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Diabetes Carb Diet

Low-carb Diet For Diabetes

Low-carb Diet For Diabetes

The Glandt Center for Diabetes Care, located in Tel Aviv, aims to help patients live optimal lives by managing their disease through medicine, diet, exercise, and more. The Center was started by Dr. Mariela Glandt, an endocrinologist specialist in diabetes, and is made up of a multi-disciplinary team all with the joint goal of providing the best care possible. Unique to this clinic is the low-carb, high-fat diet given to diabetic patients in order to treat the condition and possibly reverse it. In general, there are many studies (1,2,3,4) that support the low-carb diet for treatment of diabetes. Going back to the 1920’s, this was the standard treatment of care for diabetes before the discovery of insulin. One study showed that a low-carb diet, followed for 6 months, lead to well-controlled diabetes more than 3 years later. The American Diabetes Association make mention of low-carb diets in their Nutrition Therapy Recommendations for the Management of Adults with Diabetes. Some highlights below: It’s unclear how many carbohydrates people with diabetes should be consuming The amount insulin and carbohydrates in the body are the biggest factors in affecting blood sugar response after meals It’s important to track carbohydrate intake in achieving balanced sugar levels It seems that amount of carbohydrates people with diabetes should be consuming needs to be individualized. Some studies suggest lower levels of carbohydrates (21g per day, up to 40% of total energy), while others lean towards a higher carbohydrate intake. It’s also important to monitor blood sugar levels before and after eating carbohydrates, and to think about the type of carbohydrate when calculating the ideal amount for individual intake. DayTwo’s CEO Lihi Segal, along with Dr. Mariela Glandt, spo Continue reading >>

Critical Review Dietary Carbohydrate Restriction As The First Approach In Diabetes Management: Critical Review And Evidence Base

Critical Review Dietary Carbohydrate Restriction As The First Approach In Diabetes Management: Critical Review And Evidence Base

Highlights • We present major evidence for low-carbohydrate diets as first approach for diabetes. • Such diets reliably reduce high blood glucose, the most salient feature of diabetes. • Benefits do not require weight loss although nothing is better for weight reduction. • Carbohydrate-restricted diets reduce or eliminate need for medication. • There are no side effects comparable with those seen in intensive pharmacologic treatment. The inability of current recommendations to control the epidemic of diabetes, the specific failure of the prevailing low-fat diets to improve obesity, cardiovascular risk, or general health and the persistent reports of some serious side effects of commonly prescribed diabetic medications, in combination with the continued success of low-carbohydrate diets in the treatment of diabetes and metabolic syndrome without significant side effects, point to the need for a reappraisal of dietary guidelines. The benefits of carbohydrate restriction in diabetes are immediate and well documented. Concerns about the efficacy and safety are long term and conjectural rather than data driven. Dietary carbohydrate restriction reliably reduces high blood glucose, does not require weight loss (although is still best for weight loss), and leads to the reduction or elimination of medication. It has never shown side effects comparable with those seen in many drugs. Here we present 12 points of evidence supporting the use of low-carbohydrate diets as the first approach to treating type 2 diabetes and as the most effective adjunct to pharmacology in type 1. They represent the best-documented, least controversial results. The insistence on long-term randomized controlled trials as the only kind of data that will be accepted is without precedent in science Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Diet: The Low-carb Debate

Diabetes And Your Diet: The Low-carb Debate

A few years ago, Richard Kahn, the now-retired chief scientific and medical officer of the American Diabetes Association, was charged with organizing a committee to prescribe a diet plan for people with diabetes. He began by looking at the evidence for different diets, asking which, if any, best controlled diabetes. “When you look at the literature, whoa is it weak. It is so weak,” Dr. Kahn said in a recent interview. Studies tended to be short term, diets unsustainable, differences among them clinically insignificant. The only thing that really seemed to help people with diabetes was weight loss — and for weight loss, there is no magic diet. But people want diet advice, Dr. Kahn reasoned, and the association really should say something about diets. So it, like the National Institutes of Health, went with the Department of Agriculture’s food pyramid. Why? “It’s a diet for all America,” Dr. Kahn said. “It has lots of fruits and vegetables and a reasonable amount of fat.” That advice, though, recently came under attack in a New York Times commentary written by Sarah Hallberg, an osteopath at a weight loss clinic in Indiana, and Osama Hamdy, the medical director of the obesity weight loss program at the Joslin Diabetes Center at Harvard Medical School. There is a diet that helps with diabetes, the two doctors said: one that restricts — or, according to Dr. Hallberg, severely restricts — carbohydrates. “If the goal is to get patients off their medications, including insulin, and resolve rather than just control their diabetes, significant carb restriction is by far the best nutrition plan,” Dr. Hallberg said in an email. “This would include elimination of grains, potatoes and sugars and all processed foods. There is a significant and ever growing Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet ‘has Saved Nhs £6.9m’

Low Carb Diet ‘has Saved Nhs £6.9m’

A low carbohydrate diet has made a saving of £6.9 million in one year through reducing type 2 diabetes medications, according to the largest online diabetes community forum. Diabetes.co.uk said more than 7,000 people have participated in the Low Carb Program, which is a 10 week, evidence-based structured education initiative. The new figures have been revealed in a book called The Pioppi Diet, which explains the science and provides evidence from simple diet advice and how it can prevent or reduce the symptoms of type 2 diabetes. Written by Britain’s leading anti-sugar campaigner and award-winning consultant cardiologist Dr Aseem Malhotra and acclaimed film-maker and former international track and field athlete, Donal O’ Neill, the book combines the secrets of the tiny southern Italian village Pioppi with the latest cutting edge medical, nutrition and exercise science to bust the myths present in today’s weight loss, medical and health industries. Arjun Panesar, chief executive officer of Diabetes.co.uk said: “We are incredibly pleased at just how much money the Low Carb Program is saving the NHS in medication cost savings for type 2 diabetes. The message is simple – remove added sugar and refined carbohydrates from the diet. “The results are astounding – thousands of people are placing their type 2 diabetes into remission, significantly changing their lives by adopting a diet before drugs approach and saving the NHS from a considerable cost.” Type 2 diabetes alone which is “almost entirely preventable and reversible” is costing the NHS and economy, due to lost productivity, approximately £20 billion. The Pioppi diet offers a specific prescription of lifestyle interventions, including dietary changes, the importance of regular movement, and managin Continue reading >>

Asknadia: Is My Low Carb Diet Causing A False Pre Diabetes Diagnosis

Asknadia: Is My Low Carb Diet Causing A False Pre Diabetes Diagnosis

Dear Nadia, When you are loosing weight on a low carb diet, does this artificially inflate my pre-diabetes glucose test? Paula Corin Linnwood WA Dear Paula, Pre-diabetes statistics have been in the news for several years with great concern for our national population. It is great that you are staying on top of your health and paying attention to your diet to be one less number in the growing diabetes population. The annual increase in pre-diabetes diagnosis is growing at an alarming rate. In 2010, 79 million people were diagnosed with pre-diabetes. Two year later, in 2012, this number grew to 86 million people . The Center for Disease Control and Prevention reports within a five year period, 15-30% of the people diagnosed with pre-diabetes will be be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. This translates into anther 12.9 to 25.8 million people who are coming up through ranks with a diabetes diagnosis from 2012. What is Pre-diabetes Pre-diabetes is when your blood sugar test reads higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed with diabetes. Does a Low Carb Diet Give You a False Pre-diabetes Diagnosis If you take a glucose tolerance test and are eating under 300 carbs a day for three days prior to the test; yes you can get a false diabetes or pre-diabetes diagnosis. Typically when you eat food, the GLP-1 hormone in your body simulates the secretion of the insulin hormone to convert food into energy. With a low carb diet your body secrets less insulin and turns to your reserves to metabolize the fat for energy. Why You Get a False Pre-diabetes Diagnosis A low carb diet will create a slow uptake of insulin which shows a false elevated glucose. It metabolizes your fat reserves. Dr Richard Bernstein, a famous low carb diet advocate and a person with type 1, tells me we can Continue reading >>

The Low Carb Plan

The Low Carb Plan

Eating to control your weight and your blood sugar The Mediterranean-style low carb approach which we recommend in The Blood Sugar Diet, is low in starchy, easily digestible carbs, but packed full of disease-fighting vitamins and flavonoids. It is rich in olive oil, fish, nuts, fruit and vegetables, but also contains lots of lovely things that down the years we have been told not to eat, such as full fat yoghurt and eggs. Although it is derived from the eating habits of people living in Mediterranean countries, you can apply the principles of Med-style eating to a wide range of different cuisines, from Chinese or Indian through to Mexican or Scandanavian. There is extensive evidence for the benefit of the Mediterranean style low carbohydrate diet, including cutting your risk of heart disease and diabetes. It has even been found to reduce risk the risk of breast cancer, compared with those on a low-fat diet. Consuming extra virgin olive oil (the fresh squeezed juice of olives) seems to be particularly beneficial when it comes to cancer, perhaps because it contains compounds such as polyphenols which are known to be anti-inflammatory. “This is potentially a life changing book for people with raised blood sugar levels as well as those with type 2 diabetes” Dr Tim Spector, Professor of Genetics, Kings College, London Kick the Carbs: Low Carb Mediterranean Style Eating – The ‘M Plan’ Cut right down on sugar, sugary treats, drinks and desserts: No more than once or twice a week and preferably less. You can use sugar substitutes like stevia and xylitol, but try to wean yourself off your sweet tooth. Avoid sweet fruits: Berries, apples & pears are fine, but sweet tropical fruits such as mango, pineapple, melon and bananas are full of sugar. Minimise or avoid the starc Continue reading >>

Low Carb Vs. High Carb - My Surprising 24-day Diabetes Diet Battle

Low Carb Vs. High Carb - My Surprising 24-day Diabetes Diet Battle

Twitter summary: What I learned from doubling my carb intake: the same average blood sugar, but four times as much hypoglycemia, more work, stress, & danger. As a teenager, I ate a high carb diet that included lots of Goldfish crackers, white sandwich bread, pasta, and white potatoes. It was tasty, but it put my blood sugars on a wild roller coaster every single day. Things turned around in college when I learned about nutrition, got on CGM, and spent time with health conscious friends. I soon realized that eating less than 30 grams of carbs at one time was a complete gamechanger. I’ve stuck with that approach ever since. But is this lower carb method actually better for my blood sugars, or have I just been fooling myself? To find out, I took on a somewhat terrifying self-tracking experiment: 12 days of my usual, lower-carb diet, which averaged 146 grams of carbs per day (21% of daily calories). My carbs were primarily from nuts, seeds, vegetables, and a bit of fruit. 12 days of a higher-carb, high whole-grain diet, which averaged 313 grams of carbs per day (43% of my daily calories). My sources of carbs were NOT junk food: plain oatmeal, whole wheat bread, quinoa, wild rice, and fruit. Neither of these was unrealistic. My lower-carb diet was nowhere near Atkins level (20 grams per day), and the higher-carb diet was consistent with the “average” 45% carb diet in people with diabetes (according to ADA). Even though this was a one-person (n=1) experiment, I wanted to be as scientific and fair as possible: eating whole, unprocessed foods in both periods; counting and tracking every single gram of carbohydrate (LoseIt! app); wearing CGM 24/7 and downloading the glucose data to document what happened (Dexcom G5 and Clarity); taking insulin before meals (5-15 minutes pr Continue reading >>

Low-carbohydrate Diet

Low-carbohydrate Diet

Not to be confused with slow carb diet. This article is about low carbohydrate diets as a lifestyle choice or for weight loss. For low-carbohydrate dietary therapy for epilepsy, see Ketogenic diet. Low-carbohydrate diets or low-carb diets are dietary programs that restrict carbohydrate consumption. Foods high in easily digestible carbohydrates (e.g., sugar, bread, pasta) are limited or replaced with foods containing a higher percentage of fats and moderate protein (e.g., meat, poultry, fish, shellfish, eggs, cheese, nuts, and seeds) and other foods low in carbohydrates (e.g., most salad vegetables such as spinach, kale, chard and collards), although other vegetables and fruits (especially berries) are often allowed. The amount of carbohydrate allowed varies with different low-carbohydrate diets.[1] Such diets are sometimes 'ketogenic' (i.e., they restrict carbohydrate intake sufficiently to cause ketosis). The induction phase of the Atkins diet[2][3][4] is ketogenic. The term "low-carbohydrate diet" is generally applied to diets that restrict carbohydrates to less than 20% of caloric intake, but can also refer to diets that simply restrict or limit carbohydrates to less than recommended proportions (generally less than 45% of total energy coming from carbohydrates).[5][6] Definition and classification[edit] Low-carbohydrate diets are not well-defined.[7] The American Academy of Family Physicians defines low-carbohydrate diets as diets that restrict carbohydrate intake to 20 to 60 grams per day, typically less than 20% of caloric intake.[8] A 2016 review of low-carbohydrate diets classified diets with 50g of carbohydrate per day (less than 10% of total calories) as "very low" and diets with 40% of calories from carbohydrates as "mild" low-carbohydrate diets.[9] Used for Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Diet Is Different From And Easier Than A Weight Loss Diet

A Diabetes Diet Is Different From And Easier Than A Weight Loss Diet

Weight Loss Diets Usually Fail but Diabetes Diets Can't Afford To Fail. The stakes are too high! Did your heart sink when you learned that the best way to control diabetes was with "diet?" Of course it did. Almost everyone diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes has a long history of trying to diet off weight and failing miserably. If you believe that your health depends on even more dieting, it is easy to give up hope. But it turns out that a diabetes diet is very different from a weight loss diet of the sort you can see illustrated in the photo above. The point of a diabetes diet is not to lose weight. The point of a diabetes diet is to bring your very high post-meal blood sugars down into the normal range. You can eat as much food as you want on a diabetes diet, as long as the food you eat is food that doesn't raise your blood sugar. What comes as a surprise, however, is that many people with Type 2 diabetes find that when the adopt an effective diet that lowers blood sugar, they lose weight, sometimes a lot of weight. One reason for this is because high blood sugars make us more insulin resistant than we would otherwise be, which promotes weight gain. But there's another reason why diabetes diets can help you lose weight without trying: when you flatten out your blood sugar after meals, you eliminate the overwhelming hunger that often goes along with blood sugars that surge very high. When you aren't starving all the time, losing weight is a lot easier. But that's just a nice plus. You can eat a totally successful diabetes diet that gives you back your health without losing a pound. The Diabetes Diet is All About Carbohydrates It's the carbohydrates you eat that raise your blood sugar, the starches and sugars of all types. No other nutrient raises blood sugar to any signific Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet Won't Help In Gestational Diabetes

Low Carb Diet Won't Help In Gestational Diabetes

Low Carb Diet Won't Help in Gestational Diabetes by Todd Neale Todd Neale, Senior Staff Writer, MedPage Today This article is a collaboration between MedPage Today® and: Note that this small randomized study demonstrated that a low carbohydrate diet was not superior to a control diet in reducing insulin use among women with gestational diabetes. Be aware that pregnancy outcomes were similar in both groups as well. Simply reducing dietary carbohydrate content was not an effective way to forestall the need for insulin among women with gestational diabetes, a randomized trial showed. The percentage of patients who were started on insulin was 54.7% both among those who ate a low-carbohydrate diet and among those who ate a diet with a normal level of carbohydrates (P=1.00), according to Didac Mauricio, MD, PhD, of the University of Lleida in Spain, and colleagues. Pregnancy and neonatal outcomes were similar in the two groups as well, the researchers reported online in Diabetes Care. "Therefore, the amount of carbohydrates [in] the diet may not be a key issue in future clinical recommendations on medical nutrition therapy of gestational diabetes," they wrote. "Additional randomized intervention studies that consider different populations and different strategies to modify glycemic load are warranted to assess the optimal [approach]," they wrote. Medical nutrition therapy has formed the basis of treatment for gestational diabetes, and has been centered on modifying the amount and distribution of carbohydrates to maintain glycemic control without ketosis, according to the researchers. In recent years, the therapy has been aimed primarily at modifying the glycemic index, but there is little evidence-based information on specific approaches to managing the condition. The curre Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diet: Can It Help You Lose Weight?

Low-carb Diet: Can It Help You Lose Weight?

Could a low-carb diet give you an edge in losing weight? Help you keep weight off permanently? Here's what you need to know about the low-carb diet. Definition A low-carb diet limits carbohydrates — such as those found in grains, starchy vegetables and fruit — and emphasizes foods high in protein and fat. Many types of low-carb diets exist. Each diet has varying restrictions on the types and amounts of carbohydrates you can eat. Purpose A low-carb diet is generally used for losing weight. Some low-carb diets may have health benefits beyond weight loss, such as reducing risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Why you might follow a low-carb diet You might choose to follow a low-carb diet because you: Want a diet that restricts certain carbs to help you lose weight Want to change your overall eating habits Enjoy the types and amounts of foods featured in low-carb diets Check with your doctor before starting any weight-loss diet, especially if you have any health conditions, such as diabetes or heart disease. Diet details As the name says, a low-carb diet restricts the type and amount of carbohydrates you eat. Carbohydrates are a type of calorie-providing macronutrient found in many foods and beverages. Carbohydrates can be simple or complex. They can further be classified as simple refined (table sugar), simple natural (lactose in milk and fructose in fruit), complex refined (white flour) and complex natural (whole grains or beans). Common sources of naturally occurring carbohydrates include: Grains Fruits Vegetables Milk Nuts Seeds Legumes (beans, lentils, peas) Food manufacturers also add refined carbohydrates to processed foods in the form of sugar or white flour. Examples of foods that contain refined carbohydrates are white breads and Continue reading >>

Low Carb-high Fat Diet And Diabetes: A Detailed Guide For Beginners

Low Carb-high Fat Diet And Diabetes: A Detailed Guide For Beginners

If you are a regular reader of our site, you would already know that we highly endorse the Low Carb High Fat (LCHF) diet for reversing diabetes, losing weight and improving your overall health and well-being. The reason why a low carb diet for diabetes comes highly recommended by doctors and nutritionists alike is the fact that carbohydrates are the main culprit behind elevated blood sugar levels. Once you eat fewer carbs, it automatically becomes much easier for the body to attain stable blood sugar levels. Low Carb High Fat (LCHF) Diet for Diabetes: Why It Works? Carbohydrates are broken down into simple sugars during digestion. These sugars enter the blood stream and elevate blood sugar levels. As a diabetic, your body either doesn’t produce insulin at all, or doesn’t produce enough insulin to minimize this blood sugar spike before it causes irreplaceable damage to internal organs. This is the reason why your body’s dependence on insulin goes down when you eat lesser carbs. A UK study tried to understand the short-term effects of severe dietary carbohydrate-restriction advice in type 2 diabetes. It found that restricting carbohydrate intake is an effective method to lose weight as well as improve HDL ratios. This was a randomized controlled trial studying 102 patients over a course of 3 months, and the results were published in the Diabetic Medicine in September 2005. Another research group from Duke University Medical Center studying the effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients, found that 95.2% patients had managed to reduce or eliminate their glucose-lowering medication within 6 months of being on a LCHF diet. A low carb diet works very well in lowering blood sugar and insul Continue reading >>

Eggplant Is A Low Carb Option For People With Diabetes

Eggplant Is A Low Carb Option For People With Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes management requires eating a healthy diet rich in non-starchy vegetables, lean protein, healthy fats and a moderate amount of complex carbohydrates that are rich in fiber. Oftentimes, people with diabetes have trouble coming up with healthy meal choices that include vegetables. They find that vegetables are boring, tasteless or unappealing in appearance. As a result, they get stuck eating the same old thing day-to-day, which may lead to cravings of other unhealthy foods. When checking out produce for healthy additions to your diet, don't forget the eggplant. It's a low-carbohydrate, high-fiber vegetable that has infinite possibilities for adding variety to your meals. Eggplant can take on many flavors, too, which makes it easy to prepare too. What is Eggplant and How Can it be Cooked? Eggplant is a member of the nightshades family, which also includes tomatoes and peppers. It has been said that many useful medications derive from this family. Most people know of the purple eggplant, but eggplants can also be white or striped, pear-shaped or cylindrical shape. They range in size as, and can be as small as a golf ball or as large as a football. Cultures all over the world use eggplant in their cuisines. From Italian eggplant Parmesan to Turkish baba ganoush to spicy garlic Japanese or Asian eggplant, eggplant is a tasty, filling and healthful vegetable. Because of its hearty texture, eggplant is often used as a meat in vegan meal plans. Eggplant is easy to prepare. It isn't hard to slice and can be cut into rounds, cubes, wedges, strips etc. It can be sauteed, roasted, fried, grilled, baked, or steamed. Eggplant also pairs well with any variety of protein - chicken, fish, tofu, to name a few. Eggplant is Low in Calories and Carbohydrates and Rich in Nutrie Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association Approves Low Carb Diets For Weight Loss

American Diabetes Association Approves Low Carb Diets For Weight Loss

In December 2008, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) issued its Clinical Practice Recommendations which included the option for Diabetics to follow low-carbohydrate diets as a weight-loss option. While this is obviously not ‘news’, it is important to note that the Canadian Diabetes Association – now called Diabetes Canada, does not as yet make the same recommendation. Why is that? Is there something inherently different about Diabetics in Canada than Diabetics in the United States? For the last 9 years the American Diabetes Association has given people the option of following what they call a “moderate“ carbohydrate diet by (a) omitting some of the carb-containing foods on their standard meal plan or (b) substituting them for much lower carb alternatives. They also (c) provide Americans with the option of following a low carb diet for weight loss. Let’s take a look at the American dietary recommendations compared with the Canadian ones. Dietary Recommendations of the American Diabetes Association On their web page, the American Diabetes Association states that their standard Meal Plans that are “moderate” in carbohydrates provide ~45% of calories from carbs, but they add; Your healthcare provider may ask you to limit carbohydrate more than our meal plan suggests. This means you should cut back on the carbohydrate foods that you eat throughout the day. To keep your calorie intake about the same, substitute sources of lean protein or healthy fats for those higher carbohydrate foods. Then they give some examples of how people can lower carbohydrate intake by making some adjustments to the posted meal plan, such as; omitting the slice of whole wheat toast at breakfast replacing the whole wheat wrap for a lettuce wrap at lunch skipping the serving of bro Continue reading >>

The Low-carb Diabetes Plan That Works

The Low-carb Diabetes Plan That Works

After hearing for years that a high-carb, low-fat diet is the only real road to weight loss, you might be wondering how a low-carb diabetes diet can help you finally drop the pounds and help you get control of your blood sugar. Let us explain. The high-carb, low-fat idea basically oversimplified how food works once it enters your body. It ignored the fact that not all carbs are good, and glossed over that not all fats are bad. Therefore, we loaded up on all the breads, pastas, and low-fat goodies, never realizing that it was making us fatter. Here's how it really works. All carbs are converted to glucose and raise your blood sugar, but they aren't all converted at the same rate. How fast they are absorbed--and how much--is what affects your weight. There are two general classes of carbs--refined and unrefined. Refined carbs (white breads, white flour, pastas) are essentially refined sugars, meaning once you eat them they are quickly turned into glucose in your system. Unrefined carbs are the kinds found in whole grains, beans, fruits, and many vegetables. The fiber in these foods helps to slow down your body's absorption of carbs, therefore slowing the process of turning carbs into glucose. The problem comes in when you eat too many carbs--especially too many refined carbs. If you eat excessive amounts of quickly absorbed carbs, you create a situation where more glucose becomes available than your body needs. That excess glucose gets turned into fat. What's the problem with eating lots of carbs if you have diabetes? If you eat excessive amounts of quickly absorbed carbs, you upset your body's precise balance of blood sugar. Simply put, eating too many carbohydrate grams may cause a situation where more glucose becomes available to the cells than the body needs. Obviousl Continue reading >>

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