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Diet For Fatty Liver Disease And Diabetes

Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease And Diabetes

Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease And Diabetes

Go to: Abstract Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are common conditions that regularly co-exist and can act synergistically to drive adverse outcomes. The presence of both NAFLD and T2DM increases the likelihood of the development of complications of diabetes (including both macro- and micro- vascular complications) as well as augmenting the risk of more severe NAFLD, including cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and death. The mainstay of NAFLD management is currently to reduce modifiable metabolic risk. Achieving good glycaemic control and optimising weight loss are pivotal to restricting disease progression. Once cirrhosis has developed, it is necessary to screen for complications and minimise the risk of hepatic decompensation. Therapeutic disease modifying options for patients with NAFLD are currently limited. When diabetes and NAFLD co-exist, there are published data that can help inform the clinician as to the most appropriate oral hypoglycaemic agent or injectable therapy that may improve NAFLD, however most of these data are drawn from observations in retrospective series and there is a paucity of well-designed randomised double blind placebo controlled studies with gold-standard end-points. Furthermore, given the heterogeneity of inclusion criteria and primary outcomes, as well as duration of follow-up, it is difficult to draw robust conclusions that are applicable across the entire spectrum of NAFLD and diabetes. In this review, we have summarised and critically evaluated the available data, with the aim of helping to inform the reader as to the most pertinent issues when managing patients with co-existent NAFLD and T2DM. Keywords: NAFLD, NASH, Diabetes, Insulin resistance, Diabetes complications Continue reading >>

What Should You Be Eating If You Have A Fatty Liver?

What Should You Be Eating If You Have A Fatty Liver?

What Should You Be Eating If You Have A Fatty Liver? Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide and will have a major impact on the health care requirements of many countries in the future. NAFLD can progress to cirrhosis, liver cancer and liver failure. These are the reasons I have done a lot of research into the diet and nutritional therapies that can reverse the pathology of NAFLD. The liver possesses remarkable properties of repair and renewal and it is possible to completely reverse NAFLD if it is detected early enough. We are seeing NAFLD in a much younger population and it is not uncommon in overweight children. This is worrying because the earlier in life you develop a fatty liver, the more likely you are to develop complications. I have developed a very specific way of eating, which is designed to: Reduce the fat in the liver Minimize liver damage Improve the function of insulin Make weight loss easier This is not a low-fat low-calorie diet, and unlike those old fashioned diets, will not leave you hungry and tired. It is not a high protein diet either but rather provides you with first class protein regularly throughout the day, along with plenty of vegetables and some good fats. Enjoy this way of eating, as your liver will definitely thank you for it! With your meals it is ideal to include: Raw plant food, especially raw vegetables. A maximum of 2 pieces of fruit daily are allowed while you are trying to lose weight. Most fruits are fairly high in sugar. Vegetables contain very little sugar, therefore you can eat unlimited quantities. Cooked vegetables of different varieties including some starchy vegetables (except potatoes); this will compensate for the fact that you will not be eating bread, bis Continue reading >>

Fatty Liver Disease And Ketogenic Diets

Fatty Liver Disease And Ketogenic Diets

Fatty liver disease is a condition in which the liver becomes clogged with excess fat due to elevated triglyceride levels within the body. The condition is strongly linked to insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and prediabetes. When the fat stored in the liver accounts for more than 10% of the liver’s weight, the function of the liver becomes compromised, and the liver can't metabolize insulin and fine tune blood sugar levels as it would normally. This type of liver disease is called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or hepatic steatosis and if left untreated, it can result in liver damage or liver cancer. What Causes NAFLD? High Triglycerides High blood triglyceride levels associated with high carbohydrate and fructose consumption. The elevated triglycerides which cause fatty liver disease are a direct result of a diet which is high in carbohydrates, and specifically, high in fructose. Studies have shown that fructose consumption elevates blood pressure, sky rockets triglyceride levels and increases inflammation and insulin resistance in the liver. Insulin resistant body systems. A high carb consumption and lack of exercise is strongly associated with the development of overall body insulin resistance and high triglycerides levels. See this study, and this study shows that a high carbohydrate diet is linked to liver dysfunction. Vegetable Oil Consumption High levels of vegetable oil consumption. Vegetables oils contain omega-6 polyunsaturated fats which are inflammatory when consumed in large amounts. In addition, they are often hydrogenated to solidify them, and this introduces trans-fats which can also damage the liver. The most prevalent are corn, canola, and soybean oil. These oils are commonly found in commercial mayonnaise and salad dressings. Altern Continue reading >>

Comparative Review Of Diets For The Metabolic Syndrome: Implications For Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease1,2,3

Comparative Review Of Diets For The Metabolic Syndrome: Implications For Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease1,2,3

Abstract Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a significant health problem and affects 70 million adults in the United States (30% of the adult population), and an estimated 20% of these individuals have the most severe form of NAFLD—nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The mechanisms underlying disease development and progression are awaiting clarification. Insulin resistance and obesity-related inflammation, among other possible genetic, dietary, and lifestyle factors, are thought to play a key role. A program targeting gradual weight reduction and physical exercise continues to be the gold standard of treatment for all forms of NAFLD. Even though weight loss and dietary and lifestyle changes are recommended as primary treatment for fatty liver, little to no scientific evidence is available on diet and NAFLD. This article reviews the implications of current dietary approaches, including national guidelines and popular weight-loss diets, with a focus on determining the optimal diet to prescribe for NAFLD and NASH patients. The effects of macronutrient content (carbohydrate, fat, and protein ratios) and specific food components, such as soluble fiber, n−3 fatty acids, and fructose, are discussed. The premises, effects, barriers, and issues related to current dietary guidelines and specific diets are discussed, and the question, “Will it work for the pathogenesis of NAFLD and NASH? ”, is addressed. INTRODUCTION The rising incidence of obesity in today's environment is associated with many obesity-related health complications (1), including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (2-5). This constellation is also recognized as the metabolic syndrome and is characterized by underlying insul Continue reading >>

Fatty Liver Is More Dangerous Than You Might Realize. Here’s How To Heal It

Fatty Liver Is More Dangerous Than You Might Realize. Here’s How To Heal It

“My doctor says I have a fatty liver and I should stay away from fat,” writes this week’s house call. “Are high-fat foods the culprit here? Any tips to help with a fatty liver?” Indeed, your doctor is right to feel concern: Fatty liver is a dangerous yet misunderstood disease. In America, it affects 90 million of us and 17 percent of our children. Think about foie gras, the French delicacy made from duck or goose liver. It is made by force-feeding the animals a combination of sugar with corn and starch (a really sad, horrible practice), intentionally creating a fatty liver. So if you’re gorging on sugar and starch, you’re essentially doing the same thing with your own liver. Fatty liver literally means your liver fills with fat, paving the path for chronic disease and inflammation. You might be surprised to learn the primary culprit here. Research shows that carbs (and not fat) produce more fat in your belly and liver. Sugar switches on fat production in your liver, creating an internal process called lipogenesis, which is your body’s normal response to sugar. Fructose, the most detrimental sugar that heads directly to your liver, actually ramps up lipogenesis. That explains why sugar, especially fructose, becomes the chief cause of liver disease and the leading cause of liver transplants. What’s so bad about having a fatty liver? Well, among its numerous repercussions include inflammation, which triggers insulin resistance and pre-diabetes, meaning your body deposits fat in your liver and organs including your belly (called visceral fat). It gets worse. Excess sugar and starch creates more serious problems including high triglycerides, low HDL (“good” cholesterol), and high amounts of small LDL (dangerous cholesterol particles that cause heart att Continue reading >>

12 Foods To Help Fatty Liver Reversal

12 Foods To Help Fatty Liver Reversal

There are two major types of fatty liver disease — alcohol-induced and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Fatty liver disease affects nearly one-third of American adults and is one of the leading contributors to liver failure. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is most commonly diagnosed in those who are obese or sedentary and those who eat a highly processed diet. One of the main ways to treat fatty liver disease, regardless of type, is with diet. As the name suggests, fatty liver disease means you have too much fat in your liver. In a healthy body, the liver helps to remove toxins and produces bile, the digestive protein. Fatty liver disease damages the liver and prevents it from working as well as it should. In general, the diet for fatty liver disease includes: lots of fruits and vegetables high-fiber plants like legumes and whole grains very little added sugar, salt, trans fat, refined carbohydrates, and saturated fat no alcohol A low-fat, reduced-calorie diet can help you lose weight and reduce the risk of fatty liver disease. Ideally, if you’re overweight, you would aim to lose at least 10 percent of your body weight. Here are a few foods to include in your healthy liver diet: 1. Coffee to lower abnormal liver enzymes Studies have shown that coffee drinkers with fatty liver disease have less liver damage than those who don’t drink this caffeinated beverage. Caffeine appears to lower the amount of abnormal liver enzymes of people at risk for liver diseases. 2. Greens to prevent fat buildup Broccoli is shown to help prevent the buildup of fat in the liver in mice. Eating more greens, like spinach, Brussels sprouts, and kale, can also help with general weight loss. Try the Canadian Liver Foundation’s recipe for vegetarian chili, which lets you cut back on calor Continue reading >>

International Textbook Of Diabetes Mellitus, 4th Ed., Excerpt #104: Treatment Of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease And Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Part 2

International Textbook Of Diabetes Mellitus, 4th Ed., Excerpt #104: Treatment Of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease And Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Part 2

Dietary alone interventions The effect of dietary intervention alone for the management of NAFLD and NASH has been evaluated extensively over the past 2–3 decades [42,43]. These studies can be divided into two main types: those that have focused on weight reduction only, and clinical trials that have assessed the role of a particular dietary composition on hepatic steatosis. Several small and uncontrolled studies have examined the effect of diet-induced weight reduction (without physical activity changes) on plasma aminotransferases levels and hepatic steatosis measured by either liver ultrasound [34,44] or computed tomography (CT) [35,36]. Taken together, a 4–5% weight loss by dietary intervention alone usually improves plasma aminotransferases levels and hepatic steatosis. Unfortunately, these surrogate markers of liver disease have been shown to have weak correlations with histologic findings [45], and do not allow to make firm conclusions regarding the long-term value of weight reduction by dietary intervention alone in NAFLD. Table 20.1 summarizes the studies that have assessed the effect of weight reduction by diet alone on hepatic triglyceride accumulation by MRS in patients with NAFLD. As can be observed, independently of the type of diet used, weight reductions ranging from 6.5 to 11.0% have been associated with a significant reduction in liver fat content by MRS in the order of 38% to 81%. Moreover, Tendler et al. [46] in a provocative small (n=5) pilot study reported that after 6 months of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet, a reduction of ∼11% of body weight was associated with qualitative improvements in liver histology. Only a few studies have examined the role of dietary composition in addition to negative caloric balance. Ryan et al. [47] reported Continue reading >>

A High Carbohydrate Diet For Fatty Liver Disease And Diabetes

A High Carbohydrate Diet For Fatty Liver Disease And Diabetes

A High Carbohydrate Diet Is The Most Effective Treatment For Fatty Liver Which Causes Type 2 Diabetes Yale study slaps down misinformation on the cause of Type 2 Diabetes. Hint: it’s your liver and high carbohydrates are are the cure. You’re middle aged and that spare tire has grown snugly around your waist. No matter what you do, or how active you are, it’s impossible to shake the extra weight. Blood work confirms your cholesterol is high and blood pressure numbers are rising. What’s more, your doctor prescribed blood pressure medication, a statin and insulin to combat your newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes. Stunned and amazed, you leave the doctor’s office and diligently start medication in the hopes that you will regain your health. In a moment of reflection you ask yourself, “How did I get to this place of unhealth?” The short answer is – it’s your liver. Through your bouts of weight gain and fatigue, your liver has been trying to get your attention. In doing so, it ultimately led you to your doctor’s office where the recommended treatment is to eat a high protein diet – the very thing that got you into this mess in the first place. What Causes A Fatty Liver? There are two types of fatty liver; non-alcoholic fatty liver, which is caused by improper diet, and alcoholic fatty liver, which is caused by a high intake of alcohol. According to the Mayo Clinic a dangerous complication of both non-alcoholic and alcoholic fatty liver is cirrhosis. But before it gets to that point, there’s usually a diagnosis and long time struggle with Type 2 diabetes. Fatty Liver Causes Insulin Resistance, Not Vice Versa According to the American Diabetes Association 1.4 million Americans are diagnosed with Diabetes every year. According to Diabetes Care diabetes is th Continue reading >>

Fatty Liver Disease

Fatty Liver Disease

The normal treatment for , whether it's alcohol-related or not, is to work toward a healthy weight through diet and exercise. What should have a place on your plate? Generally speaking, foods that fight cell damage, make it easier for your body to use insulin, or lower inflammation can help reverse the condition. Since every person is different, you should work with your doctor to come up with an eating plan that's right for you. A Mediterranean Diet Although it wasn't originally meant for people with fatty liver disease, this style of eating combines the kinds of foods that help reduce fat in your liver: healthy fats, antioxidants, and complex carbohydrates. Things you're likely to see on the table that you should reach for include: Fruits Grains Nuts Olive oil Vegetables The Right Fats Your cells use glucose, a kind of sugar, for energy. The hormone insulin helps get the glucose from your digested food into your cells. People with fatty liver disease are often insulin resistant. Their bodies make insulin, but it doesn't work well. Glucose builds up in the blood, and the liver turns that extra sugar into fat. Certain fats in your diet can improve your sensitivity to, or ability to use, insulin. Your cells can take in glucose, so your liver doesn't need to make and store fat. Omega-3 fatty acids are found in fish, fish oil, vegetable oils, nuts (especially walnuts), flaxseeds and flaxseed oil, and leafy veggies. Monounsaturated fats are plentiful in plant sources, like olives, nuts, and avocados. Steer clear of saturated fats, though. Eat less meat and dairy products. Avoid baked goods and fried foods made with palm or coconut oils. These lead to more fatty deposits in your liver. Antioxidants Another reason fat builds up is that liver cells can be damaged when nutrient Continue reading >>

Diet For Diabetes & Liver Problems

Diet For Diabetes & Liver Problems

A diet for diabetes and liver problems balances the needs of both conditions effectively. Diabetics need to monitor carbohydrate intake to keep blood sugar levels within range, while those with liver problems needs to reduce the intake of foods that stress the liver, such as protein. Monounsaturated fats and omega-3 fatty acids should also be a part of your diet. If you have diabetes and liver problems, speak to your doctor or health care practitioner about the optimal diet for you. Video of the Day The coexistence of diabetes and liver problems such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis and liver failure occurs regularly, according to an article in the March 2007 issue of "Diabetes Care." Recommended diet modifications include reducing caloric intake, as weight loss diminishes fatty liver. A diet high in complex carbohydrates, low in red meat and high in monounsaturated fats, such as the Mediterranean diet, seems to help patients with diabetes and liver problems manage both conditions. While complex carbohydrates, such as sweet potatoes, lentils, brown rice, oatmeal and high-fiber bran cereals, are recommended for patients with diabetes and liver problems, it is important to keep the portions of these types of foods low to avoid spiking blood sugar levels. Eating too many carbohydrates will also lead to a glut in caloric intake and weight gain, which can exacerbate liver problems. As a rule patients with diabetes and liver problems should keep their protein intake low, because a damaged liver will have difficulty processing protein, according to MedlinePlus. A moderate to high intake of monounsaturated fats, such as olive oil, avocado, canola oil and almonds, works well for diabetics with liver problems. Omega-3 fatty acids from cold water fish, such as such Continue reading >>

Beat Fatty Liver With This Powerful Low-carb Diet

Beat Fatty Liver With This Powerful Low-carb Diet

While ‘fatty liver’ might sound like an ingredient you should be putting into pate, the reality is that for many people, fatty liver is a serious condition that has the potential to severely impact health and well-being in many ways. The liver is one of the most important organs in our bodies – one that detoxifies our blood, processes our medicines and aids digestion. For many years, the only dietary cause of liver damage to be feared was a large consumption of alcohol over a long period of time. However, with overweight and obesity on the rise, the sugar and fat content of most diets increasing, and processed and fast foods everywhere, fatty liver disease threatens more of us than ever before. The reality today is that 34% of U.S. adults have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and it is the leading cause of liver disease in developed countries such as the U.S., Australia and Canada. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a serious condition that can progress to permanent liver damage and even liver failure or cancer. So how do you know if you’re at risk for fatty liver disease, and what can you do about it? What is Fatty Liver Disease? Fatty liver disease is a condition where excess fat gets stored in the liver and interferes with the normal function of the liver cells. There are two main types of fatty liver disease – alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Alcoholic Liver Disease Alcoholic liver disease occurs when the liver is put under a great deal of stress from chronic and extreme alcohol consumption, which causes fat to build up in the liver. Long term results of alcoholic liver disease can include permanent scarring (cirrhosis) and liver cancer. If you have been diagnosed with alcoholic liver disease, your doctor or health profess Continue reading >>

What To Eat For A Fatty Liver

What To Eat For A Fatty Liver

The body stores fat in many areas of the body for use as energy and insulation. The liver is partially made up of fat, but if the fat content in the liver is too high, it may be a sign of fatty liver disease. There are two types of fatty liver disease: alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. It is also possible to get fatty liver disease due to pregnancy. Fatty liver disease damages the liver, preventing it from removing toxins and producing bile for the digestive system. When the liver is unable to do these tasks effectively, it puts a person at risk of developing other problems throughout their body. The primary treatment for fatty liver disease concerns making changes in diet and exercise, although some people may need to see a doctor for further treatment. Foods to eat for a fatty liver A diet for fatty liver disease includes a wide variety of foods. Reducing calories and eating high-fiber, natural foods are a good starting point. Eating foods containing complex carbohydrates, fiber, and protein can help the body feel full and provide sustained energy. Foods that reduce inflammation or help the body repair its cells are equally important. Some people choose to follow specific diet plans, such as a plant-based diet or the Mediterranean diet. A dietitian can often help a person create a diet plan that is right for their tastes, symptoms, and health status. In addition to these basic guidelines, there are also some specific foods that may be especially helpful for people with fatty liver disease, including: Garlic Garlic is a staple in many diets and may be beneficial for people with fatty liver disease. A study in Advanced Biomedical Research found that garlic powder supplements appear to help reduce body weight and fat in people with fatty liver Continue reading >>

Fatty Liver: What It Is, And How To Get Rid Of It

Fatty Liver: What It Is, And How To Get Rid Of It

Fatty liver is linked to type 2. Find out more. By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Fatty liver disease is becoming increasingly common in many parts of the world, affecting about 25% of people globally. It is linked to obesity, type 2 diabetes and other disorders characterized by insulin resistance. What’s more, if fatty liver isn’t addressed, it may progress to more serious liver disease and other health problems. What Is Fatty Liver? Fatty liver occurs when too much fat builds up in liver cells. Although it is normal to have a tiny amount of fat in these cells, the liver is considered fatty if more than 5% of it is fat. While drinking too much alcohol can lead to fatty liver, in many cases it does not play a role. A number of fatty liver conditions fall under the broad category of non-alcoholic liver disease (NAFLD), which is the most common liver disease in adults and children in Western countries. Non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) is the initial, reversible stage of liver disease. Unfortunately, it often goes undiagnosed. Over time, NAFL may lead to a more serious liver condition known as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, or NASH. NASH involves greater fat accumulation and inflammation that damages the liver cells. This can lead to fibrosis, or scar tissue, as liver cells are repeatedly injured and die off. Unfortunately, it is difficult to predict whether fatty liver will progress to NASH, which greatly increases the risk of cirrhosis (severe scarring that impairs liver function) and liver cancer. NAFLD is also linked to an increased risk of other diseases, including heart disease, diabetes and kidney disease. Bottom Line: Fatty liver occurs when too much fat builds up in the liver. Fatty liver is reversible at an early stage, but it sometimes progresses to advanced l Continue reading >>

Fatty Liver Disease In Diabetes Mellitus

Fatty Liver Disease In Diabetes Mellitus

Harikrashna B. Bhatt, Robert J. Smith The Warren Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI 02906, USA Correspondence to: Robert J. Smith, MD. The Warren Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, 14 Arnold Street, Providence, RI 02906, USA. Email: [email protected]. Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is highly prevalent in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), likely reflecting the frequent occurrence of obesity and insulin resistance in T2DM. NAFLD also can occur in type 1 DM (T1DM), but must be distinguished from the more common glycogen hepatopathy as a cause of hepatomegaly and liver function abnormalities in T1DM. Weight reduction achieved by diet and exercise is effective in preventing and treating NAFLD in obese diabetic subjects. Bariatric surgery also has been shown to reverse NAFLD in T2DM, and recently approved weight loss medications should be evaluated for their impact on the development and progression of NAFLD. There is limited evidence suggesting that specific drugs used for blood glucose control in T2DM [thiazolidinediones (TZDs), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors] and also statins may have a role in preventing or treating NAFLD in patients with diabetes. Keywords: Diabetes mellitus (DM); fatty liver; hepatic steatosis; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); steatohepatitis Submitted Oct 24, 2014. Accepted for publication Dec 09, 2014. Continue reading >>

High Protein, Low-carb Diet Helps Reverse Fatty Liver In People With Type 2 Diabetes

High Protein, Low-carb Diet Helps Reverse Fatty Liver In People With Type 2 Diabetes

A diet high in animal or plant protein, and relatively low in carb, has been shown to significantly reduce liver fat in people with type 2 diabetes patients and alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is a disease characterised by excessive fat content in the liver, which is associated with increased risks for metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Previous studies have shown that diets that are higher in carbohydrates, high in animal protein and high in fat tend to increase liver fat. In this study, published in the journal Gastroenterology, German researchers placed 37 patients with type 2 diabetes and NAFLD on two different high protein, moderate fat and low carbohydrate diets for six weeks. Calories weren't restricted and were split between 30 per cent of energy from protein, 30 per cent from fat, and 40 per cent from carbohydrates - which is lower in carbohydrate than the 45-60 per cent recommended by Public Health England. One diet was high in animal protein and consisted of consuming meals rich in meat and dairy foods, while the other was based upon plant protein obtained from legumes. The study indicates that no matter what the protein source is, a higher protein content in the diet, in combination with lower carbohydrate, can significantly reduce liver fat. Specifically, after six weeks, liver fat content decreased by 48 per cent in the animal protein group, and by 35.7 per cent in the plant-based protein group. Nine patients (three from the animal protein group and six from the plant protein group) even saw their degree of hepatic fat content drop below what is considered as having NAFLD, meaning that they no longer had it. These reductions were unrelated to variation in the participants' body weight, that the researchers monitored throughout the experim Continue reading >>

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