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Diet For Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy: Can Dietary Supplements Help?

Diabetic Neuropathy: Can Dietary Supplements Help?

A healthy diet is a critical factor in controlling blood sugar, which is key in managing diabetes and preventing or slowing the progression of diabetes complications such as diabetic neuropathy. Dietary supplements also may play a role. Diabetic neuropathy is damage to nerves caused by excess blood sugar, inflammation and blocked small blood vessels associated with diabetes. Left unchecked, diabetic neuropathy can cause complications such as pain and tingling in the hands and feet; it can also result in digestive difficulties and sexual problems. Advanced neuropathy in the feet can lead to the need for amputation of a toe, foot or lower leg. Eating a healthy diet is an important part of managing your diabetes and may help prevent its complications, including diabetic neuropathy. Tight blood sugar management might also help slow the progression of nerve damage. Dietary supplements also may play a role in managing diabetic neuropathy, although more research is needed. Talk to your doctor before adding a dietary supplement because some may interfere with certain diabetes medications, and some can increase the risk of kidney problems. How dietary supplements might help Various nutrients in food play a role in the protection, repair and function of tissues affected by diabetic neuropathy. So, researchers are interested in nutrition and nutritional supplements to help prevent and manage diabetic neuropathy. Research in this field is still relatively new, and the results of clinical studies have yielded mixed results. However, the following dietary supplements may have some limited benefit in preventing and managing diabetic neuropathy. Vitamin B-12 Vitamin B-12 is present naturally in some foods. It plays a number of roles in the body, including helping with proper nerve func Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy 10 Things You Need To Know

Peripheral Neuropathy 10 Things You Need To Know

Life with peripheral neuropathy can be filled with unknowns – especially for those of us whose symptoms or diagnoses are relatively new. Navigating this new life with a painful condition can be (and most often is) overwhelming and frustrating. From bothersome symptoms like lack of muscle control to debilitating ones such as sharp, stabbing pains in the hands or feet, peripheral neuropathy can wreak havoc on your quality of life. Finding out as much information as possible about the condition, its causes and its treatments can go a long way in getting you onto the path to a better – and more pain free – life. Despite affecting nearly 20 million people in the United States, there is still a lot of information that is widely unknown among those suffering from peripheral neuropathy. At its most basic level, peripheral neuropathy is damage to the nerves in the peripheral nervous system – the system that connects your central nervous system to your organs and limbs. Peripheral nerves are the longest nerves in the body, extending all the way to the hands and feet. When damaged, the most common symptoms are pain, numbness or tingling in the hands and feet. As we’ll see, however, these aren’t the only symptoms. Lets take a look at 10 things you need to know about neuropathy: Complications from diabetes can lead to neuropathy Diabetes is the number one cause of neuropathy worldwide. In fact, an estimated 70% of diabetes patients develop the symptoms of neuropathy. If you suffer from diabetes induced neuropathy – or suffer from diabetes but haven’t yet developed neuropathy – managing your blood sugar levels is the most effective form of treatment for preventing, stopping and even reversing the effects of diabetic neuropathy. Other Potential Causes of Peripheral N Continue reading >>

How I Overcame Peripheral Neuropathy By Eating A Raw Vegan Diet

How I Overcame Peripheral Neuropathy By Eating A Raw Vegan Diet

How I Overcame Peripheral Neuropathy by Eating a Raw Vegan Diet My memories are still as vivid as if they happened yesterday. My health started to deteriorate by the turn of the millennium in various ways, due in part to the exhaustive lifestyle of being an international DJ. Being on the road, playing gigs, for over a decade, and visiting over 40 countries, started taking its toll on my body. I started to gain weight and began to feel run down with numerous symptoms of ill health. One of the most strange and bizarre feelings I felt during those years was a prickling and tingling sensation in both my legs. The weakness I felt through the muscles of my legs got so bad that at one point that it made standing up very difficult. It didnt feel good, and I was concerned with what was causing the problem. I also started to lose balance and coordination and felt dizzy, especially when up at a height. Years went by, and I thought the situation would improve, but it didnt. By 2003, and whilst living in Camden Town in London, I started experiencing what I can only describe as excruciatingly painful electric shocks that went from my waist right down my legs to my feet. It was a burning, sharp pain that really freaked me out. Soon after, on one my trips to Argentina, I went to see a specialist doctor who sent me for a blood test, brain scan, and for a nerve conductivity test. This was when I was diagnosed with moderately severe Peripheral Neuropathy. I was soon advised to visit a Rheumatologist who also confirmed the disease and said it was a slow progressing illness and there was nothing I could do, other than taking medicine. I was prescribed the drugs Lyrica and Endep but I decided to wait and put off taking the medicine until I returned to the UK. At the same time, I noticed it Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy Nutrition

Peripheral Neuropathy Nutrition

Good nutrition is often the first line of defense to avoid many diseases, including peripheral neuropathy. The best way to prevent peripheral neuropathy is to carefully manage any medical condition that puts you at risk. That means controlling your blood sugar level if you have diabetes or talking to your doctor about safe and effective treatments if you think you may have a problem with alcohol. Whether or not you have a medical condition, eat a healthy diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean protein. Keep a food diary so you are aware of what you’re eating and to make sure you get all the nutrients you need each day to stay as healthy as possible. Disclaimer: Please check with your doctor before beginning any supplement regimens. Continue reading >>

Diet For Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Diet For Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Good nutrition can go a long way in helping to manage nerve pain in your legs and feet from Diabetes. Healthy eating can help you manage your blood sugar levels, lose some weight and reduce some of the inflammation that results in nerve pain. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy develops in more than 60% of the people who have Diabetes1, and is more likely the longer you have had Diabetes and the longer you have had elevated blood sugar levels. Burning, shooting, electric shock-like or pins and needles pain can really affect your quality of life, day and night, and lead to serious complications such as skin infections, ulcers and amputation. Thats why it is important to do all you can to manage your Diabetes and nerve pain. In a small pilot study, researchers tested whether a plant-based vegan diet could help people with Type 2 Diabetes and painful nerve damage in their legs and feet. They discovered over the 20 weeks of the study that the people assigned to the study lost an average of 15 pounds, experienced improved blood flow to their feet and their pain eased up. 2 While it is not conclusive that a vegan diet alone (no eggs, no animal products or dairy) is necessary, medical experts in Diabetes are certain that weight loss by itself can help with pain, since losing extra fat in the body reduces inflammation and improves mobility, also helping to ease nerve pain. Healthy Eating for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy A healthy diet for diabetes is generally the same as healthy eating for anyone low in saturated and trans fats, moderate in salt and sugar, and meals with lean protein, non-starchy vegetables, whole grains, healthy fats and fruits. There are different approaches to creating a diabetes diet designed to keep your blood sugar in the normal range key to reducing diabe Continue reading >>

Neuropathy: The Sugar Connection

Neuropathy: The Sugar Connection

One of the most common calls I get as a nutritionist is, “Help! What do I do to stop the tingling in my hands and feet? Are there supplements that will help?” These clients are experiencing symptoms of neuropathy, or nerve damage. They are looking for a solution for the pain, maybe a medication or a supplement. For this problem, the solution may lie in what you put in your grocery cart, pack in your lunch or plan to order at dinner tonight. What is neuropathy? Technically speaking, neuropathy is a result of damage to a nerve or set of nerves. Your nerves send out messages from your brain and spinal cord to the rest of your body. If they become damaged, that message does not make it to its destination. This can often lead to weakness, numbness, unpleasant and often painful sensations, usually in hands and feet. Damage to nerves can also manifest in restless leg syndrome, plantar fasciitis, carpal tunnel, migraine headaches and even Alzheimer’s. So, what is causing this nerve damage? Neuropathy on the rise as your blood sugar rises Damage to the nerves can be a result of several factors such as chemotherapy, exposure to toxins, alcoholism, traumatic injuries or a deficiency in B vitamins, but the most common cause of neuropathy is high blood sugars, often experienced by diabetic patients. Neuropathy affects up to 50 percent of patients with diabetes; so we know there is a strong correlation between high blood sugars and neuropathy. Whether you’re a diabetic or you’re simply eating cereal every morning for breakfast, your nerves are being damaged by the excess sugar in your blood stream. When you eat carbohydrates, especially in processed forms (like bread, pasta, cereal and crackers), the carbohydrates break down into sugar (or glucose) which rushes into the blo Continue reading >>

Curing Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

Curing Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

More from the neuropathy list below: Alpha-Lipoic Acid Clinical Studies 1. Oral Treatment with R-Alpha Lipoic Acid Improves Diabetic Polyneuropathy SelectShow Ziegler D, Ametov A, Barinov A, et al. The SYDNEY 2 trial. Diabetes Care. 2006;29:2365-70] OBJECTIVE: The aim of this trial was to evaluate the effects of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) on positive sensory symptoms and neuropathic deficits in diabetic patients with distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In this multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 181 diabetic patients in Russia and Israel received once-daily oral doses of 600 mg (n = 45) (ALA600), 1,200 mg (n = 47) (ALA1200), and 1,800 mg (ALA1800) of ALA (n = 46) or placebo (n = 43) for 5 weeks after a 1-week placebo run-in period. The primary outcome measure was the change from baseline of the Total Symptom Score (TSS), including stabbing pain, burning pain, paresthesia, and asleep numbness of the feet. Secondary end points included individual symptoms of TSS, Neuropathy Symptoms and Change (NSC) score, Neuropathy Impairment Score (NIS), and patients’ global assessment of RESULTS: Mean TSS did not differ significantly at baseline among the treatment groups and on average decreased by 4.9 points (51%) in ALA600, 4.5 (48%) in ALA1200, and 4.7 (52%) in ALA1800 compared with 2.9 points (32%) in the placebo group (all P /=50% reduction in TSS) were 62, 50, 56, and 26%, respectively. Significant improvements favoring all three ALA groups were also noted for stabbing and burning pain, the NSC score, and the patients’ global assessment of efficacy. The NIS was numerically reduced. Safety analysis showed a dose-dependent increase in nausea, vomiting, and vertigo. CONCLUSIONS: Oral treatment with Alpha-Lipoic Acid for Continue reading >>

Vegan Diet Helps Alleviate Diabetic Neuropathy

Vegan Diet Helps Alleviate Diabetic Neuropathy

Vegan Diet Helps Alleviate Diabetic Neuropathy Vegan Diet Helps Alleviate Diabetic Neuropathy Participants with type 2 diabetes and diabetic neuropathy lost an average of 15 pounds. HealthDay News A vegan diet might help patients with diabetic neuropathy lose weight and find some pain relief, a small pilot study suggests. The findings were published online May 26 in Nutrition & Diabetes. Cameron Wells, MPH, RD, acting director of nutrition education for the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine in Washington, D.C., and colleagues recruited 34 adults with type 2 diabetes and diabetic neuropathy. The authors randomly assigned half to follow a vegan diet and take a vitamin B12 supplement; the rest took the supplement but continued with their normal diets. The intervention group was told to limit themselves to 20 to 30 grams of fat per day and to increase low glycemic index foods; they were also offered weekly classes for support in following the vegan diet. The researchers found that after about five months, the vegan group had lost 15 pounds, on average, versus about one pound in the comparison group. They also reported bigger improvements on a standard pain-rating survey. "In just 20 weeks, we had people lose weight, see their blood sugar levels drop and their pain improve," Wells told HealthDay. "Sometimes doctors are quick to rely on medications, but diet can make a big difference." Continue reading >>

Neuropathy (diabetic)

Neuropathy (diabetic)

Dietary And Lifestyle Considerations Dietary and lifestyle modifications are essential for people with diabetic neuropathy because they can help prevent the disease from progressing further. One of the most important ways that diabetics can slow the progression of their neuropathy is to achieve better control of their blood glucose levels (Skyler 1996; Callaghan 2012a). It is in this goal that dietary and lifestyle changes can be most effective. In addition to the strategies outlined in this protocol, readers are encouraged to review the Diabetes and Weight Loss protocols. Diet Diet is one of the main ways that people with diabetes can control their blood glucose levels without taking additional medication. Eating well-balanced meals, with a mixture of fruits, vegetables, proteins, and fats will help prevent major swings in blood glucose levels. Eating meals on a regular schedule and coordinating meals with diabetes medications will also minimize blood glucose fluctuations (Mayo Clinic 2011). In addition, specific dietary patterns, such as high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets (Gannon 2004) or diets rich in foods with a low glycemic index (Rizkalla 2004) have been shown to improve blood glucose control. A healthy diet will also help diabetics lose weight, which has been shown to help keep blood glucose levels low (Wing 1987). Notably, a study found that making dietary changes to help keep blood glucose levels under control reduced diabetic neuropathy symptoms in patients with impaired glucose tolerance, which is considered to be a pre-diabetic condition (Smith 2006). Ideally, most people should target a fasting blood glucose level between 70 and 85 mg/dL, although this may be difficult for diabetics to achieve. Exercise Regular exercise is also important for people with Continue reading >>

7 Natural Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments That Work

7 Natural Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments That Work

Diabetes itself is extremely common, affecting about one in every three adults in the U.S., and diabetic neuropathy is one of the most likely complications to develop as a side effect because high blood sugar levels affect nerve fibers throughout the body. Neuropathy is a pathological condition that encompasses more than 100 different forms and manifestations of nerve damage, both in people with diabetes and those without. (1) Diabetic neuropathy (also sometimes called peripheral neuropathy) is the term for nerve damage caused by diabetes, a chronic condition that occurs when the body doesn’t use the hormone insulin properly. Neuropathy can form anywhere but is most likely to affect nerves running through the limbs, hands and feet. Not every person with diabetes symptoms develops complications such as neuropathy, but many do. In fact, up to 60 percent to 70 percent of all diabetics experience some form of neuropathy. For some people, only mild symptoms develop from nerve damage, such as tingling or numbness in the limbs. But for others, neuropathy causes a good amount of pain, digestive issues, problems with the heart and blood vessels, the inability to go about life normally, and even death if major organs are affected badly enough. Diabetic neuropathy can trigger a cascade of events that lead to even more serious complications. Just like with diabetes itself, there is no known “cure” for peripheral neuropathy, only ways to manage it and stop progression, similarly to the natural treatments for diabetes. It’s a dangerous problem to have, but fortunately most people are able to keep it under control by regulating their blood sugar levels, changing their diets and adopting healthier lifestyles overall, all of which help control their diabetes. 7 Natural Remedies Continue reading >>

10 Healing Foods To Ease Nerve Pain & Slow Neuropathy

10 Healing Foods To Ease Nerve Pain & Slow Neuropathy

10 Healing Foods to Ease Nerve Pain & Slow Neuropathy Of all the medicines and remedies youve considered for your neuropathy treatment Ill bet food wasnt high on the list (if it was even on the list at all). Believe it or not though emerging research is showing that the types of foods we consume can have a powerful effect on our nerves and may even help heal or repair damaged nerves. Foods can have a positive or negative effect on your neuropathy. Some foods can actually weaken or damage the nerves further leading to exacerbated symptoms. Knowing what these foods are and avoiding them at all costs can go a long way in preventing the spread or worsening of your nerve pain, numbness or tingling. MORE: 4 Foods to Avoid if You Have Nerve Pain Other foods can strengthen your nerves helping to guard against further damage and boosting the health of your peripheral nervous system. In some cases, the foods you eat may even help repair damaged nerves, resulting in relief from the symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. These nerve-boosting foods are the topic of todays blog post. Lets take a look at 10 foods you should include in your diet to both boost nerve health and promote the healing of damaged nerves: Of all the vitamins and nutrients for nerve health B12 is one of the most important. Vitamin B12 helps build, sustain and repair the layer of protective fat around the nerves. This protective coating, known as the Myelin Sheath, is an essential defense against harmful substances that could damage or destroy nerves. Without enough vitamin B12, the myelin sheath weakens, leaving your nerves more vulnerable to damage. In fact, a deficiency of vitamin B12 is one of the leading causes of neuropathy. You may be thinking well, my nerves have already been damaged so what use is it now?. Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy And Diabetes

Peripheral Neuropathy And Diabetes

Pain. Tingling. Numbness. If you have a type of nerve damage from diabetes called diabetic peripheral neuropathy, chances are you've experienced these symptoms, especially in your hands and feet. The discomfort can affect your mood, sleep, and overall quality of life. Prescription medications can help. But research shows that they only ease the pain by about 30% to 50%. How can you bridge the gap? Learn how you can get relief now -- and prevent the condition from getting worse down the road. If don't manage your diabetes, your blood glucose levels get too high. Over time, excess blood sugar can damage your peripheral nerves. These connect your brain and spinal cord to the rest of your body. That could set the stage for diabetic neuropathy. If you bring your blood sugar into the healthy range (a hemoglobin A1C reading of 7% or lower), you'll reduce your risk of nerve damage by 60%, according to research from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. "Healthy blood sugar levels can slow the process and ease the pain of diabetic neuropathy," says Aaron I. Vinik, MD, PhD, the director of the research and neuroendocrine unit at Eastern Virginia Medical School. How can you keep your blood sugar in check? First, talk to your doctor. "A rapid drop can actually make the pain worse," Vinik says. Your doctor can suggest changes to gently bring your levels down into the healthy zone, like: Eat a diet high that's in fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy, and whole grains; contains a moderate amount of fish, poultry, nuts, and beans; and has a very low amount of red meat. Manage your stress levels. Exercise for at least 30 minutes, 5 days a week. If your doctor prescribes medication for your blood sugar, take it as recommended. Acetaminophen, aspirin, ibuprofe Continue reading >>

Neuropathy Symptoms And Treatment

Neuropathy Symptoms And Treatment

Neuropathy is a common disorder that stems from damage to the peripheral nerves, especially those that branch out through the arms, legs, fingers and toes. Neuropathy symptoms include weakness, numbness, tingling, and burning or painful sensations. Diabetes is a frequent cause of neuropathy, but peripheral neuropathy can also be due to toxic trauma (such as from chemotherapy) or mechanical injury, as with carpal tunnel syndrome. It can be caused by putting pressure on nerves, such as the prolonged use of crutches, or even by sitting in the same position for too long. Disorders such as atherosclerosis , autoimmunity, advanced kidney disease and hypothyroidism may also be to blame, as well as certain drugs or environmental toxins. What is the conventional neuropathy treatment? Conventional treatments include tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep) and imipramine (Tofranil). These drugs act on the central nervous system and may reduce pain independent of their action as antidepressants (do not expect immediate results; it usually takes a few weeks for them to bring relief). Common side effects include drowsiness, dry mouth, urinary retention and dizziness. Anti-seizure medications such as phenytoin (Dilantin), carbamazepine (tegretol) and gabapentin (Neurontin) are also used effectively for peripheral neuropathy. If neuropathic pain is due to compression of a nerve by a tumor or a ruptured disc, surgery may be recommended. What neuropathy treatment and natural remedies does Dr. Weil recommend? Your first step should be a general medical checkup to determine if an underlying disease or injury is the cause of your neuropathy symptoms, and if so, to determine its nature. Your doctor should do complete blood work and may refer you to a neurologist who Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Improved With Vegan Diet

Diabetic Neuropathy Improved With Vegan Diet

A randomized controlled trial indicates that a vegan diet may be beneficial in relieving diabetic nerve pain…. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy, which occurs in about half of all patients with type 2 diabetes, is underdiagnosed, and this is partly because physicians aren"t able to offer anything to treat the underlying cause of this condition, and the current treatments provided to these patients only treat the pain. The vegan diet is a plant-based diet, and studies show that it can help ease the pain caused by diabetic neuropathy. In an earlier observational study conducted by Crane and Sample, 21 type 2 diabetes patients with nerve pain were put on a low-fat, high-fiber vegan diet for 1 month, and 81% of the participants achieved complete pain relief and lost around 11 lbs on average. Additionally, the diet enabled most of these patients to reduce their diabetes medications and blood pressure medications. Anne Bunner, PhD, and Caroline Trapp, MSN, of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, sought to see whether these same benefits could be seen in a randomized controlled trial. They conducted the Dietary Intervention for chronic diabetic Neuropathy pain (DINE) study, in which 15 patients with type 2 diabetes and diabetic neuropathy were randomized to either a low-fat, high-fiber, vegan diet and B12 supplementation or B12 supplementation alone. The patients had a mean age of 57, half of them were female, and half had a college education or higher. Bunner noted that there tended to be a deficiency in B12 in diabetic patients, especially those taking metformin. The participants who were put on the diet had to attend 20 weekly nutrition classes involving nutrition education, social support, cooking demonstrations, and food product sampling, eat plant-based food Continue reading >>

6 Things To Know About Diabetic Neuropathy

6 Things To Know About Diabetic Neuropathy

Home Your Health 6 Things to Know About Diabetic Neuropathy 6 Things to Know About Diabetic Neuropathy By: Rachel Despres on Tuesday, November 14th Diabetic neuropathy is a nerve disorder that can occur in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. It is commonly caused by blood sugar levels being too high over a prolonged period of time, resulting in nerve damage throughout the body, most frequently in the legs and feet. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases says , About 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy, but risk is especially high for those who have had diabetes for over 25 years. Read on to learn more about the different types of diabetic neuropathy, as well as symptoms to look out for and treatment options available. The family of diabetic neuropathies is made up of four main types: peripheral, autonomic, proximal, and focal. According to MedicalNewsToday.com, peripheral neuropathy is the most common form and affects the nerves of the hands and feet. While autonomic neuropathy affects the nerves that control the involuntary functions of the body, including digestion, bowel and bladder function, and perspiration. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases adds that it can also impact the nerves that serve the heart and control blood pressure, as well as nerves in the lungs and eyes. Proximal neuropathy, on the other hand, causes pain in the thighs, hips, or buttocks and leads to weakness in the legs. And, finally, focal neuropathy is when one nerve or a group of nerves anywhere in the body experience sudden weakness. A Canadian study has found an increased risk for diabetes among breast cancer survivors over 55 years of agecompared to women who have never had breast cancer. Dia Continue reading >>

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