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Diabetes In School Setting

Kids With Diabetes & Their Rights In School

Kids With Diabetes & Their Rights In School

Diabetes & You > Know Your Rights > Kids with Diabetes & Their Rights in School Kids with Diabetes & Their Rights in School What is Diabetes Canadas position on kids with diabetes in school? Students living with diabetes have the right to be full and equal participants in school and all school-related activities without the fear of being excluded, stigmatized, or discriminated against. School boards should develop and communicate a comprehensive diabetes management policy that includes the roles and responsibilities of the students living with diabetes, their parents/caregivers and school personnel according to Diabetes Canadas Standards of Care for Students with Diabetes in School. School principals should work with each student living with diabetes, their parents/caregivers and healthcare professionals to develop and communicate to school personnel and Individual Care Plan (ICP) that complies with the students prescribed diabetes management regimen. Each ICP should be comprised of a daily management plan and a diabetes emergency plan. Schools should permit students living with diabetes to monitor their blood glucose (sugar), administer insulin and treat low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) and high blood glucose (hyperglycemia) conveniently and safely wherever and whenever required. School personnel should be trained to recognize emergency situations and to respond appropriately according to the students individual care plan (ICP). School personnel should be trained to administer glucagon in the event of a severe hypoglycemic reaction. What resources does Diabetes Canada have related to the health and safety of kids with diabetes in school? Guidelines for the Care for Students Living with Diabetes at School These are Diabetes Canada guidelines addressing the roles and re Continue reading >>

School And Diabetes

School And Diabetes

Schools might be prepared to deal with kids with diabetes, but parents also should be part of the process. This usually means gathering the information that the school needs, making sure that it gets to the right people, and meeting with school officials to discuss their plans. You'll also need to prepare your child to manage diabetes away from home. It may sound complicated, but your child's diabetes health care team can help. And school administrators and nurses often have experience in helping kids with diabetes participate safely and successfully at school. Most of the things you need to care for your child at home are needed at school, including a specific diabetes management plan, diabetes medications, and testing supplies. take insulin or other diabetes medications eat lunch at a certain time, with plenty of time to finish have easy access to water and time to take bathroom breaks get physical activity and participate in school events like field trips recognize and get treatment for low blood sugar episodes Diabetes management materials that need to go to school might include: a medical identification bracelet or necklace You might arrange these items into packages for teachers, the school nurse, coaches, your child, and others. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends giving the school a packet with general diabetes information, including how to recognize and treat hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia , in addition to the management plan. Also include emergency contact information for you and other caregivers, your child's doctor, and other members of the diabetes health care team. The school staff should be made aware of your child's diagnosis and current health status. It's also good to clarify: any accommodations that the school might need to make To kee Continue reading >>

School Nurse / Diabetes Managament

School Nurse / Diabetes Managament

Managing diabetes at school is most effective when there is a partnership among students, parents, school nurse, health care providers, teachers, counselors, coaches, transportation, food service employees, and administrators. The school nurse provides the health expertise and coordination needed to ensure cooperation from all partners in assisting the student toward self-management of diabetes. Each student with diabetes is unique in his or her disease process, developmental and intellectual abilities and levels of assistance required for disease management. The goals of the Diabetes Medical Management Plan are to promote normal or near normal blood glucose with minimal episodes of hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, normal growth and development, positive mental health, and academic success (Kaufman, 2009). Throughout childhood and adolescence, the student with diabetes is continuously moving through transitions toward more independence and self-management (Silverstein et al., 2005). They will require various levels of supervision or assistance to perform diabetes care tasks in school. Students who lack diabetes management experience or cognitive and developmental skills must have assistance with their diabetes management during the school day as determined by the nursing assessment and as outlined in the Diabetes Medical Management Plan. American Diabetes Association (ADA). (2011). Diabetes care in the school and day care setting. Diabetes Care, 34(Supp 1), S70-S74. Kauffman, F. (Ed.). (2009). Medical management of type 1 diabetes (5th ed.). Alexandria, VA: American Diabetes Association. National Association of School Nurses (NASN). (2012). Diabetes Management in the School Setting. Silverstein, J., Klingensmith, G., Copeland, K., Plotnick, L., Kaufman, F., & Clark, N. ( Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes At School Playbook

Managing Diabetes At School Playbook

Goodbye, summer. Hello, homework. And guess what—the first assignment isn’t for kids. Parents, make a game plan to ensure all the bases are covered for your child’s diabetes care at school. Getting back into the routine of school takes a little more preparation for kids with diabetes, but it pays off over and over as the weeks and months go by. And since kids spend nearly half their waking hours in school, reliable diabetes care during the school day really matters. Some older students will be comfortable testing their blood sugar, injecting insulin, and adjusting levels if they use an insulin pump. Younger students and those who just found out they have diabetes will need help with everyday diabetes care. In a perfect world, all teachers and other school staff would understand how to manage diabetes so they could support your child as needed. But here in the real world, you’ll want to provide information to the school and work with staff to keep your son or daughter safe and healthy, no matter what the school day brings. Put it in Writing No two kids handle their diabetes exactly the same way. Before the year begins, meet with your child’s health care team to develop a personalized Diabetes Medical Management Plan (DMMP). Then visit the school and review the DMMP with the principal, office secretary, school nurse, nutrition service manager, teachers, and other staff who may have responsibility for your son or daughter during the day and after school. The DMMP explains everything about diabetes management and treatment, including: Target blood sugar range and whether your child needs help checking his or her blood sugar Your child’s specific hypoglycemia (low blood sugar, or “low”) symptoms (see the list on this page) and how to treat hypoglycemia Insuli Continue reading >>

School

School

Young people with diabetes are able to participate fully in school life. However, there are aspects of school life that can affect diabetes, for example sports, break times, school camps and exams. Because of this, its important that the school knows whether a student has diabetes. The school has a duty of care to create a safe environment and adequate supervision. As a parent there are resources you can provide teachers or coaches listed at the end of this page to help them understand diabetes management. Tips for students on how to tell their teacher and friends is available on the MyD site , a dedicated website for young people with diabetes, developed by NDSS. Mastering Diabetes is a new NDSS resource to help families, teachers and paediatric endocrinology teams. It has been designed to help teachers and families support children with type 1 diabetes at school and preschool, helping children to learn, grow and have fun. It is available as a PDF or an eBook . Diabetes Australia's Diabetes in Schools Report calls for a nationally consistent approach to diabetes support in schools and all education settings to benefit over 11,000 children and young people with diabetes and their families across Australia. Children and young people with diabetes should be supported to actively and fully participate in all school can offer them along the academic pathway and towards healthy psychosocial and physical development. There are around 11,000 children and young people in Australia who are living with diabetes. Most children have type 1 diabetes, although increasingly we are seeing children and young people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. There are now nearly 1,000 young people aged 20 or under in Australia with type 2 diabetes. The increasing prevalence of diabetes in younger Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Schools | Diabetes Uk

Diabetes In Schools | Diabetes Uk

If your child has Type 1 diabetes, we know theres a lot to think about, especially if your child has recently started school, changed schools or has different teachers. Or maybe youre a teacher or school caring for children and young people living with Type 1 diabetes and you need guidance on the best care to put in place. Thats why were here to help. This section is packed full of information and support to help make sure all children with Type 1 diabetes get the support and care they deserve at school so that they have the same opportunities at school as other children. We also have free resources with information about planning school trips and exams. Every child with diabetes deserves to have the same opportunities as their friends. And you should be confident they're looked after properly in school. Our work and your efforts have really helped improve the care and equal opportunities to children with diabetes in many schools across the country since 2015. Residential school trips and exam tools now available in print and digital If you're a parent or school planning exams and/or school residential trips for children with Type 1 diabetes, look no further. These practical tools now available in print and digital will help you make sense of the planning process so that you can get on with successful school trips and exams. Weve got a range of presentations ready to go if you think the school, or your childs classmates, could learn a bit more about diabetes. It doesnt have to be ham sandwiches every day. If you want to mix it up, weve got some easy, healthy packed lunch ideas to help. Support our work with the Health Conditions in School Alliance Diabetes UK chairs the Health Conditions in Schools Alliance and together we have already changed the law to get better car Continue reading >>

Care Of Students With Diabetes In Schools: Frequently Asked Questions

Care Of Students With Diabetes In Schools: Frequently Asked Questions

The law was signed on October 1, 2009 and is effective January 29, 2010. Does the law apply to nonpublic schools or early childhood programs? No. The law defines a school as an elementary or secondary public school located within the state. Who coordinates diabetes care in the school? The law requires the school nurse to coordinate the provision of diabetes care at that school. The school nurse develops the individualized healthcare plan (IHP) and an emergency healthcare plan (IEHP), communicates regularly with the student, parents/guardians, and the healthcare team, and documents care. Why does the law require an individualized healthcare plan (IHP) and an emergency healthcare plan (IEHP)? The IHP and the IEHP are developed by the school nurse, in consultation with the parent/guardian and other appropriate medical professionals, to establish a set of procedural guidelines and directions for the care of the student with diabetes while at school or at school-sponsored activities. What information must be included in the IHP/IEHP? The law states each individualized health care plan (IHP) shall include, and each individualized emergency healthcare plan may include the following information: the symptoms of hypoglycemia and recommended treatment; the symptoms of hyperglycemia and recommended treatment; written orders from the students physician or advanced practice nurse outlining the dosage and indications for insulin administration and glucagon, if needed; the times of meals and snacks and indications for snacks with exercise; full participation in exercise and sports and any contraindications or accommodations; accommodations for field trips, after school activities, parties, and other school-related activities; medical and treatment issues that may impact the education Continue reading >>

Tips For School Nurses

Tips For School Nurses

Tips for School Nurses provide ideas to help the school nurse coordinate diabetes care in the school setting. Tips include planning for the care newly diagnosed or returning student, where to seek training resources, preparation for field trips, what information to provide to transportation, and other information. Meet with parent/guardian before the school year begins or after diagnosis to review the student's Diabetes Medical Management Plan/physician's orders (DMMP) and secure needed diabetes supplies, equipment, medication, and snacks. Determine if parents/ guardian is authorized to make adjustments to insulin as indicated in the student's DMMP. Make sure the parent/guardian provides notification of any changes to the student's diabetes regimen and obtains an updated DMMP to document changes. Seek out training as needed to update your skills and gain knowledge about new technologies such as the insulin pump or continuous glucose monitor. Put an Emergency Action Plan in place for prompt recognition and treatment of hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) and make sure the student has immediate access to a quick-acting form of glucose (regular soda, fruit juice, glucose tabs). Put an Emergency Action Plan in place for prompt recognition and treatment of hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) and make sure the student has immediate access to a water and insulin as prescribed in the DMMP. Inform school employees that a student with diabetes should never be sent anywhere alone if feeling hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic. Inform parent/guardian that their child has rights under relevant federal laws such as Section 504 and be a member of the team that determines eligibility for services under federal law and develops the 504 plan or other written accommodations plan. Identify and recr Continue reading >>

School Resource Pack

School Resource Pack

Diabetes Ireland > Living with Diabetes > Your child and diabetes > School > School Resource Pack As more and more children/young people are being diagnosed with a chronic health condition such as asthma, diabetes, epilepsy and anaphylaxis, teachers are faced with the challenge of supporting a student with these conditions in school. This can seem like a great responsibility and one teachers, principals, school staff and parents can be anxious about. To address this need, the Asthma Society of Ireland, Diabetes Ireland, Brainwave the Irish Epilepsy Association and Anaphylaxis Ireland came together to produce a resource pack Managing Chronic Health Conditions at School to help teachers and parents to work together and provide a safe and enjoyable school environment for students with any one of these conditions. Information on developing or updating your schools guidelines on managing students with chronic health conditions Standardised Healthcare Plan and template forms/letters that can be adapted to meet your schools information need for each student with a chronic condition Clear outline of parents, teachers and board of management responsibilities to aid communication and expectations of all parties in managing a student with a chronic condition on a daily basis Practical information including an Emergency Plan on each condition for teachers and guidance on safe storage and safe disposal of medications at school Continue reading >>

What Is Effective Diabetes Management At School?

What Is Effective Diabetes Management At School?

Maintaining Optimal Blood Glucose Control Assisting the Student with Performing Diabetes Care Tasks Designating Trained Diabetes Personnel Maintaining Optimal Blood Glucose Control The goal of effective diabetes management is to keep blood glucose levels within a target range determined by the student’s personal diabetes health care team. Optimal blood glucose control helps to promote normal growth and development and to prevent the immediate dangers of blood glucose levels that are too high or too low. Maintaining blood glucose levels within the target range also can help to optimize the student’s ability to learn by avoiding the effects of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia on cognition, attention, and behavior. In the long term, effective diabetes management helps to prevent or delay the serious complications of diabetes such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney failure, gum disease, nerve disease, and amputations of the foot or leg. The key to maintaining optimal blood glucose control is to carefully balance food intake, physical activity, insulin, and/or other medication. As a general rule, food makes blood glucose levels go up. Physical activity, insulin, and diabetes medications make blood glucose levels go down. Several other factors, such as growth and puberty, physical and emotional stress, illness, or injury, also can affect blood glucose levels. Managing blood glucose is a constant juggling act—24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Many students with diabetes check their blood glucose levels throughout the day using a blood glucose meter. Some students also wear a continuous glucose monitor (CGM). When blood glucose levels are too low (hypoglycemia) or too high (hyperglycemia), corrective actions need to be taken. Low blood glucose levels, which can be lif Continue reading >>

Many Schools Failing On Type 1 Diabetes Care

Many Schools Failing On Type 1 Diabetes Care

Health |Many Schools Failing on Type 1 Diabetes Care Quintarius Monroe, who has Type 1 diabetes, checks his blood sugar before football practice at Woodlawn High School in Birmingham, Ala. Credit Bob Miller for The New York Times With twin boys ready for school, Jason and Jessica Pollard braced for paperwork, parent-teacher meetings and shopping trips for supplies. But they were not prepared for the reception their son, Owen, then 5, received from school administrators. Officials at their neighborhood kindergarten and a nearby private academy said he would not be allowed to attend because he has Type 1 diabetes . The Pollards, doctors in Seattle, were flabbergasted. One headmaster said that Owen would never be accepted because of his disability. It took everything in me not give him the middle finger, said Dr. Jessica Pollard, a pediatric oncologist. The Pollards are hardly the first family to face this kind of discrimination. Too many schools are failing to provide the growing number of students who have Type 1 diabetes with the routine care they need, such as insulin shots or blood sugar monitoring, federal regulators and diabetes experts say. And often, parents do not know they have the legal right to insist on it. The incidence of Type 1 diabetes among children has increased by 21 percent in recent years. In 2009, an estimated 167,000 children had the disease, according to the latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In nearly 400 cases since 2011, parents have brought complaints to federal authorities about schools that decline to care for these students. Experts say the number vastly understates the problem in public and private education ( Share your own experience here) . Many children have been barred from attending their zoned schoo Continue reading >>

Diabetes: School Information

Diabetes: School Information

It is important for families to work closely with school staff to create a safe environment for diabetes. A diabetes healthcare provider will generally work with your child/adolescent, your family and teachers. children with diabetes go to kindergarten, day care and school and participate in all normal educational and social activities every child living with diabetes has specific needs it is important for families to work closely with school staff to create a safe environment for diabetes Diabetes management at kindergarten, early childhood settings and school You could share a video with staff at your child's school. Check the external links and downloads below for the link. Children with diabetes go to kindergarten, day care and school and participate in all normal educational and social activities. A diabetes healthcare provider will generally work with your child/adolescent, your family and teachers. This ensures that school and early childhood staff know about the safe management of diabetes and can involve your child fully in education based activities without discrimination. It is important to recognise that every child living with diabetes has specific needs. The 'Clinical Network for Children and Young People's Diabetes Services' has developed a collection of school action and accompanying management plans. These are designed to support families in creating a safe environment at school for diabetes care. Families need to complete the plans with the support of their local diabetes treating team before sharing them with relevant school staff. Diabetes action and management plans for kindergarten and early childhood settings Continue reading >>

States With Published Diabetes Care Programs

States With Published Diabetes Care Programs

Children with diabetes require medical care to remain healthy. The need for medical care does not end while the child is at school. The following information is designed to help children with diabetes and their parents ensure that they are able to care for their diabetes while at school. School Bill of Rights for Children with Diabetes What every child with diabetes should expect at school The Law, Schools, and Your Child with Diabetes The basis for non-discrimination at school, including a sample 504 plan Information for Teachers and Child-Care Providers An overview of diabetes and what it means for school Diabetes Management at School Detailed instructions and forms to help your child at school, including a 504 plan Sample 504 and IEP Plans Help parents ensure that their kids get the most out of school Before School Starts A quick check list of things to do before your child starts school One-page Instruction Sheet for Teachers Summarize your child's care needs for the teacher States with Published Diabetes Care Programs Florida offers Guidelines for the Care and Delegation of Care for Students with Diabetes in Florida Schools (January 2015). The New Jersey Department of Education has published its Guidelines for the Care of Students with Diabetes in the School Setting. The New York State Department of Health offers a collection of information on Children with Diabetes. The Texas Diabetes Council offers Guidelines for Training School Employees Who Are Not Licensed Healthcare Professionals. Guidelines For Care Of Students With Diabetes from the Washington State Task Force for Students with Diabetes is available online. This excellent guide can serve as a starting point for school systems interested in establishing a diabetes program. (Scroll down the page to find the d Continue reading >>

Care Of Children With Diabetes In The School And Day Care Setting

Care Of Children With Diabetes In The School And Day Care Setting

Federal laws that protect children with diabetes include Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1991 (originally the Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975), and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Under these laws, diabetes has been considered to be a disability, and it is illegal for schools and/or day care centers to discriminate against children with disabilities. In addition, any school that receives federal funding or any facility considered open to the public must reasonably accommodate the special needs of children with diabetes. Indeed, federal law requires an individualized assessment of any child with diabetes. The required accommodations should be provided within the child’s usual school setting with as little disruption to the school’s and the child’s routine as possible and allowing the child full participation in all school activities. Despite these protections, children in the school and day care setting still face discrimination. For example, some day care centers may refuse admission to children with diabetes, and children in the classroom may not be provided the assistance necessary to monitor blood glucose and may be prohibited from eating needed snacks. The American Diabetes Association works to ensure the safe and fair treatment of children with diabetes in the school and day care setting (13–15). Diabetes care in schools Appropriate diabetes care in the school and day care setting is necessary for the child’s immediate safety, long-term well being, and optimal academic performance. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial showed a significant link between blood glucose control and the later development of diabetes complications, with improved glycemic control dec Continue reading >>

Managing Type 1 Diabetes In School: Recommendations For Policy And Practice

Managing Type 1 Diabetes In School: Recommendations For Policy And Practice

Managing type 1 diabetes in school: Recommendations for policy and practice Paediatrics & Child Health, Volume 20, Issue 1, 1 January 2015, Pages 3539, Sarah E Lawrence, Elizabeth A Cummings, Danile Pacaud, Andrew Lynk, Daniel L Metzger; Managing type 1 diabetes in school: Recommendations for policy and practice, Paediatrics & Child Health, Volume 20, Issue 1, 1 January 2015, Pages 3539, Diabetes requiring insulin is increasingly common and likely to impact students in most, if not all, schools. Diabetes and its complications have major personal, social and economic impact, and improved diabetes control reduces the risk of both short- and long-term complications. Evidence shows that more intensive management of diabetes through frequent blood glucose monitoring, insulin administration with injections and/or insulin pumps, and careful attention to diet and exercise leads to better control. Since children spend 30 to 35 hours per week at school, effectively managing their diabetes while there is integral to their short- and long-term health. The Canadian Paediatric Society and the Canadian Pediatric Endocrine Group recommend that minimum standards for supervision and care be established across Canada to support children and youth with type 1 diabetes in schools. These recommendations are derived from evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, with input from diabetes care providers from across Canada, and are consistent with the Canadian Diabetes Associations Guidelines for the Care of Students Living with Diabetes at School. The Canadian Paediatric Society and the Canadian Pediatric Endocrine Group are concerned about how type 1 diabetes (and other forms of diabetes requiring insulin treatment) is managed in schools. Diabetes is not a static condition: blood sugars ca Continue reading >>

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