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Diabetic Medications That Cause Swelling

Diabetic Legs Swelling Causes And Remedies

Diabetic Legs Swelling Causes And Remedies

Many people suffering from diabetes complain about swelling in legs and feet. Usually, this swelling is painless and due to retention of fluid. There can be numerous reasons leading to such retention, from very high and uncontrolled sugar levels (which is dangerous for various organs) to the secondary complications of diabetes. Usually, fluid retention indicates that either heart of a diabetic person has become weak. Thus there is a poor flow of fluids, or kidneys are not functioning properly. In some cases, it may be due to liver disease or some anti-diabetic medications. Other reasons of such swelling could be a disease of blood vessels, or deficit of certain micronutrients and electrolytes(“Swelling and Diabetes – Swollen Legs, Ankle & Feet, Peripheral Edema,” n.d.). Let us look in detail at some leading causes of swelling of legs in diabetes. Congested heart failure The major complication of diabetes is weakening of heart and blood vessels. Congested Heart Failure (CHF) often coexists in diabetes(Nasir & Aguilar, 2012). In fact, a person suffering from diabetes is at much higher risk of heart failure(Nichols, Gullion, Koro, Ephross, & Brown, 2004). In CHF though the heart is functioning, but its pumping power is compromised, which means that it is not strong enough for blood to circulate properly in our body. Things are further made worse by stiffening of arteries(“Heart failure,” n.d.). All this leads to swelling and accumulation of fluids in the legs. Kidney failure More than one-third people suffering from diabetes have chronic kidney disease(“Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease,” 2014). Diabetes is slowly emerging one of the leading causes of chronic kidney disease. Almost half of people going for dialysis, also have diabetes(Cavanaugh, 2007). In d Continue reading >>

Seven Tips For Dealing With Diabetes-related Fluid Retention

Seven Tips For Dealing With Diabetes-related Fluid Retention

Fluid retention, also known as edema, is a problem that affects many diabetics, especially those with type 2 diabetes. Water retention can occur in any part of the legs, including the feet, ankles, calves and thighs. There are several reasons why edema occurs, such as fluid buildup or from inflammation in injured or diseased tissue and joints. Types of Edema There are three types of diabetes-related fluid retention: The first type is called macular edema. Macular edema is a swelling that occurs in the macular, which is near the center of the retina. The retina is responsible for a number of duties such as the ability to read, daytime vision and color reception. Macular edema can cause diabetic retinopathy, which starts with the leaking of fluid from blood vessels into the macula. If not treated, this condition can blind a person. Pulmonary edema is the second type of fluid retention, which occurs if someone is using certain diabetic medications and if the person has cardiovascular problems. This type of edema can be treated inserting a catheter that drains the fluids. Foot and leg edema is the third type of edema and is also the most commonly discussed. Edema in the legs and feet can cause a high risk of non-healing wounds in diabetics. This type of edema is usually treated with manual decongestive therapy and diuretics. Medication Risks for Edema People who take thiazolidinedione medications are known to experience water retention. Thiazolidinediones are commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes as they help the body produce more insulin. However, one of the downsides of this medication is that it can lead to weight gain and edema. Preventing and Treating Edema Edema can have a lot of harmful effects if not treated like loss of vision. One of the main ways to stop fluid r Continue reading >>

Diabetes Basics

Diabetes Basics

Basics of diabetes Diabetes is a condition caused by lack of a chemical in the body (a hormone) called insulin. There are two major forms of diabetes. In type 1 diabetes eventually no insulin is produced and individuals require insulin injections for survival. It used to be thought this only presented in children, but it is now clear this can occur at any age. The other more common form of diabetes called type 2 diabetes occurs due to the body's resistance to the effects of insulin in addition to an insufficient quantity of insulin. However, in this type of diabetes there is usually some insulin produced. For both types of diabetes, blood glucose levels are elevated. Furthermore, people with diabetes are prone to certain complications not seen in those without diabetes. These complications involve the eye (retinopathy), kidney (nephropathy) and nerves (neuropathy). People with diabetes also get early hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis), leading to early heart attacks and strokes. The good news for people with diabetes is that with proper care all of these problems can be avoided. Immediate medical attention Uncontrolled diabetes presents with frequent thirst and urination. Over time, patients will become dehydrated as the glucose is "spilling" over into the urine. If insulin deficiency is severe enough, fat stores are used for energy as glucose cannot get into cells. This problem is much more common with type 1 diabetes and is called "ketoacidosis". It can be diagnosed at home with a simple urine test. When significant ketones are found in the urine, it is important to be in touch with a physician immediately. There are other conditions that require immediate attention. Blurry vision in someone with known diabetic eye disease or someone with a long history of di Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Edema

Diabetes And Edema

Edema is a medical condition caused by the abnormal fluid retention in the spaces between the body's cells or in the circulatory system. This medical condition causes puffiness and swelling in several areas of the body, including legs, arms, feet, hands, lungs, heart, or stomach area. Is there a connection between edema and diabetes? Let’s find out. There are basically three main types of edema associated with diabetes - macular edema, pulmonary edema, and foot and leg edema. The causes of diabetic edema include: Acute liver failure, cirrhosis Renal artery stenosis Chronic hepatitis Cardiovascular complications Nephrotic Syndrome or acute renal failure Medications used to treat diabetes Other factors such as premenstrual fluid retention, thiamine deficiency, protein losing enteropathy, pregnancy and acute anaphylaxis, also contribute to diabetic edema. Macular edema is a condition in which the macular tissue area, near the center of the retina gets filled with fluid. This area is mainly responsible for vision. Macular edema caused from diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes. The vision loss can progress, leading to eventual blindness. There are two types of macular edema, focal macular edema and diffuse macular edema. The first one is caused by vascular abnormalities, and can be treated using focal laser treatment. The second type is caused by dilated retinal capillaries. This condition can be treated with grid laser treatment, which is used to seal the leakages. Macular edema is caused by the increasing deposition of fluids and proteins on or under the macula of the eye. The macula is identified as a pale yellow area close to the center of the retina. A local swelling results from fluid and protein retention in the macula. The swelling soon directly press Continue reading >>

These 7 Medications Can Cause Puffy Legs And Ankles

These 7 Medications Can Cause Puffy Legs And Ankles

Medications are a common offender when it comes to lower extremity edema, either as the cause or as a factor that can make it worse. Swelling in the lower legs from fluid in the tissues—lower extremity edema—is a familiar complaint among patients. Imprints from your socks, puffy legs and feet so you can’t put your shoes on, or swelling so that you can make an indent with your thumb (pitting edema) may lead you to wonder what’s going on. One clue that your medication could be the cause: you have edema on both sides (it’s bilateral). Swelling from a clot in the leg, a “DVT” or deep venous thromboembolism, is usually on one side not both. Other causes of bilateral lower extremity edema is dependent edema (your legs have been in a dependent position for a while—sitting or standing for long periods of time), or more complex conditions like chronic venous disease, lymphedema, or heart failure. If you do start to have lower extremity edema on both sides of your body, look at this list and make sure you aren’t taking one of these seven medications. Amlodipine (Norvasc) is a medication used to lower blood pressure. The higher the dose, the more likely you are to have swelling in both of your legs and feet. Edema occurs in 1.8% of folks taking 2.5 mg, 3% of folks taking 5 mg, and almost 11% of those taking 10 mg of amlodipine. So one in ten of you will have swelling when taking amlodipine 10 mg daily. More women taking amlodipine experience edema in their lower extremities: 15% of women compared to 5.6% of men. Other options exist for lowering blood pressure that don’t cause swelling in the legs, so if this is a problem for you, ask your doctor about switching up. Gabapentin (Neurontin) is used for the treatment of neuropathic pain—pain after a shingles outb Continue reading >>

Actos Side Effects?

Actos Side Effects?

I thought Actos was wonderful after taking it for a few weeks. My BS and my A1C were both down significantly. At 3 months I am experiencing terrible swelling in my feet and ankles, unexplained weight gain and awful skin itching. Anyone have any experience with this drug? No side effects, I thought, until I started getting severe leg cramps, then my feet, legs and ankles started to swell also. I just thought that it was part of being a diabetic. I did gain alot of weight too. I had tried the metformin and the met. ER but couldn't take either one of them, they make me very sick with stomach cramps, nausea. That's why I got on Actos. It really worked great til I finally realized that what was causing the leg cramps and swelling. I also think that it is bad for your hair too. I put my ownself back on met. and prayed and prayed that God would let me take it because I didn't want the Actos anymore. The reg. met. did both me for about a week or so. I just went to bed and waited it out because I was determined to make it work. Anyway when I went back to doctor for reg. check up I told her that I wanted to try the Met. ER so she put me on it and that's been since March 2010 and it doesn't give me any problems. I think because I had already start the reg. met that when I started the Met. ER it was already in my system so I did just great and I am doing so much better now. Finally got it all balanced out now, Praise the Lord. God answered my prayers. There are alot of other meds for D so ask your doctor about them Good luck, and hope all will work out for you too. PS) I did loose the weight doing LC and I have lost 50 pounds. I am on actos and the doctor aways checks my ankles for swelling. I would advise you to call the doctor and report this side effect as soon as you can! D.D. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Medications That Cause Leg Swelling

Diabetic Medications That Cause Leg Swelling

Many different types of oral medications help treat type II diabetes, and some may produce side effects such as swelling. If your legs swell when you take diabetes medications, call your doctor. He may need to change medicines. The only medication for people with type I diabetes is insulin, which does not produce swelling. Video of the Day Rosiglitazone may cause swelling in your body, as well as weight gain, according to Drugs.com. Before starting this diabetic medication, inform your doctor if you have a history of heart problems. Drugs.com says that rosiglitazone may raise the level of risk of heart attacks. For this reason, your doctor only should prescribe it if other diabetic drugs do not work for you. Metformin, often the first medication your doctor will prescribe for Type II diabetes, helps to control glucose levels by restricting how much sugar your body absorbs. It also helps your liver and cells to become more sensitive to the insulin your pancreas secretes so your body can use glucose more effectively. Metformin may cause swelling in your body, including your legs, according to the Mayo Clinic. Metformin and Pioglitazone Combination Your physician may prescribe a drug for your Type II diabetes that contains a combination of metformin and pioglitazone that may produce swelling in your legs, according to the Mayo Clinics. Pioglitazone works by making the appropriate parts of your body -- such as the muscle cells, fat cells and liver -- use insulin more effectively. Together, these two medications in one pill may cause swelling in your body and weight gain, according to Drugs.com. If swelling occurs, it may reduce the circulation of blood in your body, so your doctor may need to switch medications. Talk with your doctor if you have a history of heart or kidney Continue reading >>

What Medications Can Cause Swollen Ankles And Feet?

What Medications Can Cause Swollen Ankles And Feet?

ANSWER Many drugs can cause swelling in the feet and ankles as a possible side effect. They include: Hormones such as estrogen (found in oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy) and testosterone Calcium channel blockers, a type of blood pressure medication, which includes nifedipine (Adalat, Afeditab, Nifediac, Nifedical, Procardia), amlodipine (Norvasc), diltiazem (Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Diltia, Tiazac), felodipine (Plendil), and verapamil (Calan, Covera-HS, Isoptin, Isoptin SR, Verelan) Steroids, including androgenic and anabolic steroids and corticosteroids such as prednisone Antidepressants, including: tricyclics, such as nortriptyline (Pamelor, Aventyl), desipramine (Norpramin), and amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep, Vanatrip); and monoamine oxidase inhibitors such as phenelzine (Nardil) and tranylcypromine (Parnate) Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs Diabetes medications Continue reading >>

Peripheral Edema And Diabetes

Peripheral Edema And Diabetes

Peripheral edema is swelling from the collection of fluid in the feet, ankles, and legs. It can occur in one or both of your lower extremities. If you have diabetes, you need to take extra precautions when you have edema. Edema is the result of damage to capillaries or increased pressure causing capillaries to leak fluid into surrounding tissues and result in swelling. People with diabetes often have circulation problems that can cause wounds to heal slowly or not at all. Edema makes it more difficult for wounds to heal. Therefore, controlling edema is essential. Causes There are many common causes of edema that are fairly benign. Some examples of more common causes of peripheral edema, not specifically related to diabetes, include physical inactivity, standing or sitting for long periods of time, surgery, burns, hot weather, pregnancy, menstruation, menopause, contraceptive pills, certain medications, excessive salt intake, malnutrition, or a bad diet. Edema may present in only one extremity (rather than both) due to deep venous thrombosis (DVT), cellulitis, osteomyelitis, trauma, a ruptured Baker's cyst, or a lymphatic obstruction. Peripheral edema can also be associated with more serious conditions—many of which can be associated with diabetes complications such as heart disease, venous insufficiency, liver disease, and kidney disease. Certain diabetes medications can also cause edema, specifically the thiazolidinedione drugs Actos and Avandia. These drugs have come under a cloud because of their potential cardiac adverse effects, and should not be used in anyone who has had a history of congestive heart failure. People with diabetes are twice as likely to have heart disease or heart failure (such as congestive heart failure). If the patient has neuropathy, the sym Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Leg Swelling: The Terrible Twosome

Diabetes And Leg Swelling: The Terrible Twosome

If you are diabetic, you need to worry about a lot more things like heart diseases and leg swelling. This causes peripheral edema in some cases and can be painful. If you see symptoms of swelling in your ankles, lower legs or feet, it is time to pay your physician an emergency visit. Diabetes expand blood circulation in an inappropriate way, which can cause swelling in the lower leg region. However, there could be other reasons as well that would cause the swelling. So a visit to the doctor is a must. Diabetes is a serious disease which gives rise to many further complications; swelling in the legs is one of them. Let’s discuss a few reasons that could be contributing to the swelling and its cure. What can lead to leg swelling? For any diabetic patient, it is a must to consult a doctor in case you notice any changes in the body. A patient who’s been living with diabetes for several years needs to be extra careful because this disease comes with so many attached risks. If you are diabetic and have noticed some leg swelling recently, the following could be a few reasons for it. The main reason for leg swelling in diabetes is peripheral edema. Fluids collect in the feet, ankles and leg and this condition can become quite severe if left untreated. A consultation with a doctor is a must. Sometimes, a diabetic may suffer from diabetic neuropathy. This is a condition that leads to numbness in legs and feet. As a result, the diabetic may not be able to feel an injury, maybe something even as severe as a sprain or a fracture and continue to use the limb. But the swelling caused by the injury is what will raise concern, which is why a consultation with the doctor becomes very important. Diabetics have low immunity towards infections and your swelling could very well be a sign Continue reading >>

Swelling (edema) And Diabetes - Swelling In The Legs, Ankles And Feet

Swelling (edema) And Diabetes - Swelling In The Legs, Ankles And Feet

Tweet Edema (known as oedema in the UK) is a build up of fluid in the body (water retention) which causes swelling. Edema commonly affects the legs, ankles, feet and wrist. Water retention is often treatable, with treatment varying depending on the cause. Symptoms of edema The main symptom of edema is swelling of the affected area. Other symptoms that may occur, along with swelling, include: Weight gain Aching limbs Stiff joints Discolouration of skin Hypertension (high blood pressure) What causes swelling in the legs, feet and ankles? Swollen ankles and legs will often be brought on, or aggravated, by long periods of standing. A number of medications can increase the risk of oedema. Such medications include corticosteroids, blood pressure medications and the contraceptive pill. Water retention may also be caused by a number of conditions including: A high intake of salt can increase the problems of swelling in people with kidney disease. Treatment for edema Treatment for edema may vary depending on the cause. Water retention may be resolved if the underlying cause can be adequately treated. Regular physical activity and preventing long periods of standing can help reduce water retention. A low dietary salt intake is advisable, particularly if fluid retention has been brought on by kidney disease. If you are overweight, weight loss can help with reducing fluid retention. Diuretics, also known as ‘water tablets’, help to remove fluid from the body and may be prescribed for some causes of oedema. Prevention You can reduce your risk of edema by taking steps to prevent kidney disease and heart failure from developing. This can be achieved through good control of blood glucose levels, regular exercise and a healthy diet. If you can avoid long periods of standing, this wi Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Water Retention: How Are They Related?

Diabetes And Water Retention: How Are They Related?

By pH health care professionals If you have diabetes, or if someone close to you does, perhaps you’ve noticed some swelling in the ankles where fluid has built up, causing a puffy appearance. This is typically water retention, also called edema, and is relatively common among diabetics. Let’s take a look at how diabetes and water retention are related. What is water retention? Water retention is a buildup of fluid in an area of the body, causing swelling, often in the ankles, feet, wrists and/or arms. So, how are diabetes and water retention related? The most common type of water retention is in the legs and feet (peripheral edema). Sometimes, water retention occurs as a side effect of insulin therapy or diabetes drugs. Peripheral edema is sometimes a symptom of kidney problems or heart failure related to diabetes. However, water retention can occur as a result of an injury, surgery, long plane rides, pregnancy, hormone changes and certain medications. But if you have diabetes, you need to be extra cautious as water retention can make it more difficult for wounds to heal. Read here for other causes of water retention. So, how can you be more proactive? Work with a doctor. While the water retention itself may not seem to be giving you any trouble, it may be a red flag for something else, so it’s important to be proactive and tell your doctor right away about any swelling. Utilize body composition testing on a regular basis. You can gauge whether your body’s fluids are out of balance even before you see significant swelling through body composition testing. It only takes a few minutes to get information that can save you time, money and stress. Be proactive. Get to the root cause of your water retention. There may be other factors including problems with the thyro Continue reading >>

Metformin And Swollen Feet And Ankles

Metformin And Swollen Feet And Ankles

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Has anybody developed swollen feet and ankles by taking Metformin ? I took 2 tabs @ 500 mg per day for a very long time with no problems. When increased to 3 tabs @ 500 mg per day my left foot started to puff up a little. When increased to 4 tabs @ 500 mg per day, the left foot and ankle became swollen and the right foot also. My Doctor has reduced the Metformin to 2 tabs per day @ 500 mg and supplemented it with 1 tab Gliclazide @ 80 mg per day. It is too early to make a judgement, but my feet have almost returned to normal after just over a week. Other people on the web have complained about 2,000 mg of Metformin per day making their feet and ankles swell. from the look of it at present, in my case there is no doubt about it. My last HbA1c reading over month ago was 63 mmol/mol or 7.9 %. Not a disaster, but could be better. Has anybody developed swollen feet and ankles by taking Metformin ? I took 2 tabs @ 500 mg per day for a very long time with no problems. When increased to 3 tabs @ 500 mg per day my left foot started to puff up a little. When increased to 4 tabs @ 500 mg per day, the left foot and ankle became swollen and the right foot also. My Doctor has reduced the Metformin to 2 tabs per day @ 500 mg and supplemented it with 1 tab Gliclazide @ 80 mg per day. It is too early to make a judgement, but my feet have almost returned to normal after just over a week. Other people on the web have complained about 2,000 mg of Metformin per day making their feet and ankles swell. from the look of it at present, in my case there is no doubt about it. My last HbA1c reading over month ago was 63 mmol/mol or 7.9 %. Not a disaster, but could be better. Continue reading >>

Edema

Edema

Abnormal accumulation of fluid in various body tissues, causing swelling. The swelling may affect any of a number of body sites, such as the legs, ankles, and feet; the hands; the back or abdomen; and even the eyelids. Edema may be caused by a number of different medical conditions and can also be a side effect of certain drugs. Here are some possible causes: Congestive heart failure may result in edema. To compensate for heart failure, in which the heart fails to circulate adequate amounts of blood, the kidneys retain sodium to help the body hold on to water and increase the volume of blood. Deep vein thrombosis, the formation of a blood clot in a deep vein within the leg, can cause edema by damaging the valves within the veins that control normal blood flow. This type of edema most commonly makes the ankles swell but may also cause swelling in the calf or even the thigh. Kidney diseases, such as diabetic nephropathy, may cause edema due to excess sodium and fluid retention. Edema may be a side effect of certain drugs, including the oral diabetes drugs pioglitazone (brand name Actos) and rosiglitazone (Avandia). People sometimes experience mild edema when starting on insulin therapy, but this generally goes away within a few weeks. If you experience any unusual swelling, be sure to contact your doctor. It may be the result of a medical condition you don’t know you have. Treating edema involves treating the underlying medical condition that is causing it or adjusting medication as necessary. This article was written by Robert S. Dinsmoor, a Contributing Editor of Diabetes Self-Management. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provide Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

People with diabetes probably know about Metformin and its side effects. This article is for all those who wish to learn more about this drug. Metformin is a medication used in diabetes (especially type 2 diabetes) treatment, (including patients who are overweight). It is used in treating polycystic ovaries syndrome as well. According to some sources, it is one of the world’s most prescribed anti-diabetic medications. Although it is considered quite safe, it can cause some side effects. Metformin side effects are not very severe, but some people are too sensitive and can have bad reaction to this medication. Possible Metformin Side Effects Metformin does not cause many side effects, in condition it is used in appropriate cases and in recommended doses. This medication helps reducing triglycerides and can contribute to preventing cardiovascular problems in people who suffer from diabetes. Contraindications are possible in patients who suffer from any problem related to lactic acidosis. There can be kidney problems and liver or lung problems. Patients with hypothyroidism should be extra careful with this drug and must consult their doctor first. Metformin side effects that can sometimes occur are: headache, abdominal cramps, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, flatulence and other gastrointestinal problems. Some users may experience weight gain. Allergies to this drug are also possible, so if you experience any sort of allergic reaction (rash, difficult breathing, pain in your chest, mouth swelling, lip swelling, face or tongue swelling) call your doctor immediately. These are signs of allergic reactions, so if you experience any of these, you will have to get immediate medical help. Even if you have never had any kind of allergy, you never know what can happen. Skin rash is us Continue reading >>

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