diabetestalk.net

Diabetes And Weight Gain

My Diabetes Is Controlled But Why Am I Gaining Weight?

My Diabetes Is Controlled But Why Am I Gaining Weight?

Exercise, eat right, and stay at a healthy weight. These goals are at the core of every type 2 diabetes treatment plan. And, for some people, that’s enough. When it’s not, insulin therapy is one treatment option that can help patients, but one possible side effect is weight gain. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy This can become a cycle for patients who need to control both diabetes and their weight. It’s frustrating when you feel the treatment is part of the problem. With diabetes, however, you have to get the blood sugar under control first. Insulin is used because it works. The cost of insulin can vary, but lower-cost insulin is associated with more weight gain. In a way, weight gain is a sign that the insulin is working — your body is more effectively utilizing sugar, fat and protein. Your body also has the ability to store them, which means if you don’t adjust your food intake, more of those calories turn to fat. Also, insulin is not necessarily the only factor. When you’re managing your diabetes, your body has a better chance to rehydrate, which also can cause weight gain. Of course, dehydration is a greater risk if you have diabetes, with frequent urination and thirst as two common signs of the condition. Drugs you take for other conditions also sometimes cause weight gain. So, what are your options if weight gain and insulin are an issue? Try these three tips: The simplest answer is to adjust your diet and exercise . Talk to your doctor and to a nutrition specialist about a food plan that takes the insulin effects into account. Work a bit more activity or exercise into each day. Don’t self- Continue reading >>

11 Ways To Gain Weight If You Have Diabetes

11 Ways To Gain Weight If You Have Diabetes

Although diabetes is often associated with being overweight, especially type 2 diabetes, it’s a myth that everyone with diabetes has a high body mass index (BMI). Some people have trouble gaining weight. In fact, unexplained or unintentional weight loss can be a symptom of undiagnosed diabetes. Issues with weight management center around insulin, a hormone produced by your pancreas. People with diabetes are unable to use or produce enough insulin to transport excess sugar out of their blood and into their cells, where it can be used as energy. This can cause your body to burn its existing fat stores and muscle tissue in order to supply your cells with energy. If your sugar levels are constantly in flux, your body will continue to chip away at its fat stores, resulting in weight loss. Diabetes food plans are often geared toward helping people lose, rather than gain, weight. This can make it harder to figure out how to gain weight in a healthy way. Before trying the tips below, talk with your doctor or dietician. They can help you set the right diet and exercise goals for you, as well as answer any questions you may have. There are many apps available to help you manage your condition and make the right food choices. Look for apps that help you track blood sugar and BMI. Some options include: GlucOracle: This glucose forecasting app uses crowdsourcing to analyze the estimated amount of carbohydrates, protein, fat, calories, and fiber in each meal. It also predicts what your glucose level will be after eating. SuperTracker: This app helps you gain weight by providing comprehensive nutritional information on over 8,000 food items. It also tracks your nutritional targets, diet, and activity levels against your goals. If these don’t appeal to you, we’ve also rounded up Continue reading >>

Should I Worry About Weight Gain With Insulin?

Should I Worry About Weight Gain With Insulin?

I am almost 20 years old, have had type 1 diabetes for eight years, and use insulin glargine (Lantus). Should I try to lower the need for insulin to prevent weight gain? I haven't been gaining weight, but I am concerned that I'll get into a cycle of increased insulin dosages and weight gain. Continue reading >>

Factors Associated With Weight Gain In People With Type 2 Diabetes Starting On Insulin

Factors Associated With Weight Gain In People With Type 2 Diabetes Starting On Insulin

OBJECTIVE Moderate weight gain is usual after starting insulin therapy. The identification and quantification of factors associated with weight gain may help target strategies for avoidance of weight gain. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The noninterventional CREDIT (Cardiovascular Risk Evaluation in people with type 2 Diabetes on Insulin Therapy) study included data from people with type 2 diabetes starting any insulin in 314 centers, in 12 countries. From a number of predefined candidate explanatory variables, analyses identified factors associated with weight gain 1 year after starting insulin treatment, after adjusting for investigational site as a random factor. A multivariable backward regression analysis selected a subset of these factors associated with weight gain. RESULTS We studied the 2,179 people with data for body weight change at 1 year and for potential predictive factors. The mean weight gain was 1.78 kg, and 24% gained ≥5.0 kg. Baseline factors associated with weight gain were BMI, A1C, insulin regimen, insulin dose, other glucose-lowering therapies, and hypertension; at 1 year, additional factors were A1C, insulin regimen, insulin dose, and use of other glucose-lowering therapies. In multivariable analysis, weight gain at 1 year was associated with a higher A1C at baseline, a higher insulin dose at baseline and at 1 year, and a lower baseline BMI. CONCLUSIONS By the time insulin was started, a high baseline A1C and insulin dose requirements were independently associated with greater weight gain, as was lower baseline BMI. Insulin regimen per se was not a predictive factor. Introduction Good glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes can prevent long-term microvascular complications and may also prevent or slow progression of the macrovascular disea Continue reading >>

Diabetes Detectives €“ Finding Uncommon Conditions Beverly Thomassian, Rn, Mph, Cde, Bc-adm

Diabetes Detectives €“ Finding Uncommon Conditions Beverly Thomassian, Rn, Mph, Cde, Bc-adm

- Diabetes Educational Services Training Healthcare Professionals On State-of-the-Art Diabetes Care Another Downloadable Article from the Diabetes Educational Services Site This article provides health care professionals with strategies to detect common, yet often underdiagnosed, complications associated with hyperglycemia and diabetes. It also describes how medications, organ transplants, and chronic illnesses can cause hyperglycemia. Diabetes Educational Services Beverly Dyck Thomassian PO Box 3749 Chico, CA 95928 530 893-8635 [email protected] www.DiabetesEd.net Diabetes Detectives – Finding Uncommon Conditions Beverly Thomassian, RN, MPH, CDE, BC-ADM Rebecca* has Type 2 diabetes. Her diabetes and weight were stable, but over the last three weeks, her blood sugars have been consistently elevated, up to 300 mg/dL, and she has gained 10 pounds. Rebecca takes two diabetes oral medications plus insulin injections three times a day, thyroid replacement therapy, a cholesterol medication, and a new medication for “mood swings.†Frustrated and depressed, Rebecca wants to get her diabetes and weight back under control. Since people with diabetes are at greater risk for a long list of comorbidities, health care professionals often double as detectives while uncovering complications.1 Several common, yet often underdiagnosed, complications are associated with diabetes. People with diabetes can also experience weight gain or weight loss, or complain of something not feeling right because of a variety of factors that warrant investigation. By improving their “diabetes detective†skills, health care professionals can help patients improve the management of their diabetes — and their quality of life. Unexplained weight gain If patients complain o Continue reading >>

Weight-gain Supplements For Diabetics

Weight-gain Supplements For Diabetics

Even though many people with diabetes struggle to lose weight, some may have the desire to gain. Supplements may help you get the calories you need to gain the weight. But as with all your other food choices, it's important to consider the total carbs in the supplement and how it might fit into your diet plan so that your blood sugars stay within the normal range. You won't be able to put the weight on if your blood sugars are out of control. Consult your doctor or dietitian to help you work the right supplement into your diet plan. Video of the Day Nutrition Shakes for Diabetes To gain 1 pound a week, you need to eat an extra 500 calories a day. These calories should come from a mix of carbs, protein and fat, according to the Joslin Diabetes Center. Nutrition shakes specifically designed for people with diabetes make a good choice because they contain a healthy mix of carbs, protein and fat. Most of these shakes have about 200 calories per 8-ounce serving, with about 50 percent of calories from carbs, 20 percent from protein and 30 percent from fat. These shakes also have 3 grams of fiber per serving, which may help keep blood sugar in control. Nutrition Bars for Diabetes You can also use nutrition bars specifically designed for people with diabetes to help add extra calories to your diet to gain weight. Nutrition information for these bars may vary, but they contain about 150 calories, with 50 percent of calories from carbs, 25 percent from protein and 25 percent from fat. The nutrition bars for people with diabetes are not as high in calories as the shakes, so you may need to eat more bars to meet your calorie needs for weight gain. A weight-gain supplement purchased at a health food store may also provide the calories you seek. Read food labels to find one that prov Continue reading >>

Why Did I Gain Weight When I Started Taking Insulin?

Why Did I Gain Weight When I Started Taking Insulin?

There are several factors at work to lead you to believe that insulin is "to blame" for your weight gain. People who have poorly controlled diabetes also sometimes experience weight loss because their bodies are unable to properly convert food into energy. This is because they either are not producing enough insulin or their bodies are unable to use the insulin they produce properly. This food winds up as excess glucose circulating in the blood (resulting in high blood glucose!). Ultimately the body can't use all that extra glucose circulating in the blood and so it is eliminated in the urine. When your blood glucose runs high, you can become dehydrated as your body works to clear itself of all that excess glucose — which makes you think you've lost weight, but you've only lost water. Then, when you start taking insulin and get your blood glucose under better control, you start over-retaining fluids initially to make up for your dehydration, which makes you think you've rapidly gained a lot of weight. You associate it with taking insulin, but really what is happening is taking your insulin properly is just enabling your body to better use food and maintain a proper water balance. Also, once you start taking insulin injections and start getting your blood glucose under control, you now have enough insulin circulating in your blood to help the glucose get into the body's cells where it can be used as energy. So the glucose produced by the food you eat is no longer spending time in your bloodstream and being excreted out as urine. You gain weight. Your high blood glucose may have also made you feel more hungry because not all the food you were eating was able to get into the cells as energy to nourish the cells. Then, you started taking insulin — and continued to eat t Continue reading >>

Weight And Diabetes

Weight And Diabetes

A balanced diet and an active lifestyle can help all kids maintain a healthy weight. For kids with diabetes, diet and exercise are even more important because weight can affect diabetes and diabetes can affect weight. This is true for kids and teens with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, the body doesn't use glucose properly. Glucose, a sugar, is the main source of energy for the body. Glucose levels are controlled by a hormone called insulin , which is made in the pancreas. In type 1 diabetes , the pancreas does not make enough insulin. Undiagnosed or untreated type 1 diabetes can cause weight loss. Glucose builds up in the bloodstream if insulin isn't available to move it into the body's cells. When glucose levels become high, the kidneys work to get rid of unused sugar through urine (pee). This causes weight loss due to dehydration and loss of calories from the sugar that wasn't used as energy. Kids who develop type 1 diabetes often lose weight even though they have a normal or increased appetite. Once kids are diagnosed and treated for type 1 diabetes, weight usually returns to normal. Developing type 1 diabetes isn't related to being overweight, but keeping a healthy weight is important. Too much fat tissue can make it hard for insulin to work properly, leading to both higher insulin needs and trouble controlling blood sugar. In type 2 diabetes , the pancreas still makes insulin, but the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should and blood sugar levels get too high. Most kids and teens are overweight when they're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese increases a person's risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Also, weight gain in people with type 2 diabetes makes blood sugar levels even harder to control. People with type 2 di Continue reading >>

Diabetes Information Symptoms, Causes And Prevention

Diabetes Information Symptoms, Causes And Prevention

The Risks of Treating Diabetes with Drugs Are FAR Worse than the Disease There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes arent aware of their circumstances, either. The latest diabetes statistics 1 echo an increase in diabetes cases, both diagnosed and undiagnosed. By some estimates, diabetes has increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years! At least 29 million Americans are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and another 86 million are prediabetic . Whats hidden behind this medical smokescreen is that type 2 diabetes is completely preventable. The cure lies in a true understanding of the underlying cause (which is impaired insulin and leptin sensitivity) and implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle adjustments that spell phenomenal benefits to your health. Also known as diabetes mellitus, type 1 diabetes is a chronic health condition traditionally characterized by elevated levels of glucose in your blood, often simply called high blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes dubbed juvenile onset diabetes is the relatively uncommon type, affecting only about 1 in 250 Americans. Occurring in individuals younger than age 20, it has no known cure. Whats most concerning about juvenile diabetes is that, these numbers have been going up steadily right along with type 2 diabetes: for non-Hispanic white youths ages Continue reading >>

Insulin And Weight Gain: Keep The Pounds Off

Insulin And Weight Gain: Keep The Pounds Off

Insulin and weight gain often go hand in hand, but weight control is possible. If you need insulin therapy, here's how to minimize — or avoid — weight gain. Weight gain is a common side effect for people who take insulin — a hormone that regulates the absorption of sugar (glucose) by cells. This can be frustrating because maintaining a healthy weight is an important part of your overall diabetes management plan. The good news is that it is possible to maintain your weight while taking insulin. The link between insulin and weight gain When you take insulin, glucose is able to enter your cells, and glucose levels in your blood drop. This is the desired treatment goal. But if you take in more calories than you need to maintain a healthy weight — given your level of activity — your cells will get more glucose than they need. Glucose that your cells don't use accumulates as fat. Avoid weight gain while taking insulin Eating healthy foods and being physically active most days of the week can help you prevent unwanted weight gain. The following tips can help you keep the pounds off: Count calories. Eating and drinking fewer calories helps you prevent weight gain. Stock the refrigerator and pantry with fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Plan for every meal to have the right mix of starches, fruits and vegetables, proteins, and fats. Generally, experts recommend that meals consist of half non starchy vegetable, one-quarter protein and one quarter a starch such as rice or a starchy vegetable such as corn or peas. Trim your portion sizes, skip second helpings and drink water instead of high-calorie drinks. Talk to your doctor, nurse or a dietitian about meal-planning strategies and resources. Don't skip meals. Don't try to cut calories by skipping meals. When you skip Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Lose Weight

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Lose Weight

Weight loss is a common recommendation for treatment for type 2 diabetes. Many people are overweight when they’re first diagnosed, and that extra fat actually increases their insulin resistance (when their bodies can’t properly use the hormone insulin). By losing weight, people with type 2 diabetes can become less insulin resistant, and they’re able to use insulin better. (To learn more about how the hormone insulin works, read our article on how insulin regulates blood glucose levels.) If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and you're overweight, you should get started as soon as possible on a weight loss plan. It is important to work with a registered dietitian to help you figure out a plan that will work for you—a healthy meal plan, physical activity, and realistic goals will help you reach a healthy weight. There are many advantages to losing weight (and not just diabetes-related ones): Boost your energy level Lower your cholesterol levels (especially important for people with type 2 diabetes) Protect your heart (also important for people with diabetes, since heart-related complications are very common) Make it easier to control your blood glucose level As you may already know, losing weight can be a challenge, but don’t let that stop you. Do whatever you need to in order to stay motivated. It is the amount of calories we eat that contributes to weight gain. Make small changes. Learn portion sizes and reduce the amount of snacks in your day to reduce the total amount of calories you consume each day. Find cookbooks with healthier recipes using low-fat options. For a little fun, take our carb counting quiz to see how well you know the carb content of certain foods; this can help you make healthier choices. Work with a registered dietitian Continue reading >>

Does Your Medicine Make You Gain Weight?

Does Your Medicine Make You Gain Weight?

Diabetes medications are effective at lowering blood glucose, but they also can cause you to gain weight. "Weight gain is a frequent yet unrevealed side effect of insulin and a few other categories of blood glucose lowering medicines," says Marty Irons, R.Ph., CDE, a clinical community pharmacist in Vermont and member of the Diabetic Living editorial advisory board. Irons says weight gain doesn't have to be permanent, and your health-care provider should help you balance blood glucose control with your weight. Avoid extra pounds caused by medication with these easy-to-follow tips: How to Prevent Medication-Related Weight Gain If you're prescribed a diabetes medication that may cause weight gain, here's how to avoid this unwanted side effect: Speak up and ask questions. Ask your health-care provider why you need a particular medication that may cause you to gain weight instead of one that may promote weight loss. "Primary-care providers can be slow to adopt newer medications and often rely on tried-and-true fixes," says Marty Irons, R.Ph., CDE. Ask for help and a plan. "Work with an educator to develop a plan to nip weight gain in the bud and get the support you need along the way," says Jennifer Okemah, R.D., BC-ADM. Reduce calorie intake. Avoid weight gain by making small changes. Use measuring tools to get the right portion sizes, and lighten up on salad dressing, mayonnaise, and margarine to save calories. Adjust calorie intake as needed. Burn more calories. Increase physical activity to help burn more calories. Create a calorie deficit of at least 500 calories per day, suggests Anne Daly, R.D., BC-ADM, CDE. Get moving at least 30 minutes on most days. Don't overtreat lows. Eating too much to treat hypoglycemia can raise blood glucose too high and add excess calories Continue reading >>

Can’t Lose Weight? Here Are Four Reasons Why…

Can’t Lose Weight? Here Are Four Reasons Why…

Spring is here and many of you are probably looking forward to wearing shorts, bathing suits, and flip-flops. And it’s often this time of year when people somewhat guiltily reflect back on their eating habits over the winter. Did you gain a few pounds? Are your spring pants or skirts feeling a little tight around the waistband? It’s actually normal to put weight on over the winter. After all, you may not have been as active as you usually are, and maybe you opted for those comfort foods over lower-calorie fare, like salads. But the time is here to shed that winter weight. It’s not always easy. And sometimes people find that despite eating fewer calories, cutting out the snacks, and stepping up the exercise, the weight is stubbornly refusing to come off — or it’s taking its own sweet time. This week, I’d like to point out some reasons why it might be harder for you to lose weight (or, why you’re gaining weight). Now, most weight gain occurs because of an imbalance between food intake and physical activity (that is to say, calories in exceed calories out). But if you’ve been struggling to drop those pounds, you might consider these possible causes: Hypothyroidism. It seems all too easy to blame your weight gain on “hormones” that are out of whack. But, as I wrote back in January, thyroid disorders are more common in people with diabetes, especially among people with Type 1 diabetes. Hypothyroidism, or too having too little thyroid hormone, can not only make you feel sluggish and tired, it can cause you to gain weight (or at least, make it hard to lose weight). Have your thyroid hormone (TSH and T4) levels checked every year. If you take thyroid medicine, take it as directed and work with your health-care provider to get your dose regulated, if needed. Continue reading >>

How Can I Gain Weight?

How Can I Gain Weight?

When I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at age 68, I was 5 feet 5 inches, 135 pounds, very active, and eating reasonably. Two years later, after trying to follow diabetic nutritional plans, I am down to 104 pounds. How can I gain weight? Aja J. McTyre, Douglasville, Georgia Many eating plans and diets for people with type 2 diabetes are low in calories and fat, which can affect weight loss. But unless youre overweight, dropping pounds isnt recommended. In order to gain weight, you need to consume more calories than you do currently. The Institute of Medicine recommends that moderately active women over the age of 50 get 1,800 calories daily. For men of the same age and activity level, the guidance is for between 2,200 and 2,400 calories a day. To gain weight healthfully, focus on choosing nutrient-rich foods that are high in healthful mono- and polyunsaturated fats, such as avocados, olives, nuts, seeds, oils, and fatty fish. Up to 35 percent of your daily calories should come from these foods. Its also important to eat an adequate amount of food with dietary protein. With weight loss, you lose lean muscle mass, and protein is necessary for building and maintaining it. Try to get at least 0.36 grams of protein per pound of body weight daily (so 49 grams of protein for a 135-pound woman), though older adults may need even more. Examples of protein-rich foods include beans, nuts, eggs, yogurt, fish, poultry, and beef. Many of these high-protein foods (except yogurt and legumes) have little to no significant impact on blood glucose levels. Stay away from foods marketed as low fat, including crackers, cookies, and other snack foods, many of which are high in sugar and other nutrient-poor ingredients that quickly raise blood glucose levels. Be mindful of meal-replacement Continue reading >>

How To Gain Weight And Maintain Blood Glucose

How To Gain Weight And Maintain Blood Glucose

By Lara Rondinelli-Hamilton, RD, LDN, CDE Yes, you read the title correctly—there are people with diabetes that are actually trying to gain weight. These people are underweight and need to put on a few pounds without creating extremely high blood sugar levels. Note: If you have diabetes and are losing weight or having difficulty gaining weight, your first step is making sure the issue isn’t due to high blood glucose levels. Uncontrolled hyperglycemia, which is typical with undiagnosed type 1 diabetes (or misdiagnosed type 2), can lead to weight loss and is a dangerous state for your body. If your weight loss or inability to gain weight is unexpected, make sure to discuss it right away with your doctor. It may be that your medication needs to be adjusted for better glycemic control. If, on the other hand, your blood glucose levels are controlled, here are few tips to help you gain weight without spiking your sugar. 1. Eat three meals a day. Don’t skip meals. If you are trying to gain weight, you need to increase your daily caloric intake. If you skip breakfast (or any meal), you could be missing out on an extra 400 to 500 calories per day, which if done consistently could lead to a one-pound weight loss per week. So, even if you are not a breakfast person, find some foods that you can eat for breakfast, such as a fruit-vegetable smoothie (you can add flax seed and coconut oil to increase calories, fiber, and satiety). A quick smoothie could be a few handfuls of spinach, 1 cup frozen berries, ½ banana, 1-2 tablespoons coconut oil, 1 tablespoon ground flax seed and ½-1 cup coconut milk. Serve the smoothie with a side of egg and chicken sausage. You might also try an egg, cheese, and avocado sandwich on a low-carb wrap or tortilla. 2. Eat snacks. Snacks and small me Continue reading >>

More in diabetic diet