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Diabetes And Liver Disease Diet

3-day Meal Plan: My Cirrhosis (liver Disease) Healing Diet

3-day Meal Plan: My Cirrhosis (liver Disease) Healing Diet

Save I was diagnosed with advanced-stage Cirrhosis (chronic liver disease) at 30 years old. After trips in and out of the hospital, and upon the suggestion of my doctor, I studied the Renal Diet, and found that a modified version was the best diet for my own healing. The Renal diet emphasizes limiting fluids, eating a low-protein diet, limiting salt, potassium, phosphorous, and other electrolytes, and getting enough calories if you are losing weight. That being said, it was very challenging to drastically change my diet and lifestyle to combat chronic liver disease – cirrhosis! To make it less overwhelming, here is a three day meal-plan I used, complete with recipes, so you can get healing too! Before Breakfast, a Cleansing Beverage: One thing I always start the day with is a glass or two of dandelion tea (found easily at your local health food store) with a teaspoon of raw honey and the juice of half a lemon. This is a great cleansing beverage and is a good way to jump-start your metabolism. Dandelion root is thought to aid in liver function, lemon adds vitamin C and a bit of natural acid and raw local honey is great for allergies. I personally used to have awful seasonal allergies but this past year hasn’t been much of an issue and I suspect this daily habit is one of the main reasons. Start with a Smoothie: After that, I almost always start with this smoothie! Other great breakfast recipes from my collection include: – Chia Yogurt ‘Custard’ – Chinese Egg Scallion Mushroom Omelet Lunch: Lunch is the biggest meal of my day and is eaten between noon and 2pm. These following recipes are easy to prepare and taste great even if taken to go. – Southwest Tabbouleh (4 servings) – Indian Chickpea and Artichoke Sautee Snack Attack: Here are some snacks I keep ar Continue reading >>

Cirrhosis Diet Plan: Foods To Eat And Avoid

Cirrhosis Diet Plan: Foods To Eat And Avoid

Anything we put in our body at some point gets filtered through the liver, and this is why our diet can play such a large role in the development of cirrhosis. Cirrhosis is a type of liver disease which progresses from fibrosis – scarring of the liver. In cirrhosis, the scarring is irreversible, and this can be a result of alcohol abuse, viral hepatitis B and C, and fatty liver disease. The liver is the only organ that can regenerate and heal itself, and this may be possible if cirrhosis is mild. If severe, though, the progression of cirrhosis will eventually bring the function of the liver to a halt. The good news is, a healthy diet can go a long way in slowing down the progression of cirrhosis, all the while maintaining a healthy liver and healthy body overall. Below you will find the foods to eat and the ones to avoid if you have cirrhosis. Diet and nutrition tips for people with cirrhosis Limit salt: Salt retains water, which can cause further problems for cirrhosis patients. It is important that you limit your salt intake to less than 2,000 mg a day or less. You can do this by avoiding salty foods, cooking for yourself, reading food labels carefully, avoiding fast-food restaurants, and reducing your intake of red meat. Watch your calories and protein: Cirrhosis patients may need additional calories and protein as they may lose their appetite or experience nausea or vomiting, leading to weight loss. Eating smaller, more frequent meals may help combat this while replenishing lost nutrients, calories, and protein. Protein should come from plant sources as meat-sourced protein is hard for your liver to filter through. Avoid alcohol: In many cases, alcohol is a main cause for cirrhosis, so continuing to drink will worsen your condition. Avoid alcohol at all costs. Lim Continue reading >>

Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (nafld)

Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (nafld)

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the term for a range of conditions caused by a build-up of fat in the liver. It's usually seen in people who are overweight or obese. A healthy liver should contain little or no fat. It's estimated that up to 1 in every 3 people in the UK has early stages of NAFLD where there are small amounts of fat in their liver. Early-stage NAFLD doesn't usually cause any harm, but it can lead to serious liver damage, including cirrhosis, if it gets worse. Having high levels of fat in your liver is also associated with an increased risk of problems such as diabetes, heart attacks and strokes. If detected and managed at an early stage, it's possible to stop NAFLD getting worse and reduce the amount of fat in your liver. Stages of NAFLD NAFLD develops in 4 main stages. Most people will only ever develop the first stage, usually without realising it. In a small number of cases, it can progress and eventually lead to liver damage if not detected and managed. The main stages of NAFLD are: simple fatty liver (steatosis) – a largely harmless build-up of fat in the liver cells that may only be diagnosed during tests carried out for another reason non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) – a more serious form of NAFLD, where the liver has become inflamed; this is estimated to affect up to 5% of the UK population fibrosis – where persistent inflammation causes scar tissue around the liver and nearby blood vessels, but the liver is still able to function normally cirrhosis – the most severe stage, occurring after years of inflammation, where the liver shrinks and becomes scarred and lumpy; this damage is permanent and can lead to liver failure (where your liver stops working properly) and liver cancer It can take years for fibrosis or cirrhosis Continue reading >>

Fatty Liver Disease And Ketogenic Diets

Fatty Liver Disease And Ketogenic Diets

Fatty liver disease is a condition in which the liver becomes clogged with excess fat due to elevated triglyceride levels within the body. The condition is strongly linked to insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and prediabetes. When the fat stored in the liver accounts for more than 10% of the liver’s weight, the function of the liver becomes compromised, and the liver can't metabolize insulin and fine tune blood sugar levels as it would normally. This type of liver disease is called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or hepatic steatosis and if left untreated, it can result in liver damage or liver cancer. What Causes NAFLD? High Triglycerides High blood triglyceride levels associated with high carbohydrate and fructose consumption. The elevated triglycerides which cause fatty liver disease are a direct result of a diet which is high in carbohydrates, and specifically, high in fructose. Studies have shown that fructose consumption elevates blood pressure, sky rockets triglyceride levels and increases inflammation and insulin resistance in the liver. Insulin resistant body systems. A high carb consumption and lack of exercise is strongly associated with the development of overall body insulin resistance and high triglycerides levels. See this study, and this study shows that a high carbohydrate diet is linked to liver dysfunction. Vegetable Oil Consumption High levels of vegetable oil consumption. Vegetables oils contain omega-6 polyunsaturated fats which are inflammatory when consumed in large amounts. In addition, they are often hydrogenated to solidify them, and this introduces trans-fats which can also damage the liver. The most prevalent are corn, canola, and soybean oil. These oils are commonly found in commercial mayonnaise and salad dressings. Altern Continue reading >>

Spectrum Of Liver Disease In Type 2 Diabetes And Management Of Patients With Diabetes And Liver Disease

Spectrum Of Liver Disease In Type 2 Diabetes And Management Of Patients With Diabetes And Liver Disease

It is estimated that 20.8 million people, i.e., 7.0% of the U.S. population, have diabetes (1). Type 2 diabetes, with its core defects of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency, accounts for 90–95% of those with the disease. Another 5.2 million people are estimated to have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. It is the sixth leading cause of death (1) in the U.S. and accounts for 17.2% of all deaths for those aged >25 years (2). Liver disease is an important cause of death in type 2 diabetes. In the population-based Verona Diabetes Study (3), cirrhosis was the fourth leading cause of death and accounted for 4.4% of diabetes-related deaths. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR), i.e., the relative rate of an event compared with the background rate, for cirrhosis was 2.52 compared with 1.34 for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In another prospective cohort study (4), cirrhosis accounted for 12.5% of deaths in patients with diabetes. Diabetes, by most estimates, is now the most common cause of liver disease in the U.S. Cryptogenic cirrhosis, of which diabetes is, by far, the most common cause, has become the third leading indication for liver transplantation in the U.S. (5,6). Virtually the entire spectrum of liver disease is seen in patients with type 2 diabetes. This includes abnormal liver enzymes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and acute liver failure. In addition, there is an unexplained association of diabetes with hepatitis C. Finally, the prevalence of diabetes in cirrhosis is 12.3–57% (7). Thus, patients with diabetes have a high prevalence of liver disease and patients with liver disease have a high prevalence of diabetes. The management of diabetes in patients with liver disease is theoretically complicated b Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Pathogenic Duo

Diabetes And Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Pathogenic Duo

Limitation of Use: The safety and efficacy of Humulin R U-500 used in combination with other insulins has not been determined. The safety and efficacy of Humulin R U-500 delivered by continuous subcutaneous infusion has not been determined. For the Humulin R U-500 vial, particular attention should be paid to the 20-mL vial size, prominent “U-500” and warning statements on the vial label, and distinctive coloring on the vial and carton. Dosing errors have occurred when Humulin R U-500 was administered with syringes other than a U-500 insulin syringe. Patients should be prescribed U-500 syringes for use with Humulin R U-500 vials. The dose of Humulin R U-500 should always be expressed in units of insulin. DO NOT transfer Humulin R U-500 from the Humulin R U-500 KwikPen into any syringe for administration. Overdose and severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hyperglycemia or Hypoglycemia with Changes in Insulin Regimen: Changes in insulin, manufacturer, type, or method of administration should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Hypoglycemia: Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction associated with insulin, including Humulin R U-500. Severe hypoglycemia can cause seizures, may be life-threatening, or cause death. Severe hypoglycemia may develop as long as 18 to 24 hours after an injection of Humulin R U-500. Hypoglycemia can impair concentration ability and reaction time; this may place an individual and others at risk in situations where these abilities are important, such as driving or operating other machinery. Early warning symptoms of hypoglycemia may be less pronounced in patients with longstanding diabetes, in patients with diabetic nerve disease, in patients using medications th Continue reading >>

Do You Have Diabetes, Liver Disease? Watch Out For Cvd

Do You Have Diabetes, Liver Disease? Watch Out For Cvd

A study analyzing the medical data of more than 133,000 people shows that those with diabetes and a medical history of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease have a significantly higher risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Recent data suggest that non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common type of liver disease affecting people in the United States. NAFLD is defined by a range of conditions determined by excess fat accumulating in the liver. Liver disease is also associated with a high risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and brings an elevated risk of mortality. At the same time, studies have shown that there is a strong association between NAFLD and type 2 diabetes. Often, when the two conditions coexist, they augment the probability of developing other complications. However, although diabetes and NAFLD so commonly occur together, and although NAFLD is associated with a risk of CVD and death, no studies so far have conclusively shown that people with both NAFLD and diabetes are also more exposed to CVD and mortality. But now, Prof. Sarah Wild, from the University of Edinburgh, and Prof. Christopher Byrne, from the University of Southampton - both in the United Kingdom - have analyzed data from hospital records to confirm this risk in people with NAFLD and diabetes. They have recently presented their findings at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes Annual Meeting, held in Lisbon, Portugal. Higher CVD incidence, doubled death risk To test for a higher risk of mortality and CVD in people with both diabetes and NAFLD, the researchers looked at the data of individuals diagnosed with diabetes while also targeting a "clinically significant" history of NAFLD. Clinically significant was defined as at least one hospital admission Continue reading >>

Digestive Weight Loss Center

Digestive Weight Loss Center

Fatty liver, or hepatic steatosis, refers to excessive fat accumulation in the liver. In the absence of high alcohol consumption, it is termed non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Obesity, and medical conditions such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes, are risk factors for the development of NAFLD. In some patients, fat causes liver inflammation, or steatohepatitis; also referred to as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH may eventually cause liver scarring (fibrosis), leading to cirrhosis. How do I know if I have fatty liver disease? Fatty liver disease does not cause symptoms. However, your doctor may find elevated liver enzymes after a routine blood test. The liver releases the enzymes ALT and AST when there is inflammation. Obesity and fatty liver disease Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is strongly associated with obesity. Excess fat causes insulin resistance and inflammatory signals. Insulin resistance means that the pancreas has to produce more insulin in order to maintain normal blood glucose levels, and is the first step towards developing diabetes. Patients who have hypertension (high blood pressure), have high cholesterol, are overweight or obese, and have diabetes or insulin resistance are at greater risk to develop fatty liver disease. Physicians and scientists do not fully understand why the excess fat causes these liver changes. They do know that by losing weight, liver enzymes may normalize and liver inflammation may improve. How much weight do I have to lose so I can cure my fatty liver disease? Studies show that losing 10 percent of your weight causes the liver enzymes to improve, which correlates with a reduction in the liver inflammation caused by the extra fat. Can fatty liver disease make it harder for me to lose weigh Continue reading >>

Diabetes: How Do I Help Protect My Liver?

Diabetes: How Do I Help Protect My Liver?

If I have diabetes, is there anything special I need to do to take care of my liver? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. You're wise to wonder about steps to protect your liver. Diabetes raises your risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, a condition in which excess fat builds up in your liver even if you drink little or no alcohol. This condition occurs in at least half of those with type 2 diabetes. It isn't clear whether the condition appears more often in people with type 1 diabetes than in the general population because obesity, which is a risk factor, occurs with similar frequency in both groups. Other medical conditions, such as high cholesterol and high blood pressure, also raise your risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Fatty liver disease itself usually causes no symptoms. But it raises your risk of developing liver inflammation or scarring (cirrhosis). It's also linked to an increased risk of liver cancer, heart disease and kidney disease. Fatty liver disease may even play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes. Once you have both conditions, poorly managed type 2 diabetes can make fatty liver disease worse. Your best defense against fatty liver disease includes these strategies: Work with your health care team to achieve good control of your blood sugar. Lose weight if you need to, and try to maintain a healthy weight. Take steps to reduce high blood pressure. Keep your low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or "bad") cholesterol and triglycerides — a type of blood fat — within recommended limits. Don't drink too much alcohol. If you have diabetes, your doctor may recommend an ultrasound examination of your liver when you're first diagnosed and regular follow-up blood tests to monitor your liver function. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Liver Disease - Nafld And Nash

Diabetes Liver Disease - Nafld And Nash

Before considering the bad news about Diabetes 2, the reader should understand that diabetes 2 and all its complications is an optional disease process. Each person who has or is heading for diabetes 2 has choices. The only logical conclusion is that wrong food and too little exercise will lead you down a path of misery and progressive deterioration. A collection of metabolic problems is found in patients with type 2 Diabetes. This metabolic syndrome involves insulin resistance, gout, hypertension, android (visceral) obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperbetalipoproteinemia and low concentrations of the protective blood fat, HDL. These metabolic problems are all risk factors for liver disease, atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease and strokes. According to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse (a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, U.S. Public Health Service.): "Diabetes is widely recognized as one of the leading causes of death and disability contributing to the deaths in the USA alone of more than 169,000 persons in 1992. Its toll increases every year. Diabetes is associated with long-term complications that affect every part of the body. The main horrors are Liver Disease (NAFDL and NASH), blindness, heart disease, strokes, kidney failure, amputations, and nerve damage. Fatty Livers NAFLD Fat accumulates in livers for a variety of reasons. For many years, alcoholic liver disease was the most prevalent diagnosis. More recently, a large and growing population of obese and diabetic patients have fatty livers associated with inflammation, scarring. The term “nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)” is often used in the medical literature. A better term would be fatty liver disease (FLD); the refer Continue reading >>

Liver Disease And Diabetes Mellitus

Liver Disease And Diabetes Mellitus

CLINICAL DIABETES VOL. 17 NO. 2 1999 These pages are best viewed with Netscape version 3.0 or higher or Internet Explorer version 3.0 or higher. When viewed with other browsers, some characters or attributes may not be rendered correctly. FEATURE ARTICLE Gavin N. Levinthal, MD, and Anthony S. Tavill, MD, FRCP, FACP IN BRIEF Liver disease may cause or contribute to, be coincident with, or occur as a result of diabetes mellitus. This article addresses these associations. This article addresses the role of the liver in normal glucose homeostasis and discusses a variety of liver conditions associated with abnormal glucose homeostasis. This association may explain the pathogenesis of the liver disease or of the abnormal glucose homeostasis, or may be purely coincidental (Table 1). Table 1. Liver Disease and Diabetes Mellitus 1. Liver disease occurring as a consequence of diabetes mellitus Glycogen deposition Steatosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) Fibrosis and cirrhosis Biliary disease, cholelithiasis, cholecystitis Complications of therapy of diabetes (cholestatic and necroinflammatory) 2 . Diabetes mellitus and abnormalities of glucose homeostasis occurring as a complication of liver disease Hepatitis Cirrhosis Hepatocellular carcinoma Fulminant hepatic failure Postorthotopic liver transplantation 3 . Liver disease occurring coincidentally with diabetes mellitus and abnormalities of glucose homeostasis Hemochromatosis Glycogen storage diseases Autoimmunebiliary disease The prevalence of type 1 diabetes in the United States is ~0.26%. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is far higher, ~1–2% in Caucasian Americans and up to 40% in Pima Indians. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, hepatitis C alone chronically infects more than 1.8% of the A Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Fatty Liver

How To Reverse Fatty Liver

Two recent studies have come up with some useful information about what it takes to reverse nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. This is a condition where fat accumulates in the liver. It is often considered "benign"--that is not associated with any adverse health effects. But in rare cases it can lead to liver damage and, very rarely, this damage may lead to liver failure. Fatty liver disease is caused by--or found in association with--the taking of certain medications, gastric bypass surgery, high cholesterol, high levels of triglycerides in the blood, malnutrition, metabolic syndrome, obesity, rapid weight loss, toxins and chemicals, such as pesticides, Type 2 diabetes, and Wilson's disease. The drugs reported as causing fatty liver include total parenteral nutrition, methotrexate (Rheumatrex), griseofulvin (Grifulvin V), tamoxifen (Nolvadex), steroids, valproate (Depakote), and amiodarone (Cordarone). However, most people with Type 2 diabetes who develop fatty liver probably develop it because of exposure to the very high triglycerides that result from uncontrolled high sugars. If you are diagnosed with fatty liver, you will probably be told that losing weight will reverse fatty liver, and this appears to be true. The two studies I want to discus here tell us two things: how much weight you have to lose to reverse your fatty liver and what the most effective diet might be for doing that. How Much Weight Loss Reverses Fatty Liver The first study Orlistat for overweight subjects with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: A randomized, prospective trial. was another drug company supported trial that hoped to prove that the drug, Orlistat, which blocks the digestion of fat would reverse steatohepatitis, which is the term for the inflammatory liver condition that develops in some p Continue reading >>

A High Carbohydrate Diet For Fatty Liver Disease And Diabetes

A High Carbohydrate Diet For Fatty Liver Disease And Diabetes

A High Carbohydrate Diet Is The Most Effective Treatment For Fatty Liver Which Causes Type 2 Diabetes Yale study slaps down misinformation on the cause of Type 2 Diabetes. Hint: it’s your liver and high carbohydrates are are the cure. You’re middle aged and that spare tire has grown snugly around your waist. No matter what you do, or how active you are, it’s impossible to shake the extra weight. Blood work confirms your cholesterol is high and blood pressure numbers are rising. What’s more, your doctor prescribed blood pressure medication, a statin and insulin to combat your newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes. Stunned and amazed, you leave the doctor’s office and diligently start medication in the hopes that you will regain your health. In a moment of reflection you ask yourself, “How did I get to this place of unhealth?” The short answer is – it’s your liver. Through your bouts of weight gain and fatigue, your liver has been trying to get your attention. In doing so, it ultimately led you to your doctor’s office where the recommended treatment is to eat a high protein diet – the very thing that got you into this mess in the first place. What Causes A Fatty Liver? There are two types of fatty liver; non-alcoholic fatty liver, which is caused by improper diet, and alcoholic fatty liver, which is caused by a high intake of alcohol. According to the Mayo Clinic a dangerous complication of both non-alcoholic and alcoholic fatty liver is cirrhosis. But before it gets to that point, there’s usually a diagnosis and long time struggle with Type 2 diabetes. Fatty Liver Causes Insulin Resistance, Not Vice Versa According to the American Diabetes Association 1.4 million Americans are diagnosed with Diabetes every year. According to Diabetes Care diabetes is th Continue reading >>

Effect Of Aerobic Exercise And Diet On Liver Fat In Pre-diabetic Patients With Non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Effect Of Aerobic Exercise And Diet On Liver Fat In Pre-diabetic Patients With Non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial

The study aimed to assess whether aerobic exercise (AEx) training and a fibre-enriched diet can reduce hepatic fat content (HFC) and increase glycaemic control in pre-diabetic patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Six-hundred-and-three patients from seven clinics in Yangpu district, Shanghai, China were recruited. Of them 115 individuals aged 50–65-year fulfilled the inclusion criteria (NAFLD with impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance) and were randomly assigned into exercise (AEx n = 29), diet (Diet n = 28), exercise plus diet (AED n = 29), or no-intervention (NI n = 29) groups. Progressive supervised AEx training (60–75% VO2max intensity) was given 2-3 times/week in 30–60 min/sessions, and the diet intervention was provided as lunch with 38% carbohydrate and diet fibre of 12 g/day for 8.6-month. HFC was assessed by 1H MRS. We found that HFC was significantly reduced in the AEx (−24.4%), diet (−23.2%), and AED (−47.9%) groups by contrast to the 20.9% increase in the NI group (p = 0.001 for all) after intervention. However, only AED group significantly decreased HbA1c (−4.4%, p = 0.01) compared with the NI group (−0.6%). Aerobic exercise training combined with fibre-enriched diet can reduce HFC more effectively than either exercise or increased fibre-intake alone in pre-diabetic patients with NAFLD. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the developing world, and occurs in 17–30% of the population in Western countries and 2–4% worldwide1. In China the prevalence of NAFLD is 10–30% and up to 75% among obese and type 2 diabetes (T2D)2. At the same time, a recent large national survey estimated that 10% of Chinese adults may have diabetes and 50% may have predi Continue reading >>

Fatty Liver Disease

Fatty Liver Disease

The normal treatment for , whether it's alcohol-related or not, is to work toward a healthy weight through diet and exercise. What should have a place on your plate? Generally speaking, foods that fight cell damage, make it easier for your body to use insulin, or lower inflammation can help reverse the condition. Since every person is different, you should work with your doctor to come up with an eating plan that's right for you. A Mediterranean Diet Although it wasn't originally meant for people with fatty liver disease, this style of eating combines the kinds of foods that help reduce fat in your liver: healthy fats, antioxidants, and complex carbohydrates. Things you're likely to see on the table that you should reach for include: Fruits Grains Nuts Olive oil Vegetables The Right Fats Your cells use glucose, a kind of sugar, for energy. The hormone insulin helps get the glucose from your digested food into your cells. People with fatty liver disease are often insulin resistant. Their bodies make insulin, but it doesn't work well. Glucose builds up in the blood, and the liver turns that extra sugar into fat. Certain fats in your diet can improve your sensitivity to, or ability to use, insulin. Your cells can take in glucose, so your liver doesn't need to make and store fat. Omega-3 fatty acids are found in fish, fish oil, vegetable oils, nuts (especially walnuts), flaxseeds and flaxseed oil, and leafy veggies. Monounsaturated fats are plentiful in plant sources, like olives, nuts, and avocados. Steer clear of saturated fats, though. Eat less meat and dairy products. Avoid baked goods and fried foods made with palm or coconut oils. These lead to more fatty deposits in your liver. Antioxidants Another reason fat builds up is that liver cells can be damaged when nutrient Continue reading >>

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