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Diabetes Prevention Diet Plan

Basic Meal Planning

Basic Meal Planning

Diabetes is a condition in which your body cannot properly use and store food for energy. The fuel that your body needs is called glucose, a form of sugar. Glucose comes from foods such as fruit, milk, some vegetables, starchy foods and sugar. To control your blood glucose (sugar), you will need to eat healthy foods, be active and you may need to take pills and/or insulin. In the following table, you will find some tips to help you until you see a registered dietitian. Tips for Healthy Eating, Diabetes Prevention and Management Tips Reasons Eat three meals per day at regular times and space meals no more than six hours apart. You may benefit from a healthy snack. Eating at regular times helps your body control blood glucose (sugar) levels. Limit sugars and sweets such as sugar, regular pop, desserts, candies, jam and honey. The more sugar you eat, the higher your blood glucose will be. Artificial sweeteners can be useful. Limit the amount of high-fat food you eat such as fried foods, chips and pastries. High-fat foods may cause you to gain weight. A healthy weight helps with blood glucose (sugar) control and is healthier for your heart. Eat more high-fibre foods such as whole grain breads and cereals, lentils, dried beans and peas, brown rice, vegetables and fruits. Foods high in fibre may help you feel full and may lower blood glucose (sugar) and cholesterol levels. If you are thirsty, drink water. Drinking regular pop and fruit juice will raise your blood glucose (sugar). Add physical activity to your life. Regular physical activity will improve your blood glucose (sugar) control. Plan for healthy eating Using a standard dinner plate, follow the Plate Method in the image below to control your portion sizes. Alcohol can affect blood glucose (sugar) levels and cause you Continue reading >>

Your Game Plan To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Your Game Plan To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes prevention is proven, possible, and powerful. Taking small steps, such as eating less and moving more to lose weight, can help you prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and related health problems. The information below is based on the NIH-sponsored Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) research study, which showed that people could prevent or delay type 2 diabetes even if they were at high risk for the disease. Follow these steps to get started on your game plan. If you are overweight, set a weight-loss goal that you can reach. Try to lose at least 5 to 10 percent of your current weight. For example, if you weigh 200 pounds, a 10-percent weight-loss goal means that you will try to lose 20 pounds. Research shows that you can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing weight by following a reduced-calorie eating plan and being more active each day. Find ways to be active every day. Start slowly and add more activity until you get to at least 30 minutes of physical activity, like a brisk walk, 5 days a week. Keep track of your progress to help you reach your goals. Use your phone, a printed log, online tracker, app, or other device to record your weight, what you eat and drink, and how long you are active. Ask your health care team about steps you can take to prevent type 2 diabetes. Learn about other ways to help reach your goal, such as taking the medicine metformin. Also, ask if your health insurance covers services for weight loss or physical activity. It’s not easy to make and stick to lifelong changes in what you eat and how often you are active. Get your friends and family involved by asking them to support your changes. You can also join a diabetes prevention program to meet other people who are making similar changes. Set a weight-loss goal If you are ov Continue reading >>

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

A prediabetes diagnosis can be alarming. This condition is marked by abnormally high blood sugar (glucose) most often due to insulin resistance. This is a condition in which the body doesn’t use insulin properly. It’s often a precursor to type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, people with prediabetes are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years. With prediabetes, you may also be at risk of developing cardiovascular disease. However, a prediabetes diagnosis doesn’t mean you will definitely get type 2 diabetes. The key is early intervention; to get your blood sugar out of the prediabetes range. Your diet is important, and you need to know the right kind of foods to eat. How diet relates to prediabetes There are many factors that increase your risk for prediabetes. Genetics can play a role, especially if diabetes runs in your family. Excess body fat and a sedentary lifestyle are other potential risk factors. In prediabetes, sugar from food begins to build up in your bloodstream because insulin can’t easily move it into your cells. Eating carbohydrates doesn’t cause prediabetes. But a diet filled with carbohydrates that digest quickly can lead to blood sugar spikes. For most people with prediabetes, your body has a difficult time lowering blood sugar levels after meals. Avoiding blood sugar spikes can help. When you eat more calories than your body needs, they get stored as fat. This can cause you to gain weight. Body fat, especially around the belly, is linked to insulin resistance. This explains why many people with prediabetes are also overweight. You can’t control all risk factors for prediabetes, but some can be mitigated. Lifestyle changes can help you maintain balanced blood sugar levels as well as a healthy weight. Watch carbs with Continue reading >>

Eat Well!

Eat Well!

When you have diabetes, deciding what, when, and how much to eat may seem challenging. So, what can you eat, and how can you fit the foods you love into your meal plan? Eating healthy food at home and choosing healthy food when eating out are important in managing your diabetes. The first step is to work with your doctor or dietitian to make a meal plan just for you. As soon as you find out you have diabetes, ask for a meeting with your doctor or dietitian to discuss how to make and follow a meal plan. During this meeting, you will learn how to choose healthier foods—a variety of vegetables and fruits, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat dairy foods, lean meats, and other proteins. You will also learn to watch your portion sizes and what to drink while staying within your calorie, fat, and carbohydrate (carbs) limits. You can still enjoy food while eating healthy. But how do you do that? Here are a few tips to help you when eating at home and away from home. Eating Healthy Portions An easy way to know portion sizes is to use the “plate method.” Looking at your basic 9-inch dinner plate[PDF – 14 MB], draw an imaginary line down the middle of the plate, and divide one side in half. Fill the largest section with non-starchy vegetables, like salad, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and carrots. In one of the smaller sections, put a grain or starchy food such as bread, noodles, rice, corn or potatoes. In the other smaller section, put your protein, like fish, chicken, lean beef, tofu, or cooked dried beans. Learn more at Create Your Plate, an interactive resource from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) that shows how a healthy plate should look. This tool allows you to select different foods and see the portion sizes you should use in planning your meal Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Your diabetes diet is simply a healthy-eating plan that will help you control your blood sugar. Here's help getting started, from meal planning to exchange lists and counting carbohydrates. Definition A diabetes diet simply means eating the healthiest foods in moderate amounts and sticking to regular mealtimes. A diabetes diet is a healthy-eating plan that's naturally rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories. Key elements are fruits, vegetables and whole grains. In fact, a diabetes diet is the best eating plan for most everyone. Purpose If you have diabetes or prediabetes, your doctor will likely recommend that you see a dietitian to help you develop a healthy eating plan. The plan helps you control your blood sugar (glucose), manage your weight and control risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure and high blood fats. When you eat excess calories and fat, your body responds by creating an undesirable rise in blood glucose. If blood glucose isn't kept in check, it can lead to serious problems, such as a dangerously high blood glucose level (hyperglycemia) and long-term complications, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. You can help keep your blood glucose level in a safe range by making healthy food choices and tracking your eating habits. For most people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss also can make it easier to control blood glucose and offers a host of other health benefits. If you need to lose weight, a diabetes diet provides a well-organized, nutritious way to reach your goal safely. Diet details A diabetes diet is based on eating three meals a day at regular times. This helps your body better use the insulin it produces or gets through a medication. A registered dietitian can help you put together a diet based on your health goals, tas Continue reading >>

Having A Diabetes Prevention Diet Plan

Having A Diabetes Prevention Diet Plan

The awareness on diabetes is very high now-a-days and people want to avoid getting contracted with diabetes. This has prompted to ensure a healthy living with diabetes prevention diet plan and enough of exercise. In the present days busy life junk food, stress and laziness or exhaustiveness had made the people to get diagnosed with different lifestyle diseases and diabetes is one of them. All the lifestyle diseases can be controlled or avoided, if proper care is taken. It is not cumbersome to follow a healthy life. Instead, it is very much required to understand the necessity of lifestyle changes. Nature has given solutions for every problem we face, but it is our carelessness that prompts to have these sedentary diseases. A new research had found that four specific nutrients, fiber, vitamin D, omega-3s and calcium can work together to help balancing the blood sugar and encourage weight loss. Build your diabetes prevention diet plan by choosing one breakfast, one lunch and one dinner, plus two snacks, any combination gets you approximately 1,400 calories a day and a healthy dose of the “Fat-Fighting 4.” Remember to eat in every 3 hours and practice portion control. People with diabetes have to take extra care to ensure that their food is balanced with insulin and oral medications, that they are taking and exercise to manage their blood glucose levels. This might sound like a lot of work, but your doctor or dietitian can help you to create a meal plan that is best for you. When you make healthy food choices, you can improve your overall health and you can prevent complications such as heart disease and some cancers. A diabetes prevention diet plan is a way of eating that reduces the risk for complications such as heart disease and stroke. Healthy eating includes eati Continue reading >>

Eat To Beat Diabetes In Just Eight Weeks: It's The Life-changing Diet That Can Help You Avoid Or Even Reverse Type 2 Diabetes. And The Best Part? It's The Tasty Way To Get Back To Health

Eat To Beat Diabetes In Just Eight Weeks: It's The Life-changing Diet That Can Help You Avoid Or Even Reverse Type 2 Diabetes. And The Best Part? It's The Tasty Way To Get Back To Health

The food we eat today, along with our sedentary lifestyle, is not only making us fat but putting us at risk of Type 2 diabetes — and it’s one of the greatest epidemics of our time. More than 4 million Britons now have this disease, while one in three adults has raised blood sugar levels that can lead to diabetes, yet most don’t know it. Now, help is at hand. Based on research carried out at the University of Newcastle, I have put together a simple diet plan and lifestyle programme that should not only reduce your risk of getting Type 2 diabetes, but can reverse it in those already suffering — all in only eight weeks. What’s more, it’s not just for those at highest risk but for anyone who wants to lose weight fast and regain control of their health. Sounds good? Well, here’s a little story to inspire you. Hanging in the wardrobe at 56-year-old Alan Tutty’s home in Sunderland is an old shirt that he won’t be throwing out any time soon. According to Alan, a father of four, it once used to fit him ‘like cling-film’. These days, it’s much looser — which is all down to the diet he went on three years ago. In just eight weeks, Alan lost two stone. And he has since kept most of that weight off, even though he admits to being ‘no angel’. ‘Occasionally I’ll have takeaways, and wine, cheese and beer,’ he says. ‘But I put the shirt on every so often to see if it’s still loose, and as long as it is, I’m doing fine.’ Far more significant than the fit of his shirt, though, is the fact that Alan, who was diagnosed with diabetes shortly before he began the diet, has had normal blood sugar levels ever since. Yet he might still have had Type 2 diabetes today had he not been lucky enough to be one of 11 people recruited for a research trial at Ne Continue reading >>

Dr. Oz's 4-week Diabetes Prevention Plan

Dr. Oz's 4-week Diabetes Prevention Plan

Before I begin most cardiovascular surgeries, I look into the eyes of the patient lying on the table and wonder, "What led her here? Could she have avoided this operation?" The majority of people who end up in my OR are overweight or obese, and many have type 2 diabetes. The fact is, diabetes has become an epidemic. There are now nearly 26 million diabetics in this country; and at least one in five girls and one in four boys born in the year 2000 will be diagnosed with diabetes in their lifetimes. Type 2 diabetics are up to four times as likely to die from heart disease. It's estimated that women diagnosed by the time they're 40 will lose 14 years, on average, from their lives; men, almost 12. But here is a source of great hope: A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine determined that more than 90 percent of type 2 diabetes cases can be prevented by lifestyle changes. The disease is often triggered by poor diet and inactivity, because fat interferes with the body's ability to use insulin, the hormone that ferries glucose from our bloodstream into our cells. When glucose can't get into the cells, it builds up in the blood and can lead to problems ranging from poor circulation to nerve damage, kidney failure, and blindness. Over the course of my career, I've watched patients who were destined for diabetes completely rewrite their fate by losing weight and getting in shape. In fact, even if you already have diabetes, drastic changes in your habits can put you into remission, as long as those changes are permanent. I have developed a four-week strategy to help at-risk patients start down a healthier path. It's a gradual process, with each week building on the last. Just remember: This isn't a simple diet-and-exercise plan. It's a whole new philosophy that co Continue reading >>

Reach Your Goals With Our Proven Program

Reach Your Goals With Our Proven Program

Participants who followed our type 2 menu lost 3x more weight than those receiving usual care Participants also achieved a lower HbA1c of 6.6% as compared to 7.5% for usual care while showing greater improvements in HDL (good) cholesterol and triglyceride levels 72% of participants reduced or eliminated their use of insulin A recent review of 10 commercial weight loss programs by researchers at Johns Hopkins published in the June issue of Obesity Reviews Journal‡, found that only those individuals with type 2 diabetes following the Jenny Craig program reduced hemoglobin A1c -- a three-month average of blood sugar concentrations -- more than weight loss counseling at 12 months. Jenny Craig was recommended as one option due to its strong evidence to support diabetes benefits. Take the guesswork out of diabetes meal planning with our easy to follow, calorie + carbohydrate controlled type 2 menu that gives you the right balance of nutrients to lose weight, yet has a variety of delicious flavors to keep you excited about what you’re eating. Your dedicated personal consultant designs strategies to help you reach your weight loss goals and hit your diabetes targets, while giving you weekly one-on-one support, either in person or over the phone. In an independent study Jenny Craig participants following the lower carbohydrate menu for diabetes lost 3x more weight than those receiving usual care, achieved a lower HbA1c of 6.6% as compared to 7.5% for usual care, while showing greater improvements in HDL (good) cholesterol and triglycerides.† Continue reading >>

15+ Best And Worst Foods For Your Prediabetes Diet Plan

15+ Best And Worst Foods For Your Prediabetes Diet Plan

Worst breakfast: bagels, breakfast cereals, or bacon Highly refined grains like bagels made from white flour and cereals are bad breakfast choices because they lack the fiber that blunts your blood sugar response. (Besides, some cereals are packed with sugar; you have to look at the nutrition label carefully.) You can still eat these on occasion, but you should aim to limit these in your diet, says Jill Weisenberger, RD, author of Diabetes Weight Loss Week By Week. Bacon also shouldn't be an "everyday food," she says. "People think, 'oh, it doesn't have carbs,' but there are so many things about it that are not a good idea for prediabetics," she says. For one, it's linked to colon cancer, something people with type 2 diabetes are already at an increased risk of. Best breakfast: eggs and avocado Eggs are one food that Weisenberger likes to recommend to clients, mainly because there are so many ways to cook them. Besides being fast and easy to prepare, they're also a good source of protein for people with prediabetes. And while you may be nervous about the cholesterol, research shows that in the context of a healthy diet, eating eggs doesn't have a negative effect on your heart health. Avocado also tops this list because it's rich in monounsaturated fatty acids, heart healthy fats that have been shown to improve fasting blood glucose levels. Worst lunch: a deli sandwich Veering away from processed meats, including deli meat, is a good idea. In one 2010 Harvard review of the research, people who ate about 2 ounces of processed meats per day had 19 percent higher odds of type 2 diabetes, and 42 percent higher risk of cardiovascular disease. (Unprocessed meats didn't up likelihood of either disease, the researchers discovered.) Sodium and nitrates in processed meats may impa Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Prevention Program Is A Weight-loss Plan In Disguise

New Diabetes Prevention Program Is A Weight-loss Plan In Disguise

The government plans to create a diabetes prevention program for Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries with prediabetes. Sounds good, but the program may well hurt more people than it helps. The new program will be called MDPP, or Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program. The program is not new, but this is the first time Medicare will be paying for it and supervising it. MDPP will consist of 16 sessions, mostly training on diet and exercise. It sounds like people will be getting useful support, but for what? The Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) proposal rarely mentions the words “glucose” or “blood pressure.” It’s nearly all about weight loss. People will have to weigh in at every session. There is no provision for testing of HbA1c levels or even blood pressure checks. Except for a few mentions, you will search in vain through the dozens of pages of regulations for the terms HbA1c or fasting blood sugar. People will have to have numbers in the prediabetes range to qualify for services. From then on, it’s mainly about weight. If you want to read the report, you can see it here. Why is a weight-loss program pretending to be a diabetes program, and what’s wrong with that? CMS wants hard data, and the easiest data to get is weight. No lab tests, no professional examination. Just step on a scale. But weight is not diabetes. Roughly 10% to 20% of people with Type 2 are not heavy, and most heavy people do not get diabetes. Yes, weight loss is often accompanied by lower glucose numbers. Dr. Roy Taylor showed that a very-low-calorie diet could reverse Type 2. Eating a low-carb diet while exercising more will likely lower your weight in the short-term and improve your sugar levels. But is it the weight loss that lowers sugars, or is it the behaviors that pro Continue reading >>

Csiro And Baker Idi Diabetes Diet And Lifestyle Plan

Csiro And Baker Idi Diabetes Diet And Lifestyle Plan

The 'Diabetes Diet and Lifestyle Plan' is a clear and easy guide for all Australians to follow, covering every aspect of dealing with type 2 diabetes prevention and control. More than 1.5 million Australians have diabetes and more than twice this number are at significant risk of developing the disease in the next five to ten years. The team that produced the revolutionary CSIRO Total Wellbeing Diet books has partnered with the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute to produce an evidence-based resource covering every aspect of type 2 diabetes prevention and control About the book The CSIRO and Baker IDI Diabetes Diet and Lifestyle Plan is a guide to help Australians make the best diabetes management choices, in order to live full and satisfying lives. The book explains what diabetes is, how people develop it and how its severity can be reduced. It also includes comprehensive plans to support a healthy lifestyle, advice on optimal diets, ideas for increased physical activity as well as strategies to help avoid developing diabetes complications. The CSIRO and Baker IDI Diabetes Diet and Lifestyle Plan is equally relevant for those who want to reduce their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The most powerful contributor to developing type 2 diabetes is becoming overweight or obese, so the book provides tips on simple lifestyle changes to reduce weight and improve health and wellbeing. This book includes more than 80 delicious diabetes-friendly recipes. There are recipes for: breakfasts snacks lunches and light meals soups and salads dinners on a shoestring week night dinners casual nights in with friends dinner parties weekend cooking, and weekend barbecue picnic. The CSIRO and Baker IDI Diabetes Diet and Lifestyle Plan enables readers to estimate their own risk of devel Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

The Weight Watchers Program*

The Weight Watchers Program*

Recognized as a National Diabetes Prevention Program by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).** Positive lifestyle changes, such as losing weight and being more physically active, not only lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, but also improve your overall well-being and the well-being of your family.*** Numerous expert panels recommend lifestyle changes as a key strategy for weight loss, and highlight that group support and trained Leaders are critical keys to success.‡ Weight Watchers has been tested in those with prediabetes and the results show significant weight loss and improvements in blood sugar control in 6 months, and most importantly, sustained those improvements over 12 months.† PROVEN PROGRAM You'll make healthier food choices and discover fun ways to move more each day to help you lose weight. SUPPORT Real-world weight-loss strategies from a trained Leader and members just like you. FLEXIBILITY You can start the program at any time. The DPP curriculum is incorporated in the standard Weight Watchers program, which is repeated frequently through the year. There numerous times and locations so you can find the meeting that fits your life. * The Weight Watchers program and guidance is not intended as a substitute for medical diagnosis or treatment; you should always consult your physician or health care provider about any health care issues. ** Weight Watchers has received pending recognition from the CDC as a provider of diabetes prevention services as of August 2015. ***CDC Website. “About Prediabetes & Type 2 Diabetes.” † Marrero et al. Comparison of commercial and self-initiated weight loss programs in people with prediabetes: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Public Health 2016;106(5):949-956. ‡ Jensen MD et al. 2013 Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Currently, there are nine drug classes of oral diabetes medications approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Sulfonylureas, for example, glimepiride (Amaryl) and glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL) Meglitinides, for example, nateglinide (Starlix) and repaglinide (Prandin) Thiazolidinediones, for example, pioglitazone (Actos) DPP-4 inhibitors, for example, sitagliptin (Januvia) and linagliptin (Tradjenta) What types of foods are recommended for a type 2 diabetes meal plan? A diabetes meal plan can follow a number of different patterns and have a variable ratio of fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. The carbohydrates consumed should be low glycemic load and come primarily from vegetables. The fat and proteins consumed should primarily come from plant sources. What type of carbohydrates are recommended for a type 2 diabetic diet plan? Carbohydrates (carbs) are the primary food that raises blood sugar. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure the impact of a carbohydrate on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. The main factors that determine a food's (or meal's) glycemic load are the amount of fiber, fat, and protein it contains. The difference between glycemic index and glycemic load is that glycemic index is a standardized measurement and glycemic load accounts for a real-life portion size. For example, the glycemic index of a bowl of peas is 68 (per 100 grams) but its glycemic load is just 16 (lower the better). If you just referred to the glycemic index, you'd think peas were a bad choice, but in reality, you wouldn't eat 100 grams of peas. With a normal portion size, peas have a healthy glycemic load as well as being an excellent source of pro Continue reading >>

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