diabetestalk.net

Diet For High Blood Pressure And High Cholesterol And Diabetes

High Blood Pressure: Major Risk Factor For Heart Disease

High Blood Pressure: Major Risk Factor For Heart Disease

High blood pressure, or hypertension, is one of the top 4 silent killers because it has no early significant symptoms. The American Heart Association estimates that up to one third of people living with high blood pressure are unaware of the fact that their blood pressure is high, and many people are unaware of the risks of high blood pressure. The danger from high blood pressure is the extra load on the heart, leading to complications such as hypertensive heart disease. High blood pressure can also seriously damage the kidneys. And it does all this silently, without any major symptoms, except when the high blood pressure gets extreme. High blood pressure is usually one of the first signs that the cardiovascular system is lacking key nutrients and is under serious stress and deterioration. This is due to the heart’s extra force required to push the blood through the arteries eventually causing damage to the inner lining of the arteries. This, in turn, causes inflammation and oxidative stress, leaving the arteries susceptible to the buildup of fatty plaque that can narrow or block the arteries and reduce blood flow to the body’s organs. In some men, this can lead to erectile dysfunction, which may be an early sign of endothelial dysfunction, which is a precursor to cardiovascular disease. However, because of the success and popularity of ED drugs such as Viagara and Cialis, most men fail to address their cardiovascular health. As a result, a heart attack or a stroke is imminent unless there is some form of intervention, e. g. dietary, lifestyle changes. WARNING! When left untreated, high blood pressure can lead to cardiovascular disease (aka heart disease), congestive heart failure (CHF), kidney damage, heart failure, stroke, and loss of vision from damage to the ret Continue reading >>

How To Cut Down On Medications

How To Cut Down On Medications

What if you could cut back on the prescription drugs you take for blood pressure, cholesterol, or type 2 diabetes? It may be possible, with your doctor's support. The trick is to make lifestyle changes that have a big impact on your health. These seven steps will help. 1. Make better eating convenient. Heart-healthy eating boils down to a few simple steps: Stay away from refined sugars. Eat more nuts, fiber, and fish, which are sources of healthy fats. It sounds so simple, right? But first, you need to get those items in your pantry, fridge, car, workplace, and anywhere else you spend a lot of time. What's in there right now? Is it supporting your goals for how you want to eat? If not, it's time to rethink and restock. 2. Read when you shop. Check the nutrition facts label on anything that comes in a bag, box, or can. Packaged foods can have a lot of sodium in them, and there are often lower-sodium options you could buy instead. Making that shift, and reaching for the saltshaker less often, can make a big difference. Cutting back on sodium can start to improve your blood pressure quickly -- in about a month, says Houston cardiologist John Higgins. 3. Strengthen your most important muscle. It's your heart. And the way you make it stronger is just like any other muscle: Make it work harder. You do that by moving more. It can be a formal workout, or it can just be part of your day. Maybe you take your dog on a hike, or take a dance break when you're doing your chores at home. Maybe you try an online yoga video, or dust off the bike in your garage. Whatever you do, you're making your heart stronger, helping to lower your blood pressure, and starting to get your blood sugar level to where you want it to be. Moving more can cut down on the amount of insulin you need, lower yo Continue reading >>

Microsoft Word - Dysglycemic Diet.doc

Microsoft Word - Dysglycemic Diet.doc

Best Foods for Diabetes, High Cholesterol, High Blood Pressure, and Weight All these conditions involve a genetic sensitivity to refined carbohydrates. In many people, refined carbohydrates leads to abnormally high and low blood sugar levels, a condition called dysglycemia. This information sheet helps you reduce this abnormal response. Did you know that what you eat is a critical determinant of how much you eat? Whether you want to lose weight, or want to maintain your present healthy weight, choosing the right kinds of foods will help you achieve your goals. Let's leave calorie counting to the mathematicians. If you are overweight, you know what happens when you ask your doctor for help. The usual response is "follow this diet and get more exercise.†That doesn't work all by itself, does it? That is because it is based on a partial truth - that the reason people gain weight is that they eat too much and exercise too little. Let's look at the facts. The fact my overweight patients have been telling me for years is "Doc, it's my metabolism." Let’s see how and why your food choices influence that metabolism, so that you can know what to eat, and what not to eat, to improve your health and lose weight. First, I suggest you watch our videotape on weight gain. You can borrow it from our receptionist. Here is part of the script for that videotape… �������� � ������ ������������������������������������������ “To help you understand what to do about this kind of metabolism, Continue reading >>

About Your Diet: Salt And Cholesterol

About Your Diet: Salt And Cholesterol

Heart disease and strokes are two to four times more common in people with diabetes than in people without. A healthy diet, low in salt and fat, can help minimize this risk. When you have too much cholesterol in your bloodstream, it builds up in your artery walls, causing them to narrow - reducing and possibly blocking the flow of blood. If the blood flow becomes completely cut off to the heart or brain, this will lead to a heart attack or stroke. It is important to control your blood cholesterol. Although some fat is part of a healthy diet, the type of fat you eat is important in controlling your cholesterol level. A simple way to look at this is to break fats down into bad fats and good fats. Fats that come from animals and some vegetable oils are often considered bad fats. These fats can quickly build up in your arteries increasing your chances of a heart attack or stroke. Your body does require some fat. Small amounts of good fats such as nuts, seeds and oily fish are part of a healthy diet but they should be consumed in moderation. A key factor leading to heart and stroke is high blood pressure. When you eat foods high in salt, your blood pressure increases putting a strain on your arteries. With high blood pressure, your heart pumps harder to circulate blood. This causes damage to your heart and blood vessels throughout the body leading to complications such as heart attack, stroke, kidney failure, impaired vision and aneurysms. A substantial amount salt intake comes in packaged food. Read food labels closely, looking for foods with little or no added salt, often referred to, as sodium. A healthy lifestyle, including regular activity, and a diet low in fat and salt, along with taking your prescribed medication, can help control your cholesterol level and lower you Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure, High Cholesterol, And Diabetes Risk May Be Lowered With Brisk Walking: Study

High Blood Pressure, High Cholesterol, And Diabetes Risk May Be Lowered With Brisk Walking: Study

Home » Heart Health » High blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes risk may be lowered with brisk walking: Study High blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes risk may be lowered with brisk walking. The researchers found that the impact of brisk walking is similar to that of running, which means, regardless of your fitness level or age, you can still manage to successfully lower your blood pressure and cholesterol, and control your diabetes with an activity as easy as walking. The researchers analyzed 33,060 runners and 15,045 walkers. They found the same amount of energy used for moderate-intensity walking and vigorous-intensity running yielded similar results when it came to controlling blood pressure, cholesterol, and diabetes. Principal investigator Paul T. Williams said, “Walking and running provide an ideal test of the health benefits of moderate-intensity walking and vigorous-intensity running because they involve the same muscle groups and the same activities performed at different intensities. The more the runners ran and the walkers walked, the better off they were in health benefits. If the amount of energy expended was the same between the two groups, then the health benefits were comparable.” Williams added, “Walking may be a more sustainable activity for some people when compared to running, however, those who choose running end up exercising twice as much as those that choose walking. This is probably because they can do twice as much in an hour.” The study offers an alternative way of exercising, which eliminates excuses that one can’t do it. Exercise to manage heart-related conditions: Previous studies The risk of type 2 diabetes is lower in people partaking in brisk walks. The study found that brisk walking may actually be more Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure (hypertension)

High Blood Pressure (hypertension)

Tweet High blood pressure, or hypertension, is common in people with diabetes. Reports from 2012 show that high blood pressure affects 50% of people with diabetes. Blood pressure is important as it is linked with a higher risk of diabetes complications. The symptoms of blood pressure may not show unless blood pressure becomes very high and so it is important that your blood pressure level is checked each year. Target blood pressure levels The first number in a blood pressure reading is known as the systolic reading, which is the pressure of your blood when your heart beats. The second number is the diastolic reading, which is the blood pressure between heart beats. The blood pressure targets set by NICE are slightly different depending on your type of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes: Below 135/85 mmHg If you have diabetic nephropathy (kidney disease) or two signs of metabolic syndrome, the target is 130/80 mmHg. Type 2 diabetes: Below 140/80 mmHg If you have nephropathy, retinopathy or have cerebrovascular disease (which includes stroke) the target is 130/80 mmHg. The NHS regards an ideal blood pressure reading as being below 120/80mmHg. The target is to get your blood pressure below both of these numbers. Symptoms The NHS notes that high blood pressure is a 'silent killer' [47] as there are often no obvious high blood pressure symptoms. However, very high blood pressure could result in: Headaches Nosebleed Blurred vision Difficulty breathing Diagnosis of high blood pressure Diagnosis of high blood pressure is usually diagnosed by a doctor or nurse taking your blood pressure level via a pressurised sleeve put around your arm. The test can be taken quickly; however, it’s important that you are calm and rested when the test is performed. If the reading is high, the doctor or Continue reading >>

Diet For High Blood Pressure And High Uric Acid (gout): Restrict Intake Of High-purine Foods

Diet For High Blood Pressure And High Uric Acid (gout): Restrict Intake Of High-purine Foods

Previous Page: Diet for high blood pressure and coronary heart disease:Calorie and protein intake should not be too high. High uric acid (hyperuricemia) is also called gout. With the improvement of living standards, changes in diet, high purine foods intake increasing, gout prevalence rate increased gradually. If high blood pressure patients find a slight elevation in the level of uric acid, they can adjust their diets to reduce the intake of purine, thereby lowering the level of uric acid. High blood pressure patients with moderately elevated uric acid need to control diets and receive medication. Patients with high blood pressure and gout should pay attention to their diet. Scientific and reasonable diets can help relieve symptoms and prevent recurrence, while poor diets will aggravate diseases. Develop Healthy Eating Habits for high blood pressure and high uric acid The intake of the amount of purine-containing food should be limited, and animal foods containing relatively high levels of purine should not be consumed frequently. Fish should be consumed two or three times a week, because fish are rich in taurine and methionine, which regulate blood pressure by increasing the discharge of the amount of sodium in the urine, thereby lowering the blood pressure. While it should be noted that fish with a low level of purine should be consumed. When high blood pressure and high uric acid patients' conditions are in remission, their daily intake of fat should not exceed 50 grams, intake of meat should not exceed 100 grams. You should drink less broth, fish soup, chicken soup, these foods contain a large amount of purine. Diet for high blood pressure and high uric acid: Do's and Dont's Eat more alkaline foods , such as fresh vegetables, fruit, milk, etc. These foods can adjus Continue reading >>

Healthy Recipes

Healthy Recipes

Good nutrition is one way to reduce your risk of developing heart disease and stroke. Making these healthy but tasty dishes at home can help you control your cholesterol levels, blood pressure or diabetes. We've created these recipes to help you prepare meals that not only taste great, but are good for you. Recipes for Cholesterol Management These recipes will help you avoid excess saturated and trans fat while enjoying mouth-watering foods. Recipes for Blood Pressure Management You won't miss the salt when you taste these dishes. Recipes for Diabetes Management Living with type 2 diabetes means that eating a healthy, balanced diet can be a challenge. More Heart-Healthy Recipes Find even more tasty bites that will make your heart and taste buds happy. Continue reading >>

Cholesterol & Diabetes

Cholesterol & Diabetes

Most adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are at high risk for cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack and stroke. People with diabetes have an increased risk of these diseases even if their low-density lipoprotein, or LDL ("bad") cholesterol, is “normal.” They have an even higher risk if their LDL-cholesterol is elevated. Definitions Cardiovascular disease: Damage to the heart and blood vessels. One cause is narrowing of the blood vessels due to fat deposits on the vessel walls, which limits blood flow. Cholesterol: A fat substance that is naturally present in your blood and cells. There are two main types of cholesterol: LDL and HDL. LDL (low-density lipoprotein): Often called “bad” cholesterol because higher levels of LDL can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. HDL (high-density lipoprotein): Often called “good” cholesterol because higher levels of HDL can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Triglyceride: A form of fat that the body makes from sugar, alcohol or other food sources. Have you had your cholesterol tested lately? Adults with diabetes should have their cholesterol tested yearly or as indicated by your health-care provider. More frequent testing may be necessary for people taking cholesterol medications. Always discuss your cholesterol results with your doctor and other members of your health-care team. Have you been told that you have high cholesterol? High cholesterol usually refers to high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. The main goal is to lower LDL-cholesterol. Check with your health-care provider to find out if you should be on medication to accomplish this. Weight management, healthy eating and regular physical activity will also help you reach this goal. Diabetes management requires good blood glucose (sugar), blood pr Continue reading >>

Easy Ways To Lower Cholesterol And Reduce Blood Pressure

Easy Ways To Lower Cholesterol And Reduce Blood Pressure

6 tips for getting your heart in shape from an NFL nutritionist. You might think you don’t have much in common with professional football players, but it when it comes keeping your heart healthy, you’d be smart to follow the same advice that Leslie Bonci, R.D., nutritionist for the Pittsburgh Steelers, gives the team. These heart-healthy “plays” can help you lower your cholesterol, reduce your blood pressure and improve your overall health. 1. Get Trim Steelers backup quarterback Charlie Batch dropped 12 pounds and reduced his total cholesterol about 20 percent between the end of one season and the start of the next. (Major diet changes: making better choices when eating out; swapping wine in place of apple martinis, sugar free Jell-O for gummy worms and popcorn for Doritos.) Losing as little as 5 to 10 percent of your body weight can result in better blood pressure, lower risk for diabetes and improved cholesterol levels, according to various research studies. When Pittsburgh Steeler Casey Hampton (a.k.a. “Big Snack”) arrived at training camp a few years ago too heavy to play, team nutritionist Leslie Bonci worked with the team’s chef to create meals designed to slash Hampton’s intake of calories and saturated fats, which can elevate “bad” LDL cholesterol, leading to plaque buildup in arteries. In place of fried chicken wings, Bonci gave Hampton grilled chicken strips with low-fat dipping sauces. Other ways to reduce saturated fat: replace butter with olive and canola oils, which contain good amounts of heart healthy monounsaturated fats; choose lean meats, poultry, fish and beans instead of higher fat meats; select nonfat or low-fat milk and yogurt in place of whole-milk versions; eat full-fat cheeses sparingly. Avoid trans fats, which also increas Continue reading >>

Got Diabetes And High Blood Pressure? 9 Diet Tips

Got Diabetes And High Blood Pressure? 9 Diet Tips

Two out of three people with diabetes also have high blood pressure. Keeping your diet in check -- counting carbs, limiting sugar, eating less salt -- is key. You can still eat well and manage your conditions with these easy tips. Since you have high blood pressure, you should get no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium per day. That's less than a teaspoon. So retrain taste buds. Instead of reaching for the saltshaker, flavor food with citrus zest, garlic, rosemary, ginger, jalapeno peppers, oregano, or cumin. Cooking at home also helps. “If you’re eating something from a bag or box or off a restaurant menu, chances are you’re getting too much sodium,” says Janet Bond Brill, PhD, RD, author of Blood Pressure Down. To get in the habit of having a balanced diet, “visualize your plate as a clock,” says Amber L. Taylor, MD, who directs The Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. Fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables. A quarter gets lean protein like baked fish, beans, or chicken. The last quarter holds grains, preferably whole, like brown rice. You’ll still need to count carbohydrates and make sure you're not getting too much sodium. Caffeine can raise your blood sugar and blood pressure. If you have higher blood sugar or blood pressure after drinking coffee, “limit your caffeine intake to 200 milligrams -- about 2 cups of coffee -- a day,” says Torey Jones Armul, RD, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Skip the French press or espresso and choose coffee made with a paper filter. The paper soaks up an oily compound in coffee beans called cafestol, which can hike up cholesterol. You can also consider switching to decaf. “Some research suggests it can reduce blood sugar,” Armul says. Continue reading >>

How Obesity, High Cholesterol, And Metabolic Syndrome Are Related

How Obesity, High Cholesterol, And Metabolic Syndrome Are Related

We all know that both obesity and high cholesterol are bad for your heart health. But combine them with one or more other health problems — such as high blood pressure or high blood sugar — and these health risks can create a perfect storm known as metabolic syndrome. Although preventable and treatable, metabolic syndrome increases your likelihood of having serious health problems later, including coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, heart attack, and stroke, according to the American Heart Association (AHA). Unfortunately, the older you are, the more likely you are to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome, which currently affects about one-third of all adults in the United States. What Is Metabolic Syndrome? The word "metabolic" is used when talking about how your body uses food and makes energy, and metabolic syndrome describes a group of factors or conditions that raise your risk for heart disease and other health problems, such as diabetes and stroke. You may be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome if you have three or more of the following, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: Abdominal Obesity This refers to excess belly fat, or carrying a lot of extra weight around your middle. A waistline of 40 inches or more for a man, and 35 inches or more for a woman, increases heart disease risk. Having too much belly fat is more of a risk indicator than having fat in other places on your body. High Blood Sugar This ooccurs when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal when measured while fasting (without any food or drink in your system). Blood glucose higher than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) increases risk of heart disease. High Triglycerides Levels Having too much of this type of fat in your blood raises your heart disease risk. Continue reading >>

6 Best Tips To Lower Blood Pressure When You Have Diabetes

6 Best Tips To Lower Blood Pressure When You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes, you’ve probably already started counting carbs and exercising more to keep your blood sugar stable. But you may be neglecting another, often silent problem that can go hand-in-hand with diabetes: high blood pressure. Also known as hypertension, the condition occurs in as many as two-thirds of people with diabetes. If you have both conditions and either is out of control, your risk of blood vessel damage increases, heightening the likelihood of complications like heart attack, stroke or kidney failure. If both conditions are unmanaged, the risk is even greater. Here are six suggestions to help keep your blood pressure in check. RELATED: Have Diabetes? Why You Need to Know Your Blood Pressure Numbers 1. Get up and move Exercise is an important part of any healthy lifestyle. It strengthens the heart and makes it pump more efficiently, so it is particularly critical if you have hypertension. To improve cardiovascular health and maintain your weight, try to get 150 minutes each week of aerobic activity. You want to spread this over at least three days, with no more than two consecutive days without exercise. This can include walking, cycling and swimming. 2. Eat fresh, natural foods If you find yourself struggling to figure out which foods in the grocery aisles have too much sodium, here’s a good tip to follow: Food in its natural state is best. Skip over processed foods and opt for fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and lean meats. 3. Reduce salt If you are planning to start a low-sodium diet (no more than 1,500 mg per day), the first step is to get rid of the salt shaker. In its place, use salt-free herbs, spices and other seasonings. It’s also important to watch for hidden sodium in the foods you eat. The following items are typically hi Continue reading >>

Natural Treatments For The Most Common Medical Problems.

Natural Treatments For The Most Common Medical Problems.

The lifestyle advice that helps our clients (and can help you, too). Wondering about natural treatments for high cholesterol? Blood pressure? Diabetes? Autoimmune disease? Thyroid? Lots of clients come to us after being diagnosed with something new (and scary). We help them eat, exercise, and supplement to turn things around. Want to listen instead of read? Download the audio recording here… ++++ On the face of it, what we do at Precision Nutrition — helping people lose weight and look and feel their best — must seem like lots of fun. In many ways, it is. We help our clients work healthy eating and exercise into their lives in ways that work for them, and then 12 months later I get to share their inspiring nutrition-coaching stories, full of challenges, doubts, perseverance, and triumph — along with their amazing before and after shots. I’ll admit, those aspects are really exciting. But most of our clients come to us for a reason that’s much more serious than wanting to look better. Check this out: A remarkable number of the people who sign up for our nutrition coaching programs are dealing with a specific health problem. Many are on multiple prescriptions and OTC drugs. And they’re not cool with that. They used to feel all right. But then they went to the doctor and got scary news, like having: High cholesterol It’s a turning point. Since a lot of these health problems don’t have obvious symptoms (or don’t have symptoms that you’d know how to trace until you’re diagnosed), a lot of clients say that it feels like going from “healthy” to “unhealthy” overnight. They don’t want to be on meds for the rest of their lives. They want to feel — to be — healthy again. They want control. The good news: There’s help. And often, another path. Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure Diet: What You Should Be Eating To Lower Reading In Two Weeks

High Blood Pressure Diet: What You Should Be Eating To Lower Reading In Two Weeks

However, diet is a key way people can make changes to their health. The DASH diet, which stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, is said to be able to lower their blood pressure reading in two weeks, experts have claimed, but yields better results in the long term. The DASH diet includes vegetables, fruits and low-fat dairy products and vegetable oil. It also consists of wholegrains, fish, poultry, nuts and beans. People on the diet should be limiting food high in saturated fat, full fat dairy products and tropical oils including coconut oil and palm oil, and stopping eating sugar-sweetened food and drinks. The DASH eating plan includes: Six to eight daily servings of grains a day One service is includes 1oz of dry cereal, or half a cup of cooked rice or pasta Six servings or less of meat, poultry or fish a day One serving equates to roughly 1oz cooked meat or one egg Between four and five serving of vegetables a day A serving is one cup of leafy vegetables or half a cup of cooked vegetables Between four and five servings of fruit a day One serving is one medium fruit or 1/4 cup of dried fruit Two to three Low fat or fat-free dairy products a day A serving includes one cup of milk or yoghurt Two to three daily servings of fats and oils One serving equates to one tablespoon mayonnaise or a teaspoon of vegetable oil Eating seeds, nuts, dry beans and peas four to five times a week One serving equates to 1/3 cup of nuts Thu, June 8, 2017 High blood pressure: Here are the risk factors you should be aware of. On average, adults in the UK eat about 8.1g of salt (3.2g sodium) a day. To reduce the risk of high blood pressure, it is recommended that adults should not be eating more than 6g of salt - the equivalent of 2.4g sodium a day. The plan, which is recommended b Continue reading >>

More in diabetic diet