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Diabetes Diets

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

How to choose food If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," says Andrews. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, says Andrews. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabete Continue reading >>

The Top 20 Foods For Beating Diabetes

The Top 20 Foods For Beating Diabetes

Having diabetes doesn’t mean you have a boring diet Every time you roll your shopping cart into the supermarket, you’re making a decision that goes far beyond whether you’re going to have pork or pierogies for dinner. You’re actually choosing between being a victim and a victor. What you put in your cart goes a long way toward determining whether you’ll be compromised by diabetes or start controlling and eventually even beating it. That’s why we’ve assembled the following list of the 20 best foods for fighting diabetes. Every time you go to the store from now on, take this list with you and check off each item. In fact, if your favourite store has a delivery service, sign up for it so your supplies are automatically replenished every few weeks. Research proves that making a few key changes to your diet such as eating more produce, fewer refined carbohydrates, plenty of lean protein, and more ‘good’ fat’helps improve blood-sugar control and cuts the risk of diabetes-related complications. Don’t make the mistake of thinking that one or two or even five foods on this list will transform you. You need most of them, yes, even the flaxseed, because together they represent a new approach to eating, a lifestyle rather than just a diet. 1. Apples Because they offer so many health advantages, put these at the core of your diet. Apples are naturally low in calories, yet their high fibre content (4 grams) fills you up, battles bad cholesterol, and blunts blood-sugar swings. Red Delicious and Granny Smith are also among the top 10 fruits with the most disease-fighting antioxidants. Eat them whole and unpeeled for the greatest benefit, or make a quick ‘baked’ apple. After washing and chopping one apple, put it in a bowl with a dusting of cinnamon and microwa Continue reading >>

Critical Review Dietary Carbohydrate Restriction As The First Approach In Diabetes Management: Critical Review And Evidence Base

Critical Review Dietary Carbohydrate Restriction As The First Approach In Diabetes Management: Critical Review And Evidence Base

Highlights • We present major evidence for low-carbohydrate diets as first approach for diabetes. • Such diets reliably reduce high blood glucose, the most salient feature of diabetes. • Benefits do not require weight loss although nothing is better for weight reduction. • Carbohydrate-restricted diets reduce or eliminate need for medication. • There are no side effects comparable with those seen in intensive pharmacologic treatment. The inability of current recommendations to control the epidemic of diabetes, the specific failure of the prevailing low-fat diets to improve obesity, cardiovascular risk, or general health and the persistent reports of some serious side effects of commonly prescribed diabetic medications, in combination with the continued success of low-carbohydrate diets in the treatment of diabetes and metabolic syndrome without significant side effects, point to the need for a reappraisal of dietary guidelines. The benefits of carbohydrate restriction in diabetes are immediate and well documented. Concerns about the efficacy and safety are long term and conjectural rather than data driven. Dietary carbohydrate restriction reliably reduces high blood glucose, does not require weight loss (although is still best for weight loss), and leads to the reduction or elimination of medication. It has never shown side effects comparable with those seen in many drugs. Here we present 12 points of evidence supporting the use of low-carbohydrate diets as the first approach to treating type 2 diabetes and as the most effective adjunct to pharmacology in type 1. They represent the best-documented, least controversial results. The insistence on long-term randomized controlled trials as the only kind of data that will be accepted is without precedent in science Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet 'regenerates Diabetic Organ'

Fasting Diet 'regenerates Diabetic Organ'

The pancreas can be triggered to regenerate itself through a type of fasting diet, say US researchers. Restoring the function of the organ - which helps control blood sugar levels - reversed symptoms of diabetes in animal experiments. The study, published in the journal Cell, says the diet reboots the body. Experts said the findings were "potentially very exciting" as they could become a new treatment for the disease. People are advised not to try this without medical advice. In the experiments, mice were put on a modified form of the "fasting-mimicking diet". It is like the human form of the diet when people spend five days on a low-calorie, low-protein, low-carbohydrate but high unsaturated-fat diet. It resembles a vegan diet with nuts and soups, but with around 800 to 1,100 calories a day. Then they have 25 days eating what they want - so overall it mimics periods of feast and famine. Previous research has suggested it can slow the pace of ageing. Diabetes therapy? But animal experiments showed the diet regenerated a special type of cell in the pancreas called a beta cell. These are the cells that detect sugar in the blood and release the hormone insulin if it gets too high. Dr Valter Longo, from the University of Southern California, said: "Our conclusion is that by pushing the mice into an extreme state and then bringing them back - by starving them and then feeding them again - the cells in the pancreas are triggered to use some kind of developmental reprogramming that rebuilds the part of the organ that's no longer functioning." There were benefits in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in the mouse experiments. Type 1 is caused by the immune system destroying beta cells and type 2 is largely caused by lifestyle and the body no longer responding to insulin. Further t Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For People With Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diet Tips For People With Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diet is one of the most important treatments in managing diabetes and kidney disease. If you’ve been diagnosed with kidney disease as a result of diabetes, you’ll need to work with a dietitian to create an eating plan that’s right for you. This plan will help manage your blood glucose levels and reduce the amount of waste and fluid your kidneys process. Which nutrients do I need to regulate? Your dietitian will give you nutritional guidelines that tell you how much protein, fat and carbohydrate you can eat, as well as how much potassium, phosphorus and sodium you can have each day. Because your diet needs to be lower in these minerals, you’ll limit or avoid certain foods, while planning your meals. Portion control is also important. Talk to your dietitian regarding tips for accurately measuring a serving size. What may be measured as one serving on a regular diet may count as three servings on the kidney diet. Your doctor and dietitian will also recommend you eat meals and snacks of the same size and calorie/carbohydrate content at certain times of the day to keep your blood glucose at an even level. .It’s important to check blood glucose levels often and share the results with your doctor. What can I eat? Below is an example of food choices that are usually recommended on a typical renal diabetic diet. This list is based on sodium, potassium, phosphorus and high sugar content of foods included. Ask your dietitian if you can have any of these listed foods and make sure you know what the recommended serving size should be. Carbohydrate Foods Milk and nondairy Recommended Avoid Skim or fat-free milk, non-dairy creamer, plain yogurt, sugar-free yogurt, sugar-free pudding, sugar-free ice cream, sugar-free nondairy frozen desserts* *Portions of dairy products are o Continue reading >>

15 Of The Best Foods For Diabetics, According To Science

15 Of The Best Foods For Diabetics, According To Science

High in soluble fiber, oats are slower to digest than processed carbs. Eat them and you’ll release glucose into the bloodstream more slowly, which will prevent spikes in your blood-sugar levels. In a 2012 study from Sweden’s Karolinska University, researchers found that eating four servings of whole grains daily reduced the risk for developing prediabetes by 30 percent. Other research shows that if you eat whole grains you experience less inflammation, which could lower the odds of your developing insulin resistance, heart disease, and high blood pressure. These science-backed strategies can work to reverse diabetes. This sweet seasoning contains a compound called hydroxychalcone, which may stimulate insulin receptors on cells and, in turn, improve your body’s ability to absorb blood sugar. Researchers from the University of California-Davis recently reviewed eight different studies on cinnamon and reported that about half to one teaspoon a day lowered fasting blood sugar levels by an average of nine points among people with diabetes. Sprinkle the fragrant spice onto oatmeal or add a dash to a cup of coffee. These myths about diabetes could be damaging your health. From Merrill Lynch Eating more whole fruits, particularly grapes, blueberries, and apples, was significantly associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a Harvard study published in the British Medical Journal in 2013. People who ate at least two servings each week of certain whole fruits reduced their risk for type 2 diabetes by as much as 23 percent when compared to those who ate less than one serving per month. Eating the whole fruit seems to be key, though; researchers found that fruit juice drinkers faced as much as a 21 percent increased risk of developing diabetes. Make sure to Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Follow A Low-carb Diet The Right Way

7 Ways To Follow A Low-carb Diet The Right Way

Feeling "hangry," the combination of hungry and angry, is what I hear a lot from patients who believe all carbs are evil, and that if you want to control your blood sugar or lose weight, they all have to go. Strong studies point to carbohydrate restriction as a main treatment for type 2 diabetes, but it doesn't have to be all or nothing. Many of my patients on very low-carb diets can’t sustain them long term. Eventually, they re-gain their weight and their blood-sugar problems come back. Those angry months of deprivation weren’t worth it. There’s a better way, which involves keeping some of the foods you love, and as a result, maintaining your sanity. Any time you eat a carbohydrate, your body has to redirect the glucose from your bloodstream to your cells. It calls on your pancreas, where insulin lives, to get the job done. Insulin’s role is to take the glucose and distribute it to your muscle and fat cells, where it’s either used for energy or stored for fat. When everything goes right, insulin is your friend. Eat too much or consume the wrong things and insulin becomes your enemy. Excess insulin circulating in your body may cause you to gain weight. Here’s how to do low-carb right. 1. Plan your meals around lean proteins and healthy fats. The reason many people fail at low-carb diets is because they are buying foods like low-carb chips, bars and drinks. These options are not always nutrient dense. They can leave you with a lack of satisfaction, increased hunger and the dreaded rebound binge. Instead, opt for real food. Find options that make you less hungry and more satisfied. Focusing on foods that are good sources of protein and healthy fats will help. A 2011 study found increased protein in the diet helped to satisfy hunger and promote weight loss. Cho Continue reading >>

The Truth About Diabetic Diets

The Truth About Diabetic Diets

(MyRecipes.com) -- Having diabetes doesn't mean having to eat a spartan diet of bland, tasteless foods. But it does mean you have to pay close attention to portion control. Learn why some of the common myths about diabetic diets are not exactly true and what steps you can take to control diabetes. Myth: One diet fits all. Because there is not just one type of diabetes (pre-diabetes, type 1, type 2, gestational), there is no one diet that works for everyone. Many people with type 2 diabetes are obese and need a weight-control diet plan, while others with type 1 diabetes might be 17-year old athletes who need a high-calorie diet. Blood sugar control can be achieved in different approaches such as low-carb, high-fiber, low-fat, and low glycemic index diets. It's important to meet with your doctor and a dietitian to figure out what type of plan will work for you. MyRecipes.com: Defy diabetes Myth: No sugar allowed. It's okay to eat some sugar as long as it's part of a balanced, healthy eating plan and is accounted for in the total amount of carbohydrate in your diet. However, you should try to cut down on foods and drinks that are concentrated in sugars because, in large amounts, they can make blood sugar control and weight control more difficult. Myth: Eat all the fruit you want. Fruit is fine, but in unlimited amounts can mess with diabetes control. Along with lots of vitamins and antioxidants, fruits contain natural sugars that can increase blood glucose. Fresh fruits have a slight advantage over fruit juices because the fresh fruits contain fiber, which helps slow the rise of blood glucose. Enjoy fresh fruits, but pay attention to the amount. MyRecipes.com: Browse all healthy fruit salad recipes Myth: Salt doesn't count Although salt does not directly affect blood sugar Continue reading >>

Gluten-free Diets Are Not Actually Linked To Diabetes

Gluten-free Diets Are Not Actually Linked To Diabetes

In the pantheon of fad diets, there is perhaps none more hated on than gluten-free. And despite how annoying fad dieters are (if I hear one more person order a salad because they’re ‘gluten-free’ and then ask for croutons…), it’s not unreasonable to want to avoid foods that might possibly be bad for you. But is gluten actually bad for people who don’t have a problem with it? There’s no real evidence that avoiding gluten leads to tangible health benefits, assuming that you don’t have celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity. But there also haven’t been many studies that actually asked that question—there’s just not much information out there. On Thursday we got some preliminary answers...kind of. Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done People who eat low gluten diets are at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes, according to results presented on Thursday at the American Heart Association Meeting. It’s crucial to point out here that these researchers weren’t looking at people on gluten-free diets. The researchers were only studying associations between eating less gluten and getting diabetes. Their study size was massive—199,794 people—because they looked at data f Continue reading >>

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

I have gestational diabetes. Do I have to watch what I eat? Yes. Eating well helps all women stay healthy during pregnancy. But if you have gestational diabetes, choosing the right food to eat is even more important. That's because many women with gestational diabetes can manage their condition by following a healthy eating plan, monitoring their blood sugar, and exercising regularly. Keeping your blood sugar stable by eating healthy food and exercising makes it less likely that you'll need medication to control your condition. You and your baby are also less likely to have any complications from your condition. Watching what you eat also helps you gain a healthy amount of weight during pregnancy. If you were overweight before becoming pregnant, your healthcare provider may recommend limiting calories so you don't gain too much as your baby grows. Do I need to monitor carbohydrates? Yes. The amount and type of carbohydrates (natural starches and sugars) in food affects your blood sugar levels. And with gestational diabetes, you'll need to track your carbohydrate intake in particular. Setting a limit on the amount of carbohydrates you eat at each meal is the first step to managing your blood sugar. Your provider is likely to recommend reducing the total amount of carbohydrates to about 40 percent of your daily calories. Try to eat carbohydrates that are high in fiber. Fibrous foods are harder to digest. Whole grains are high in fiber, so choosing brown rice and whole grain bread instead of refined versions (white bread and rice) means that they take longer to digest and release sugar more slowly into your bloodstream. Vegetables, beans, lentils, and chickpeas are also high in fiber and release sugar into your blood slowly. Avoid food and drinks that are high in added sug Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Nutrition

Diabetes And Nutrition

People who have diabetes have too much sugar in their blood. Managing diabetes means managing your blood sugar level. What you eat is closely connected to the amount of sugar in your blood. The right food choices will help you control your blood sugar level. Path to improved health Eating well is one of the primary things you can do to help control diabetes. Do I have to follow a special diet? There isn’t one specific “diabetes diet.” Your doctor can work with you to design a meal plan. A meal plan is a guide that tells you what kinds of food to eat at meals and for snacks. The plan also tells you how much food to have. For most people who have diabetes (and those without, too), a healthy diet consists of: 40% to 60% of calories from carbohydrates. 20% calories from protein. 30% or fewer calories from fat. Your diet should also be low in cholesterol, low in salt, and low in added sugar. Can I eat any sugar? Yes. In recent years, doctors have learned that eating some sugar doesn’t usually cause problems for most people who have diabetes — as long as it is part of a balanced diet. Just be careful about how much sugar you eat and try not to add sugar to foods. What kinds of foods can I eat? In general, at each meal you may have: 2 to 5 choices (or up to 60 grams) of carbohydrates. 1 choice of protein. A certain amount of fat. Talk to your doctor or dietitian for specific advice. Carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are found in fruits, vegetables, beans, dairy foods, and starchy foods such as breads. Try to have fresh fruits rather than canned fruits, fruit juices, or dried fruit. You may eat fresh vegetables and frozen or canned vegetables. Condiments such as nonfat mayonnaise, ketchup, and mustard are also carbohydrates. Protein. Protein is found in meat, poultry, fish Continue reading >>

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Healthy eating is the cornerstone of managing diabetes, yet it can be a challenge figuring out what to eat to balance your blood sugar. Here we've created a delicious 3-day meal plan that makes it easier to follow a diabetes diet. In this plan you'll find a mix of nutritious foods including fiber-rich complex carbohydrates, like whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein sources, healthy fats and dairy. This plan limits the amount of foods with refined carbohydrates (think white bread, white rice and sugar), added sugars and saturated fats, which can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing 2-3 carb servings (30-45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1 carb serving (15 grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Incorporating a variety of foods, as we do in this meal plan, is a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Not sure if this is the right plan for you? Calculate your calorie level and find the diet meal plan that will work best for you. Day 1 Meal Prep Tip: Cook or set aside an extra 1/2 cup of black beans tonight at dinner to have for lunch on Day 2. Be sure to rinse canned beans to get rid of excess salt. Breakfast (298 calories, 32 grams carbohydrates) • 1 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt • 1/2 cup blueberries • 1 1/2 Tbsp. chopped walnuts • 2 tsp. honey Top yogurt with blueberries, walnuts and honey. Note: We use a small amount of added sweetener, in this case h Continue reading >>

Diet Plays An Important Role In Keeping Your Pet's Diabetes Well Regulated. Because Insulin Requirements Change Depending

Diet Plays An Important Role In Keeping Your Pet's Diabetes Well Regulated. Because Insulin Requirements Change Depending

Type of diet Food Comparisons Home Cooking Timing of meals Treats Tips for picky eaters or when a meal is refused References on the amount and type of food eaten, a consistent, high-quality diet that the pet will reliably eat is important. The healthier and more consistent the diet, the easier it will be to control the blood glucose. View sample bg charts showing the relationship between food and bg. Type of diet The ideal composition of the diet for diabetic pets has not been determined, and research continues in this area. However, many vets recommend a special diet that has a higher fiber content than commercially available foods. These special diets usually contain a greater amount of soluble fiber. Research in humans and in some animal studies shows that soluble fiber slows the absorption of glucose from the digestive system. This helps prevent a rapid rise in the blood glucose after a meal. You will see this referred to as postprandial (after eating) blood glucose. Several special diets are available by prescription from your veterinarian. Hills w/d is a commonly used prescription diet. Purina, Eukanuba, and other pet food manufacturers also make prescription diets. Another school of thought, particularly for diabetic cats, is to feed a higher protein diet. Purina has developed a prescription Diabetes Management Formula. Many diabet cat owners have reported that their cat requires less insulin when fed this diet compared to other diets. Purina provides a feeding plan to your veterinarian to help switch from normal or higher fiber diets to the higher protein diet while at the same time preventing insulin overdose. Some pets refuse to eat prescription foods, or the prescription foods may not be a good choice for your pet because of other health reasons. Many diabeti Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Currently, there are nine drug classes of oral diabetes medications approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Sulfonylureas, for example, glimepiride (Amaryl) and glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL) Meglitinides, for example, nateglinide (Starlix) and repaglinide (Prandin) Thiazolidinediones, for example, pioglitazone (Actos) DPP-4 inhibitors, for example, sitagliptin (Januvia) and linagliptin (Tradjenta) What types of foods are recommended for a type 2 diabetes meal plan? A diabetes meal plan can follow a number of different patterns and have a variable ratio of fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. The carbohydrates consumed should be low glycemic load and come primarily from vegetables. The fat and proteins consumed should primarily come from plant sources. What type of carbohydrates are recommended for a type 2 diabetic diet plan? Carbohydrates (carbs) are the primary food that raises blood sugar. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure the impact of a carbohydrate on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. The main factors that determine a food's (or meal's) glycemic load are the amount of fiber, fat, and protein it contains. The difference between glycemic index and glycemic load is that glycemic index is a standardized measurement and glycemic load accounts for a real-life portion size. For example, the glycemic index of a bowl of peas is 68 (per 100 grams) but its glycemic load is just 16 (lower the better). If you just referred to the glycemic index, you'd think peas were a bad choice, but in reality, you wouldn't eat 100 grams of peas. With a normal portion size, peas have a healthy glycemic load as well as being an excellent source of pro Continue reading >>

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