical thought, this does not require the presence of a named disease of the glands that produce the chemicals that helps us keep glucose balanced. 4 Clues that You May Have Non-Diabetic Hypoglycemia Fatigue: The Number One Symptom of Non-Diabetic Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is the same as low blood sugar. Blood Continue reading >>

Common Concerns About Low-carb Dieting And Hypoglycemia

Common Concerns About Low-carb Dieting And Hypoglycemia

I magine that you’re a few days into your low-carb diet and when you suddenly you begin to feel “off”. You’re experiencing “brain fog”, light-headedness, weakness, and mood swings. Thoughts race through your mind. I don’t feel right…could I be hypoglycemic? Oh no, my blood sugar is low. Maybe, I should drink some fruit juice… STOP! Hold it right there! There is a better solution, but first, let’s try and figure out what may be the cause. Why am I feeling this way? When I hear someone say that they are hypoglycemic, I often raise an eyebrow. It is possible for some to experience episodes of acute hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, but that term gets tossed around more than a hot potato. In fact, the medical field uses a variety of values in glycemic control as cut-off points in order to define hypo- or hyperglycemia. The cut-off values aren’t clear-cut[1]. If you have a true underlying medical cause, such as diabetes, or some other condition, then this article isn’t intended for you. This is for the rest of the population, most of whom may not even know what a common fasting blood glucose range is. When one begins The Carb Nite® Solution, Carb Backloading™, or any other low-carb diet, there are some foreign physiological changes that can occur, and it is normal to be concerned or aware of these shifts. The “feeling” that you’re experiencing may indeed be a drop in blood sugar. Even if it’s within the normal range, you may experience the symptoms of hypoglycemia. However, there could be other reasons that you aren’t feeling optimal. Improving metabolic flexibility to use fats for fuel, namely the rate at which fat oxidation adjusts to high fat intake, can vary[2-4]. You could also be experiencing a shift in electrolytes[5]. That being s Continue reading >>

Reactive Hypoglycemia

Reactive Hypoglycemia

Reactive hypoglycemia is a condition in which the body reacts to a perceived catastrophic drop in blood sugar. I say perceived because during an episode, the blood sugar readings may be in the normal range, but still "feel" like low blood sugar to the person having the reaction. In my experience, hypoglycemia happens to most people when first beginning a low carb, ketogenic diet. It may be especially strong in people who have already developed insulin resistance or pre-diabetes from a chronic excess of carbohydrate intake. There are different types of low blood sugar causes. Transient hypoglycemia normally happens when most people who have been eating a high carb diet drastically reduce carbohydrate intake for the first time. This type happens during the first several weeks of carb reduction because the body has not had time to create the enzymes or metabolic state to burn internal fat stores for fuel. Basically there is a gap in the amount of carbohydrate available for fuel, and the process of accessing fat stores for fuel. The lack of fuel sources results in transient low blood sugar. Reactive hypoglycemia is more of an acute reaction to a very high carb meal. For instance, when a person eats 2 or 3 glazed donuts, there is a huge spike in blood sugar and compensating insulin secretion after such a meal. The large insulin spike drives blood sugar very low several hours after the meal. How Reactive Hypoglycemia Happens Insulin, a hormone, is secreted from the pancreas in response to eating food, especially foods high in carbohydrates. Its main job is to move the sugar your body makes from the food you eat into your cells so that this excess sugar can be broken down for energy or stored. Insulin is a very powerful hormone, and it acts very quickly. The amount of insulin Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Definition The condition called hypoglycemia is literally translated as low blood sugar. Hypoglycemia occurs when blood sugar (or blood glucose) concentrations fall below a level necessary to properly support the body's need for energy and stability throughout its cells. Description Carbohydrates are the main dietary source of the glucose that is manufactured in the liver and absorbed into the bloodstream to fuel the body's cells and organs. Glucose concentration is controlled by hormones, primarily insulin and glucagon. Glucose concentration also is controlled by epinephrine (adrenalin) and norepinephrine, as well as growth hormone. If these regulators are not working properly, levels of blood sugar can become either excessive (as in hyperglycemia) or inadequate (as in hypoglycemia). If a person has a blood sugar level of 50 mg/dl or less, he or she is considered hypoglycemic, although glucose levels vary widely from one person to another. Hypoglycemia can occur in several ways. Drug-induced hypoglycemia Drug-induced hypoglycemia, a complication of diabetes, is the most commonly seen and most dangerous form of hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia occurs most often in diabetics who must inject insulin periodically to lower their blood sugar. While other diabetics also are vulnerable to low blood sugar episodes, they have a lower risk of a serious outcome than insulin-dependant diabetics. Unless recognized and treated immediately, severe hypoglycemia in the insulin-dependent diabetic can lead to generalized convulsions followed by amnesia and unconsciousness. Death, though rare, is a possible outcome. In insulin-dependent diabetics, hypoglycemia known as an insulin reaction or insulin shock can be caused by several factors. These include overmedicating with manufactured insulin, m Continue reading >>

Diet Plans For Hypoglycemia

Diet Plans For Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia means that you have low blood sugar. People with diabetes often experience low blood sugar levels. Certain medications, excessive alcohol consumption, some critical illnesses and hormone deficiencies can also cause hypoglycemia without diabetes. Reactive hypoglycemia is a condition that causes low blood sugar within a four-hour window after meals. Eating food raises your blood sugar levels, but people who have hypoglycemia make more insulin than is needed when they eat. This excess insulin leads to the drop in their blood sugar level. Hypoglycemia is a lifelong condition, but you can help manage its symptoms through your diet. Follow these rules of thumb: Eat small meals every 3 to 4 hours throughout the day, rather than 3 large meals per day. Avoid foods high in saturated fats or trans fats. Choose foods with a low glycemic index score. Reduce or eliminate processed and refined sugars from your diet. Choose complex carbohydrates over simple carbohydrates. Reduce or eliminate alcoholic drinks, and never mix alcohol with sugar-filled mixers, such as fruit juice. Eat lean protein. Eat foods high in soluble fiber. Here are some ideas for a diet plan for people with hypoglycemia. You should eat a small meal as soon as possible after waking. A good breakfast should consist of protein, such as scrambled eggs, plus a complex carbohydrate. Try these: hard boiled eggs and a slice of whole-grain bread with cinnamon (several small studies indicate that cinnamon may help reduce blood sugar) a small serving of steel-cut oatmeal, like this protein-packed oatmeal with blueberries, sunflower seeds, and agave plain Greek yogurt with berries, honey, and oatmeal In addition, be mindful of your consumption of juices. Stick to 100% juice varieties that do not have added sweeten Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Hypoglycemia For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Hypoglycemia is a condition you definitely have to pay attention to, but once you get in the habit of choosing healthy foods and avoiding processed foods that can wreak havoc with your blood sugar levels, you can enjoy a healthy lifestyle without too much thought. Making the transition can lead to cravings for the “old, bad” foods, but you can come up with strategies to deal with those and find that the cravings weaken over time. Foods to Choose if You’re Hypoglycemic You can help manage your hypoglycemia, often referred to as low blood sugar, by choosing foods that improve your condition. You can enjoy a variety of foods, and the foods in the following list are tasty and healthy: Organic meats (grass-fed, if possible), vegetables, and fruits whenever you can High-quality protein (fish, poultry, lean meat, free-range eggs) Fresh fruits, preferably with a meal or half an hour before. Eat blueberries and raspberries often; stone fruits, such as peaches and nectarines, are also good. You may not be able to tolerate fruit initially. If that’s the case, wait several months before trying again. Fresh vegetables, especially dark, leafy greens, lightly cooked or, as much as possible, raw Raw, unsalted, unseasoned nuts and seeds Alternative sweeteners, such as stevia Foods to Avoid if You’re Hypoglycemic Controlling low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, is easier if you just say no to foods that can throw your blood glucose levels out of whack. The following list of foods and food groups are those to avoid: Processed foods Fried foods MSG (monosodium glutamate) All soft drinks Artificial sweeteners such as aspartame (NutraSweet), sucralose (Splenda), and saccharine (Sweet’n Low) Hot dogs, sausages, and deli meats Having arguments or debates or discussing unpleasant topic Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Symptoms To Look Out For & Ways To Naturally Treat Them

Hypoglycemia Symptoms To Look Out For & Ways To Naturally Treat Them

Uncontrolled glucose levels are one of the most common health problems in the world. Hypoglycemia symptoms frequently affect people with prediabetes or diabetes but are also linked with other health problems, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol and even arthritis. And although it’s rarely mentioned, hypoglycemia has been called “an under-appreciated problem” that’s the most common and serious side effect of glucose-lowering diabetes drugs. (1) Those who are at risk for both hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia are not only people who are ill, overweight or inactive — anyone who consumes a poor diet and has trouble with normal glucose metabolism can develop symptoms. The standard American diet, which tends to be very high in things like refined grains and sugar but low in nutrients like healthy fats and fiber, contributes to hypoglycemia and related diseases. What are some clues you might be experiencing hypoglycemia symptoms, and what kind of things can you do to help manage them? Symptoms of hypoglycemia are often confused with other health conditions and can include sudden hunger, irritability, headaches, brain fog and shakiness. By managing your intake of empty calories, improving your diet, and paying attention to how meal timing and exercise affects you, you can help control low blood sugar symptoms and prevent them from returning. What Is Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition caused by low blood sugar levels, also sometimes referred to as low glucose. Glucose is mostly found in carbohydrate foods and those containing sugar and is considered to be one of the most important sources of energy for the body. (2) Here’s an overview of how glucose works once it enters the body and the process of how our hormones regulate blood sugar levels: When we Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Diet

Hypoglycemia Diet

The Importance of Individualizing your Hypoglycemia Diet – an excerpt from The Do’s and Don’ts of Hypoglycemia: An Everyday Guide to Low Blood Sugar by Roberta Ruggiero There are many books on hypoglycemia diet. If you’ve read some of them, by now you’re aware that many disagree on what type of diet to follow. It’s indeed confusing if you read one book and it tells you to eat a high protein/low carbohydrate diet, while another book says to consume low protein/high carbohydrate foods. Where does that leave you, the confused and bewildered hypoglycemic? First of all, I am sure that each author has enough confirmation and evidence that his or her diet is successful. Most likely, they all are. This is probably due to the fact that the big offenders (sugar, white flour, alcohol, caffeine and tobacco) are eliminated and six small meals are consumed instead. But the key to a successful hypoglycemia diet lies in its “individualization.” Each one of us is different. Each one of us is biochemically unique. Therefore, every diet must be tailor-made to meet our individual nutritional requirements. The list of foods your physician gives you or the list you may read in your favorite book on hypoglycemia, even the suggested food list in the back of this book, are basic guidelines. Variations come with time and patience, trial and error. Don’t be afraid to listen to your body. It will send you signals when it cannot tolerate a food. So basically, stick to the suggestions in the following do’s and don’ts, and hopefully, with just a few adjustments during your course of treatment, a new and healthier you will gradually appear. DO… DO — Keep a daily account of everything you eat for one week to ten days. In one column, list every bit of food, drink and medication Continue reading >>

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Non-diabetic hypoglycemia is a condition that causes the sugar (glucose) in your blood to drop too low. This can happen in people who do not have diabetes. The 2 types of non-diabetic hypoglycemia are fasting hypoglycemia and reactive hypoglycemia. Fasting hypoglycemia often happens after the person goes without food for 8 hours or longer. Reactive hypoglycemia usually happens about 2 to 4 hours after a meal. When your blood sugar level is low, your muscles and brain cells do not have enough energy to work well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Fasting hypoglycemia: Certain medicines or herbal supplements such as fenugreek, ginseng, or cinnamon Alcohol Exercise Medical conditions such as liver disease, hypothyroidism, and tumors Eating disorders or malnutrition Stomach surgery or hemodialysis Reactive hypoglycemia: The causes of reactive hypoglycemia may be unknown. Hyperinsulinism Meals high in refined carbohydrates such as white bread or foods high in sugar Prediabetes Any surgery of the digestive system What are the signs and symptoms of non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Blurred vision or changes in vision Dizziness, lightheadedness, or shakiness Fatigue and weakness Fast or pounding heartbeat Sweating more than usual Headache Nausea or hunger Anxiety, Irritability, or confusion How is non-diabetic hypoglycemia diagnosed? Blood tests are done to measure your blood sugar levels. These tests may also be done to find the cause of your hypoglycemia. Fasting tests may be done. You may have an overnight fasting test or a 72-hour fasting test. After you have fasted overnight, your blood sugar levels will be tested 2 times. For a 72-hour fasting test, you will not be given food for a period of up to 72 hours. During th Continue reading >>

Diet For Hypoglycemia Without Diabetes

Diet For Hypoglycemia Without Diabetes

The type of hypoglycemia that occurs in people without diabetes is referred to as reactive hypoglycemia. Reactive hypoglycemia would be the results of too much insulin secreted or not enough glucagon released after a meal, which lead to low blood sugar levels a few hours after eating. If you blood sugars are too low -- below 70 mg/dL -- you may feel dizzy, light-headed, tired, hungry and confused. A few changes to your diet can help you prevent reactive hypoglycemia. Video of the Day Instead of eating two to three large meals, split your food intake into five to six smaller meals. Eating too much at once can stimulate the overproduction of insulin and increase your risk of experiencing an hypoglycemic episode. Space your meals evenly throughout the day, every two to three hours, and don't forget to reduce the amounts of food you eat at each meal to avoid gaining weight. For example, if your lunch usually is a sandwich, an apple and a yogurt, divide your meal into two parts. Have the first part at one time and save the remaining for later. Choose Low-Glycemic Index Carbohydrates Carbohydrate-containing foods with a high-glycemic index make your blood sugar levels peak, overstimulate the secretion of insulin and can often result in reactive hypoglycemia within a few hours. Avoid processed and refined carbohydrates such as white flours, white bread, breakfast cereals, crackers, baked goods, sweets and desserts. Replace these foods with low-glycemic index carbohydrates that will help you stabilize your blood sugar levels. Low-glycemic index carbohydrate foods include old-fashioned oatmeal, steel-cut oat, stone-ground whole grain flour, sourdough bread, temperate climate fruit, barley, quinoa, basmati rice and whole-grain pasta. Never eat carbohydrates on alone. Protein help Continue reading >>

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