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Diet For High Triglycerides And Type 2 Diabetes

How Triglycerides Affect Your Risk Of Diabetes

How Triglycerides Affect Your Risk Of Diabetes

No one wants type 2 diabetes. It’s a condition that affects your whole body and gets progressively worse, possibly leading to loss of vision and feeling (especially in your feet and fingertips), as well as kidney disease and heart disease. Having high triglycerides makes it more likely that you will develop diabetes, though. Luckily, with some effort, you have a good chance of lowering your triglycerides -- which, at the same time, can help you lower your chance of getting diabetes. High triglycerides don't cause diabetes. Instead, their levels indicate that your system for turning food into energy isn't working properly. Normally, your body makes insulin, which “escorts” glucose -- the type of sugar in your blood --inside your cells. There, your body turns glucose into energy. Insulin also allows your body to use triglycerides for energy. A common cause of high triglycerides is excess carbohydrates in your diet. High TG’s signals insulin resistance; that’s when you have excess insulin and blood sugar isn’t responding in normal ways to insulin. This results in higher than normal blood sugar levels. If you have insulin resistance, you’re one step closer to type 2 diabetes. If you also are overweight, eat a lot of sugary and starchy foods, or don’t exercise, your insulin resistance can be worse. You can reverse your tracks by following the exercise and meal plan your doctor recommends to lower your triglycerides and by taking prescribed medicine. Your doctor can check your blood sugar (also called glucose) levels, by taking a sample of your blood after you’ve fasted, which means you haven’t eaten for at least 8 hours. The doctor may also test the level of glucose in your blood with a special blood test called A1c. The result shows the average level of Continue reading >>

High Blood Fats And Diabetes:

High Blood Fats And Diabetes:

By now, people who are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes – as well as many in the general population – know that the disease can lead to a host of medical issues, among them eye problems, kidney disease and nerve damage which may lead to amputations. What is perhaps less known is that there is a direct relationship between diabetes and high lipid (fat) levels in the bloodstream. This condition, commonly referred to as lipid disorders, is caused by a combination of genetic predisposition and dietary intake and is an abnormality with both good and bad cholesterol and triglycerides. Cholesterol is a soft, waxy substance not readily soluble in water and produced within all cells in the body. Cholesterol is necessary for normal cell and body function, however very high levels of it can lead to plaque buildup in arteries and eventually may cause blockage of blood flow. Cholesterol comes in two major forms: high-density lipoproteins (HDL)—often referred to as the “good cholesterol”—which removes fats and cholesterol from the serum and cells and transfers them back to the liver for reuse or excretion, and low-density lipoproteins (LDL), the “bad cholesterol,” which is the leftover cholesterol after it has provided substances to the cells to create hormones and to strengthen cell membranes (the wall of the cell). The leftover LDL is also reabsorbed by special receptors on the surface of the liver. Triglycerides (TG) are a type of primary fat which provides energy to the appropriate tissues in the body. TG are formed in the liver and are found in the blood. Excess TG are stored in fat cells to use as energy when needed. When the body needs a source of energy, the liver breaks down glucose and signals the fat cells to release fatty acids it has stored as triglycerides Continue reading >>

Adopting Healthy Diet Can Help Reverse Risk Of High Triglycerides, Despite Genetic Predisposition

Adopting Healthy Diet Can Help Reverse Risk Of High Triglycerides, Despite Genetic Predisposition

Triglycerides, a type of fat in the blood, are important for good health. But having high triglycerides might increase a person's risk of heart disease, and may be a sign of metabolic syndrome--a combination of high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and too much fat accumulation at the waist. People with metabolic syndrome have increased risk for heart disease, diabetes, and stroke. A new study from nutrition researchers at the University of Illinois shows that some individuals with variations of a "gene of interest" may be at an even higher risk of developing high triglycerides. Specifically, researchers looked at genetics and risk in a group of young Mexican adults. Despite genetic predisposition, the study shows that maintaining a healthy body weight or changing diet can help reverse the risk. Katie Robinson, a former doctoral student in the U of I Division of Nutritional Sciences and fellow of the I-TOPP program, explains that the study, published in the Journal of Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics, is a collaboration between the University of Illinois and the Autonomous University of San Luis Potosi in Mexico (UASLP), also known as UP AMIGOS. "Obesity is a growing problem in the U.S. and Mexico. In the U.S., obesity affects over a third of our population. We're concerned because obesity is associated with other diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and high triglycerides," Robinson explains. Compared to Caucasian groups, Hispanics in the U.S. have higher rates of type 2 diabetes and other obesity-related diseases. Of all Hispanic subgroups, those of Mexican heritage have one of the highest risks for obesity and associated diseases." The UP AMIGOS project addresses genetic and environmental factors associated with obesity and related conditions among younger adult Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Diabetes

The Ketogenic Diet And Diabetes

The ketogenic diet was originally developed almost 100 years ago to treat epilepsy. Nowadays, it is used as a nutrition plan by health-conscious men and women to optimize body composition and athletic performance. Recent research suggests that high fat, very-low carb diets have another benefit: They may help control glucose, triglycerides, insulin, and body weight in people with diabetes. The research below shows the ketogenic diet may be an effective tool you can use to manage symptoms of Diabetes, alongside exercise and medication. Cutting through the Fat: What is Diabetes? Before we get to research, we need to review some basic medical terminology. Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases in which the body has elevated blood levels its main energy source: a sugar called glucose. There are two reasons why this occurs. In some people, there is insufficient production of a chemical called insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that lower levels of glucose in the blood. People who suffer from low insulin levels have type I diabetes and they comprise approximately 5 to 10% of all diabetics. [1] Type I diabetes is usually inherited and type I diabetics usually have to inject insulin to maintain proper levels of blood glucose. The other 90% to 95% of people with diabetes are type II diabetics. [1] In this version, the body doesn’t produce enough insulin for proper function or cells in the body do not react to insulin and take in sugar from the blood. Type 2 diabetes is not inherited. However, lifestyle factors such as high body weight, poor exercise and eating habits all increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. [2] It can be managed by improving dietary and lifestyle habits and also using proper medication. [2] Diabetes results in a higher concentration of s Continue reading >>

How To Lower High Triglycerides

How To Lower High Triglycerides

Triglycerides are the most common fat in the body. Most of the foods that people eat, whether from animal or plant sources, can have an impact on the levels of triglycerides in the blood. There are many different types of fats, from polyunsaturated fats found in olive oil to the saturated fats found in red meat. They all contribute to triglyceride levels in the body, but they do so in different ways. When a person eats more calories than their body needs, the body stores these extra calories in the form of triglyceride fats. Then later, when the body needs more energy, it consumes these fats instead of needing more calories. Triglycerides are important for health, but high levels of triglycerides in the body can lead to conditions such as heart disease, which is the leading cause of death in the United States. Taking steps to lower triglyceride levels and reduce other risk factors can decrease a person's chances of developing heart disease. It is important to understand triglyceride levels in order to adjust them. The normal range for triglyceride levels is considered to be less than 150 milligrams per deciliter. At-risk levels are anywhere from 150-199 milligrams per deciliter, and high triglyceride levels range from 200-499 milligrams per deciliter. Anything above 500 milligrams per deciliter is considered very high. Ways to lower triglyceride levels There are many ways to reduce triglyceride levels safely. These can depend on the reasons why triglyceride levels are high in the first place. If an individual regularly consumes more calories than the body can burn, it will result in an excess of triglycerides in the body. One way to lower triglyceride levels in the blood is to reduce the overall number of calories ingested every day. According to the American Heart Asso Continue reading >>

High Triglycerides – How To Lower Triglycerides

High Triglycerides – How To Lower Triglycerides

Triglycerides are important organic compounds. Most of the fat we consume in our diet is triglyceride and so too is most of the fat we store in our body. Fatty acids contained in triglycerides are an essential source of energy for our cells. Triglyceride concentration can be measured in blood and may provide valuable information about metabolism and general health. High levels may reflect underlying metabolic disorders and evidence shows that high blood triglycerides are associated with increased risk of heart disease (1,2,3). Just like other types of fats, triglycerides are transported in the bloodstream by lipoproteins. Lipoproteins consist of cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids and protein. The lipoproteins act as carriers transporting fats to the organs of the body. Chylomicrons and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) are examples of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that blood levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are causally related to the development of coronary heart disease (4). Although high triglycerides may be caused by inherited or inborn lipid disorders, they often result from acquired metabolic abnormalities that can to a large extent be corrected by lifestyle change. Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins High blood levels of triglycerides are most often associated with high levels of the two most important triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; chylomicrons and VLDL. Chylomicrons are formed in the intestine after a meal. They contain triglycerides and small amounts of cholesterol. Chylomicrons are subsequently broken down by an enzyme called lipoprotein lipase into free fatty acids that are utilized for energy production by the heart and skeletal muscles or stored in fat (adipose) tissue. The chylomicron remnant Continue reading >>

Triglycerides

Triglycerides

Where can I find a dietitian who works with people who have high triglycerides? I recently had a cholesterol blood test performed and I wanted to ask a few questions. First of all, my results: Total cholesterol 187mg/dL Triglycerides 360 mg/dL HDL cholesterol 29 mg/dL LDL cholesterol 86 mg/dL I understand that my total cholesterol below 200 is okay, HDL is low, LDL is okay, and triglycerides are high. I exercise 5-6 times a week taking aerobics. I weigh 176 pounds, height is 5 feet 8 inches. I've been at a high level of exercise (1 hour aerobics + some extra time) for over 1 year, and I've lost 25 pounds. I lost most of the weight during the first 3 months of my current program, and have been stable at 176 pounds for many months. I have much more muscle definition now than when I started this program. I'm 38 and have done various forms of exercise most of my life. Questions: What makes the triglycerides high in the blood? I don't believe I eat a lot of fatty foods, and I don't drink. I also don't drink many soft drinks. What might make my triglyceride blood level high? What can be done to improve HDL levels? Thank you for your comments. I am a type 2 diabetic and recovering from a stroke. My doctor feels that my triglyceride level calls for a TYPE 4 hyperlipoprotein diet. Can you provide this or direct me to an online source, as I have difficulty getting to a library? Keep up the good work! My triglycerides are over 700. My cholesterol was normal. I have done everything to bring it under 700. I cut out sweets, sugar and my cokes to only 2 a day Is that still to many? I am 60 lb. overweight. I have cut fat percent to 15 grams a day and calories to 1700. I exercise 4 times a week for 30 min. I have been doing this for a year. Why can't I loose the weight and bring my trig Continue reading >>

Natural Ways To Lower Your Cholesterol

Natural Ways To Lower Your Cholesterol

High cholesterol has long been known to raise the risk of heart and blood vessel disease in people with diabetes and without. Unfortunately, it’s very common among Americans generally, including those with diabetes. The good news is that there’s a lot you can do to lower your cholesterol and, consequently, lower your risk of heart disease. Making the effort to lower blood cholesterol is especially important for people with diabetes — Type 1 or Type 2 — who have a higher risk of heart disease than the general public. The bad guy: LDL Your LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol is the culprit when it comes to raising the risk of heart disease. LDL stands for low-density lipoprotein, and if you have too much of it in your blood, it can build up along the insides of your artery walls, leading to the formation of fatty deposits called plaque. Plaque makes it harder for blood to flow through your arteries, which means that less blood can get to vital organs, such as your heart and brain. Sometimes this can lead to a heart attack or a stroke. Plaque can also rupture, triggering the formation of blood clots, which can also block the arteries, leading to a heart attack or stroke. So it makes sense to keep your LDL level low. The American Diabetes Association recommends that most adults with diabetes who are not taking cholesterol-lowering statins have a fasting lipid profile done at diagnosis, first medical evaluation, and thenevery five years after, while those taking statins should have the test done when they start the medication and periodically thereafter. This test measures HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol, as well as the level of triglycerides (a type of blood fat) in the blood. HDL cholesterol above 50 mg/dl, LDL cholesterol below 100 mg/dl, and triglycerides below 150 mg Continue reading >>

Low Hdl And High Triglycerides Increase Risk Of Kidney Disease

Low Hdl And High Triglycerides Increase Risk Of Kidney Disease

These factors are tied to increased nephropathy risk in type 2 diabetes patients. Despite the achievement of blood glucose, blood pressure, and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) targets, the risk for diabetic kidney disease (DKD) remains high among patients with type 2 diabetes. This observational retrospective study investigated whether diabetic dyslipidemia—that is, high triglyceride (TG) and/or low HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels—contributes to this high residual risk for DKD. Among a total of 47,177 patients attending Italian diabetes centers, 15,362 patients with a baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2, normoalbuminuria, and LDL-C ≤130 mg/dL completing a 4-year follow-up were analyzed. The primary outcome was the incidence of DKD, defined as either low eGFR (<60 mL/min/1.73 m2) or an eGFR reduction >30% and/or albuminuria. Having low HDL cholesterol levels and high triglyceride levels can indicate a higher risk of developing diabetic kidney disease (DKD) in people with type 2 diabetes, according to an Italian study. HDL cholesterol is sometimes referred to as the ‘good cholesterol’ because having higher level of HDL cholesterol is linked with better health. In the early stages of kidney disease, there are no symptoms; but if allowed to progress, signs such as breathlessness, water retention (such as swollen ankles) and malnutrition will appear in the later stages of the condition. With the right interventions, kidney disease can be halted, which is why it is important that people with diabetes have their kidney function tested each year. In the study, none of the participants had any sign of kidney disease at the start of the study, and were monitored over four years. Through the study, the patients were monitored for the onset of Continue reading >>

Management Of Raised Triglycerides

Management Of Raised Triglycerides

Referral to secondary care (or seek specialist advice) if triglycerides > =10 mmol/l urgent referral (or urgent specialist advice) is indicated if > 20 mmol/l secondary causes (e.g. high alcohol, uncontrolled diabetes, drugs such as isotretinoin) should be identified and treated appropriately together with a reduction in alcohol and a low total fat diet. For more details regarding secondary causes then see linked item effective triglyceride lowering therapies include: high doses of marine omega 3 fatty acids such as Omacor 4 capsules/day or Maxepa 10 capsules/day are effective in severe hypertriglyceridaemia or a fibrate (2) in lipoprotein lipase deficiency pharmacological interventions are ineffective and a strict low total fat diet is required which can be supplemented with medium chain triglycerides.This requires expert dietetic advice a concensus guidance of hypertriglyceridaemia has been developed (1) for any patient with increased levels of triglycerides, the following laboratory investigations should be ordered: urine dipstick test (protein could indicate nephrotic syndrome; glucose could indicate diabetes) repeat fasting lipid profile, fasting blood glucose, liver function tests, renal function tests, thyroid function tests creatine kinase (especially if you are considering prescribing a fibrate with or without a statin) note that high levels of triglycerides can lead to a falsely low sodium measurement if raised cholesterol and raised triglyceride (combined hyperlipidaemia) approach to management can be stratified according to the extent of hypertriglyceridaemia: different guidelines state different levels when a patient should be referred for specialist advice: a concensus guideline concerning reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease and pancreatitis (1) st Continue reading >>

How Food Affects High Triglycerides

How Food Affects High Triglycerides

For those diagnosed with high triglycerides, it’s important to take action to lower your levels and improve your heart health. Triglyceride is just a fancy word for fat — the fat in our bodies is stored in the form of triglycerides. Triglycerides are found in foods and manufactured in our bodies. Normal triglyceride levels are defined as less than 150 mg/dL; 150 to 199 is considered borderline high; 200 to 499 is high; and 500 or higher is officially called very high. To me, anything over 150 is a red flag indicating my client needs to take immediate steps to get the situation under control. High triglyceride levels make blood thicker and stickier, which means that it is more likely to form clots. Studies have shown that triglyceride levels are associated with increased risks of cardiovascular disease and stroke — in both men and women — alone or in combination with other risk factors (high triglycerides combined with high LDL cholesterol can be a particularly deadly combination). For example, in one ground–breaking study, high triglycerides alone increased the risk of cardiovascular disease by 14 percent in men, and by 37 percent in women. But when the test subjects also had low HDL cholesterol (that’s the good cholesterol) and other risk factors, high triglycerides increased the risk of disease by 32 percent in men and 76 percent in women. Fortunately, triglycerides can often be easily controlled with several diet and lifestyle changes — many of the same changes that I outlined in my High Blood Pressure and High Cholesterol sections. What Factors Can Increase Triglycerides? As with cholesterol, eating too much of the wrong kinds of fats will raise your blood triglycerides. Therefore, it’s important to restrict the amounts of saturated fats and trans fa Continue reading >>

Changes In Triglyceride Levels Over Time And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes In Young Men

Changes In Triglyceride Levels Over Time And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes In Young Men

Go to: Abstract OBJECTIVE—The association between changes in triglyceride concentrations over time and diabetes is unknown. We assessed whether two triglyceride determinations obtained 5 years apart can predict incident type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Triglyceride levels at baseline (time 1) and 5 years later (time 2), followed by subsequent follow-up of 5.5 years, were measured in 13,953 apparently healthy men (age 26–45 years) with triglycerides <300 mg/dl (<3.39 mmol/l). RESULTS—During 76,742 person-years, 322 cases of diabetes occurred. A multivariate model adjusted for age, BMI, total cholesterol–to–HDL cholesterol ratio, family history of diabetes, fasting glucose, blood pressure, physical activity, and smoking status revealed a continuous independent rise in incident diabetes with increasing time 1 triglyceride levels (Ptrend < 0.001). Men in the lowest tertile of time 1 triglyceride levels who progressed to the highest tertile over follow-up (low-high) exhibited a hazard ratio (HR) of 12.62 (95% CI 3.52–31.34) compared with those remaining in the lowest tertile at both time points (reference group: low-low). Whereas men who were at the top triglyceride level tertile throughout follow-up (high-high) had a HR for diabetes of 7.08 (2.52–14.45), those whose triglyceride level decreased to the lowest tertile (high-low) exhibited a HR of 1.97 (0.67–6.13). Alterations in triglyceride levels during follow-up were associated with changes in BMI, physical activity, and eating breakfast habit (P < 0.05), but remained an independent modifier of diabetes risk even after adjustment for such changes. CONCLUSIONS—Two measurements of fasting triglyceride levels obtained 5 years apart can assist in identifying apparently healthy young men at incre Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cholesterol: Triglycerides, Ldl And Hdl…some Important News

Diabetes And Cholesterol: Triglycerides, Ldl And Hdl…some Important News

There are many factors to type 2 diabetes that make it a tough disease to understand and handle. But when you start to educate yourself on all of the other things that come into play you start to feel empowered. Well, the same is true with one of the major risk factors in type 2 diabetes. This factor is cholesterol (medical term lipids) and is often below the surface, but can lead to many other things that happen down the road in type 2 diabetes. When I speak of type 2 diabetes and cholesterol here, I’m talking about LDL, HDL and triglycerides. With a good understanding of this information I hope you are able to use this material to control and prevent many of the other complications from happening. Diabetes And Cholesterol Explained First things first, cholesterol abnormalities equal added risk for cardiovascular problems with type 2 diabetes. This leads to many of the bad things you hear about such as heart attack and stroke. The reason for this is because cholesterol problems lead to damaged and clogged arteries and high blood pressure. It is very common for people with type 2 diabetes to have high triglycerides, low HDL (good cholesterol) and high LDL (bad cholesterol). This abnormal cholesterol pattern in medical terms is called dyslipidemia. When you go to the doctor and you do blood work, your doctor will order a test to look at your cholesterol numbers. This is pretty much standard practice. In fact, most doctors have told me that they always see a relationship between bad blood sugar control in type 2 diabetes and bad cholesterol numbers. And for the most part, bad cholesterol numbers are caused by insulin resistance, the same thing that causes high blood sugar. Cholesterol And Genetics It is Key that you control your blood sugar because in most cases you can Continue reading >>

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

Figuring out the best foods to eat when you have diabetes can be tough. The main goal is to keep blood sugar levels well-controlled. However, it's also important to eat foods that help prevent diabetes complications like heart disease. Here are the 16 best foods for diabetics, both type 1 and type 2. Fatty fish is one of the healthiest foods on the planet. Salmon, sardines, herring, anchovies and mackerel are great sources of the omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA, which have major benefits for heart health. Getting enough of these fats on a regular basis is especially important for diabetics, who have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke (1). DHA and EPA protect the cells that line your blood vessels, reduce markers of inflammation and improve the way your arteries function after eating (2, 3, 4, 5). A number of observational studies suggest that people who eat fatty fish regularly have a lower risk of heart failure and are less likely to die from heart disease (6, 7). In studies, older men and women who consumed fatty fish 5–7 days per week for 8 weeks had significant reductions in triglycerides and inflammatory markers (8, 9). Fish is also a great source of high-quality protein, which helps you feel full and increases your metabolic rate (10). Fatty fish contain omega-3 fats that reduce inflammation and other risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Leafy green vegetables are extremely nutritious and low in calories. They're also very low in digestible carbs, which raise your blood sugar levels. Spinach, kale and other leafy greens are good sources of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C. In one study, increasing vitamin C intake reduced inflammatory markers and fasting blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure Continue reading >>

Hypertriglyceridemia

Hypertriglyceridemia

Practice Essentials Hypertriglyceridemia, a condition in which triglyceride levels are elevated, is a common disorder in the United States. It is often caused or exacerbated by uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, obesity, and sedentary habits, all of which are more prevalent in industrialized societies than in developing nations. In epidemiologic and interventional studies, hypertriglyceridemia is a risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). Hyperlipoproteinemia is a metabolic disorder characterized by abnormally elevated concentrations of specific lipoprotein particles in the plasma. Hyperlipidemia (ie, elevated plasma cholesterol or triglyceride levels or both) is present in all hyperlipoproteinemias. The primary form includes chylomicronemia, hypercholesterolemia, dysbetalipoproteinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, mixed hyperlipoproteinemia, and combined hyperlipoproteinemia. Other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, pancreatitis, renal disease, and hypothyroidism, cause the secondary form. Signs and symptoms Hypertriglyceridemia is usually asymptomatic until triglycerides are greater than 1000-2000 mg/dL. Signs and symptoms may include the following: See Clinical Presentation for more detail. Diagnosis On examination, findings may be normal, or they may include the following: GI: Tenderness to palpation over mid-epigastric or upper right/left quadrants; hepatomegaly Dermatologic: Eruptive xanthomas on back (see the image below), buttocks, chest, proximal extremities; palmar xanthomas in dysbetalipoproteinemia Cardiovascular: Decreased pedal pulses or ankle/brachial index in presence of peripheral vascular disease Neurologic: Memory loss, dementia, and depression in the presence of chylomicronemia syndrome Testing Laboratory studies used to evaluate hypertriglyceridemia Continue reading >>

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