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Diet For High Blood Pressure And High Cholesterol And Diabetes

Dash Diet: Healthy Eating To Lower Your Blood Pressure

Dash Diet: Healthy Eating To Lower Your Blood Pressure

The DASH diet emphasizes portion size, eating a variety of foods and getting the right amount of nutrients. Discover how DASH can improve your health and lower your blood pressure. DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. The DASH diet is a lifelong approach to healthy eating that's designed to help treat or prevent high blood pressure (hypertension). The DASH diet encourages you to reduce the sodium in your diet and eat a variety of foods rich in nutrients that help lower blood pressure, such as potassium, calcium and magnesium. By following the DASH diet, you may be able to reduce your blood pressure by a few points in just two weeks. Over time, your systolic blood pressure could drop by eight to 14 points, which can make a significant difference in your health risks. Because the DASH diet is a healthy way of eating, it offers health benefits besides just lowering blood pressure. The DASH diet is also in line with dietary recommendations to prevent osteoporosis, cancer, heart disease, stroke and diabetes. DASH diet: Sodium levels The DASH diet emphasizes vegetables, fruits and low-fat dairy foods — and moderate amounts of whole grains, fish, poultry and nuts. In addition to the standard DASH diet, there is also a lower sodium version of the diet. You can choose the version of the diet that meets your health needs: Standard DASH diet. You can consume up to 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium a day. Lower sodium DASH diet. You can consume up to 1,500 mg of sodium a day. Both versions of the DASH diet aim to reduce the amount of sodium in your diet compared with what you might get in a typical American diet, which can amount to a whopping 3,400 mg of sodium a day or more. The standard DASH diet meets the recommendation from the Dietary Guidelines for Americ Continue reading >>

Natural Ways To Combat High Cholesterol And High Blood Pressure

Natural Ways To Combat High Cholesterol And High Blood Pressure

This week in diabetes management sessions, I counseled a 63-year old patient who has had type 2 diabetes for 5 years and was being treated with Metformin, 1000mg, twice a day. He never attended diabetes or nutritional education and had very little understanding of proper self-care except for taking his “two diabetes pills”. He did all the food shopping and preparation since his original diagnosis. His present blood sugars, cholesterol, and blood pressure had gone way out of control along with a recent unexplained 51-pound weight loss from a normal weight of 172 to 121. His answer to the weight loss was to eat anything he could find that seemed high calorie without making wise choices due to his lack of knowledge. He added foods high in sugar, fat and salt for weight gain. He refused to do any exercise including walking for fear of losing more weight. While this patient is being medically evaluated for his unexpected weight loss, hypertension and high blood cholesterol numbers, we needed to get him get back on track with positive lifestyle changes and reduce his fear. He understands that he may need additional medications but is willing to learn better health habits as well. He was unaware that “hypertension” meant the same thing as high blood pressure and thought he was just “too tense”. He was anxious and upset about his unexplained weight loss which did not help his blood pressure or cholesterol levels. In the meantime, we reviewed healthy tips to lower his numbers. Let’s examine some of the information that was offered to him. What is Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)? Hypertension or high blood pressure makes your heart work harder and may eventually lead to atherosclerosis, heart arrhythmias (such as atrial fibrillation), myocardial infarction, heart Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Heart Disease, Prediabetes, Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Metabolic Syndrome, Cholesterol, Triglycerides & Prevention

Diabetes, Heart Disease, Prediabetes, Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Metabolic Syndrome, Cholesterol, Triglycerides & Prevention

American Heart Association About Diabetes Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose, or sugar, for our bodies to use for energy. The pancreas, an organ near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin to help glucose get into our bodies' cells. When you have diabetes, your body doesn't make enough insulin, can't use its own insulin as well as it should, or both. This causes sugars to build up too high in your blood. Diabetes mellitus is defined as a fasting blood glucose of 126 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or more. "Pre-diabetes" is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not yet diabetic. People with pre-diabetes are at increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke, and have one of these conditions: - impaired fasting glucose (100 to 125 mg/dL) - impaired glucose tolerance (fasting glucose less than 126 mg/dL and a glucose level between 140 and 199 mg/dL two hours after taking an oral glucose tolerance test) Type 2 diabetes is the most common form. It appears most often in middle-aged adults; however, adolescents and young adults are developing type 2 diabetes at an alarming rate. It develops when the body doesn't make enough insulin and doesn't efficiently use the insulin it makes (insulin resistance). Type 1 diabetes usually occurs in children and young adults. In type 1, the pancreas makes little or no insulin. Without daily injections of insulin, people with type 1 diabetes won't survive. Both forms of diabetes may be inherited in genes. A family history of diabetes can significantly increase the risk of developing diabetes. Untreated diabetes can lead to many serious medical problems. These include blindness, kidney disease, nerve disease, limb amputations and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Diabetes is Continue reading >>

Shopping List For Diabetics

Shopping List For Diabetics

Control Type 2 Diabetes, Shed Fat Our Shopping List for Diabetics is based on the Pritikin Eating Plan, regarded worldwide as among the healthiest diets on earth. The Pritikin Program has been documented in more than 100 studies in peer-reviewed medical journals to prevent and control many of our nation’s leading killers – heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and obesity as well as type 2 diabetes. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, pay special attention. Research on newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics coming to the Pritikin Longevity Center illustrate how profoundly beneficial early intervention can be. Scientists from UCLA followed 243 people in the early stages of diabetes (not yet on medications). Within three weeks of coming to Pritikin, their fasting blood sugar (glucose) plummeted on average from 160 to 124. Research has also found that the Pritikin Program reduces fasting insulin by 25 to 40%. Shopping List for Diabetics – More Features Here’s another big plus to our Shopping List for Diabetics. In addition to icons that are diabetes-focused like “sugar free,” this list uses icons like “low cholesterol” and “low sodium” because many people with diabetes are working to control not just diabetes but related conditions like high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure. This list can help you identify those foods most advantageous in helping you reach your personal health goals. Diabetic Food Taboos? Not Anymore! Have you been told you have to give up juicy watermelon or sweet grapes? What if we told you those foods really aren’t taboo? Watch the Video Our Healthy Shopping List for Diabetics also lists the top 10 things to put back on the shelf if you’re trying to: Lose Weight Lower Blood Pres Continue reading >>

Smoothies For Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Smoothies For Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

The smoothie is a popular drink that has been gaining a lot of traction lately. Everyone is into the smoothie craze. There are some that can help you lose weight fast, and there are some intended to increase energy. There are even smoothies for diabetes and smoothies for high blood pressure. What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a condition where the amount of sugar in your blood is too high. This happens because of two things. First, your body either does not respond to insulin. Or second, your body can’t produce insulin. Insulin is responsible for turning sugar into food for your body’s cells. There are two types of diabetes. First is type 1, where your body cannot produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes is when your body can’t use insulin or can’t produce the right amount of insulin your body needs. What Is High Blood Pressure? This condition is also known as hypertension. It is known as the “silent killer.” This is because it has no obvious symptoms. Many people are not aware if they have it. High blood pressure means your blood is pumping through your heart and blood vessels with too much force. Relationship between Diabetes and High Blood Pressure It is not known why there is a connection between the two diseases. However, it is widely assumed that obesity, inactivity, and a high-fat and high-sodium diet lead to both conditions. Around 25 percent of people with type 1 diabetes have high blood pressure. In addition, 80 percent of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes have high blood pressure. People with diabetes have to constantly monitor their blood pressure. Luckily, even if you have the two conditions, that doesn’t mean you have to miss out. Here are smoothies for diabetes and high blood pressure you can try for yourselves. Smoothies for Diabetes Smoothies for d Continue reading >>

Natural Ways To Lower Your Cholesterol

Natural Ways To Lower Your Cholesterol

High cholesterol has long been known to raise the risk of heart and blood vessel disease in people with diabetes and without. Unfortunately, it’s very common among Americans generally, including those with diabetes. The good news is that there’s a lot you can do to lower your cholesterol and, consequently, lower your risk of heart disease. Making the effort to lower blood cholesterol is especially important for people with diabetes — Type 1 or Type 2 — who have a higher risk of heart disease than the general public. The bad guy: LDL Your LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol is the culprit when it comes to raising the risk of heart disease. LDL stands for low-density lipoprotein, and if you have too much of it in your blood, it can build up along the insides of your artery walls, leading to the formation of fatty deposits called plaque. Plaque makes it harder for blood to flow through your arteries, which means that less blood can get to vital organs, such as your heart and brain. Sometimes this can lead to a heart attack or a stroke. Plaque can also rupture, triggering the formation of blood clots, which can also block the arteries, leading to a heart attack or stroke. So it makes sense to keep your LDL level low. The American Diabetes Association recommends that most adults with diabetes who are not taking cholesterol-lowering statins have a fasting lipid profile done at diagnosis, first medical evaluation, and thenevery five years after, while those taking statins should have the test done when they start the medication and periodically thereafter. This test measures HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol, as well as the level of triglycerides (a type of blood fat) in the blood. HDL cholesterol above 50 mg/dl, LDL cholesterol below 100 mg/dl, and triglycerides below 150 mg Continue reading >>

Obesity, High Blood Pressure, High Cholesterol, Alcohol And Tobacco: The World Health Organization’s Response

Obesity, High Blood Pressure, High Cholesterol, Alcohol And Tobacco: The World Health Organization’s Response

Chronic diseases are now the major cause of death and disability worldwide, and increasingly affect people from developing as well as developed countries. Noncommunicable conditions, including cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), diabetes, obesity, cancers and respiratory diseases, now account for 59 per cent of the 56.5 million deaths annually and almost half (45.9 per cent) of the global burden of disease. Five of the top 10 selected global disease burden risk factors identified by World Health Report 2002: reducing risks, promoting healthy life – obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, alcohol and tobacco – independently and often in combination, are the major causes of these diseases. The scientific evidence is strong that a change in dietary habits, physical activity and tobacco control can produce rapid changes in population risk factors for these chronic diseases. Noncommunicable Diseases (NCDs) frequently involve overlapping risk factors and chronic conditions. Recognising this, WHO is adopting a broad-ranging approach. It has begun to formulate a Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health, under a May 2002 mandate from the World Health Assembly (WHA). This extensive, population-wide, prevention-based strategy will be developed over the next two years and presented to the WHA in 2004. WHO will be consulting widely with all stakeholders during this process. WHO is already responding in other ways to Member States’ calls for action. The Tobacco Free Initiative is well-advanced in facilitating development of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. (See Fact Sheet 273) And this year’s World Health Day theme “Move for Health” focused increased attention on the need for daily moderate-intensity physical activity to maintain good health, Continue reading >>

Heal Yourself With Food: Recipes

Heal Yourself With Food: Recipes

Take control of your health! Try these recipes from the eating plans mentioned in Heal Yourself With Food, and get on the road to a healthy recovery. Pritikin Diet to fight diabetes When combined with exercise, the Pritikin Diet can improve heart-disease risk factors; prevent and control Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and several cancers; promote weight loss. It's low in fat and sodium and rich in natural unrefined carbs, vitamins, minerals, beneficial phytochemicals, antioxidants and dietary fiber with adequate amounts of protein and essential fatty acids. Pritikin Diet Recipes: Also try Prevention's New 30-Day Diabetes Diet to help manage your condition. Portfolio Diet to lower high cholesterol Relying on four categories of foods known to help prevent heart disease--soy, nuts, plant sterols, and foods high in sticky fiber--and restricting meat, fish, and dairy (high cholesterol foods) the Portfolio Diet produces fast results and works about as well as statins in people with moderately high cholesterol. Portfolio Diet Recipes: DASH Diet to lower high blood pressure The DASH eating plan, which can prevent and control high blood pressure when used along with lifestyle changes such as exercise, calls for a certain number of daily servings of grains, vegetables, fruits, fat-free dairy, lean meats, and nuts. DASH Diet Recipes: [pagebreak] Recipes for diabetes from the Pritikin Eating Plan Ingredients: 2 ½ lb. portabello mushrooms, stems removed & washed 1 cup red peppers, de-seeded and diced ½ c yellow pepper, de-seeded and diced 3 tablespoons basil leaves, chiffonaide 3 tablespoons fresh thyme, picked & chopped 1 teaspoon oregano, dry ½ cup garlic, chopped ½ cup red onion, peeled and diced 1 teaspoon black peppercorns, ground 1 cup eggplant, peeled and diced ½ Continue reading >>

How To Cut Down On Medications

How To Cut Down On Medications

What if you could cut back on the prescription drugs you take for blood pressure, cholesterol, or type 2 diabetes? It may be possible, with your doctor's support. The trick is to make lifestyle changes that have a big impact on your health. These seven steps will help. 1. Make better eating convenient. Heart-healthy eating boils down to a few simple steps: Stay away from refined sugars. Eat more nuts, fiber, and fish, which are sources of healthy fats. It sounds so simple, right? But first, you need to get those items in your pantry, fridge, car, workplace, and anywhere else you spend a lot of time. What's in there right now? Is it supporting your goals for how you want to eat? If not, it's time to rethink and restock. 2. Read when you shop. Check the nutrition facts label on anything that comes in a bag, box, or can. Packaged foods can have a lot of sodium in them, and there are often lower-sodium options you could buy instead. Making that shift, and reaching for the saltshaker less often, can make a big difference. Cutting back on sodium can start to improve your blood pressure quickly -- in about a month, says Houston cardiologist John Higgins. 3. Strengthen your most important muscle. It's your heart. And the way you make it stronger is just like any other muscle: Make it work harder. You do that by moving more. It can be a formal workout, or it can just be part of your day. Maybe you take your dog on a hike, or take a dance break when you're doing your chores at home. Maybe you try an online yoga video, or dust off the bike in your garage. Whatever you do, you're making your heart stronger, helping to lower your blood pressure, and starting to get your blood sugar level to where you want it to be. Moving more can cut down on the amount of insulin you need, lower yo Continue reading >>

Individual Health Consultations

Individual Health Consultations

Chronic conditions such as indigestion, irritable bowel, allergies, fatigue, high cholesterol and/or blood pressure, poor immunity, and hormonal imbalance often respond well to nutrition and herbal therapy. The key is to work WITH your body to restore proper function rather than merely chasing symptoms and trying to suppress them. Root causes to examine and address include: • Proper nutrition: Starting with a nutrient dense, whole food diet, and adjusted from there based on your total health picture • Healthy digestion: It is so fundamentally important to have effective digestion and absorption, as well as a digestive tract populated with healthy bacteria • Nervous system balance: Based on an assessment of your “feel good” and “stress” hormones and neurotransmitters • Sleep: Restorative sleep is key to energy, immunity and blood sugar balance • Inflammation: Ferreting out and addressing root causes of inflammation (harmful foods, stress, blood sugar, allergies, toxins, parasites, chronic bacterial or viral infection, etc.) can help resolve many problems Working together we can focus on your specific health needs and develop tailored food, supplement and herbal recommendations to re-build your health. Functional take-home and lab assessments can reveal nutrient deficiencies, thyroid function, bone health, food sensitivities, heavy metal and toxic burden. With such specific information about how your body is functioning, we can prioritize and direct your therapy for meaningful results. Healthy eating of whole foods with certain herbs, diet and lifestyle adjustments can solve issues with high cholesterol, Osteoporosis, high blood pressure, diabetes and blood sugar issues and more. Use the contact form to the right to get started on a healthy life this wee Continue reading >>

About Your Diet: Salt And Cholesterol

About Your Diet: Salt And Cholesterol

Heart disease and strokes are two to four times more common in people with diabetes than in people without. A healthy diet, low in salt and fat, can help minimize this risk. When you have too much cholesterol in your bloodstream, it builds up in your artery walls, causing them to narrow - reducing and possibly blocking the flow of blood. If the blood flow becomes completely cut off to the heart or brain, this will lead to a heart attack or stroke. It is important to control your blood cholesterol. Although some fat is part of a healthy diet, the type of fat you eat is important in controlling your cholesterol level. A simple way to look at this is to break fats down into bad fats and good fats. Fats that come from animals and some vegetable oils are often considered bad fats. These fats can quickly build up in your arteries increasing your chances of a heart attack or stroke. Your body does require some fat. Small amounts of good fats such as nuts, seeds and oily fish are part of a healthy diet but they should be consumed in moderation. A key factor leading to heart and stroke is high blood pressure. When you eat foods high in salt, your blood pressure increases putting a strain on your arteries. With high blood pressure, your heart pumps harder to circulate blood. This causes damage to your heart and blood vessels throughout the body leading to complications such as heart attack, stroke, kidney failure, impaired vision and aneurysms. A substantial amount salt intake comes in packaged food. Read food labels closely, looking for foods with little or no added salt, often referred to, as sodium. A healthy lifestyle, including regular activity, and a diet low in fat and salt, along with taking your prescribed medication, can help control your cholesterol level and lower you Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure: Major Risk Factor For Heart Disease

High Blood Pressure: Major Risk Factor For Heart Disease

High blood pressure, or hypertension, is one of the top 4 silent killers because it has no early significant symptoms. The American Heart Association estimates that up to one third of people living with high blood pressure are unaware of the fact that their blood pressure is high, and many people are unaware of the risks of high blood pressure. The danger from high blood pressure is the extra load on the heart, leading to complications such as hypertensive heart disease. High blood pressure can also seriously damage the kidneys. And it does all this silently, without any major symptoms, except when the high blood pressure gets extreme. High blood pressure is usually one of the first signs that the cardiovascular system is lacking key nutrients and is under serious stress and deterioration. This is due to the heart’s extra force required to push the blood through the arteries eventually causing damage to the inner lining of the arteries. This, in turn, causes inflammation and oxidative stress, leaving the arteries susceptible to the buildup of fatty plaque that can narrow or block the arteries and reduce blood flow to the body’s organs. In some men, this can lead to erectile dysfunction, which may be an early sign of endothelial dysfunction, which is a precursor to cardiovascular disease. However, because of the success and popularity of ED drugs such as Viagara and Cialis, most men fail to address their cardiovascular health. As a result, a heart attack or a stroke is imminent unless there is some form of intervention, e. g. dietary, lifestyle changes. WARNING! When left untreated, high blood pressure can lead to cardiovascular disease (aka heart disease), congestive heart failure (CHF), kidney damage, heart failure, stroke, and loss of vision from damage to the ret Continue reading >>

Diet For High Blood Pressure And High Uric Acid (gout): Restrict Intake Of High-purine Foods

Diet For High Blood Pressure And High Uric Acid (gout): Restrict Intake Of High-purine Foods

Previous Page: Diet for high blood pressure and coronary heart disease:Calorie and protein intake should not be too high. High uric acid (hyperuricemia) is also called gout. With the improvement of living standards, changes in diet, high purine foods intake increasing, gout prevalence rate increased gradually. If high blood pressure patients find a slight elevation in the level of uric acid, they can adjust their diets to reduce the intake of purine, thereby lowering the level of uric acid. High blood pressure patients with moderately elevated uric acid need to control diets and receive medication. Patients with high blood pressure and gout should pay attention to their diet. Scientific and reasonable diets can help relieve symptoms and prevent recurrence, while poor diets will aggravate diseases. Develop Healthy Eating Habits for high blood pressure and high uric acid The intake of the amount of purine-containing food should be limited, and animal foods containing relatively high levels of purine should not be consumed frequently. Fish should be consumed two or three times a week, because fish are rich in taurine and methionine, which regulate blood pressure by increasing the discharge of the amount of sodium in the urine, thereby lowering the blood pressure. While it should be noted that fish with a low level of purine should be consumed. When high blood pressure and high uric acid patients' conditions are in remission, their daily intake of fat should not exceed 50 grams, intake of meat should not exceed 100 grams. You should drink less broth, fish soup, chicken soup, these foods contain a large amount of purine. Diet for high blood pressure and high uric acid: Do's and Dont's Eat more alkaline foods , such as fresh vegetables, fruit, milk, etc. These foods can adjus Continue reading >>

Got Diabetes And High Blood Pressure? 9 Diet Tips

Got Diabetes And High Blood Pressure? 9 Diet Tips

Two out of three people with diabetes also have high blood pressure. Keeping your diet in check -- counting carbs, limiting sugar, eating less salt -- is key. You can still eat well and manage your conditions with these easy tips. Since you have high blood pressure, you should get no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium per day. That's less than a teaspoon. So retrain taste buds. Instead of reaching for the saltshaker, flavor food with citrus zest, garlic, rosemary, ginger, jalapeno peppers, oregano, or cumin. Cooking at home also helps. “If you’re eating something from a bag or box or off a restaurant menu, chances are you’re getting too much sodium,” says Janet Bond Brill, PhD, RD, author of Blood Pressure Down. To get in the habit of having a balanced diet, “visualize your plate as a clock,” says Amber L. Taylor, MD, who directs The Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. Fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables. A quarter gets lean protein like baked fish, beans, or chicken. The last quarter holds grains, preferably whole, like brown rice. You’ll still need to count carbohydrates and make sure you're not getting too much sodium. Caffeine can raise your blood sugar and blood pressure. If you have higher blood sugar or blood pressure after drinking coffee, “limit your caffeine intake to 200 milligrams -- about 2 cups of coffee -- a day,” says Torey Jones Armul, RD, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Skip the French press or espresso and choose coffee made with a paper filter. The paper soaks up an oily compound in coffee beans called cafestol, which can hike up cholesterol. You can also consider switching to decaf. “Some research suggests it can reduce blood sugar,” Armul says. Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure, High Cholesterol, And Diabetes Risk May Be Lowered With Brisk Walking: Study

High Blood Pressure, High Cholesterol, And Diabetes Risk May Be Lowered With Brisk Walking: Study

Home » Heart Health » High blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes risk may be lowered with brisk walking: Study High blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes risk may be lowered with brisk walking. The researchers found that the impact of brisk walking is similar to that of running, which means, regardless of your fitness level or age, you can still manage to successfully lower your blood pressure and cholesterol, and control your diabetes with an activity as easy as walking. The researchers analyzed 33,060 runners and 15,045 walkers. They found the same amount of energy used for moderate-intensity walking and vigorous-intensity running yielded similar results when it came to controlling blood pressure, cholesterol, and diabetes. Principal investigator Paul T. Williams said, “Walking and running provide an ideal test of the health benefits of moderate-intensity walking and vigorous-intensity running because they involve the same muscle groups and the same activities performed at different intensities. The more the runners ran and the walkers walked, the better off they were in health benefits. If the amount of energy expended was the same between the two groups, then the health benefits were comparable.” Williams added, “Walking may be a more sustainable activity for some people when compared to running, however, those who choose running end up exercising twice as much as those that choose walking. This is probably because they can do twice as much in an hour.” The study offers an alternative way of exercising, which eliminates excuses that one can’t do it. Exercise to manage heart-related conditions: Previous studies The risk of type 2 diabetes is lower in people partaking in brisk walks. The study found that brisk walking may actually be more Continue reading >>

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