diabetestalk.net

Diabetic Diet Chart

Basic Meal Planning

Basic Meal Planning

Meal plan You need to eat and drink at least 12 carbohydrate choices each day. Most women need 14 carbohydrate choices each day to maintain the desired weight gain of one-half pound each week. If you follow a vegetarian diet, you need 15 to 16 carbohydrate choices each day to get enough nutrients. At breakfast, include: 2 to 3 carbohydrate choices (30 to 45 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely At lunch, include: 3 to 4 carbohydrate choices (45 to 60 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely At dinner, include: 3 to 4 carbohydrate choices (45 to 60 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For a morning snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For an afternoon snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For an evening snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely Breakfast tips Blood glucose is hard to control in the morning when the hormones that boost your blood glucose levels are released. To help, follow these breakfast tips: Eat a small breakfast. Eat whole-grain bread products. Eat a food that has protein. Do not eat cereal or fruit. Do not drink fruit juice at breakfast or any other time of the day. Fruit juice raises your blood glucose very quickly. Completing a meal plan Vegetables Most vegetables do not raise blood glucose. Vegetables supply many nutrients for both you and your baby. Try to eat at least four servi Continue reading >>

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

I have gestational diabetes. Do I have to watch what I eat? Yes. Eating well helps all women stay healthy during pregnancy. But if you have gestational diabetes, choosing the right food to eat is even more important. That's because many women with gestational diabetes can manage their condition by following a healthy eating plan, monitoring their blood sugar, and exercising regularly. Keeping your blood sugar stable by eating healthy food and exercising makes it less likely that you'll need medication to control your condition. You and your baby are also less likely to have any complications from your condition. Watching what you eat also helps you gain a healthy amount of weight during pregnancy. If you were overweight before becoming pregnant, your healthcare provider may recommend limiting calories so you don't gain too much as your baby grows. Do I need to monitor carbohydrates? Yes. The amount and type of carbohydrates (natural starches and sugars) in food affects your blood sugar levels. And with gestational diabetes, you'll need to track your carbohydrate intake in particular. Setting a limit on the amount of carbohydrates you eat at each meal is the first step to managing your blood sugar. Your provider is likely to recommend reducing the total amount of carbohydrates to about 40 percent of your daily calories. Try to eat carbohydrates that are high in fiber. Fibrous foods are harder to digest. Whole grains are high in fiber, so choosing brown rice and whole grain bread instead of refined versions (white bread and rice) means that they take longer to digest and release sugar more slowly into your bloodstream. Vegetables, beans, lentils, and chickpeas are also high in fiber and release sugar into your blood slowly. Avoid food and drinks that are high in added sug Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Diet

The Diabetes Diet

What's the best diet for diabetes? Whether you’re trying to prevent or control diabetes, your nutritional needs are virtually the same as everyone else, so no special foods are necessary. But you do need to pay attention to some of your food choices—most notably the carbohydrates you eat. While following a Mediterranean or other heart-healthy diet can help with this, the most important thing you can do is to lose a little weight. Losing just 5% to 10% of your total weight can help you lower your blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. Losing weight and eating healthier can also have a profound effect on your mood, energy, and sense of wellbeing. Even if you’ve already developed diabetes, it’s not too late to make a positive change. By eating healthier, being more physically active, and losing weight, you can reduce your symptoms or even reverse diabetes. The bottom line is that you have more control over your health than you may think. The biggest risk for diabetes: belly fat Being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor for type 2 diabetes. However, your risk is higher if you tend to carry your weight around your abdomen as opposed to your hips and thighs. A lot of belly fat surrounds the abdominal organs and liver and is closely linked to insulin resistance. You are at an increased risk of developing diabetes if you are: A woman with a waist circumference of 35 inches or more A man with a waist circumference of 40 inches or more Calories obtained from fructose (found in sugary beverages such as soda, energy and sports drinks, coffee drinks, and processed foods like doughnuts, muffins, cereal, candy and granola bars) are more likely to add weight around your abdomen. Cutting back on sugary foods can mean a slimmer waistline as well as a lowe Continue reading >>

Your Diabetes Menu Plan

Your Diabetes Menu Plan

How do you get all the nutrition you need in a day while still being mindful of calories and carbs? The secret is to plan ahead. Meal planning depends on lots of things, like your taste preferences, medications, and activity level, says Jill Weisenberger, RDN, CDE, author of Diabetes Weight Loss -- Week by Week. But good general advice to follow is to keep your carbs consistent -- eat the same amount at breakfast, lunch, and dinner to keep blood sugar from spiking or dipping too low. Weisenberger recommends 45 grams as a target for the three main meals of the day. "If you go lower than 30 grams at a meal, it's going to be really hard to get all the nutrients you need, such as fiber and phytochemicals," the health-boosting nutrients in fruits and vegetables. This sample meal plan provides 1,400 calories. Supplement with healthy snacks to reach your personal calorie goals. If you're rushed in the mornings, make breakfast a snap with mix-and-match prepared items such as hardboiled eggs, nuts or seeds, a part-skim cheese stick, peanut butter, or yogurt for protein; toast, crispbread, or unsweetened instant oatmeal for whole grains; plus any kind of fruit -- dried fruit, a banana, an apple. Menu Avocado Toast and Egg Café au lait made with a half cup 1% milk Medium orange Avocado Toast and Egg This has to be one of the most satisfying, easy breakfasts around, thanks to a helping of fiber from the avocado and whole-grain bread. For an extra flavor kick, sprinkle with Cajun seasoning or smoked paprika. Makes 1 serving. Ingredients: 1 slice 100% whole grain bread 1/5 avocado 1 egg salt and pepper Directions: 1. Toast bread. Scoop out avocado and mash onto toast. Top with a poached or soft-boiled egg and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Per serving: 235 calories, 10 g protein, 19 Continue reading >>

Insulin-dependent Diabetes Diet Plan

Insulin-dependent Diabetes Diet Plan

People with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) may find that one of the most challenging parts of their condition is figuring out what to eat. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), there is no single diet or eating plan that will benefit all people with T1DM. Current height and weight, activity level, medications and other illnesses are important considerations. Additionally, each person has a unique lifestyle and food preferences, and should be involved with the healthcare team in developing an individualized eating plan. The overall goals are to achieve healthy levels of blood glucose, blood fats and blood pressure while maintaining a healthy body weight. Video of the Day The amount and type of carbohydrates in food affect blood glucose levels, but the ideal amount of daily carbohydrate intake differs among people with T1DM. The ADA recommends that people on a flexible insulin therapy program learn to count carbohydrates so that they can determine the right dose of insulin needed based on their carb intake. For those who are on a fixed dose of insulin daily, the ADA recommends eating the same amount of carbohydrates at about the same time each day. Carbohydrates that come from vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans and dairy products are preferred over carbohydrates from sugar-sweetened beverages like soda and low-fat or nonfat products that are high in added sugar. For people with T1DM and normal kidney function, the recommended amount of dietary protein is the same as for people who don’t have diabetes. For those with diabetic kidney disease, the ADA recommends keeping daily protein intake at 0.8 g/kg of body weight. Your dietitian can help you determine how this amount translates into daily portions of protein-rich foods. The ADA also recommends not Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diets For Weight Loss

Diabetic Diets For Weight Loss

If you’re ready to lose weight and improve your diabetes (or kick it to the curb entirely), use an expert weight loss diet plan to guide you. We review five options for people with diabetes. If you’re ready to lose weight and improve your diabetes (or kick it to the curb entirely), use an expert weight loss diet plan to guide you. We review five options for people with diabetes. If you’re ready to lose weight and improve your diabetes (or kick it to the curb entirely), use an expert weight loss diet plan to guide you. We review five options for people with diabetes. If you’re ready to lose weight and improve your diabetes (or kick it to the curb entirely), use an expert weight loss diet plan to guide you. We review five options for people with diabetes. Continue reading >>

Seven-day Type 2 Diabetes Meal Plan

Seven-day Type 2 Diabetes Meal Plan

Eating a diabetes-friendly diet can help keep your blood sugar levels under control. But it can be difficult to stick to a regular meal plan — unless you have a plan in place. Check out these 21 delicious, diabetes-friendly recipes to use for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Remember to stay within your carbohydrate allowance by noting the carb content and serving size of the recipes. Also, be sure to balance your meals with lean protein and healthy plant fats. Breakfast: Cream Cheese-Stuffed French Toast This may sound too decadent for breakfast, but paired with scrambled egg whites, it can fit into a diabetes-friendly meal plan. Whole grain toast will help ensure you get your daily fiber too. Lunch: Salmon Salad with White Beans Salmon is one of the best sources of omega-3 fatty acids, and is also a delicious topper to workday salad. Dinner: Cuban-Marinated Sirloin Kabobs with Grilled Asparagus Spice things up with this flavorful skewer. Dried herbs and spices are a great way to pack a punch of flavor without adding unnecessary calories and fat. Breakfast: Apple Pie Oatmeal with Greek Yogurt Who wouldn’t like a slice of pie for breakfast? This oatmeal will leave your kitchen smelling like the flavors of fall, and your stomach happy and satisfied. Add some extra plain Greek yogurt on top for more protein. Lunch: Turkey-Cranberry Wraps Turkey and cranberry sauce isn’t just for Thanksgiving! This is an easy grab-and-go lunch that even your kids will enjoy. Note: This recipe may not be appropriate for all people with type 2 diabetes, because it contains 60 grams of carbs per serving. You can adjust the amount of cranberry sauce to lower the carb count. Dinner: Cilantro-Lime Tilapia with Spinach and Tomatoes Take a trip to the tropics with this fast fish dish. Breakfast Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet: Foods That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetic Diet: Foods That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

There is no single diabetes diet, meal plan, or diet that is diabetes-friendly that can serve as a correct meal plan for all patients with diabetes (type 2, gestational, or type 1 diabetes). Glycemic index, carbohydrate counting, the MyPlate method, and the TLC diet plan are all methods for determining healthy eating habits for diabetes management. The exact type and times of meals on a diabetic meal plan depend upon a person's age and gender, how much exercise you get and your activity level, and the need to gain, lose, or maintain optimal weight. Most diabetic meal plans allow the person with diabetes to eat the same foods as the rest of the family, with attention to portion size and timing of meals and snacks. Eating a high-fiber diet can help improve blood cholesterol and blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. Glycemic index is a way to classify carbohydrates in terms of the amount that they raise blood sugar. High glycemic index foods raise blood sugar more than lower index foods. Some patients with type 2 use supplements as complementary medicine to treat their disease. However, there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of supplements in treating the disease. A diabetes meal plan (diabetes diet) is a nutritional guide for people with diabetes that helps them decide when to consume meals and snacks as well as what type of foods to eat. There is no one predetermined diabetes diet that works for all people with diabetes. The goal of any diabetic meal plan is to achieve and maintain good control over the disease, including control of blood glucose and blood lipid levels as well as to maintaining a healthy weight and good nutrition. Health care professionals and nutritionists can offer advice to help you create the best meal plan to manage your diabe Continue reading >>

Nhs Diet Advice For Diabetes

Nhs Diet Advice For Diabetes

Tweet In the UK, current 2016 NHS diabetes diet advice is that there is no special diet for people with diabetes. Many people with diabetes focus on the carbohydrate content of their meals and prefer a low-carb diet for tight blood glucose level control. The NHS (and Diabetes UK) recommend a healthy, balanced diet that is low in fat, sugar and salt and contain a high level of fresh fruit and vegetables. This guide reviews the diet advice the NHS gives to people with diabetes and discusses to what degree the advice is sensible. What does the NHS advise? The NHS provides the following diet advice for people with diabetes: [147] [148] Eat plenty of starchy carbohydrates with a low glycemic index (low GI) Increase the amount of fibre in your diet Eat plenty of fruit and vegetables - at least 5 portions per day Cut down on fat and saturated fat in particular Choose foods with unsaturated fat instead - such as vegetable oils, reduced fat spreads, oily fish and avocados Choose low-fat dairy products Choose lean meat - such as skinless chicken Avoid fatty or processed meat Eat fish at least twice a week and ensure you have oily fish at least once a week Eggs and beans are other good sources of protein Cook food by grilling, baking, poaching or steaming instead of frying or roasting Avoid fatty or sugary snacks - such as crisps, cakes, biscuits and pastries Eat snacks such as fruit, unsalted nuts and low-fat yoghurts Cut down on sugar Eat less salt - have less than 6g of salt (2.4g of sodium) per day Cut down on alcohol Don’t skip breakfast Keep hydrated - aim to drink between 1.6 and 2 litres of fluid each day Is the NHS advice sensible? Whilst a number of these points are undoubtedly sensible, some of the recommendations have been criticised by patients and some leading UK h Continue reading >>

Diet Plan For Diabetes

Diet Plan For Diabetes

Diabetes is a lifestyle disorder that plagues many today. Changing eating, exercising, and living habits have led many to this disease. However, it is not the end of the road. With regular exercising, adopting healthy lifestyle and a great diabetes meal plan it is possible to fight this disease and manage it well. Diabetes is a disease in which the body loses its ability to respond to or produce the hormone insulin. This impairment results in faulty metabolism of carbohydrates in the body and also leads to elevated glucose levels in the blood. Such people often experience blurry vision, fatigue, frequent urination and a sense of tingling or numbness in their fingers and toes. Diabetes in men causes erectile dysfunction, retrograde erection and other urologic conditions. However, on eating regular diabetes meal plans, one can effectively reduce the complications arising from the condition. A diabetes diet plan is a plan of healthy meals which are high in nutrients and low in calories and fat. The diet plan incorporates large amounts of vegetables, whole grains, and fruits in a diabetes meal plan. This plan can also be followed by healthy individuals, to ward off the risk of diabetes forever. Diabetes diet should have carbs, proteins and fats in the ratio of 60:20:20. A Diabetes meal plan has to be properly structured according to the vegetarian or non-vegetarian preferences of an individual. Timely consumption of meals is a very important factor in a diabetes meal plan. If diabetics don’t eat their meals on time, it might cause their sugar levels to fluctuate causing other complications. A basic diabetes meal plan starts with a well-balanced diet that is inclusive of carbs, proteins and fat. Do not avoid any food group as all have their own importance. Carbs are used i Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet Chart | Healthy Indian Food Chart For Diabetic Patient

Diabetes Diet Chart | Healthy Indian Food Chart For Diabetic Patient

Diet and lifestyle habits are the major cause for the onset of diabetes and its after effect. It is rather estimated by WHO that 69 millions Indians are diabetic and the condition is going to become worse by 2025. [If you are a diabetic, have a look at our diabetes reversal program as well.] The indian diet plan is one of the big reason for obesity and further to obesity as it is low in fibre and protein. Lean proteins like chicken and fish should also be included in the diet along with high-fiber foods. The protein intake should have all the 9 essentials amino acids and less saturated fats which might risk your heart. Apart from protein, diabetes diet chart should be rich in fibre since it slows down the digestion of food thus controlling the spikes in the blood sugar level. Carbohydrates in our food are broken down to sugar (glucose) in the bloodstream. A proper diet routine needs to be followed. Eating wise, healthy and at regular intervals is a must for diabetic patients. Vegetables especially green leafy vegetables should form a major part of the diet plan as they are a rich source of nutrients required by the body. The whole idea is to eat optimum amount with necessary ingredients to make sure the sugar levels in the blood are maintained. One important factor to be kept in mind while deciding on a food chart is the glycemic index (GI) of the food item. GI indicates the rise in blood sugar a particular food item causes. Foods with low GI are recommended. Sugary drinks, dairy products, and alcohol should be avoided. 5 Myths About Diabetes Diet Plan 1) Diabetes drug can be adjusted for the amount sugar intake. If you are on insulin or any other diabetes drug, don't try to adjust the level of dosage intake based on the extra carbohydrate taken. This should be done onl Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet Plan For Indians (north, South, East, West)

Diabetes Diet Plan For Indians (north, South, East, West)

Many women practice a self-willed diet control to fit in that perfect pencil skirt or, in general, to look good. Diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to utilize sugar molecules to generate energy for the body to function normally. If you are diagnosed with diabetes, or if you have diabetes in your family, doctors often recommend sticking to a diet plan. Being overweight will make you more insulin resistant. Therefore, following a diet that does not worsen your condition is preferable. We will walk you through the diet plan and tell you which foods to eat so that you can make your choice wisely. Diet Plan For Diabetes 2. How Is An Ideal Indian Diet Plan For Diabetes Made 3. Foods To Eat 4. Recipe To Make a Perfect Diabetes Friendly Meal 5. Why Diabetes Diet Plan Will Work 6. Lifestyle For Diabetics 7. Dos And Don’ts 8. Conclusion 9. FAQs 1. Indian Diet Chart For Diabetes The diet chart for diabetic patient has been prepared depending on the food habits and the foods available in different regions in India. This diet chart will provide you with 1200-1600 calories per day, with carbs, fat, and proteins in the right proportions. Doctors also advise having at least two fruits per day between the meals. Also, it is a good practice to eat a bowl of salad 10 minutes before lunch or dinner. This will stop you from overeating. Include detox drinks in your diet to feel light and fresh every day. We have prepared diet charts that are diabetes-friendly, yet not too restrictive. Find the diet that best suits your taste buds. Meal Foods To Eat Early Morning Options: Warm water with lemon juice. Cucumber and lemon detox water. Green tea without sugar or artificial sweeteners. You can have two digestive biscuits with the tea. Breakfast Options: One to two cups of porridge. Continue reading >>

Your 5-week Diabetic Diet Meal Plan

Your 5-week Diabetic Diet Meal Plan

The Outsmart Diabetes Diet is based on new research that found four specific nutrients—fiber, vitamin D, omega-3s, and calcium—work together to help balance blood sugar and encourage weight loss. Build your daily diabetic diet meal plan by choosing one breakfast, one lunch and one dinner, plus two snacks—any combination gets you approximately 1,400 calories a day and a healthy dose of the "Fat-Fighting 4." Remember to eat about every 3 hours and practice portion control. Prevention Premium: What Every Woman Knows About Erectile Dysfunction Follow this mix and match diabetic diet meal plan—adapted from The Outsmart Diabetes Diet—for the next five weeks to help fight fat, maintain healthy blood sugar levels, boost energy, and reduce your diabetes risk. BREAKFAST Fruity bagel breakfast: Spread 1 Tbsp light cream cheese and 1 tsp 100% fruit spread on ½ of a whole grain bagel. Serve with 1 c fat-free milk. Crunchy yogurt: Combine 6 oz fat-free light yogurt, ¼ c granola cereal, 1 Tbsp ground flax seed, and 1 Tbsp chopped nuts. Add ground cinnamon and/or sugar substitute to taste. Eggs and English muffin: Scramble 1 egg in a pan coated with 1 tsp canola or olive oil; top with ¼ c chopped tomato, onion, and chile salsa. Serve with toasted 100% whole grain English muffin, spread with 2 Tbsp low-fat (1%) cottage cheese, and 1 c fat-free milk. Instead of scrambled eggs, try poaching an egg: Good Morning Blend: Stir together 6 ounces fat-free yogurt, 2 Tbsp dried mixed fruit, 2 Tbsp ground flax seed and 2 Tbsp chopped almonds, walnuts, or pecans. Nutty Oatmeal: Top ½ c cooked oatmeal with ¼ c walnuts or other nuts; add ground cinnamon and/or sugar substitute to taste. Serve with 1 c fat-free milk or calcium-enriched soy or rice beverage. Bagel and cream cheese: Sprea Continue reading >>

Shopping List For Diabetics

Shopping List For Diabetics

Control Type 2 Diabetes, Shed Fat Our Shopping List for Diabetics is based on the Pritikin Eating Plan, regarded worldwide as among the healthiest diets on earth. The Pritikin Program has been documented in more than 100 studies in peer-reviewed medical journals to prevent and control many of our nation’s leading killers – heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and obesity as well as type 2 diabetes. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, pay special attention. Research on newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics coming to the Pritikin Longevity Center illustrate how profoundly beneficial early intervention can be. Scientists from UCLA followed 243 people in the early stages of diabetes (not yet on medications). Within three weeks of coming to Pritikin, their fasting blood sugar (glucose) plummeted on average from 160 to 124. Research has also found that the Pritikin Program reduces fasting insulin by 25 to 40%. Shopping List for Diabetics – More Features Here’s another big plus to our Shopping List for Diabetics. In addition to icons that are diabetes-focused like “sugar free,” this list uses icons like “low cholesterol” and “low sodium” because many people with diabetes are working to control not just diabetes but related conditions like high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure. This list can help you identify those foods most advantageous in helping you reach your personal health goals. Diabetic Food Taboos? Not Anymore! Have you been told you have to give up juicy watermelon or sweet grapes? What if we told you those foods really aren’t taboo? Watch the Video Our Healthy Shopping List for Diabetics also lists the top 10 things to put back on the shelf if you’re trying to: Lose Weight Lower Blood Pres Continue reading >>

More in diabetic diet