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Diabetes And Weightloss

Type 2 Diabetes Is 'reversible Through Weight Loss'

Type 2 Diabetes Is 'reversible Through Weight Loss'

Many doctors and patients do not realize that weight loss can reverse type 2 diabetes. Instead, there is a widespread belief that the disease is "progressive and incurable," according to a new report published in the BMJ. This is despite there being "consistent evidence" that shedding around 33 pounds (15 kilograms) often produces "total remission" of type 2 diabetes, note Prof. Mike E. J. Lean and other researchers from the University of Glasgow in the United Kingdom. The thrust of their paper is that greater awareness, when combined with better recording and monitoring of remissions, could result in many more patients no longer having to live with type 2 diabetes and a massive reduction in healthcare costs. The global burden of type 2 diabetes has nearly quadrupled over the past 35 years. In 1980, there were around 108 million people with the disease, and by 2014, this number had risen to 422 million. The vast majority of diabetes cases are type 2 diabetes, which is a disease that results when the body becomes less effective at using insulin to help cells to convert blood sugar, or glucose, into energy. Excess body weight is a main cause of this type of diabetes. In the United States, an estimated 30.3 million people, or around 9.4 percent of the population, have diabetes - including around 7.2 million who do not realize it. Diabetes accounts for a high portion of the national bill for taking care of the sick. The total direct and indirect cost of diagnosed diabetes in the U.S. was estimated to be $245 billion in 2012. In that year, of the $13,700 average medical spend for people with diagnosed diabetes, more than half (around $7,900) was directly attributed to the disease. Treatment 'focuses on drugs' Prof. Lean and colleagues note that the current management guideli Continue reading >>

The 2-day Diabetes Diet: What To Eat To Lose Weight

The 2-day Diabetes Diet: What To Eat To Lose Weight

For folks with diabetes, weight loss is a natural form of “medication.” Reams of research prove that losing even just a few pounds is an effective way to control blood sugar or reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the first place. But in an ironic twist, losing weight may be more difficult if you have type 2 diabetes. And the reason isn’t just a lack of willpower. Too often, diet plans don’t work for people with diabetes because the metabolism changes associated with blood sugar problems may increase appetite, slow down fat burning, and encourage fat storage. Now breakthrough research has revealed a better way for people to lose weight and reduce insulin resistance. The secret is a concept called intermittent fasting. British researchers created this revolutionary new diet, which strictly limits caloric intake for two days of the week but permits larger portions for the remainder. Women who followed the plan lost almost twice as much fat as those who restricted calories every day. Within three months, participants reduced insulin resistance by 25 percent more on nonfast days and inflammation by 8 percent more than people who dieted continuously. Why Does this Particular Diabetes Diet Plan Work? It counteracts the effects of “diabesity,” where blood sugar problems and excess body fat meet. Just a small amount of excess weight and a genetic tendency for metabolism problems can trigger a cascade of health issues, including high cholesterol, high blood pressure, immune system problems, and hormonal imbalances. This constellation of health problems is caused by a modern lifestyle that is out of sync with our genetic inheritance. Researchers theorize that because humans evolved during alternating periods of feast and famine, many of us inherited variou Continue reading >>

Unexplained Weight Loss? Why You Need To See A Doctor

Unexplained Weight Loss? Why You Need To See A Doctor

All of us cangain or lose a pound or two; we indulge a little too much,and then we put in a few extra workouts. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy But if you havent tightened the belt on your diet or ramped up your exercise routine and your weight is still dropping, talk to your doctor. While weight loss of just a pound or two isnt a reason for concern, unexplained weight loss of 10 pounds or more may meansomething is wrong. It could be an early sign of diabetes . This weight loss can occur relatively quickly over a few weeks to a couple of months. Insulin is a hormone that allows your body to use glucose (sugar) for energy. If you have type 2 diabetes , your body doesnt use insulin effectively, and cant transport the glucose to the cells. Instead, it builds up in the blood. When the glucose doesnt arrive in your cells, your body thinks its starving and finds a way to compensate. It creates energy by burning fat and muscle at a rapid pace. This causes unexplained weight loss. Your kidneys also begin working overtime to eliminate the excess sugars in the blood. This uses additional energy and can cause damage to the kidneys. Type 1 diabetes has a similar pattern, but instead of being unable to use insulin, your body stops producing it altogether. Unexplained weight loss can occur in people who have type 2 diabetes, but its more commonly found in people with type 1 . Parents are often the first to notice the unusual weight loss in a child with type 1 diabetes. What othersymptoms should you watch for? Weight loss from diabetes is not usually a standalone symptom. It is typically accompanied by other signs and symptoms including: Continue reading >>

Could You Have Type 2? 10 Diabetes Symptoms

Could You Have Type 2? 10 Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes symptoms Diabetes affects 24 million people in the U.S., but only 18 million know they have it. About 90% of those people have type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, rising blood sugar acts like a poison. Diabetes is often called the silent killer because of its easy-to-miss symptoms. "Almost every day people come into my office with diabetes who don't know it," says Maria Collazo-Clavell, MD, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. The best way to pick up on it is to have a blood sugar test. But if you have these symptoms, see your doctor. Watch the video: 5 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Increased urination, excessive thirst If you need to urinate frequently—particularly if you often have to get up at night to use the bathroom—it could be a symptom of diabetes. The kidneys kick into high gear to get rid of all that extra glucose in the blood, hence the urge to relieve yourself, sometimes several times during the night. The excessive thirst means your body is trying to replenish those lost fluids. These two symptoms go hand in hand and are some of "your body's ways of trying to manage high blood sugar," explains Dr. Collazo-Clavell. Weight loss Overly high blood sugar levels can also cause rapid weight loss, say 10 to 20 pounds over two or three months—but this is not a healthy weight loss. Because the insulin hormone isn't getting glucose into the cells, where it can be used as energy, the body thinks it's starving and starts breaking down protein from the muscles as an alternate source of fuel. The kidneys are also working overtime to eliminate the excess sugar, and this leads to a loss of calories (and can harm the kidneys). "These are processes that require a lot of energy," Dr. Collazo-Clavell notes. "You create a calorie deficit." Hunger Continue reading >>

The Dilemma Of Weight Loss In Diabetes

The Dilemma Of Weight Loss In Diabetes

People with diabetes receive mixed messages about weight loss from magazines, newspapers, friends, family, and, yes, even health professionals. Few subjects have accumulated as much misleading and potentially dangerous folklore as the subject of obesity. A common message is that losing weight is just a matter of willpower, and if you have been losing weight and reach a plateau, it's because you've lost your willpower and are no longer following your diet. Furthermore, for people with type 2 diabetes, the message often is that weight loss is the answer to improving glucose control: “If you just lose 20 lb, you won't need insulin.” What does research tell us about these issues, and what should our messages as health professionals be to people with diabetes? Obesity is a serious worldwide problem and is associated with the risk of developing diabetes. Today, more than 1.1 billion adults worldwide are overweight, and 312 million of them are obese.1 In the past 20 years, the rates of obesity have tripled in developing countries that have adopted a Western lifestyle, with the Middle East, Pacific Islands, Southeast Asia, India, and China facing the greatest increase. Consequently, the number of people with diabetes in these countries is expected to increase from 84 million in 2000 to 228 million by 2030. Thus, preventing obesity is a high priority for the prevention of diabetes and other chronic diseases. According to some obesity researchers, it may not be possible to decrease the current numbers of overweight and obese people in the United States, but we need to try to slow or prevent the increase that has been occurring at an alarming rate.2 The hope is that slowing the rising prevalence of obesity will also slow the diabetes epidemic. Can this be accomplished? Thus fa Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Cured Through Weight Loss, Newcastle University Finds

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Cured Through Weight Loss, Newcastle University Finds

Type 2 diabetes can be cured through weight loss, Newcastle University finds Type 2 diabetes can be reversed with weight loss, scientists have shownCredit:Bill Cheyrou/ Alamy Millions of people suffering from Type 2 diabetes could be cured of the disease if they just lost weight, a new study suggests. Scientists at Newcastle University have shown the disease is caused by fat accumulating in the pancreas and losing less than one gram from the organ can reverse the life-limiting illness and restore insulin production. Type 2 diabetes affects 3.3 million people in England and Wales and, until now, was thought to be chronic. It can lead to blindness, stroke, kidney failure and limb amputation. For people with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight allows them to drain excess fat out of the pancreas and allows function to return to normal Professor Roy Taylor, Newcastle University But now researchers at Newcastle have shown that the disease can be reversed , even in obese people who have had the condition for a long time. 18 obese people with Type 2 diabetes who were given gastric band surgery and put on a restricted diet for eight weeks were cured of their condition. During the trial the patients, aged between 25 and 65, lost an average of 2.2 stone, which was around 13 per cent of their body weight. Crucially they also lost 0.6 grams of fat from their pancreas, allowing the organ to secrete normal levels of insulin. The team is now planning a larger two year study involving 200 people with Glasgow University to check that the findings can be replicated and weight loss can be sustained for two years. For people with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight allows them to drain excess fat out of the pancreas and allows function to return to normal, said Professor Roy Taylor, of Newcastle Uni Continue reading >>

Weight Loss Really Can Reverse Diabetes, New Study Finds

Weight Loss Really Can Reverse Diabetes, New Study Finds

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects 422 million people worldwide. For decades, doctors have treated it with medications designed to keep blood sugar levels down. But in a paper published in the Lancet, researchers in the UK describe a landmark study in which people with diabetes went into remission—just by losing weight. Nearly half of people in the study who were given a six-month diet plan and lost an average of 30 pounds went into remission and no longer had diabetes. None took any medications during that time to control their disease and relied on weight loss alone. TIME Health Newsletter Get the latest health and science news, plus: burning questions and expert tips. View Sample Sign Up Now Type 2 diabetes is caused by the body’s in ability to break down sugars from the diet. Normally, cells in the pancreas work to release insulin, a hormone that can process sugar and either send it to cells that need it for energy or store it as fat for future energy needs. Cells in the liver are responsible for clearing insulin from the circulation. But excess fat in the pancreas and liver can start to shut down these insulin-producing cells, leading to spikes in blood sugar levels. Diabetes medications can bring sugar levels down but do not address the compromised insulin machinery. In the study, Dr. Roy Taylor, professor of medicine and metabolism at Newcastle University, and his colleagues randomly assigned nearly 300 people to either a weight management program or their usual treatments, including diabetes medications. All of the people had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in the six years preceding the study. The people assigned to the diet group stopped any diabetes drugs they were taking on the same day they b Continue reading >>

Weight And Diabetes: Lose Pounds To Lower Your Risk

Weight And Diabetes: Lose Pounds To Lower Your Risk

If you’re overweight, you’ve probably thought about shedding some pounds. If you have diabetes or are at risk for getting it, you should stop thinking and start doing -- now. Why? Because excess weight puts a strain on your body in all sorts of ways. “If I suddenly take a bunch of gravel and throw it in the back of your car, you can still probably make 70 mph on the interstate. But you’re going to make the engine work a little harder. If I put 1,000 pounds in your car, that effect increases. I can probably put enough weight in so, eventually, your car no longer can perform like it needs to,” says David Marrero, PhD, president of health care and education for the American Diabetes Association. It sounds harsh, but the truth is, that extra weight in your trunk? It can lead to a higher risk of heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and diabetes, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Your engine already is whining. Ditch the gravel. You might be surprised at how dropping just a few pounds can make a dramatic difference. “What we know in diabetes prevention, and in prediabetes, is that a very modest amount of weight loss has this huge reduction in risk,” Marrero says. “You lose 7% of your body weight, you cut your risk [of developing diabetes] by 60%. And, in fact, if you’re over 65, it’s over 70%." But how do you not just lose weight, but keep it off? Through a combination of exercise and watching what you eat. If you’re overweight and have diabetes, or are at risk of getting it, you have to exercise. There’s no way around it. “In your body, what exercise does, is it allows you to bind or uptake insulin more efficiently,” Marrero says. Your pancreas makes insulin, a hormone that “unlocks” the cells so they c Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: 8 Steps To Weight-loss Success

Type 2 Diabetes: 8 Steps To Weight-loss Success

Losing weight is at the top of many people's to-do lists. But for those with type 2 diabetes, weight control is especially important. “Carrying excess body fat increases the body's resistence to insulin, making blood glucose management more challenging,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, CDE, past 2009 national president of health care and education for the American Diabetes Association. "According to the World Health Organization, 90 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese." In fact, research indicates that the longer someone has a high body mass index or BMI (a common measure of being overweight or obese), the greater their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It’s no secret that losing weight — and keeping it off — isn’t easy. But it is possible, and the benefits for those with diabetes are great. So how do you get started? Experts say the right way to lose weight is to incorporate a healthful diet into your overall diabetes management plan. Diabetes Diet Control: Steps to Success Here's how to get started on the path to weight-loss success: Get physical. Exercise can help keep off the weight. “Research shows that people who increase physical activity along with reducing calorie intake will lose more body fat than people who only diet,” says McLaughlin, now a certified diabetes educator at Nebraska Medicine, Children's Hospital and Endocrine Clinics, in Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska. For confirmation, look at the National Weight Control Registry (NWCR), a database of 10,000 men and women who have lost a significant amount of weight and kept it off. Only 10 percent reached and maintained their weight-loss goal without exercise. Most people in the register chose walking as their form of exercise. Eat breakfast. The most effective diabetes die Continue reading >>

Unexplained Weight Loss With Diabetes

Unexplained Weight Loss With Diabetes

You might be aware that as a metabolic disorder, some forms of diabetes come with excessive weight. But diabetes might also cause a sudden drop in weight too. In fact, many patients who are ultimately diagnosed with diabetes first go to their doctor with concerns about unexplained weight loss. Several mechanisms are behind this symptom. Weight loss can occur as a consequence of high blood sugar, dehydration, muscle breakdown and problems with your thyroid. Video of the Day Although both type 1 and type 2 diabetes can involve fairly dramatic weight loss over several days at the onset of the disease, it tends to be more common among people with type 1. In both cases, the cause is that your body fails to adequately deal with insulin. The job of insulin is to transport glucose from the foods you eat into your cells to provide energy for all the work that’s required to keep you alive. However, most type 1 diabetics don’t produce insulin. Type 2 diabetics either don’t produce enough insulin or their bodies don’t respond to it properly. Consequently, even if you eat normally, that blood sugar simply builds up and gets excreted in your urine. This causes weight loss, but it could also damage your organs if you don't receive treatment. If you experience an unexplained weight loss, surpassing 5 percent of your body weight within days, see your health care provider as soon as possible. Another symptom of diabetes associated with weight loss is frequent urination. When you urinate more frequently and don’t drink enough to replace the lost fluid, you become dehydrated. Urination increases in diabetes, because your kidneys have to work harder to filter the excess glucose building up in your system. The increased glucose in the urine draws fluid from your tissues. When you l Continue reading >>

One Man's Weight Loss Was A Sign Of Type 2 Diabetes

One Man's Weight Loss Was A Sign Of Type 2 Diabetes

Kim Palmaffy was diagnosed with diabetes at age 51. (KIM PALMAFFY) If you have type 2 diabetes, you may feel abnormally thirsty and have a need to urinate frequently. One other possibility? You may lose weight without even trying. If it sounds like a weight-loss dream come true, it's actually more of a nightmare. Because your body doesn't have enough insulin or is losing sensitivity to insulin, you can't shuttle blood sugar into muscle cells. Blood sugar rises to toxic levels and you begin to excrete that excess sugar into the urine. At this point some people may shed pounds without dieting. Kim Palmaffy, 61, a contractor in Maplewood, N.J., was close to 300 pounds when he began to show signs of type 2 diabetes ten years ago. At 5'10", he knew he needed to lose weight. And then it started happening all on its own. The pounds started flying off, sometimes up to three pounds a week. "I got down to like 250 pounds over a period of weeks." You may feel exhausted His clothes began to fit better, but Palmaffy was feeling terrible. "I couldn't sleep, I started to urinate all the time, and I was always thirsty." It began to interfere with his work. "I had to get off the roof and take a leak all the time, as dumb as it sounds," he says. A visit to his doctors showed that Palmaffy's blood glucose, the type of sugar the body uses for energy, was a whopping 450 mg/dL, four times what's considered normal on a fasting blood glucose test110 mg/dL. ​​"He started me on a whole battery of medications; I found that the medications were very positive," he said. "We finally settled on Glucotrol (glipizide), five milligrams twice a day." He also takes a cholesterol-lowering drug. Palmaffy had to make some dietary changes to cope with the diagnosis. He found it wasn't that difficult. His Continue reading >>

Keeping The Pounds On: Causes Of Unexplained Weight Loss

Keeping The Pounds On: Causes Of Unexplained Weight Loss

Our society is obsessed with weight, if you haven’t noticed. More than two thirds of US adults are overweight or obese, there are more diet books published than we can count, and, of course, we have the privilege of watching shows like The Biggest Loser to help keep us in line. And according to government statistics, more than 85% of people with Type 2 diabetes are overweight. So it stands to reason that much of the focus of managing Type 2 diabetes is based on reaching and staying at a healthy weight. It’s important to note that thin people can get diabetes too, and not just Type 1 diabetes. In a 2008 study published in the journal Diabetes Care, adults age 60 to 79 years old with a body-mass index (BMI) of less than 18.5 (which is considered to be underweight) were 30% more likely to get Type 2 diabetes than adults with a “normal” BMI of 18.5 to 24.9. In a society where being thin equates with beauty, youth, intelligence, and success, there is often little sympathy or patience for people who are too thin and who desperately want to gain weight. If you’ve struggled with losing weight and keeping it off, you know all too well how challenging that can be. People who want to gain weight often face the same kind of battle. And to have diabetes on top of that can make it doubly difficult. First things first: identify the cause If you have diabetes, are underweight, and would like to gain weight, it’s helpful to first have a talk with your doctor. Make sure there are no health or medical reasons for you being underweight (especially if you’ve recently lost weight without trying) such as having an overactive thyroid, a digestive disorder (such as Crohn disease), or cancer, for example. A physical exam, blood work, and other tests may be needed to rule out certai Continue reading >>

Unexplained Weight Loss

Unexplained Weight Loss

Tweet Unexplained weight loss is the term used to describe a decrease in body weight that occurs unintentionally and can be a warning sign of diabetes. The amount you weigh is determined by a number of factors including age, your calorie intake and overall health. Once you reach middle adulthood, your weight should remain relatively stable from year to year. Losing or gaining a few pounds here and there is normal, but unexplained weight loss that is significant (10 lbs/4.5kg or more or over 5% of your body weight) or persistent may signal an underlying medical condition. Unexplained weight loss means weight loss that occurs without trying through dieting or exercising. What are the possible causes of unexplained weight loss? Unintentional or unexplained weight loss can be caused by a number of things, including depression, certain medication and diabetes. Potential causes of unexplained weight loss include: Addison’s disease Coeliac disease Chronic diarrhoea Dementia Diabetes mellitus Eating disorders (anorexia and bulimia) Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency HIV/AIDS Hypercalcemia Hyperthyroidism Malnutrition Medicines, including chemotherapy drugs, laxatives, and thyroid medications Parkinson’s disease Recreational drugs, including amphetamines and cocaine Tuberculosis Diabetes and sudden weight loss In people with diabetes, insufficient insulin prevents the body from getting glucose from the blood into the body's cells to use as energy. When this occurs, the body starts burning fat and muscle for energy, causing a reduction in overall body weight. Unexpected weight loss is often noticed in people prior to a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes but it may also affect people with type 2 diabetes. When to call your doctor If you have unintentionally lost more than 5% of your Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diets For Weight Loss

Diabetic Diets For Weight Loss

If you’re ready to lose weight and improve your diabetes (or kick it to the curb entirely), use an expert weight loss diet plan to guide you. We review five options for people with diabetes. If you’re ready to lose weight and improve your diabetes (or kick it to the curb entirely), use an expert weight loss diet plan to guide you. We review five options for people with diabetes. If you’re ready to lose weight and improve your diabetes (or kick it to the curb entirely), use an expert weight loss diet plan to guide you. We review five options for people with diabetes. If you’re ready to lose weight and improve your diabetes (or kick it to the curb entirely), use an expert weight loss diet plan to guide you. We review five options for people with diabetes. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Lose Weight

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Lose Weight

Weight loss is a common recommendation for treatment for type 2 diabetes. Many people are overweight when they’re first diagnosed, and that extra fat actually increases their insulin resistance (when their bodies can’t properly use the hormone insulin). By losing weight, people with type 2 diabetes can become less insulin resistant, and they’re able to use insulin better. (To learn more about how the hormone insulin works, read our article on how insulin regulates blood glucose levels.) If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and you're overweight, you should get started as soon as possible on a weight loss plan. It is important to work with a registered dietitian to help you figure out a plan that will work for you—a healthy meal plan, physical activity, and realistic goals will help you reach a healthy weight. There are many advantages to losing weight (and not just diabetes-related ones): Boost your energy level Lower your cholesterol levels (especially important for people with type 2 diabetes) Protect your heart (also important for people with diabetes, since heart-related complications are very common) Make it easier to control your blood glucose level As you may already know, losing weight can be a challenge, but don’t let that stop you. Do whatever you need to in order to stay motivated. It is the amount of calories we eat that contributes to weight gain. Make small changes. Learn portion sizes and reduce the amount of snacks in your day to reduce the total amount of calories you consume each day. Find cookbooks with healthier recipes using low-fat options. For a little fun, take our carb counting quiz to see how well you know the carb content of certain foods; this can help you make healthier choices. Work with a registered dietitian Continue reading >>

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