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Diabetic Diet Breakfast

12 Breakfast Rules For Diabetes

12 Breakfast Rules For Diabetes

First, eat it iStock/EasyBuy4u Even if your blood sugar is high in the morning, don't skip breakfast. Research shows that forgoing a morning meal increases the risk for obesity and insulin resistance. And studies confirm that breakfast eaters are better able to resist fatty and high-calorie foods later in the day. Aim to eat your breakfast at the same time every day, since keeping your blood sugar levels even throughout the day means eating consistently from day to day. Try to incorporate these healthy carbs for diabetes into your breakfast. iStock/ShotShare You can't (and shouldn't) avoid restaurants altogether, but there's one meal you should almost always eat at home: breakfast. Look at the alternatives: Diner-style breakfasts can include 1,000 calories or more with astronomical amounts of carbohydrates and fats. A healthy-sounding whole-wheat bagel with light cream cheese from a bagel shop may contain up to 67 grams of carbs, 450 calories, and 9 grams of fat. A sausage muffin may pack 29 grams of carbs, 370 calories, and 22 grams of fat. Compare those to a bowl of oatmeal (half a cup) with a half cup of fat-free milk, which contains a mere 12 grams of carbs, 195 calories, and 3 grams of fat. iStock/MarkGillow We assume you're already starting out with a cereal that contains at least 5 grams of fiber per serving. (Studies have found that people who regularly eat whole-grain cereal gain less weight than people who don't.) Make it even more diabetes-friendly by adding half a cup (one serving) of fresh fruit, such as strawberries or blueberries. Here's why fruit is healthy for diabetes (not forbidden!). Sprinkle 1 or 2 tablespoons of ground flaxseed on hot and cold cereal and yogurt iStock/Sasha Radosavljevic Rich in protein and fiber, these tiny seeds are a godsend to Continue reading >>

Breakfast For Chronic Kidney Disease

Breakfast For Chronic Kidney Disease

Eating a healthy, kidney safe diet is the most recommended treatment for chronic kidney disease. Although there are medications that can help with the symptoms of kidney disease, nothing seems as effective for treating the uncomfortable symptoms and helping stop the progressive damage of kidney disease. You can find great kidney safe recipes just about everywhere, from magazines and books to the Internet. It seems, however, that many of those recipes are focused on dinner meals with very few options for breakfast. This is a shame, because breakfast is obviously a very important meal, and a lot of people tend to make poor choices when it comes to breakfast due to being in a hurry. Also, it’s hard not to love all of the sweet, salty, greasy options breakfast can have to offer. Starting your day with a healthy, kidney safe breakfast can set the tone for your entire day. A good breakfast, of course, gets your blood sugar leveled and gives you the energy you need to get started. It also helps sustain you until your next meal. With chronic kidney disease, you likely have dietary restrictions that need to be followed closely. If you are unsure about what you can and cannot eat, you should talk to your doctor to get a list of foods he or she recommends, including restrictions. Here are some breakfast recipes for pre-dialysis kidney disease that are easy to make and enjoyable: Omelets Omelets are great, delicious, easy options for a pre-dialysis kidney diet breakfast. You can use whole eggs if your doctor is okay with it, or egg whites for a healthier version. The trick is using non-dairy creamer instead of milk. You can use just onions and peppers, or you can add in your favorite vegetables. 2 eggs 2 tablespoons non-dairy creamer Diced onions and bell peppers Fresh ground pep Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Diet Without Breakfast May Be Best For Diabetics

Mediterranean Diet Without Breakfast May Be Best For Diabetics

The new study compared the effect of different dietary patterns on measures of blood glucose, dietary lipids and hormone levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Led by researchers at Linköping University in Sweden, the three diets assessed were a low-fat diet, a low-carbohydrate diet and a Mediterranean diet. "We found that the low-carbohydrate diet increased blood glucose levels much less than the low-fat diet but that levels of triglycerides tended to be high compared to the low-fat diet,"​ said Dr Hans Guldbrand, who together with Professor Fredrik Nystrom was the principal investigator of the study. "It is very interesting that the Mediterranean diet, without breakfast and with a massive lunch with wine, did not induce higher blood glucose levels than the low-fat diet lunch, despite such a large single meal,"​ Nyström revealed. "This suggests that it is favourable to have a large meal instead of several smaller meals when you have diabetes, and it is surprising how often one today refers to the usefulness of the so-called Mediterranean diet but forgets that it also traditionally meant the absence of a breakfast."​ "Our results give reason to reconsider both nutritional composition and meal arrangements for patients with diabetes,"​ he added. Study details​ Writing in PLoS One,​ the research team assessed the impact of the three diets in 21 volunteers who received each test diet in a randomly assigned order. The low-fat diet had a nutrient composition that has traditionally been recommended in the Nordic countries, with about 55% of the total energy from carbohydrates. The low-carbohydrate diet had a relatively low content of carbohydrate; approximately 20% of the energy was from carbohydrates and about 50% of the total energy came from fat. The Mediterr Continue reading >>

7 Ideas For A Low Carb Breakfast

7 Ideas For A Low Carb Breakfast

Two years ago, I started a low carb diet to lose weight. I ate around 55-80 grams of carbohydrates per day and dropped weight faster than I could have imagined. Now, I’m not a big person by any means, but these recipes are enough to satisfy even the biggest appetite. Bacon and eggs. Sure, this one’s a classic. But there’s a reason that it’s everyone’s go-to, low-carb breakfast. It’s delicious, easy to make, and has zero carbs per serving. With the high protein and high fat content of this yummy combination, you’re sure to stay satisfied for hours. Cantaloupe and cottage cheese. Yes, fruit has carbs in it. But one cup of sliced cantaloupe has only 16g of carbohydrates. And the protein and calcium you’re getting from the cottage cheese is through the roof. Plus, your sweet tooth can get satisfied at the same time. It’s the perfect combination. Low-carb tortillas with scrambled eggs, cheese, salsa and jalapenos. If you’re craving a breakfast burrito, look no further than this tasty dish. All you do is scramble the eggs with jalapeno. Put the eggs and jalapeno in the tortilla, top with cheese and salsa and you’ve got a delicious and healthy breakfast. The carb total is dependent on the tortillas you use, but when I made this, I bolused for 20g of carbohydrates. Berries and plain yogurt. Berries are great for people on low-carb diets. They’re packed with nutrition, they satisfy the urge for something sweet, and they have few carbohydrates. Plain yogurt is great because its full of calcium and low in carbohydrates. My favorite kind of yogurt is Fage, which is Greek yogurt. It’s smooth, creamy, and so good you’ll forget you’re on a diet. If you’re eating a cup of yogurt and 1/2 cup of berries you’re eating about 15g of carbohydrates. Hard-boil Continue reading >>

Breakfast Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Breakfast Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Sugary cereals, bagels covered in cream cheese, and high-fat bacon breakfasts are the subjects of many food fantasies. However, they are all poor choices for people with diabetes. Diabetes management requires attention to sugar and carbohydrates. To optimize heart health, people with diabetes should also steer clear of high-fat foods that have little nutritional value. This does not mean that people with diabetes have to have dull breakfasts. A number of classic breakfasts are excellent choices. A few minor tweaks to traditional breakfasts can make many of them healthful even for people with type 2 diabetes. Classic breakfasts for type 2 diabetes Breakfasts high in fiber, but low in added sugar, carbohydrates, and salt are excellent choices for people with diabetes. Nutrient-dense foods support feelings of fullness, which can help stop people snacking on unhealthful options. Some healthful breakfast options include the following: Smoothies Fruit juices contain rapidly absorbed sugar and, sometimes, artificial sweeteners that can either trigger blood sugar spikes or affect insulin sensitivity and gut bacteria. Smoothies offer the same sweet taste as juice but contain lots of nutrients that help fight hunger. There are many ways to include different nutrients in a smoothie. Load up on fiber by using spinach, kale, or avocado in a smoothie. Layer on sweetness by adding frozen berries, bananas, apples, or peaches. Make sure to include some fat or protein to make the smoothie as filling as possible. This will also slow down the digestion of the carbohydrates. Adding a scoop of a protein powder or one-half of a cup of Greek yogurt can make a smoothie even more satisfying. Try this diabetes-friendly smoothie: Blend two cups of frozen raspberries, blueberries, and strawberries Continue reading >>

A Home Run Breakfast With Diabetes

A Home Run Breakfast With Diabetes

Seven things I do to beat the hardest meal of the day. With diabetes, the stakes are high in the morning. A well-managed breakfast can dramatically improve my time in zone (70-140 mg/dl) for the rest of the day. Conversely, I might regret poor choices at breakfast three, five, even eight hours later. Unfortunately, the morning brings a perfect storm for blood sugar spikes: high-carb and sugary food options, insulin resistance and inactivity, time demands, stress, and caffeine. Breakfast is also the most likely meal to prompt outrage: “How can I be LOW right now?! I did the same thing yesterday and was HIGH!” This article shares what I’ve learned through diabetes trial-and-error about managing breakfast with diabetes, including many personal examples collected over the past few weeks. The tactics that have had the biggest impact on my diabetes are listed first, though all seven have made a major difference. Click on a tactic in the table of contents below to skip right down to it. At the end of the article, I’ve added two other approaches that might improve blood sugar around breakfast (cut caffeine and reduce stress), but I couldn’t confirm them from my own data. Please send feedback or other tactics by email or on Twitter; I love hearing from readers! And if you find this article useful, check out my upcoming book, Bright Spots & Landmines! I’m NOT a healthcare provider. Always confirm changes with a professional, especially when using insulin. Summary 2. Eat non-traditional foods for breakfast: almond flour, nuts and seeds, lentils, etc. 3. Dose insulin 20+ minutes before eating carbs, and wait longer if blood glucose is above target or when eating something really sugary. 4. More breakfast insulin: I use a more aggressive morning correction factor and mor Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet Breakfast Menu Vegetarian

Diabetic Diet Breakfast Menu Vegetarian

Even if you’re not indulging in a bacon, egg and cheese sandwich, chances are your breakfast contain at least a little something off limits on a vegan diet. So what are the options when Greek yogurt, egg-white omelets and cereal with milk are off the menu? Diabetic Food Diet Before Colonoscopy Diet Plan For Diabetes Zone Natural Diet For A Diabetic Cat The Best Foods for Cat Illnesses – Pet Shops – About.com – Conversely, many experts say that cats with diabetes should not be fed foods containing fruits and certain vegetables, … Natural cat litter is a prime example. Good Diabetic Diet Xls – 5 Diabetes Diets And Recipes Xo America’s Best Cookbook for Kids With Diabetes, by Colleen Bartley (Robert Rose Inc., $18.95). Besides having 141 recipes for everything from breakfast foods to desserts, the book is packed with such "extras" as dietitians’ suggestions for variations … This low-carb veggie is a wise addition to a diabetic diet because it’s loaded with folate … Diabetic Diet 101. Recommended steps to help control blood glucose and prevent diabetes. Diabetic Diet Guidelines; Diabetic Diet: FAQs; Diabetic Diet: Type 1 … Moderate coffee drinking is also highlighted in the suggested menu. Moderate coffee drinking is defined as drinking three to five cups a day. Coffee has been shown to possibly reduce your risk of Type 2 diabetes … diet … 11 healthy restaurants in London you can eat in without breaking the diet – Everything is centred around protein and not only are the calories labelled on the menu … free and vegan options. The deli-cum-cafe has a laid-back Cali vibe. It’s only open until five in the evening, making it the perfect … Continue reading >>

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

Cooking with less fat by using nonstick pans and cooking sprays and avoiding fat- and sugar-laden coffee drinks will help ensure that you're eating a healthy breakfast. For many people, breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day. But if you have type 2 diabetes, breakfast is a must, and it can have real benefits. “The body really needs the nutrients that breakfast provides to literally ‘break the fast’ that results during sleeping hours,” says Kelly Kennedy, MS, RD, an Everyday Health dietitian. “Having a source of healthy carbohydrates along with protein and fiber is the perfect way to start the morning.” Eating foods at breakfast that have a low glycemic index may help prevent a spike in blood sugar all morning long — and even after lunch. Eating peanut butter or almond butter at breakfast, for example, will keep you feeling full, thanks to the combination of protein and fat, according to the American Diabetes Association. And a good breakfast helps kick-start your morning metabolism and keeps your energy up throughout the day. Pressed for time? You don't have to create an elaborate spread. Here are seven diabetes-friendly breakfast ideas to help you stay healthy and get on with your day. 1. Breakfast Shake For a meal in a minute, blend one cup of fat-free milk or plain nonfat yogurt with one-half cup of fruit, such as strawberries, bananas, or blueberries. Add one teaspoon of wheat germ, a teaspoon of nuts, and ice and blend for a tasty, filling, and healthy breakfast. Time saver: Measure everything out the night before. 2. Muffin Parfait Halve a whole grain or other high-fiber muffin (aim for one with 30 grams of carbohydrates and at least 3 grams of fiber), cover with berries, and top with a dollop of low- or nonfat yogurt for a fast and easy bre Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diabetic Breakfast Smoothie

Low Carb Diabetic Breakfast Smoothie

I was over having a conversation on Facebook the other day and it came to my attention that many people struggle with eating breakfast. If you have diabetes it's not ideal to skip breakfast because even if you don't eat blood sugar will rise. So the very act of eating breakfast can actually help regulate blood sugar. So the perfect alternative to actually eating something is to whip up a low carb diabetic breakfast smoothie. A balanced smoothie with protein, healthy fats, and a little carbs from mixed berries, will keep you full, regulate your blood sugar, and help you get through the morning. So here is a simple breakfast smoothie recipe, with a few alternatives and options to try, so you can give it a different twist every time you have it. Do you have a favorite way you like to have breakfast smoothies? Continue reading >>

Diabetic Breakfast Ideas

Diabetic Breakfast Ideas

Tweet Breakfast is said to be the most important meal of the day. For people with diabetes, morning is usually the time of day with the highest blood glucose levels so a good breakfast choice will help to improve your control. Whilst putting the breakfast list together, we found some supermarket cereals that were far from the ideal choice for breakfast – with high levels of sugar (with some cereals containing chocolate) and a number of other less than healthy additives. We’ve put together some simple and healthy breakfast ideas to get you started. Greek yoghurt and cottage cheese Greek yoghurt and cottage cheese make good breakfast choices. Quick to put together and easy to tailor to your own desires by adding any of the following: Nuts – always a good source of energy and a low carb favourite Oatmeal or wheat bran for fibre (whole grains) Berries are a popular choice Fruit – cantaloupe is listed as a good accompaniment Smoothies A very simple idea - take a mix of food, stick it in a blender and drink it. Some mixtures work better than others and it can be fun to find out which do work. For the dedicated, making smoothies can be quite an art form to get the colour and consistencies just right. For us with diabetes, we also need to consider the carbohydrate content to our own requirements. Rather than suggest one smoothie, here are some ingredient ideas to get you started for your own smoothies – be they savoury or fruity: Cucumbers Carrots Avocados – help to make your smoothies creamy Berries Citrus fruits –oranges, pineapple, limes etc Bananas – also help to make your smoothies creamy Cashew nuts Yoghurt Cottage cheese Cream Coconut milk If you hit upon a fantastic smoothie mixture, share your find on the diabetes food forum. Scrambled eggs and omelette Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet (breakfast, Lunch And Dinner)

Diabetes Diet (breakfast, Lunch And Dinner)

Diet plan for diabetes patient should include high-value balanced elements. In the mean time, his diet must contain types of foods that are low in fat and sugars. By this way we can ensure keeping relative stability for the level of sugar in the blood. Choosing the best diet for diabetes patients: It is important to choose a healthy diet that contains a low percentage of carbohydrates and sugar, and is rich with good nutrients, as: fruit, vegetables, fish, white meat and whole starch. While unhealthy foods that contain high calorie content should be avoided completely, including fried foods, candies and soft drinks. Examples for the best foods for diabetes diet: Green beans, as they are rich in fiber, magnesium, and potassium. Beans are also a good source of protein and do not contain saturated fat. Also vegetables with dark green leaves such as spinach, cabbage and turnips are excellent sources of essential vitamins and minerals that do not contain any carbohydrates or calories. Citrus fruits such as oranges and lemons are a major source of vitamin C and soluble fiber, as well as berries that are rich in antioxidants. Tomato is also a main element in many foods and is a healthy diet option for diabetes patients. Also fish, whole grains and nuts, and skinned milk are also essential elements in the diet of diabetics to provide them with high nutritional value free of sugars, fats and carbohydrates. A diet plan for diabetes patient: Breakfast: A well-boiled egg or a hundred grams of low- fat cheese, or three tablespoons of beans, with a little oil and lemon. In addition to that, a loaf of bread and a cup of tea or coffee without sugar. Lunch: a dish of green salad, one hundred grams of grilled or boiled meat, or one hundred and fifty grams of skimmed chicken, and a dish o Continue reading >>

Large Breakfast, Small Dinner Tied To Better Diabetes Blood Sugar

Large Breakfast, Small Dinner Tied To Better Diabetes Blood Sugar

(Reuters Health) - Big breakfasts and small dinners might be a healthier way to eat for people with type 2 diabetes, according to a small new study. Diabetics in the study who ate big breakfasts and small dinners had fewer episodes of high blood sugar than those who ate small breakfasts and large dinners, researchers found. Blood sugar – also known as blood glucose – is controlled by the body’s internal clock, with larger blood sugar peaks after evening meals, Dr. Daniela Jakubowicz told Reuters Health in an email. People with type 2 diabetes often time their meals in opposition to their internal clock, said Jakubowicz, a researcher at Tel Aviv University’s Wolfson Medical Center in Israel. “They frequently skip breakfast while eating a high-calorie dinner,” she said, adding that skipping breakfast is linked to obesity and poor blood sugar control. The new study involved eight men and ten women with type 2 diabetes, ages 30 to 70, who were being treated with either the diabetes drug metformin and dietary advice or diet advice alone. Type 2 is the most common form of diabetes and is often linked to obesity. In type 2 diabetes, the body’s cells are resistant to the hormone insulin, or the body doesn’t make enough of it. Insulin gives blood sugar access to the body’s cells to be used as fuel. The participants were randomly assigned to follow a meal plan that consisted of either a 700-calorie breakfast and 200-calorie dinner or a 200-calorie breakfast and a 700-calorie dinner. Both diets included a 600-calorie lunch. After following the assigned meal plans for six days at home, the participants spent a day at the clinic, where blood tests were taken. They repeated the experiment two weeks later with the other diet plan. The study team found that post-meal Continue reading >>

The Best 7-day Diabetes Meal Plan

The Best 7-day Diabetes Meal Plan

This 1,200-calorie meal plan makes it easy to follow a diabetes diet with healthy and delicious foods that help to balance blood sugar. The simple meals and snacks in this 7-day plan feature complex carbohydrates (think whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables), lean protein and healthy fats. We limited refined carbohydrates (like white bread, white pasta and white rice) as well as added sugars, which can spike your blood sugar quickly. We've also cut back on saturated fats and sodium, as they can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing 2-3 carb servings (30-45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1 carb serving (15 grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be difficult—choose a variety of nutritious foods, as we do in this meal plan, and add in daily exercise for a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Day 1 Breakfast (294 calories, 41 g carbohydrates) • 1/2 cup oats cooked in 1/2 cup each 2% milk and water • 1 medium plum, chopped • 4 walnut halves, chopped Top oats with plum and walnuts. A.M. Snack (96 calories, 18 g carbohydrates) • 3/4 cup blueberries • 1/4 nonfat plain Greek yogurt Top blueberries with yogurt. Lunch (319 calories, 37 g carbohydrates) Turkey & Apple Cheddar Melt • 2 slices whole-wheat bread • 2 tsp. whole-grain mustard, divided • 1/2 medium apple, sliced • 2 oz. low-sodium deli turkey • 2 Tbsp. shredded Cheddar cheese, divided • 1 cup mixed greens Top one slice of bread with 1 tsp. mustard, apple, turkey and 1 Tbsp. cheese. Top the other Continue reading >>

20 Low Carb Breakfast Ideas

20 Low Carb Breakfast Ideas

If you thought your days of sitting down to a hearty fulfilling breakfast were over, think again. This collection of breakfast recipes for diabetics has some low-carb alternatives for your hearty breakfast favorites. Download the full 20 above. Continue reading >>

Low-carbohydrate Mini Omelets

Low-carbohydrate Mini Omelets

Need an easy breakfast recipe that is low carb, kid friendly and easy to make? When you are preparing meals for someone with diabetes, it is easy to get caught up in the list of things that need to be avoided or consumed in moderation. Don’t get me wrong, that list is quite lengthy, but the good news is that the list of healthy foods that are also low in carbohydrates and even zero carbohydrates is pretty hefty as well. When I meal plan complete meals for my type-1 diabetic son, I am always trying to incorporate low and zero carbohydrate options. When the entire meal consists of these foods, I feel as though I have won the lottery. Take these mini omelets for example; they are made with eggs, milk, veggies, meat of choice, and topped with shredded cheddar cheese. All of these ingredients have either low or zero carbohydrates. I cooked mine in a brownie pan, and they became perfect individual portions! Each square has a pretty even amount of eggs, milk, veggies, meat, and cheese; each individual serving is virtually carbohydrate free. For insulin dosage purposes, I calculate one portion as 2 carbohydrates. I’ve found a brand of bread with as little as 7 grams of carbohydrates, so I add a piece of toast, making the entire meal roughly 9 carbohydrates. Include some fresh blueberries, strawberries, apple slices, or yogurt, and you still have a very low-carbohydrate meal. Make these for breakfast, brunch, or pack them for lunch. Low-Carbohydrate Mini Omelets makes 12 individual portions in muffin tins or brownie squares. Ingredients 12 eggs 3/4 c. milk Veggies (green pepper, red pepper, onions, mushrooms, tomatoes, etc.) Meat (diced ham, turkey sausage, bacon, etc.) Shredded cheddar cheese (for topping) Instructions Whisk together milk and eggs. Pour into the 12 wells, f Continue reading >>

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