diabetestalk.net

Diet For High Blood Pressure And High Cholesterol And Diabetes

Cholesterol & Diabetes

Cholesterol & Diabetes

Most adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are at high risk for cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack and stroke. People with diabetes have an increased risk of these diseases even if their low-density lipoprotein, or LDL ("bad") cholesterol, is “normal.” They have an even higher risk if their LDL-cholesterol is elevated. Definitions Cardiovascular disease: Damage to the heart and blood vessels. One cause is narrowing of the blood vessels due to fat deposits on the vessel walls, which limits blood flow. Cholesterol: A fat substance that is naturally present in your blood and cells. There are two main types of cholesterol: LDL and HDL. LDL (low-density lipoprotein): Often called “bad” cholesterol because higher levels of LDL can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. HDL (high-density lipoprotein): Often called “good” cholesterol because higher levels of HDL can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Triglyceride: A form of fat that the body makes from sugar, alcohol or other food sources. Have you had your cholesterol tested lately? Adults with diabetes should have their cholesterol tested yearly or as indicated by your health-care provider. More frequent testing may be necessary for people taking cholesterol medications. Always discuss your cholesterol results with your doctor and other members of your health-care team. Have you been told that you have high cholesterol? High cholesterol usually refers to high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. The main goal is to lower LDL-cholesterol. Check with your health-care provider to find out if you should be on medication to accomplish this. Weight management, healthy eating and regular physical activity will also help you reach this goal. Diabetes management requires good blood glucose (sugar), blood pr Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure (hypertension) Signs, Causes, Diet, And Treatment

High Blood Pressure (hypertension) Signs, Causes, Diet, And Treatment

What is high blood pressure? What is normal blood pressure? High blood pressure (hypertension) is defined as high pressure (tension) in the arteries, which are the vessels that carry blood from the heart to the rest of the body. Blood pressure readings are given as two numbers: The systolic blood pressure (the top number) equals the pressure in the arteries as the heart contracts. The diastolic pressure (the bottom number) is the pressure in the arteries as the heart relaxes. Normal blood pressure is below 120/80. In 2017, the American College of Cardiology released new guidelines for high blood pressure. Blood pressure between 120/80 and 129/80 is elevated blood pressure, and a blood pressure of 130/80 or above is considered high. Complications of high blood pressure include heart disease, kidney (renal) disease, hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis or arteriosclerosis), eye damage, and stroke (brain damage). Hypertension is a major public health problem. With the new guidelines for defining high blood presure, The American Heart Association estimates high blood pressure affects nearly half of all adults (46%) in the United States. High Blood Pressure Symptoms, Causes, Treatments It is beneficial to add potassium to the diet. Studies show that people who consume more potassium have lower blood pressures. Good sources of potassium include: bananas, melons, oranges, spinach and zucchini. Along with lowering salt in the diet, a balanced eating plan that also reduces cholesterol intake and fatty foods is recommended. The TLC Diet (Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes) often is recommended to lower blood cholesterol. What do blood pressure readings mean? (blood pressure readings chart) Blood pressure readings can vary in a single person throughout the day depending on the si Continue reading >>

Natural Ways To Lower Your Cholesterol

Natural Ways To Lower Your Cholesterol

High cholesterol has long been known to raise the risk of heart and blood vessel disease in people with diabetes and without. Unfortunately, it’s very common among Americans generally, including those with diabetes. The good news is that there’s a lot you can do to lower your cholesterol and, consequently, lower your risk of heart disease. Making the effort to lower blood cholesterol is especially important for people with diabetes — Type 1 or Type 2 — who have a higher risk of heart disease than the general public. The bad guy: LDL Your LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol is the culprit when it comes to raising the risk of heart disease. LDL stands for low-density lipoprotein, and if you have too much of it in your blood, it can build up along the insides of your artery walls, leading to the formation of fatty deposits called plaque. Plaque makes it harder for blood to flow through your arteries, which means that less blood can get to vital organs, such as your heart and brain. Sometimes this can lead to a heart attack or a stroke. Plaque can also rupture, triggering the formation of blood clots, which can also block the arteries, leading to a heart attack or stroke. So it makes sense to keep your LDL level low. The American Diabetes Association recommends that most adults with diabetes who are not taking cholesterol-lowering statins have a fasting lipid profile done at diagnosis, first medical evaluation, and thenevery five years after, while those taking statins should have the test done when they start the medication and periodically thereafter. This test measures HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol, as well as the level of triglycerides (a type of blood fat) in the blood. HDL cholesterol above 50 mg/dl, LDL cholesterol below 100 mg/dl, and triglycerides below 150 mg Continue reading >>

About Your Diet: Salt And Cholesterol

About Your Diet: Salt And Cholesterol

Heart disease and strokes are two to four times more common in people with diabetes than in people without. A healthy diet, low in salt and fat, can help minimize this risk. When you have too much cholesterol in your bloodstream, it builds up in your artery walls, causing them to narrow - reducing and possibly blocking the flow of blood. If the blood flow becomes completely cut off to the heart or brain, this will lead to a heart attack or stroke. It is important to control your blood cholesterol. Although some fat is part of a healthy diet, the type of fat you eat is important in controlling your cholesterol level. A simple way to look at this is to break fats down into bad fats and good fats. Fats that come from animals and some vegetable oils are often considered bad fats. These fats can quickly build up in your arteries increasing your chances of a heart attack or stroke. Your body does require some fat. Small amounts of good fats such as nuts, seeds and oily fish are part of a healthy diet but they should be consumed in moderation. A key factor leading to heart and stroke is high blood pressure. When you eat foods high in salt, your blood pressure increases putting a strain on your arteries. With high blood pressure, your heart pumps harder to circulate blood. This causes damage to your heart and blood vessels throughout the body leading to complications such as heart attack, stroke, kidney failure, impaired vision and aneurysms. A substantial amount salt intake comes in packaged food. Read food labels closely, looking for foods with little or no added salt, often referred to, as sodium. A healthy lifestyle, including regular activity, and a diet low in fat and salt, along with taking your prescribed medication, can help control your cholesterol level and lower you Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure Diet: What You Should Be Eating To Lower Reading In Two Weeks

High Blood Pressure Diet: What You Should Be Eating To Lower Reading In Two Weeks

However, diet is a key way people can make changes to their health. The DASH diet, which stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, is said to be able to lower their blood pressure reading in two weeks, experts have claimed, but yields better results in the long term. The DASH diet includes vegetables, fruits and low-fat dairy products and vegetable oil. It also consists of wholegrains, fish, poultry, nuts and beans. People on the diet should be limiting food high in saturated fat, full fat dairy products and tropical oils including coconut oil and palm oil, and stopping eating sugar-sweetened food and drinks. The DASH eating plan includes: Six to eight daily servings of grains a day One service is includes 1oz of dry cereal, or half a cup of cooked rice or pasta Six servings or less of meat, poultry or fish a day One serving equates to roughly 1oz cooked meat or one egg Between four and five serving of vegetables a day A serving is one cup of leafy vegetables or half a cup of cooked vegetables Between four and five servings of fruit a day One serving is one medium fruit or 1/4 cup of dried fruit Two to three Low fat or fat-free dairy products a day A serving includes one cup of milk or yoghurt Two to three daily servings of fats and oils One serving equates to one tablespoon mayonnaise or a teaspoon of vegetable oil Eating seeds, nuts, dry beans and peas four to five times a week One serving equates to 1/3 cup of nuts Thu, June 8, 2017 High blood pressure: Here are the risk factors you should be aware of. On average, adults in the UK eat about 8.1g of salt (3.2g sodium) a day. To reduce the risk of high blood pressure, it is recommended that adults should not be eating more than 6g of salt - the equivalent of 2.4g sodium a day. The plan, which is recommended b Continue reading >>

Diets To Lower High Blood Sugar & High Cholesterol

Diets To Lower High Blood Sugar & High Cholesterol

High blood sugar and cholesterol can lead to serious conditions. Uncontrolled high blood sugar can put you on a course toward diabetes and complications such as heart disease, kidney disease, blindness and amputations, according to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse. High cholesterol is a risk factor for heart disease. A healthy diet, along with any other lifestyle changes your doctor recommends, can help you lower high blood sugar and cholesterol. Video of the Day Losing weight if you are overweight or obese can lower high blood sugar and cholesterol levels. The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse states that if you have prediabetes, you are likely to develop diabetes within 10 years unless you make lifestyle changes, such as losing excess weight. Losing as little as 5 percent to 7 percent of your body weight can help prevent the development of diabetes. Reduce your calorie consumption to lose weight by emphasizing vegetables, fruits and lean proteins. Compared to the typical American diet, prudent diet patterns tend to be higher in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and healthy fats. They are lower in sweets, sugar-sweetened beverages and other sources of added sugars, red meat and solid fats, such as butter. According to research published in July 2012 in the “Journal of Research in Medical Sciences,” higher consumption of fruits, vegetables, nuts and whole grains -- combined with lower consumption of red meat -- can help prevent diabetes. Increased fiber consumption can help lower cholesterol. Research has shown that the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension eating pattern not only lowers high blood pressure but also reduces the risk for heart disease. The pattern may also help reduce hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, according to the 2012 Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

If you have diabetes you should aim to keep your blood pressure well controlled. Having high blood pressure (hypertension) is one of several risk factors that can increase your chance of developing heart disease, a stroke and some other complications. Treatment includes a change in lifestyle risk factors where these can be improved. Many people with diabetes need to take medication to lower their blood pressure. How common is high blood pressure in people with diabetes? In the UK, about half of all people aged over 65, and about 1 in 4 of all middle-aged adults, have high blood pressure (hypertension). It is less common in younger adults. High blood pressure is more common in people with diabetes. Around 3 in 10 people with type 1 diabetes and around 8 in 10 people with type 2 diabetes develop high blood pressure at some stage. People with diabetes are more at risk of developing high blood pressure if they: Are of African-Caribbean origin. Are from the Indian sub-continent. Have a family history of high blood pressure. Have certain lifestyle factors - for example, those who: Are overweight. Eat a lot of salt. Do not eat much fruit and vegetables. Do not take much exercise. Drink a lot of alcohol. What is high blood pressure? This is not as simple to answer as it may seem. In general, the higher the blood pressure, the greater the risk to health. Depending on various factors, the level at which blood pressure is said to be high (hypertension) can vary from person to person. The cut-off point for blood pressure that is said to be high is 140/80 mm Hg or above for people with diabetes and 130/80 mm Hg for those with diabetes and complications (for example, kidney disease). These are lower than the cut-off point for people who do not have diabetes. Note: high blood pressure Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure Diet & Natural Remedies

High Blood Pressure Diet & Natural Remedies

Are you one of the millions of people unknowingly living with high blood pressure? You’re not alone. About one in every three American adults deals with the condition, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (1) The good news is a high blood pressure diagnosis doesn’t mean you’re destined for a life of prescription medications. It’s relatively easy to lower blood pressure naturally, especially by improving your diet in order follow a high blood pressure diet. If you’ve been diagnosed with high blood pressure or you’re just hoping to prevent it from developing in the future, a high blood pressure diet is one of the most important things to address. A healthy diet is the key natural remedy for high blood pressure, especially since it’s completely safe, simple and works fast to improve your overall health beyond just your blood pressure. The High Blood Pressure Diet: How to Improve Your Diet to Lower High Blood Pressure Research shows that about 50 percent of people with high blood pressure fail to control their condition, either because they aren’t aware of the problem or they haven’t made lifestyle changes that promote overall heart health. It might seem daunting to overhaul your whole life to help control your high blood pressure — for example, by taking prescriptions, eating differently, lowering stress and exercising. But you’ll be happy to learn that it’s usually surprisingly easy for many people to help tackle high blood pressure just by making some simple changes. For example, people following a high blood pressure diet like the DASH diet over time have been able to lower their systolic blood pressure by seven to 12 points, a significant amount that can make a big difference. This can be accomplished in stages through ve Continue reading >>

Dash Diet: Healthy Eating To Lower Your Blood Pressure

Dash Diet: Healthy Eating To Lower Your Blood Pressure

The DASH diet emphasizes portion size, eating a variety of foods and getting the right amount of nutrients. Discover how DASH can improve your health and lower your blood pressure. DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. The DASH diet is a lifelong approach to healthy eating that's designed to help treat or prevent high blood pressure (hypertension). The DASH diet encourages you to reduce the sodium in your diet and eat a variety of foods rich in nutrients that help lower blood pressure, such as potassium, calcium and magnesium. By following the DASH diet, you may be able to reduce your blood pressure by a few points in just two weeks. Over time, your systolic blood pressure could drop by eight to 14 points, which can make a significant difference in your health risks. Because the DASH diet is a healthy way of eating, it offers health benefits besides just lowering blood pressure. The DASH diet is also in line with dietary recommendations to prevent osteoporosis, cancer, heart disease, stroke and diabetes. DASH diet: Sodium levels The DASH diet emphasizes vegetables, fruits and low-fat dairy foods — and moderate amounts of whole grains, fish, poultry and nuts. In addition to the standard DASH diet, there is also a lower sodium version of the diet. You can choose the version of the diet that meets your health needs: Standard DASH diet. You can consume up to 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium a day. Lower sodium DASH diet. You can consume up to 1,500 mg of sodium a day. Both versions of the DASH diet aim to reduce the amount of sodium in your diet compared with what you might get in a typical American diet, which can amount to a whopping 3,400 mg of sodium a day or more. The standard DASH diet meets the recommendation from the Dietary Guidelines for Americ Continue reading >>

Is There A Diet For Diabetes, High Cholesterol And High Blood Pressure, As Well As Type 2 Diabetes, Gerd, And Coumadin?

Is There A Diet For Diabetes, High Cholesterol And High Blood Pressure, As Well As Type 2 Diabetes, Gerd, And Coumadin?

In our household we have members with high blood pressure, high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, reflux, and Coumadin use. Your Dr. Gourmet Diet Plan program sounded like a custom combination could be made to cover all of us. However, the diabetic, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure diets are not choices. The 4 of us range in age from 28-64 and need to lose 50 - 100 pounds. We are motivated to get started if only we could come up with a diet that would work for all of us. What would you suggest we do? Your website could be a lifesaver for all of us. Dr. Gourmet Says... We now know that the most effective diet for all three of the issues you mention is Mediterranean style diet. There is tremendous research to show that eating this way can effectively treat diabetes, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. All of the recipes on the Dr. Gourmet web site are based on Mediterranean diet principles and we translate those principles to familiar American recipes for you. You can read about this by using The Dr. Gourmet Diet Plan Coaching program, a collection of brief essays on how to eat healthy. You are correct that a lot of folks who have these sorts of problems also have other challenges like acid reflux or are taking Coumadin (warfarin). This is why we have tagged every recipe to let you know how a dish might affect other conditions. We have set up The Dr. Gourmet Diet Plan planner to create two week meal plans for all the members of your household. You can get started by registering here. We have lots of folks who write us to tell their stories of how they have lost weight and had improvements in their blood sugars and blood pressure. We'd love to hear from you as y'all work to get healthier. Write to us at [email protected] Thanks for writing, Timothy S. Harla Continue reading >>

Shopping List For Diabetics

Shopping List For Diabetics

Control Type 2 Diabetes, Shed Fat Our Shopping List for Diabetics is based on the Pritikin Eating Plan, regarded worldwide as among the healthiest diets on earth. The Pritikin Program has been documented in more than 100 studies in peer-reviewed medical journals to prevent and control many of our nation’s leading killers – heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and obesity as well as type 2 diabetes. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, pay special attention. Research on newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics coming to the Pritikin Longevity Center illustrate how profoundly beneficial early intervention can be. Scientists from UCLA followed 243 people in the early stages of diabetes (not yet on medications). Within three weeks of coming to Pritikin, their fasting blood sugar (glucose) plummeted on average from 160 to 124. Research has also found that the Pritikin Program reduces fasting insulin by 25 to 40%. Shopping List for Diabetics – More Features Here’s another big plus to our Shopping List for Diabetics. In addition to icons that are diabetes-focused like “sugar free,” this list uses icons like “low cholesterol” and “low sodium” because many people with diabetes are working to control not just diabetes but related conditions like high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure. This list can help you identify those foods most advantageous in helping you reach your personal health goals. Diabetic Food Taboos? Not Anymore! Have you been told you have to give up juicy watermelon or sweet grapes? What if we told you those foods really aren’t taboo? Watch the Video Our Healthy Shopping List for Diabetics also lists the top 10 things to put back on the shelf if you’re trying to: Lose Weight Lower Blood Pres Continue reading >>

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

Figuring out the best foods to eat when you have diabetes can be tough. The main goal is to keep blood sugar levels well-controlled. However, it's also important to eat foods that help prevent diabetes complications like heart disease. Here are the 16 best foods for diabetics, both type 1 and type 2. Fatty fish is one of the healthiest foods on the planet. Salmon, sardines, herring, anchovies and mackerel are great sources of the omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA, which have major benefits for heart health. Getting enough of these fats on a regular basis is especially important for diabetics, who have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke (1). DHA and EPA protect the cells that line your blood vessels, reduce markers of inflammation and improve the way your arteries function after eating (2, 3, 4, 5). A number of observational studies suggest that people who eat fatty fish regularly have a lower risk of heart failure and are less likely to die from heart disease (6, 7). In studies, older men and women who consumed fatty fish 5–7 days per week for 8 weeks had significant reductions in triglycerides and inflammatory markers (8, 9). Fish is also a great source of high-quality protein, which helps you feel full and increases your metabolic rate (10). Fatty fish contain omega-3 fats that reduce inflammation and other risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Leafy green vegetables are extremely nutritious and low in calories. They're also very low in digestible carbs, which raise your blood sugar levels. Spinach, kale and other leafy greens are good sources of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C. In one study, increasing vitamin C intake reduced inflammatory markers and fasting blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure Continue reading >>

How Obesity, High Cholesterol, And Metabolic Syndrome Are Related

How Obesity, High Cholesterol, And Metabolic Syndrome Are Related

We all know that both obesity and high cholesterol are bad for your heart health. But combine them with one or more other health problems — such as high blood pressure or high blood sugar — and these health risks can create a perfect storm known as metabolic syndrome. Although preventable and treatable, metabolic syndrome increases your likelihood of having serious health problems later, including coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, heart attack, and stroke, according to the American Heart Association (AHA). Unfortunately, the older you are, the more likely you are to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome, which currently affects about one-third of all adults in the United States. What Is Metabolic Syndrome? The word "metabolic" is used when talking about how your body uses food and makes energy, and metabolic syndrome describes a group of factors or conditions that raise your risk for heart disease and other health problems, such as diabetes and stroke. You may be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome if you have three or more of the following, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: Abdominal Obesity This refers to excess belly fat, or carrying a lot of extra weight around your middle. A waistline of 40 inches or more for a man, and 35 inches or more for a woman, increases heart disease risk. Having too much belly fat is more of a risk indicator than having fat in other places on your body. High Blood Sugar This ooccurs when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal when measured while fasting (without any food or drink in your system). Blood glucose higher than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) increases risk of heart disease. High Triglycerides Levels Having too much of this type of fat in your blood raises your heart disease risk. Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure: Major Risk Factor For Heart Disease

High Blood Pressure: Major Risk Factor For Heart Disease

High blood pressure, or hypertension, is one of the top 4 silent killers because it has no early significant symptoms. The American Heart Association estimates that up to one third of people living with high blood pressure are unaware of the fact that their blood pressure is high, and many people are unaware of the risks of high blood pressure. The danger from high blood pressure is the extra load on the heart, leading to complications such as hypertensive heart disease. High blood pressure can also seriously damage the kidneys. And it does all this silently, without any major symptoms, except when the high blood pressure gets extreme. High blood pressure is usually one of the first signs that the cardiovascular system is lacking key nutrients and is under serious stress and deterioration. This is due to the heart’s extra force required to push the blood through the arteries eventually causing damage to the inner lining of the arteries. This, in turn, causes inflammation and oxidative stress, leaving the arteries susceptible to the buildup of fatty plaque that can narrow or block the arteries and reduce blood flow to the body’s organs. In some men, this can lead to erectile dysfunction, which may be an early sign of endothelial dysfunction, which is a precursor to cardiovascular disease. However, because of the success and popularity of ED drugs such as Viagara and Cialis, most men fail to address their cardiovascular health. As a result, a heart attack or a stroke is imminent unless there is some form of intervention, e. g. dietary, lifestyle changes. WARNING! When left untreated, high blood pressure can lead to cardiovascular disease (aka heart disease), congestive heart failure (CHF), kidney damage, heart failure, stroke, and loss of vision from damage to the ret Continue reading >>

6 Best Tips To Lower Blood Pressure When You Have Diabetes

6 Best Tips To Lower Blood Pressure When You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes, you’ve probably already started counting carbs and exercising more to keep your blood sugar stable. But you may be neglecting another, often silent problem that can go hand-in-hand with diabetes: high blood pressure. Also known as hypertension, the condition occurs in as many as two-thirds of people with diabetes. If you have both conditions and either is out of control, your risk of blood vessel damage increases, heightening the likelihood of complications like heart attack, stroke or kidney failure. If both conditions are unmanaged, the risk is even greater. Here are six suggestions to help keep your blood pressure in check. RELATED: Have Diabetes? Why You Need to Know Your Blood Pressure Numbers 1. Get up and move Exercise is an important part of any healthy lifestyle. It strengthens the heart and makes it pump more efficiently, so it is particularly critical if you have hypertension. To improve cardiovascular health and maintain your weight, try to get 150 minutes each week of aerobic activity. You want to spread this over at least three days, with no more than two consecutive days without exercise. This can include walking, cycling and swimming. 2. Eat fresh, natural foods If you find yourself struggling to figure out which foods in the grocery aisles have too much sodium, here’s a good tip to follow: Food in its natural state is best. Skip over processed foods and opt for fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and lean meats. 3. Reduce salt If you are planning to start a low-sodium diet (no more than 1,500 mg per day), the first step is to get rid of the salt shaker. In its place, use salt-free herbs, spices and other seasonings. It’s also important to watch for hidden sodium in the foods you eat. The following items are typically hi Continue reading >>

More in diabetic diet