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Diabetic Salad Recipes

Salad Recipes For Diabetics

Salad Recipes For Diabetics

By Linda Johnson Larsen B.S. Food Science & Nutrition, Cookbook Author Salads can be a healthy choice for diabetics as long as you follow a few rules. Make sure you use the freshest ingredients and choose healthy ingredients that are low in carbohydrates. Remember all carbohydrates should be restricted on a diabetic diet, not just sugary foods. Add lots of vegetables and lean meats, such as chicken and fish, to your salad recipes. Virtually everyone loves chicken salad. This recipe is very low in carbohydrates. Lean meats like chicken that contain lots of protein are a good choice for diabetics, since protein can help repair cell damage . This low-fat salad is full of flavor from mustard, lemon juice, and herbs. Serve it on dark leafy greens for even more nutrition. 2 rotisserie chickens OR 6 cups cubed cooked chicken Remove the meat from the cooked chickens, discarding the skin, and cube. Add to a large bowl with the celery and pecans. Combine all the dressing ingredients in a medium bowl and mix with a wire whisk until combined. Pour the dressing over the salad ingredients and toss to coat. Cover and refrigerate the salad for two to three hours to blend flavors before serving. Makes 8 servings. Per 1 cup serving: Calories 164, Sodium 337 mg, Cholesterol 15 mg, Fat 8g, Carbohydrates 4g Dark leafy greens are a great source of fiber and nutrients, such as iron and calcium. Diabetics should eat lots of foods high in fiber. Choose greens like kale, Romaine lettuce, mesclun, chard, and spinach for your salads. Likewise, avocados have lots of healthy fat that can fill you up and protect your heart. This salad is very high in vitamins A and C (more than 50 percent of daily value), nutrients essential for good health. You can use this dressing for any other salad, as well. Continue reading >>

Broccoli Bacon Salad (sugar-free, Nut-free, Diabetic-friendly)

Broccoli Bacon Salad (sugar-free, Nut-free, Diabetic-friendly)

Coming up on 6 years of sugar-free, whole foods centered eating, I find myself making fewer elaborate treats and more simple dishes. If you’ve ever been to any church potlucks, you’re probably familiar with Broccoli Salad. This seemingly humble cold salad–chock full of crunchy broccoli florets, smoky crumbled bacon, sweet cherry tomatoes, and sharp cheddar coated in a tangy dressing–has moved into the starring role of my lunch rotation. What is so appealing about this nutrient-packed side dish, in addition to the contrasting flavors (sweet n’ salty, tangy n’ creamy), is the ease of preparation. The biggest hurdle I face when it comes to eating veggies is the demanding prep work. This no-cook salad quashes that excuse. If you have a knife, a bowl, and a few spare minutes, you can make this dish! Speaking of knives, this Zwilling J.A. Henckels knife has valiantly weathered many a recipe testing session these past few years (see it in action here) including this one, chopping relentlessly through veggies, chocolate, and occasionally my index finger. It’s a workhouse of a knife, and I’m hoping to acquire the smaller model before moving out in a few months to attend medical school. It will be sad to part with my favorite kitchen tools (and best ever taste testers – thanks, Mom and Dad!), but exciting to move on to the next chapter. With med school on the horizon, I’ve put together a couple of projects to leave you with a few more healthy indulgences before I hit the books. They’re printable pamphlets with 10 recipes and color photos for each, and they’ll be coming your way before the end of May. The savory book features my favorite pizza crust, a new bread recipe, chicken tenders, keto-friendly cornbread, and a couple of simple, beautiful dishes that Continue reading >>

Our Top 10 Easy Diabetic Deli Salad Recipes

Our Top 10 Easy Diabetic Deli Salad Recipes

Our Best Low-Carb Recipes: 30 Low-Carb Dinner Recipes, Desserts, and More Eating healthy has never tasted so good with this FREE eCookbook. From low-carb breakfast recipes to low-carb dinners and even low-carb desserts, you'll be able to stick to your healthy eating lifestyle with ease! Bonus: Get our newsletter & special offers for free. We will not share or sell your email address. View our Privacy Policy Home > Editor's Picks > Our Top 10 Easy Diabetic Deli Salad Recipes Our Top 10 Easy Diabetic Deli Salad Recipes You must be logged in to add a private note. Login | Register We are adding the recipe to your Recipe Box. You must be logged in to add a recipe. Login | Register For anyone with a full social calendar, deli salad recipes should be an important part of your kitchen repertoire. After all, they make the perfect potluck dish for any birthday, barbecue or picnic you might be attending! Even if you don't have anywhere to go, these recipes turn your hankering for a healthy lunch salad from drab to fab, and your family will love having any of these deli salads on-hand in the fridge. From deli chicken salad to deli pasta salad, we'v got all your bases covered. Plus, this collection of easy diabetic salad recipes is so scrumptious that everyone will love it, regardless of their eating habits or dietary restrictions. This light and refreshing pasta salad gets some health and nutrition with kidney beans and peas and a bit of a kick with fat-free Italian Dressing. Why not give our Light Bean Pasta Salad a spin at your next BBQ, potluck or picnic? We all know that cottage cheese is a super-healthy option, but it can get a bit boring. So we decided to add some excitement to it by tossing it with a rainbow of colorful veggies. So now it's a Confetti Corn Salad that's cre Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Salad

Mediterranean Salad

Remember we mentioned the Mediterranean-style diet when we talked about the link between diabetes and Alzheimer’s last week? This salad is the Mediterranean diet on a plate. The nice thing about this salad is that the recipe is totally flexible. Don’t like salmon? Use chicken, chickpeas, or beans as your protein instead. No cucumbers in the house? No problem. Out of kale? Use whatever leafy greens you have on hand. Hate olives? Leave them out. Not eating dairy? Skip the feta. Reduce the fat by skimping on the dressing and adding fewer olives. Reduce the sodium by adding less of the olives, pepperoncini, and feta cheese. Also, roasted red peppers in a jar tend to be high in sodium, but it’s easy to roast your own. Simply cook red bell peppers over an open flame or under the broiler until the skin turns black. Put them in a covered bowl until cool enough to handle, then peel and chop. Make the salad vegetarian by substituting chickpeas or white beans for the salmon. Make it vegan by skipping the feta cheese. ABOUT THE AUTHOR Karyn Wofford is a type 1 diabetic who has been educating herself about health and wellness for 14 years. She has been an Emergency Medical Technician for 5 years and is now studying to become a Health and Wellness Specialist. Her aspiration in life is to bring helpful information to those seeking to be as healthy as they can be. Disclaimer: This information is not intended to take the place of medical advice. Always discuss any dietary or lifestyle changes with your doctor first. Continue reading >>

3 Easy Salad Recipes To Help Control Diabetes

3 Easy Salad Recipes To Help Control Diabetes

Diabetes is one of the most rampant diseases of our time, and when you take a look at the average North American diet you begin to see why. According to the American Diabetes Association, in 2012 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the population, had diabetes. [1] Sadly, diabetes rates are still rising steadily because we are not doing enough to adjust our diets, despite the wealth of nutritional information available to us. A study completed by the CDC & Research Triangle Institute concluded that, if recent trends in diabetes prevalence rates continue linearly over the next 50 years, future changes in the size and demographic characteristics of the U.S. population will lead to dramatic increases in the number of Americans with diagnosed diabetes. [2] Finding The Right Foods When you are diabetic, changes in diet are pretty well a must. Finding the right diet for some people can be a bit tricky, as we are often tempted by other foods or run out of creative ways to enjoy healthy meals. The truth is, the average person might look at something like a salad and think that it’s a healthy option for a diabetic given the low sugar content, yet many times we turn around and throw a sugar laden dressing on top of that salad, which entirely compromises our well-intentioned effort. Below is a short list of salads which can be good for a diabetic diet. If you are adventurous and want to try an interesting fruit which can help treat diabetes, check out bitter melon. Research has shown some very promising things with this plant. 1. Spinach With Garlic Vinaigrette Ingredients: 6 cups baby spinach leaves, or about 6 ounces 2 minced garlic cloves 1/4 cup sliced red onion 1/4 tsp black pepper, ground 1/8 tsp salt 1 1/2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil 1 tbsp white wine vinegar 1/2 tsp Dijon Continue reading >>

Diabetic Friendly Waldorf Salad

Diabetic Friendly Waldorf Salad

Drizzle lemon juice over diced apples; toss well. Mix in celery and walnuts. Blend together sugar, salt, low-fat yogurt and mayonnaise. Fold into apple mixture; chill. Advertisement Continue reading >>

Diabetic Greek Salad Recipe

Diabetic Greek Salad Recipe

Preparation time: 20 minutes. Ingredients 2 large tomatoes, thickly sliced 1 medium cucumber (about 7 inches long), thinly sliced 1 small onion, thinly sliced and separated into rings 1/3 cup Kalamata olives 2 teaspoons capers 1/4 cup chopped parsley 1/4 cup crumbled reduced-fat Feta cheese Dressing: 1 clove garlic, crushed (or 1 teaspoon bottled garlic) 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 1/2 cup fresh-squeezed lemon juice 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil Directions Combine tomato slices, cucumber slices, and onion rings on a large platter or in a large bowl. Top with olives, capers, parsley, and crumbled Feta. Place garlic, pepper, and lemon juice in a food processor or blender and pulse 4 times. With the food processor or blender running (hold lid partially over top of blender to keep ingredients from splashing out), carefully pour oil in a slow, steady stream, processing until smooth. Pour dressing over salad and serve (if salad is in a bowl, toss gently to coat). Yield: 6 servings. Serving size: 1/6 of salad. Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories: 130 calories, Carbohydrates: 8 g, Protein: 2 g, Fat: 10 g, Saturated Fat: 2 g, Sodium: 220 mg, Fiber: 2 g Exchanges per serving: 2 nonstarchy vegetable, 2 fat. Carbohydrate choices: 1/2. This recipe was developed by Tami Ross, a Diabetes Nutrition Specialist and Certified Diabetes Educator in Lexington, Kentucky. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Salad Recipes

Diabetic Salad Recipes

An important part of managing diabetes is to have a balanced diet. This salad recipe is simple to make and healthy. Cooking from scratch gives you control over what you eat. This salad recipe from Diabetes UK is simple to make and healthy. More info on staying healthy with type 2 diabetes on our page: ow.ly/SxVR30dDgnY Continue reading >>

Salad Recipes

Salad Recipes

This section includes everything from simple tossed salads and summer picnic salads to gourmet salads for lunch or dinner. Salads that include a variety of green vegetables are a good source of fiber, which helps regulate the digestive system and aids weight management. They are low calorie and carbohydrate content and have a low glycemic index – which makes them a great choice for people with type 2 diabetes. Dark green leafy vegetables, like kale and spinach, are rich in vitamins A, C, and E. All of our salad recipes provide nutritional information to make meal planning for diabetes easier. This Asian-inspired recipe is alive with shades of green from spinach and bok choy and distinct flavors of soy sauce, ginger and garlic. And when you arrange the bok choy over fresh spinach, the warmth gently and slightly wilts the spinach leaves. The result is a mouth-watering medley of tastes and textures. To turn this salad into a complete meal, top it with grilled or seared tofu, grilled or roasted chicken breast, or grilled or steamed shrimp. Recipe for Spinach Salad with Seared Bok Choy, Ginger and Cilantro from our Salads recipe section. A hearty, comfort food meal with rich flavor. Buy beef brisket that weighs almost 2 pounds before trimming as there is quite a bit of fat to discard. If a sliced brisket is preferred over the shredded variety, cook about 30 minutes less than recommended above. Serving size: 1/2 cup (125 mL) beef, 1/3 cup (75 mL) sauce. Recipe for Fall-Apart Beer Brisket from our Main Dishes recipe section. Grilled chicken breast is combined with a roasted garlic vinaigrette to create a healthy and exciting salad or main course. Recipe for Chicken, Strawberry and Fennel Salad from our recipe section. Tuna is a sturdy fish that is easy to grill or broil. If Continue reading >>

Greek Bean Salad

Greek Bean Salad

Beans are one of the healthiest carbohydrate sources out there. They are full of fiber and other nutrients. If you need to eat a gluten-free diet, beans can be a staple in your meal plan. Prep Time: 15 minutes Continue reading >>

Chopped Detox Salad Recipe

Chopped Detox Salad Recipe

Keeping to the theme of New Years detoxing, this raw Chopped Detox Salad is a great way to get your bod in tip top shape quickly!Raw veggies are packed with nutrition but they are also full of enzymes and LOADED with fiber which plays a vital role in weight loss! Fiber is only found in foods from plants, such as greens, nuts, vegetables, and fruits. It passes through the body with very little change in the digestive system. That means that fiber provides few or no calories, in addition to having many health benefits. Fiber provides many benefits.While maintaining the health of the digestive tract, it also lowers the risk of certain cancers, heart disease, and diabetes. It helps control the appetite, so its easier to keep weight in check. Because it is found only in plant foods, vegetarians tend to have very high fiber intakes, which may be one of the reasons vegetarians are generally healthier and slimmer than meateaters. ( source ) A high-fiber diet has many benefits, which include: Normalizes bowel movements.Dietary fiber increases the weight and size of your stool and softens it. A bulky stool is easier to pass, decreasing your chance of constipation. If you have loose, watery stools, fiber may also help to solidify the stool because it absorbs water and adds bulk to stool. Helps maintain bowel health.A high-fiber diet may lower your risk of developing hemorrhoids and small pouches in your colon (diverticular disease). Some fiber is fermented in the colon. Researchers are looking at how this may play a role in preventing diseases of the colon. Lowers cholesterol levels.Soluble fiber found in beans, oats, flaxseed and oat bran may help lower total blood cholesterol levels by lowering low-density lipoprotein, or bad, cholesterol levels. Studies also have shown that fi Continue reading >>

Easy Healthy Taco Salad Recipe With Ground Beef

Easy Healthy Taco Salad Recipe With Ground Beef

FREE LOW CARB RECIPES E-BOOK! Sign up to get a FREE low carb recipes e-book, plus get access to subscriber exclusives! (No spam, ever. You can unsubscribe anytime.) This post may contain affiliate links. I may earn a small commission from purchases made through them, at no additional cost to you, which helps keep this content free. (Full disclosure) We’re probably smack in the middle of the hottest time of year right now. In my kitchen, that equals easy, one-pan dinners that avoid the oven and don’t require keeping the stove on for too long. Salads are perfect for checking those boxes, but of course you still need some protein in there to make it a full meal. That’s where this easy and healthy taco salad recipe comes in. You’ve probably seen Mexican taco salad at restaurants before. In case you haven’t, it’s basically like an enormous Mexican taco in bowl form. No taco shell needed! Unlike most restaurant versions, my healthy taco salad is low carb and gluten-free. Easy Taco Salad Ingredients The way to make easy taco salad is to use simple ingredients. After browning the meat, all you have to do is mix everything together! Store bought taco seasoning saves a lot of time and makes the process easier, but check labels to avoid sugar. It’s not hard to make your own if you have time, though. Salsa and sour cream stand in lieu of a dressing here, which works out surprisingly well. Why spend time creating a complicated taco salad dressing, when these work just as well? When you mix it all up, it tastes like there’s dressing in there, anyway. Possibly the best part is that the whole thing incorporates just ten ingredients from start to finish. And, it’s on the table in merely twenty minutes. The only cooking involved is browning the ground beef on the stove Continue reading >>

Corn Salad

Corn Salad

Ingredients Directions Boil the corn in a large pot of water for 3 minutes. Remove and allow to cool to the touch. Cut off kernels and place in a large bowl. You should have about 2 cups. Lightly coat a non-stick skillet with cooking spray and sauté the onion until wilted. Add the chili powder and cumin; sauté another minute. Combine with the corn. Add the red and green bell pepper, tomato, and cilantro to the corn mixture. In a small cup, combine the oil, vinegar, salt (if using), and pepper. Drizzle over the salad. Serve at room temperature. Nutrition Information Per serving: 129 calories (27% calories from fat), 3 g protein, 4 g total fat (0.6 g saturated fat), 23 g carbohydrates, 4 g dietary fiber, 0 cholesterol, 16 mg sodium Diabetic exchanges: 1 1/2 carbohydrate (1 bread/starch, 1 vegetable), 1 fat Welcome to the Type 2 Diabetes Center! This is your launching pad for living better with type 2 diabetes. We’ve gathered all the latest type 2 diabetes information, research updates, and advances in devices and medications. And because diabetes impacts every facet of your life, you’ll also find practical advice from leading experts and other people living with type 2 diabetes featured here. That includes mouth-watering, healthy recipes; money-saving tips; advice to help navigate social, professional, and relationship issues; and inspiring personal stories from people just like you. Explore the resources here and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be alerted to new additions. Continue reading >>

7 Easy Lunches For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Lunches For Type 2 Diabetes

If breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day, lunch can often be the most hurried. A recent survey found that 62 percent of Americans rush through lunch at their desks, and even when we manage to leave the office, fast-food restaurants and food courts often prevail over more healthy options. But they don't have to be your only option — and, in fact, they shouldn't be your first choice if you have type 2 diabetes. In general, try to pack your own lunch whenever possible — the health benefits, not to mention the cost-savings, can be enormous. Short on prep time? Put these quick and nutritious lunch ideas on your menu to fill you up and keep your blood sugar in check. 1. Salads Salad should be in regular rotation for lunch. You can create a different salad every day of the week by varying your toppings. Try grilled chicken, shrimp, or fish, but avoid heaping on a lot of fattening ingredients, such as bacon bits and heavy cheeses. Salads with lots of raw vegetables are best, including carrots, cucumbers, radishes, celery, and spinach. Sprinkle nuts or seeds on top, add a few dried cranberries, and garnish with some avocado chunks to give it zip. Choose a salad dressing made with vinegar and olive oil to avoid added sugars found in fat-free and low-fat versions, and limit the serving to one tablespoon for a side salad and two tablespoons for an entrée-sized salad. 2. Sandwiches As with salads, there are many ways to spice up a sandwich. Start with whole-grain bread or a whole-wheat tortilla. Pick a lean meat, such as turkey, ham, or grilled chicken; layer on your choice of veggies; add mustard, low-fat mayonnaise, or hummus to the mix — and you have a filling and tasty lunch. Stay away from greasy chips, French fries, and other fattening sides. Instead choose fr Continue reading >>

Power Lunch Salad - Recipes For Healthy Living By The American Diabetes Association

Power Lunch Salad - Recipes For Healthy Living By The American Diabetes Association

This salad makes a nutritious and flavor-packed lunch that you are bound to love. Its a great example of how a salad can be a meal when you include vegetables, protein and healthy carbs. 5.5 ounce bag organic baby spinach, spring mix blend 1/3 cup reduced-fat feta cheese, crumbled 7 ounces oven roasted deli turkey breast, sliced into inch strips In a salad bowl, mix together all salad ingredients. In a small bowl, whisk together dressing ingredients. Pour over salad and toss to coat. Dietitian Tip: This recipe uses organic spinach, lettuce and apples because they are part of the dirty dozen list of foods that can contain the most pesticides. So, if you are trying to figure out what foods to buy organic these are few to start with. If you cant find pepitas, substitute with sunflower seeds. Dried fruit, such as cranberries, are high in carbs, but its good to eat them with other low-carb foods like spinach, salad and almonds. MAKE IT GLUTEN-FREE: Confirm the ingredients you use are gluten-free and this recipe can be made gluten-free. Natural and organic foods explained, plus what it means to you and your health. Think beyond the traditional turkey sandwich. Here are some healthy new lunch ideas. Calculate the number of calories you should eat each day to maintain your present body weight: Please select an option before you continue. I don't do any physical activity other than what I need to do for my usual activities, such as going to work or school, grocery shopping, or doing chores around the house. I do some moderate exercise every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk about 1.5 to 3 miles a day at about 3 to 4 miles an hour. Or I do something else that's moderately active. I am very active every day in addition to doing my usual activities. Continue reading >>

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