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Diabetes Carb Diet

Low Carb

Low Carb

Tweet Many people with diabetes are following a low-carb diet because of its benefits in terms of improving diabetes control, weight loss and being a diet that is satisfying and easy to stick to. Low-carb diets are flexible and can be followed by people with different types of diabetes. The diet has allowed many people with type 2 diabetes to resolve their diabetes, that is to get their blood sugar levels into a non-diabetic range without the help of medication. People with type 1 diabetes have also reported much more stable blood sugar levels, making the condition easier to predict and manage. The diet is a healthy way of eating as vegetables and natural, real foods are integral to the diet. Low-carb guidance and support The low-carb diet forum has been cited as a leading resource in providing support and encouragement for people that are looking to achieve lower HbA1c levels and sustain effective weight loss. [127] In 2015, Diabetes.co.uk launched the Low Carb Program which has helped thousands of people with type 2 diabetes to improve their diabetes control and reduce their dependency on diabetes medication. Why follow a low-carb diet? Carbohydrate is the nutrient which has the greatest effect in terms of raising blood sugar levels and requires the most insulin to be taken or be produced by the body. Lowering sugar levels is clearly a benefit for people with diabetes. Lower need for insulin is also particularly useful as lowering insulin in the body can reduce insulin resistance which can help towards reversing type 2 diabetes. Insulin is also the fat storage hormone in the body, so reducing insulin in the body with a low-carb diet can help with losing weight. Benefits of low-carb diets The benefits of a low-carb diet typically include: Lower HbA1c Improved weight lo Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Diet Is Different From And Easier Than A Weight Loss Diet

A Diabetes Diet Is Different From And Easier Than A Weight Loss Diet

Weight Loss Diets Usually Fail but Diabetes Diets Can't Afford To Fail. The stakes are too high! Did your heart sink when you learned that the best way to control diabetes was with "diet?" Of course it did. Almost everyone diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes has a long history of trying to diet off weight and failing miserably. If you believe that your health depends on even more dieting, it is easy to give up hope. But it turns out that a diabetes diet is very different from a weight loss diet of the sort you can see illustrated in the photo above. The point of a diabetes diet is not to lose weight. The point of a diabetes diet is to bring your very high post-meal blood sugars down into the normal range. You can eat as much food as you want on a diabetes diet, as long as the food you eat is food that doesn't raise your blood sugar. What comes as a surprise, however, is that many people with Type 2 diabetes find that when the adopt an effective diet that lowers blood sugar, they lose weight, sometimes a lot of weight. One reason for this is because high blood sugars make us more insulin resistant than we would otherwise be, which promotes weight gain. But there's another reason why diabetes diets can help you lose weight without trying: when you flatten out your blood sugar after meals, you eliminate the overwhelming hunger that often goes along with blood sugars that surge very high. When you aren't starving all the time, losing weight is a lot easier. But that's just a nice plus. You can eat a totally successful diabetes diet that gives you back your health without losing a pound. The Diabetes Diet is All About Carbohydrates It's the carbohydrates you eat that raise your blood sugar, the starches and sugars of all types. No other nutrient raises blood sugar to any signific Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Follow A Low-carb Diet The Right Way

7 Ways To Follow A Low-carb Diet The Right Way

Feeling "hangry," the combination of hungry and angry, is what I hear a lot from patients who believe all carbs are evil, and that if you want to control your blood sugar or lose weight, they all have to go. Strong studies point to carbohydrate restriction as a main treatment for type 2 diabetes, but it doesn't have to be all or nothing. Many of my patients on very low-carb diets can’t sustain them long term. Eventually, they re-gain their weight and their blood-sugar problems come back. Those angry months of deprivation weren’t worth it. There’s a better way, which involves keeping some of the foods you love, and as a result, maintaining your sanity. Any time you eat a carbohydrate, your body has to redirect the glucose from your bloodstream to your cells. It calls on your pancreas, where insulin lives, to get the job done. Insulin’s role is to take the glucose and distribute it to your muscle and fat cells, where it’s either used for energy or stored for fat. When everything goes right, insulin is your friend. Eat too much or consume the wrong things and insulin becomes your enemy. Excess insulin circulating in your body may cause you to gain weight. Here’s how to do low-carb right. 1. Plan your meals around lean proteins and healthy fats. The reason many people fail at low-carb diets is because they are buying foods like low-carb chips, bars and drinks. These options are not always nutrient dense. They can leave you with a lack of satisfaction, increased hunger and the dreaded rebound binge. Instead, opt for real food. Find options that make you less hungry and more satisfied. Focusing on foods that are good sources of protein and healthy fats will help. A 2011 study found increased protein in the diet helped to satisfy hunger and promote weight loss. Cho Continue reading >>

Low Carb-high Fat Diet And Diabetes: A Detailed Guide For Beginners

Low Carb-high Fat Diet And Diabetes: A Detailed Guide For Beginners

If you are a regular reader of our site, you would already know that we highly endorse the Low Carb High Fat (LCHF) diet for reversing diabetes, losing weight and improving your overall health and well-being. The reason why a low carb diet for diabetes comes highly recommended by doctors and nutritionists alike is the fact that carbohydrates are the main culprit behind elevated blood sugar levels. Once you eat fewer carbs, it automatically becomes much easier for the body to attain stable blood sugar levels. Low Carb High Fat (LCHF) Diet for Diabetes: Why It Works? Carbohydrates are broken down into simple sugars during digestion. These sugars enter the blood stream and elevate blood sugar levels. As a diabetic, your body either doesn’t produce insulin at all, or doesn’t produce enough insulin to minimize this blood sugar spike before it causes irreplaceable damage to internal organs. This is the reason why your body’s dependence on insulin goes down when you eat lesser carbs. A UK study tried to understand the short-term effects of severe dietary carbohydrate-restriction advice in type 2 diabetes. It found that restricting carbohydrate intake is an effective method to lose weight as well as improve HDL ratios. This was a randomized controlled trial studying 102 patients over a course of 3 months, and the results were published in the Diabetic Medicine in September 2005. Another research group from Duke University Medical Center studying the effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients, found that 95.2% patients had managed to reduce or eliminate their glucose-lowering medication within 6 months of being on a LCHF diet. A low carb diet works very well in lowering blood sugar and insul Continue reading >>

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes diagnosed during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in about 7 percent of all pregnancies. It usually arises in the second half of pregnancy and goes away as soon as the baby is born. However, if gestational diabetes is not treated, you may experience complications. The first step in treating gestational diabetes is to modify your diet to help keep your blood sugar level in the normal range, while still eating a healthy diet. Most women with well-controlled blood sugar deliver healthy babies without any complications. One way of keeping your blood sugar levels in normal range is by monitoring the amount of carbohydrates in your diet. Carbohydrate foods digest and turn into blood glucose (a type of sugar). Glucose in the blood is necessary because it is the fuel for your body and nourishment your baby receives from you. However, it's important that glucose levels stay within target. Carbohydrates in Food Carbohydrates are found in the following foods: Milk and yogurt Fruits and juices Rice, grains, cereals and pasta Breads, tortillas, crackers, bagels and rolls Dried beans, split peas and lentils Potatoes, corn, yams, peas and winter squash Sweets and desserts, such as sugar, honey, syrups, pastries, cookies, soda and candy also typically have large amounts of carbohydrate. Carbohydrates in foods are measured in units called grams. You can count how many carbohydrates are in foods by reading food labels and learning the exchange lists. The two most important pieces of information on food labels for a carbohydrate-controlled diet is the serving size and grams of total carbohydrate in each serving. Dietary Recommendations It is important to be meet with a registered dietitian to have your diet assessed. The dietitian will calcula Continue reading >>

Appendix A: High Carbohydrate Diet & Risk Of Heart Disease

Appendix A: High Carbohydrate Diet & Risk Of Heart Disease

Most of this book is instructional, of the how-to variety. The intent of this appendix is to provide you with a little of the science that surrounds the program described in the rest of the book. With respect to a number of the issues raised in this section, I would also refer you again to Gary Taubes’s award-winning Science article The Soft Science of Dietary Fat. Another masterpiece by Taubes, What If It’s All Been a Big Fat Lie? appeared as the cover article in the New York Times Magazine of July 2, 2002. I hope that I can cut through some of the myths that cloud diet and the treatment of diabetic complications so that you will have the why that supports the how-to. We’ve already discussed some of the myths. We’ll look at the origins of those myths to try to give you as many of the facts as are available at this writing. If your only interest is in the how-to, feel free to skip this appendix. Once you’ve started to follow a restricted-carbohydrate diet, you may find yourself pressured by well-meaning but uninformed friends or family, or even newspaper articles, to cease penalizing yourself and eat more “fun” foods—sweets, bread, pasta, and fruits. This chapter will provide you with specific scientific information that underpins my approach and will perhaps give you some ammunition for responding to this pressure. Even if you skip it now, you may want to come back to it later, or show it to your loved ones to lay their concerns to rest. As I don’t expect most readers to be scientists, I’ve tried to keep all these explanations relatively simple. Some of the explana- tions may at this moment represent more theory than fact, but they’re based on the latest information available to us. HOW DID THE COMMONLY PRESCRIBED HIGH-CARBOHYDRATE DIET COME ABOUT Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Low Carb Diet Or “ketosis” As A California Dui Defense

Diabetes, Low Carb Diet Or “ketosis” As A California Dui Defense

If you are pulled over and suspected of DUI, you will likely be asked to take a breath test. The breath test is supposed to measure the amount of alcohol in your system to see if you are legally intoxicated. However, a number of factors can throw off the accuracy of this test, including health conditions and diet. For example, people who have diabetes, or anyone who eats a low-carb diet, may sometimes be in a state called ketosis or ketoacidosis, and this can affect their test results. They could register as being intoxicated even if they are sober. What are ketosis and ketoacidosis? They are processes your body enters into when turning fat into energy. Ketosis is a process regulated by insulin, in the bodies of people eating a low-carb diet. Ketoacidosis is a process diabetics may enter into naturally because of a lack of insulin. For the purposes of this article, we’ll use “ketosis” to refer to both. Most people rarely enter ketosis, because we get most of our energy from carbohydrates, which break down into glucose (blood sugar) and provide the body with the energy it needs. Some people, however, do not eat enough carbs or have enough insulin, which means the body begins to use fat as its fuel source instead of carbs. This may apply to people who: Have any form of diabetes Follow a low carb diet, such as low carb/high protein, low carb/high fat, paleo, etc. Not all diabetics, and not all people on these diets, will be in a state of ketosis. But if you are, and if you are breath tested for DUI, you will likely get a false reading. Why does ketosis affect a DUI breath test? When your body uses ketosis, the liver produces a type of compound called ketones. Ketones circulate throughout the body the blood. If you are asked to blow into a breath test device, trace am Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet Breakthrough: Low-carb, High-fat Diets Cut Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, And Heart Disease Risk!

Diabetes Diet Breakthrough: Low-carb, High-fat Diets Cut Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, And Heart Disease Risk!

A recent study from Sweden confirms the results of prior U.S. studies showing that lower carb and higher fat diets improve blood sugar status, as well as weight and other markers. Diabetes is a deadly epidemic, afflicting over 50% of adults as well as children in the U.S. Conventional diabetic diets (high in carbohydrates and low in fat) are notoriously unsuccessful. In this Swedish study, insulin levels were reduced by 30% and “good” cholesterol levels improved in the diabetics on the higher fat, lower carb diet compared to those on a conventional low calorie, higher carb diet. Earlier studies of low-carb, higher-fat (including unlimited saturated fat Atkins-type diets) came to similar conclusions. Quoting from chapter 10 in The Diet Cure: “Other studies have confirmed the superiority of Atkins-type diets’ positive impact on blood pressure and on the lowering of weight, cholesterol, tryglycerides, glucose, insulin, and A1C levels. These last three are diabetes markers. Several studies on diabetes document the benefits of lowering carbs and including fat in the diet. To quote one such study’s author, ‘When we took away the carbohydrates, the patients spontaneously reduced their daily energy consumption by 1,000 calories a day. Although they could have, they did not compensate by eating more protein and fats and they weren’t bored with the food choices. In fact, they loved the diet. The carbohydrates were clearly stimulating their excessive appetites.’” “Four studies, three on type 2 diabetics and one on mildly obese men and women, used a high-fat and protein, low-carb diet. Their results: all subjects showed improvement in weight, as well as insulin and cholesterol levels. A fifth, Harvard School of Public Health, study ‘found no association betwee Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diet Ineffective For Gestational Diabetes

Low-carb Diet Ineffective For Gestational Diabetes

Low-Carb Diet Ineffective for Gestational Diabetes A diet that contains a low amount of calories from carbohydrates does not reduce the need for insulin treatment in women with gestational diabetes or affect pregnancy outcomes, according to a new study published online April 5 in Diabetes Care. "I believe that we should start rethinking the role of the glycemic load of the diet in the treatment of gestational diabetes ," senior author Didac Mauricio, MD, PhD, from the University of Lleida, Spain, told Medscape Medical News. "In addition, further research is needed in this area of medical nutritional therapy [MNT] in gestational diabetes, in pregnancy, and in the management of diabetes mellitus, generally speaking," he said. MNT is the mainstay of gestational diabetes treatment and is based on controlling the amount and distribution of carbohydrates to obtain optimal glycemic control without ketosis. In Spain, guidelines state that if MNT is not sufficient to control blood glucose levels, insulin should be started. However, there are no randomized controlled trials that demonstrate an advantage of a diet with a prespecified amount of carbohydrate in reducing the need for insulin, Dr. Mauricio explained. He and his team addressed the issue by randomly assigning 152 women with gestational diabetes to follow either a low-carbohydrate diet, where 40% of the total caloric content was carbohydrate, or a control diet, which consisted of 55% carbohydrate. Protein content, which was 20%, was similar in both diets. The mean gestational age at the time of enrollment was 30.4 weeks for the low-carbohydrate group and 30.1 weeks for the control group, and the mean age of the women in the low-carbohydrate group was 33.5 years for the low-carb group and 32.1 years for the control group Continue reading >>

Got Diabetes And Want To Try A Low Carb Diet? Here’s How To Make Your Carbs Count!

Got Diabetes And Want To Try A Low Carb Diet? Here’s How To Make Your Carbs Count!

Are you in this situation? You, a loved one or good friend, has prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. You’re constantly searching for answers to the all-important question: what and how much to eat. But you’re left scratching your head about whether following a low carb diet is a must. Let’s sort it out with science and current recommendations from the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Low Carb Diet Logic Once you learn about how foods or beverages that contain carbohydrate raise blood glucose levels, it likely seems very logical to strictly limit the amount of carbohydrate you eat. However, and this is very important, resulting blood glucose levels do not solely depend on or can be controlled by the amount of carbohydrate you eat. To control glucose levels you must have a sufficient supply of available insulin (whether made by your pancreas or taken as the medication insulin) at the ready to help control your blood glucose levels after you eat.1 No One Amount of Carbohydrate Is Right For Everyone…Individualize While there’s lots of noise touting low carb diets for people with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, the research evidence doesn’t make this a slam, dunk conclusion. In fact, according to the ADA “studies examining the ideal amount of carbohydrate for people with diabetes are inconclusive.”1,2 The amount of carbohydrate one eats should be individualized based on a person’s current eating pattern, food preferences and metabolic goals – or the blood glucose, lipid and blood pressure targets that you and your healthcare provider agree upon for you.2 The total amount of carbohydrate you consume should also help you get to a healthy weight. To stay at a healthy weight, lose weight, or keep lost pounds off a person can’t regularly exceed his or her tot Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet Better For Diabetes Management

Low Carb Diet Better For Diabetes Management

In a head-to-head comparison between a low carb/high fat diet and a high carb/ low fat diet, the low carb diet proved superior for managing diabetes, reducing swings in blood sugar levels and reducing medication use. Doctors agree that a healthy diet and exercise are critically important for controlling diabetes, but there is no consensus on what kind of diet is best. In a recent study, Dr. William Yancy, an associate professor of medicine at Duke, and colleagues in Australia set out to answer that question in a head-to-head comparison of two diet approaches in combination with exercise: A low carbohydrate/high fat diet vs. a high carbohydrate/low fat diet. Among the mainstays of the low-carb diet were lean meats, low-starch vegetables, nuts, skim milk and yogurt. The high-carb diet included high fiber cereal, pasta, bread, fruits, legumes such as peas and lentils, and larger servings of low-fat milk. Both diets provided participants with the same number of calories a day, and both worked equally well for weight loss; participants reported losing an average of 25 pounds over the six-month study period. But the low carb diet proved superior for managing diabetes, reducing swings in glucose levels so that participants were able to reduce their use of medications. “The neat thing about this study was that patients were able to reduce their medications by controlling blood sugar levels with diet,” Yancy said. “This shows that diet can be a powerful therapy. We can reduce medications and the associated cost and potential side effects if we focus on diet.” Of note: The study participants were also required to exercise for one hour, at least three times a week, and most participants did, and did so equally in both diet groups. Continue reading >>

The Gestational Diabetes Diet: Taking Carbs From A Pregnant Lady

The Gestational Diabetes Diet: Taking Carbs From A Pregnant Lady

When I decided, at age 40, that I wanted to try to have a child, I knew I faced a few elevated risks over younger women: first and foremost, I might not be able to conceive at all. I mentally prepared myself—as much as I could, anyway—for that and other possibilities, including the higher risk of the baby having a genetic defect. So far I’ve been fortunate. The one risk I hadn’t given much thought to—the higher chance of developing gestational diabetes—is the only one that has been a factor in my pregnancy. I’m fairly healthy, I have no history of diabetes in my family, and I try to eat well—lots of fresh fruits and vegetables and few highly processed junk foods. But older pregnant women—and that means even women as young as in their late 20s, believe it or not—can have a harder time regulating insulin, leading to increased blood sugar levels. Gestational diabetes, if not controlled through diet and exercise, can cause high-birth-weight babies and potentially lead to delivery complications, as well as increasing the risk that the child will develop obesity and type 2 diabetes later in life. For the mother, there’s also the risk of high blood pressure and a higher likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. I haven’t been diagnosed with gestational diabetes so far. But because my blood sugar was a little high during my early glucose tolerance test (this is given to all pregnant women around 28 weeks, but women of my age are also sometimes tested earlier), I was advised to exercise more frequently and follow a low-carbohydrate diet, the same advice given to those with the diagnosis. The last thing a pasta-loving pregnant lady with a sweet tooth wants to hear is that she should cut out carbs. I have always been skeptical of the low-carb Continue reading >>

How To Count Carbs In 10 Common Foods

How To Count Carbs In 10 Common Foods

What are carbohydrates? Carbohydrates are sugar-based molecules found in many foods, from cookies to cantaloupes. If you have diabetes, planning your carb intake—and sticking to the plan—is critical to keep blood sugar on an even keel and to cut your risk of diabetes-related problems like heart disease and stroke. Whether or not you have diabetes, you should aim to get about half your calories from complex carbohydrates (which are high in fiber), 20-25% from protein, and no more than 30% from fat, says Lalita Kaul, PhD, RD, a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. How to read a food label The Nutrition Facts label lists the total amount of carbohydrates per serving, including carbs from fiber, sugar, and sugar alcohols. (If you're counting carbs in your diet, be aware that 15 grams of carbohydrates count as one serving.) Sugar alcohols are often used in sugar-free foods, although they still deliver calories and carbs. Sugar alcohols and fiber don't affect blood sugar as much as other carbs, because they're not completely absorbed. If food contains sugar alcohol or 5 or more grams of fiber, you can subtract half of the grams of these ingredients from the number of total carbs. (See more details at the American Diabetes Association and University of California, San Francisco.) How many carbs per day? If you eat 2,000 calories a day, you should consume about 250 grams of complex carbohydrates per day. A good starting place for people with diabetes is to have roughly 45 to 60 grams of carbs per meal and 15 to 30 grams for snacks. While snacks are key for people with diabetes who use insulin or pills that increase insulin production (otherwise, they run the risk of low blood sugar), they aren’t essential for non-insulin users. The goal for anyone with diab Continue reading >>

9 Gestational Diabetes Myths

9 Gestational Diabetes Myths

As a specialist in gestational diabetes nutrition, I get a lot of questions about blood sugar and pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is controversial. It’s complicated. And there’s a lot of misinformation out there. I do my best to address the controversies in interviews and with participants in my online gestational diabetes course, but since I’ve been receiving more and more inquiries in my inbox from fellow healthcare professionals, I wanted to dispel some gestational diabetes myths head-on right here on the blog. I’ll also be attending some midwifery conferences this year (including one this weekend), and I figured this resource would be a helpful place to refer practitioners if they have questions. Given the medical interventions that are commonly pushed on women with gestational diabetes (believe me, I’m also disheartened by the over-medicalization of pregnancy and birth), it’s important to understand the science behind high blood sugar and pregnancy. My goal is to help moms and practitioners make better decisions – based on fact, not fear – so they can have the healthiest pregnancy possible. 9 Gestational Diabetes Myths Myth #1: Blood Sugar Levels are Naturally Higher In Pregnancy There’s a lot of misinformation floating around about blood sugar levels in pregnancy. Some think that gestational diabetes is a “diagnosis looking for a disease.” In other words, they believe that blood sugar levels naturally go up during pregnancy, so there’s nothing to worry about. Some practitioners don’t even test for gestational diabetes and just tell their patients to “eat healthy” under the assumption that any rise in blood sugar is just a normal phenomenon of pregnancy. Unfortunately, that’s not true. Research has looked at blood sugar levels in nor Continue reading >>

Critical Review Dietary Carbohydrate Restriction As The First Approach In Diabetes Management: Critical Review And Evidence Base

Critical Review Dietary Carbohydrate Restriction As The First Approach In Diabetes Management: Critical Review And Evidence Base

Highlights • We present major evidence for low-carbohydrate diets as first approach for diabetes. • Such diets reliably reduce high blood glucose, the most salient feature of diabetes. • Benefits do not require weight loss although nothing is better for weight reduction. • Carbohydrate-restricted diets reduce or eliminate need for medication. • There are no side effects comparable with those seen in intensive pharmacologic treatment. The inability of current recommendations to control the epidemic of diabetes, the specific failure of the prevailing low-fat diets to improve obesity, cardiovascular risk, or general health and the persistent reports of some serious side effects of commonly prescribed diabetic medications, in combination with the continued success of low-carbohydrate diets in the treatment of diabetes and metabolic syndrome without significant side effects, point to the need for a reappraisal of dietary guidelines. The benefits of carbohydrate restriction in diabetes are immediate and well documented. Concerns about the efficacy and safety are long term and conjectural rather than data driven. Dietary carbohydrate restriction reliably reduces high blood glucose, does not require weight loss (although is still best for weight loss), and leads to the reduction or elimination of medication. It has never shown side effects comparable with those seen in many drugs. Here we present 12 points of evidence supporting the use of low-carbohydrate diets as the first approach to treating type 2 diabetes and as the most effective adjunct to pharmacology in type 1. They represent the best-documented, least controversial results. The insistence on long-term randomized controlled trials as the only kind of data that will be accepted is without precedent in science Continue reading >>

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