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Diabetic Baked Potato Recipe

Potatoes: Good Or Bad?

Potatoes: Good Or Bad?

Potatoes have long been considered the most basic of basic foods, a no-frills staple for the everyman or everywoman. One reason potatoes have earned this distinction is, no doubt, their low cost, but another may be their basic nutritional qualities: They are fat-, sodium-, and cholesterol-free, and a medium-size potato contains just 110 calories. Nevertheless, the reputation of potatoes has taken a hit lately due to their relatively high glycemic index, which means that the carbohydrate in them is quickly converted to glucose when digested. Many people with diabetes take glycemic index into account when deciding what foods to incorporate into their diet. So how good or bad are potatoes when it comes to weight control and glucose tolerance? A study examining these topics was published earlier this month by the Journal of the American College of Nutrition. According to an article on the study in the Daily Mail, the effect of potatoes on weight control may be modestly positive. Researchers assigned 90 overweight participants to one of three groups. Two of these groups were taught how to reduce their daily caloric intake by 500 calories, but one group was taught how to do this by eating mostly high-glycemic-index foods, and the other by eating mostly low-glycemic-index foods. The third group was not told to change anything about the caloric or glycemic-index composition of their diet. All three groups were told, however, to consume 5–7 servings of potatoes per week. After 12 weeks of following their prescribed diets, there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of weight loss or body composition changes. All three groups, however, experienced modest weight loss and improvements in body composition. Since the only dietary change that all three groups h Continue reading >>

Baked Potato Soup

Baked Potato Soup

There's nothing like a hearty, steaming bowl of soup to satisfy and comfort. That's why our delicious, creamy Baked Potato Soup might be just what you need! What You'll Need: 1 (10-3/4-ounce) can Healthy Request Cream of Celery Soup 1 (12-ounce) can evaporated nonfat milk 2 cups diced unpeeled baked potatoes 2 tablespoons bacon bits 1/4 teaspoon black pepper What To Do: Coat a large saucepan with cooking spray. Over medium-high heat, saute onion and celery 5 minutes, or until tender. Add celery soup. evaporated skim milk, potatoes, and bacon bits; mix well to combine. Lower heat and simmer 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in Cheddar cheese and black pepper and continue to simmer 5 minutes, or until cheese is melted, stirring often. Continue reading >>

Mashed Potatoes On A Diabetic Diet

Mashed Potatoes On A Diabetic Diet

According to the North Carolina Potato Association, the average adult consumes about one potato each day, and potatoes are the second most consumed food in America after dairy products. A side of mashed potatoes with a meal may be an American staple, but if you have diabetes, you may be concerned about the carbohydrate content of this popular side dish. You can include mashed potatoes as part of your diabetic diet, and preparation and serving size will help you keep your blood sugar under control. Video of the Day Carbohydrates and Mashed Potatoes Diabetes occurs when your body cannot effectively control your blood sugar levels. Carbohydrates affect blood sugar, so the American Diabetes Association's meal plan recommends that people with diabetes limit their carbohydrate intake to 45 percent of their total calories, or 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal. Fruit, vegetables, grains, breads and added sugar all contribute to the carbohydrate total of your meal. One cup of mashed potatoes prepared with whole milk provides 174 calories and 37 grams of carbohydrates, between 62 and 82 percent of the total carbohydrates recommended for an entire meal. Mashed potatoes also rate high on the glycemic index, a tool that measures a food's impact on blood sugar levels. Unprocessed, high-fiber foods, such as whole grains and most fruits and vegetables, tend to be low-glycemic foods because fiber slows the rate of blood sugar increase. Processing and cooking often increases the glycemic index of foods. High-glycemic foods have a rating of 70 or above. The University of Sydney’s glycemic index database reports that mashed potatoes have a glycemic index of 83. Instant mashed potatoes have a glycemic index of 87, according to Harvard Health Publications. If you follow the glycemic Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Diet Choices If You Have Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Diet Choices If You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes, in many ways your diet is your medicine. As diabetes educators, we help patients understand what food and beverage choices are best to avoid. When foods are high in carbohydrates, fat and sodium, they increase your risk for high blood pressure, high cholesterol, weight gain, heart disease and uncontrolled sugar. Top 10 offenders Sweetened drinks. These include regular pop/soda, fruit punches and iced teas. These are loaded with sugar and calories, and they usually have little or no nutritional value. Instead, try infusing plain water with different berries and fruits so you can enjoy the natural sweetness. “Designer” or specialty coffee drinks – including frappuccinos or cappuccinos. That “once a day special treat” can add up to lots of extra sugar, calories and saturated fat. Instead, go for straight java, either black, with artificial sweetener or a small splash of skim milk. Whole milk. It has too much fat, which can lead to weight gain. Switch to 2 percent, 1 percent – or even better: skim milk. Keep in mind that one cup of skim milk has 12 grams of carbohydrates. If you don’t like milk or are lactose intolerant, you can drink almond milk, rice milk or soy milk instead—but remember to get the low sugar varieties. Hot dogs. These grilled little favorites are still high in saturated fat and sodium—yes, that even includes turkey dogs! Try to avoid them or eat them only occasionally. Packaged lunch meats. These are also high in saturated fat and sodium. Check your deli for low sodium meats—or better yet use sliced meat that you’ve roasted at home to make your sandwiches. Also remember that sandwich toppings can be very unhealthy too (think high-fat mayonnaise). Instead add flavor to your sandwiches with mustard, veggies and/or Continue reading >>

25 Healthy Sweet Potato Recipes

25 Healthy Sweet Potato Recipes

Sweet, sweet potatoes It's no surprise that sweet potatoes are at the top of nearly everyone's healthiest foods list. One baked, medium-sized sweet potato contains 438% of your daily value of vitamin A (a white potato contains 1%), 37% of your vitamin C, and some calcium, potassium, and iron too. All this at just 105 calories! What's more, they also deliver 4 grams of dietary fiber—16% of the daily value—and absolutely zip in terms of fat. And luckily there are many ways to whip them up. Here are 25 great (even kid-friendly!) sweet potato recipes. Watch the video: 5 Health Benefits of Sweet Potatoes Oven-Roasted Sweet-Potato Wedges Craving french fries? Whip up these oven-roasted sweet-potato wedges instead. A healthier way to satisfy those cravings, this recipe delivers more taste too, with a kick provided by mustard, garlic, and rosemary. Try them with a dip, as a snack all by themselves, or as a side dish; they pair particularly well with lamb. Try this recipe: Oven-Roasted Sweet-Potato Wedges Watch the video: How to Make Oven-Roasted Sweet Potato Wedges Curried Carrot, Sweet Potato, and Ginger Soup This dish is a great way to get more vitamin A and beta carotene. Both the carrots and the sweet potatoes deliver oodles of both, making this recipe particularly good for both your skin and vision. Pair it with a whole grain baguette for a hearty and satisfying meal. Try this recipe: Curried Carrot, Sweet Potato, and Ginger Soup Sweet Potato Casserole This lightened-up take on a holiday classic is perfect for the season or really any time you need a hearty and healthy comfort food. The brown sugar and pecan topping will have kids (and adults!) clamoring for more. To make this dish even healthier, use half-and-half instead of butter to cut down on fat and calories. Try Continue reading >>

Loaded Baked Sweet Potatoes

Loaded Baked Sweet Potatoes

Roasting sweet potatoes directly on the oven rack allows their skins to become extra-crisp. For a variation, try pale-fleshed Japanese sweet potatoes, which have a richer flavor and are in season in November. Source: Martha Stewart Living, November 2016 Ingredients Directions Cooking The Tuscan Way means high quality ingredients and rich flavors prepared with care. Bring the Tuscan spirit to your dinner table tonight. Continue reading >>

Easy Loaded Baked Potatoes

Easy Loaded Baked Potatoes

Buzzworthy What’s Your Pasta Personality? Ever wonder what your favorite pasta sauce says about your personality? Take this fun and simple quiz to find out! Your results may surprise you. Servings Per Recipe: 4 PER SERVING: 205 cal., 3 g total fat (1 g sat. fat), 6 mg chol., 535 mg sodium, 33 g carb. (3 g fiber, 3 g sugars), 11 g pro. Continue reading >>

Bloomin’ Loaded Baked Potatoes

Bloomin’ Loaded Baked Potatoes

Your boring baked potato just got all kinds of sexy with this Bloomin’ Loaded Baked Potatoes recipe! Crispy skinned potato wedges all covered in melty cheese and crispy bacon. Yeah, life just got a whole lot tastier! For all of you newbies that found your way recently to the TKW Family, WELCOME! Now there are a few things you need to know about me and my personality. The way I write my posts and describe my recipes is I envision you’re sitting with me in my kitchen either watching me cook/bake or you’re helping me. We’re chatting and laughing like we’ve been friends for decades – like the kind of friends who don’t judge you if you wear your sweats pants on inside out, your hair is a hot mess or if you trip will laugh til they cry all the while helping you up. When I write I open up my home and life as I want you guys to relate to me and to feel like you’re with me as I’m cooking or doing something. You feel at home here, even if you’re half way across the world, you still feel like family. Something else you need to know about me – my husband is Mr. Fantabulous who has the metabolism of 967 people. No seriously it’s unreal. I, on the other hand, have a negative metabolism (if there’s such a thing) meaning I don’t even have to eat food to gain jiggle. I’m obsessed with pigs but I love bacon. My logic is simply this – bacon is made from ugly pigs, not the uber cutsie ones that are dressed up. I want a mini teacup pig, a cat and a dog but since our house is still being remodeled (9+ years now – we’re doing it ourselves) it’s not safe to have pets. I loathe anything cherries – I mean we’re talking not even cherry lip gloss. Pizza is my all time favorite food and my favorite veggie is the potato. Thus this recipe… an ode to the glo Continue reading >>

Elswet's Baked Potato Soup [ Diabetic Version ]

Elswet's Baked Potato Soup [ Diabetic Version ]

In a large pot, brown your bacon, drain the grease, crumble, and set aside. Over medium heat, melt the margarine substitute and add in the flour, whisking thoroughly. Add in potatoes and onions, stir to mix well. Bring to a boil, stirring often to avoid scorching of the milk. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer 15 minutes. Mix in your crumbled bacon, cheese, sour cream, instant potato flakes, and salt and pepper. Cook until cheese melts, stirring often. Serve hot, topped with fresh unmelted shredded cheese, and a small sprinkling of chopped green onions. Download and Print Get 1000's of easy recipes with Recipe-Star.com Recipe-Star.com Advertisement Continue reading >>

Loaded Twice-baked Potatoes Recipe - Eatingwell

Loaded Twice-baked Potatoes Recipe - Eatingwell

Pierce potatoes all over with a fork. Place in the microwave and cook on Medium, turning once or twice, until the potatoes are soft, about 20 minutes. (Or use the "potato setting" on your microwave and cook according to the manufacturer's directions.) Meanwhile, brown meat in a large skillet over medium-high heat, stirring often, about 3 minutes. Transfer to a large bowl. Increase heat to high, add broccoli and water to the pan, cover, and cook until tender, 4 to 5 minutes. Drain the broccoli; add to the meat. Carefully cut off the top third of the cooked potatoes; reserve the tops for another use. Scoop out the insides into a medium bowl. Place the potato shells in a small baking dish. Add cup Cheddar, sour cream, salt and pepper to the potato insides and mash with a fork or potato masher. Add scallions and the potato mixture to the broccoli and meat; stir to combine. Evenly divide the potato mixture among the potato shells and top with the remaining cup cheese. Microwave on High until the filling is hot and the cheese is melted, 2 to 4 minutes. Make Ahead Tip: Prepare and stuff potatoes. Cover and refrigerate for up to 2 days. Microwave and serve. Vegetarian variation: Replace the ground beef with a soy-based substitute or omit the beef altogether and increase the broccoli to 1 cups and the cheese to 1 cups. No microwave? No problem: Preheat oven to 400F. Pierce potatoes in several places with a fork. Bake directly on the center rack until tender, 45 to 60 minutes. Fill the potato as directed and bake the stuffed potatoes on a foil-lined baking sheet until the filling is hot, about 15 minutes. I've made this recipe twice now. Followed exactly as written. It's the only thing my picky eater kids request. We all love it. These are absolutely delicious. Not sure why but Continue reading >>

Beans And Cheese Baked Potato

Beans And Cheese Baked Potato

This is a tasty alternative to sandwiches for lunch. Baked potatoes are versatile and you can add your own favourite filling. A serving of beans count towards your 5 a day and are also a good source of low fat protein and fibre. Try to use low fat cheese as suggested in this recipe as ordinary cheddar is high in saturated fat. We need 3 servings of calcium a day, and cheese in this recipe counts as one of these servings. Carbohydrate: Potatoes contain carbohydrates so they will have an effect on glucose levels, read at the nutrition label to see total carbohydrate content. Choose a smaller sized potato if you need to lose weight. Ingredients – Serves 2 Adults 2 large potatoes, scrubbed not peeled 1 x 225g / 8 oz. small can of baked beans 55g / 2 oz. of low-fat cheddar cheese, grated Salt and pepper to taste Method Pre-heat the oven to 220°C / 425°F / Gas Mark 7 Wash the potatoes and then prick them all over with a fork Bake in a pre-heated oven for 1½ hours or until the inside is tender Heat the baked beans in a saucepan on the hob or in the microwave according to instructions on the tin Cut the potato in half and carefully scoop the centre out of the potato Mix this potato with the baked beans and pepper Return the mixture to potato skin and sprinkle with grated cheese Place in a hot oven and bake until warmed through and golden Source: safefood www.safefood.eu Continue reading >>

Baked Potato Soup

Baked Potato Soup

Ingredients: 1/4 cup chopped onion 1 (10 3/4 ounce) can Healthy Request Cream of Mushroom Soup 1 1/2 cups (one 12-fluid-ounce can) Carnation Evaporated Skim Milk 2 full cups (12 ounces) diced, unpeeled baked russet potatoes 1/4 cup Hormel Bacon Bits 3/4 cup (3 ounces) shredded Kraft reduced-fat Cheddar cheese 1/4 cup chopped onion Directions: n a large saucepan sprayed with butter-flavored cooking spray, sauté onion for 5 minutes or until tender. Add mushroom soup, evaporated skim milk, potatoes, and bacon bits. Mix well to combine. Lower heat and simmer for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in Cheddar cheese and green onion. Continue simmering for 5 minutes or until cheese melts, stirring often. Recipe serves 4 (1 cup) Each serving equals: HE: 1 Protein, 3/4 Skim Milk, 3/4 Bread, 1/4 Vegetable, 3/4 Slider, 6 Optional Calories 263 Calories, 7 gm Fat, 18 gm Protein, 32gm Carbohydrate, 843 mg Sodium, 477 mg Calcium, 1 gm Fiber DIABETIC: 1 Meat, 1 Skim Milk, 1 Starch Continue reading >>

Are Sweet Potatoes Good For Diabetics?

Are Sweet Potatoes Good For Diabetics?

Diabetics have to keep a close eye on their diets, in order to manage carbohydrates and limit their impact on blood glucose and insulin levels. That means high-carbohydrate foods can be problematic, but some, such as sweet potatoes, offer substantial nutritional benefits to offset their impact on blood sugar. Deciding how much or how often you can consume them is an individual decision, but sweet potatoes can certainly find a place in a diabetic meal plan. Carbs in Sweet Potatoes Any discussion of food and diabetes management should begin with the American Diabetes Association's recommendation, which is to count the grams of carbohydrates you eat in a day. The number of carbs you need is calculated based on your body weight and activity levels, but as a rule the ADA suggests aiming for a range of 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal, although some people may require fewer for optimal blood sugar control. By that reckoning, sweet potatoes pose a challenge: One large baked sweet potato provides over 37 grams of carbs, which represents most of your allowance for that meal. By that measure, incorporating a sweet potato can sharply limit what else goes onto your plate. It's Not as Bad as it Looks That being said, there are a couple of reasons sweet potatoes might not throw your meal plan off balance. First, a large sweet potato is a substantial quantity, and if you're diabetic your meal plan probably calls for a serving of no more than 1/3 cup mashed or one small potato. This brings down your total carbohydrates to a much more manageable 12 grams for a small baked sweet potato, or a shade over 19 grams for 1/3 cup boiled, mashed sweet potato. Those figures are still high, but easier to incorporate into your daily total. Also, a large portion of those total carbohydrates Continue reading >>

Recipe: Roasted Potatoes

Recipe: Roasted Potatoes

Dietitian's tip: Instead of frying potatoes in shortening, roast them in the oven to save fat and calories. These potato wedges are dusted with rosemary and oven-fried until brown and crispy. Ingredients 1 pound large red or white potatoes with skins, cut into wedges 1/4-inch thick 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 teaspoon rosemary or oregano Directions Preheat the oven to 400 F. Lightly coat a baking sheet with cooking spray. Soak the potato wedges in ice water for 5 minutes. Drain the potatoes and rinse thoroughly under cold water. Press between paper towels to dry. Transfer potatoes to a large bowl, pour the olive oil over the potatoes and toss to coat evenly. Arrange the potatoes in a single layer on the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 15 minutes. Turn the potatoes over and bake another 5 minutes. Sprinkle the herbs over the potatoes. Return the potatoes to the oven and bake until they're brown and crispy, about 5 minutes. Serve immediately. Continue reading >>

Potatoes And Diabetes

Potatoes And Diabetes

Potatoes are another staple we've all grown to love over the years. BUT if you have diabetes, potatoes are a no no if you want to lower blood sugar and A1C. Why? Quite simply, they are a high carbohydrate food, and they are also high glycemic index as well, meaning they cause rapid rises in blood sugar. If you go searching out on the web, you will still see lots of diabetic recipes containing potatoes. There are thousands of recipes and meals out there promoted to be diabetic friendly, but they're not. Here you'll only find low carb recipes that are going to help you gain better control. So let's briefly explore some potato nutrition facts and then share some potato alternatives and a recipe you can try. Potato Nutrition Facts Potatoes range from 21 g carbs through to around 35 g carbs per one medium potato. There is such a wide range in carb count because it depends on the type of potato. Even at 21 g that's quite high for a single potato – chances are you'd probably want to eat more. It's also the same for glycemic index (GI) – it ranges from 60 right up to 95. Anything below 55 is considered a low GI, and the higher it gets over 55, the more rapidly it is going to send your blood sugar soaring. Even 60 is a high GI, and 95, well that's crazy high. So unfortunately, eating potatoes is not going to help you lower blood sugar or A1C and keep things under control. Sorry to be the bearer of the bad news if you didn't know this already. But there are some tasty alternatives. Sure, there's nothing quite like potato. But we can adapt and use other things – here comes cauliflower again! Cauliflower Cauliflower is a very adaptive, versatile vegetable – we talked about that recently in our rice alternatives post and hopefully you gave the cauliflower rice a try. Because Continue reading >>

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