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Diabetes And Liver Disease Diet

Diet For Diabetes & Liver Problems

Diet For Diabetes & Liver Problems

A diet for diabetes and liver problems balances the needs of both conditions effectively. Diabetics need to monitor carbohydrate intake to keep blood sugar levels within range, while those with liver problems needs to reduce the intake of foods that stress the liver, such as protein. Monounsaturated fats and omega-3 fatty acids should also be a part of your diet. If you have diabetes and liver problems, speak to your doctor or health care practitioner about the optimal diet for you. Video of the Day The coexistence of diabetes and liver problems such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis and liver failure occurs regularly, according to an article in the March 2007 issue of "Diabetes Care." Recommended diet modifications include reducing caloric intake, as weight loss diminishes fatty liver. A diet high in complex carbohydrates, low in red meat and high in monounsaturated fats, such as the Mediterranean diet, seems to help patients with diabetes and liver problems manage both conditions. While complex carbohydrates, such as sweet potatoes, lentils, brown rice, oatmeal and high-fiber bran cereals, are recommended for patients with diabetes and liver problems, it is important to keep the portions of these types of foods low to avoid spiking blood sugar levels. Eating too many carbohydrates will also lead to a glut in caloric intake and weight gain, which can exacerbate liver problems. As a rule patients with diabetes and liver problems should keep their protein intake low, because a damaged liver will have difficulty processing protein, according to MedlinePlus. A moderate to high intake of monounsaturated fats, such as olive oil, avocado, canola oil and almonds, works well for diabetics with liver problems. Omega-3 fatty acids from cold water fish, such as such Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Fatty Liver Disease

Type 2 Diabetes And Fatty Liver Disease

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a group of conditions in which fat builds up in the liver, leading to inflammation of the cells where it is stored and causing the liver to get bigger. It can progress to more serious conditions, including fibrosis and cirrhosis of the liver. Fatty liver disease "is so common. It’s present arguably in a majority of type 2 diabetics,” says Daniel Einhorn, MD, clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Diego and the medical director of the Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute. “None of us thought about it more than about 10 years ago, then all of a sudden we discovered it and see it all the time.” Fatty Liver Disease and Type 2 Diabetes: The Connection Diabetes does not cause fatty liver disease. Instead, the two diseases tend to occur in the same people because the same conditions cause both problems. “So, it’s not the diabetes per se. People with diabetes also have obesity and insulin resistance, and so the fatty liver is thought to be part of that,” Dr. Einhorn explains. Einhorn says that most cases of fatty liver disease do not cause any harm. However, since type 2 diabetes and obesity are so common in the United States, fatty liver disease is now a leading cause of end-stage (fatal) liver disease requiring a liver transplant, along with alcohol abuse and hepatitis. Fatty Liver Disease Diagnosis Fatty liver disease has no symptoms. People who are being treated for diabetes will have liver enzyme tests as part of their routine blood work during medical exams. Ninety-nine percent of the cases of fatty liver disease are detected by this test, says Einhorn. In some cases it will be picked up during the physical exam or in imaging studies, like a computed tomography scan of the abdomen or a liver ul Continue reading >>

Cirrhosis

Cirrhosis

On this page: What are the signs and symptoms of cirrhosis? What is cirrhosis? Cirrhosis is a condition in which the liver slowly deteriorates and is unable to function normally due to chronic, or long lasting, injury. Scar tissue replaces healthy liver tissue and partially blocks the flow of blood through the liver. The liver is the body’s largest internal organ. The liver is called the body’s metabolic factory because of the important role it plays in metabolism—the way cells change food into energy after food is digested and absorbed into the blood. The liver has many functions, including taking up, storing, and processing nutrients from food—including fat, sugar, and protein—and delivering them to the rest of the body when needed making new proteins, such as clotting factors and immune factors producing bile, which helps the body absorb fats, cholesterol, and fat-soluble vitamins removing waste products the kidneys cannot remove, such as fats, cholesterol, toxins, and medications A healthy liver is necessary for survival. The liver can regenerate most of its own cells when they become damaged. However, if injury to the liver is too severe or long lasting, regeneration is incomplete, and the liver creates scar tissue. Scarring of the liver, also called fibrosis, may lead to cirrhosis. The buildup of scar tissue that causes cirrhosis is usually a slow and gradual process. In the early stages of cirrhosis, the liver continues to function. However, as cirrhosis gets worse and scar tissue replaces more healthy tissue, the liver will begin to fail. Chronic liver failure, which is also called end-stage liver disease, progresses over months, years, or even decades. With end-stage liver disease, the liver can no longer perform important functions or effectively rep Continue reading >>

Liver Disease And Diabetes Mellitus

Liver Disease And Diabetes Mellitus

CLINICAL DIABETES VOL. 17 NO. 2 1999 These pages are best viewed with Netscape version 3.0 or higher or Internet Explorer version 3.0 or higher. When viewed with other browsers, some characters or attributes may not be rendered correctly. FEATURE ARTICLE Gavin N. Levinthal, MD, and Anthony S. Tavill, MD, FRCP, FACP IN BRIEF Liver disease may cause or contribute to, be coincident with, or occur as a result of diabetes mellitus. This article addresses these associations. This article addresses the role of the liver in normal glucose homeostasis and discusses a variety of liver conditions associated with abnormal glucose homeostasis. This association may explain the pathogenesis of the liver disease or of the abnormal glucose homeostasis, or may be purely coincidental (Table 1). Table 1. Liver Disease and Diabetes Mellitus 1. Liver disease occurring as a consequence of diabetes mellitus Glycogen deposition Steatosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) Fibrosis and cirrhosis Biliary disease, cholelithiasis, cholecystitis Complications of therapy of diabetes (cholestatic and necroinflammatory) 2 . Diabetes mellitus and abnormalities of glucose homeostasis occurring as a complication of liver disease Hepatitis Cirrhosis Hepatocellular carcinoma Fulminant hepatic failure Postorthotopic liver transplantation 3 . Liver disease occurring coincidentally with diabetes mellitus and abnormalities of glucose homeostasis Hemochromatosis Glycogen storage diseases Autoimmunebiliary disease The prevalence of type 1 diabetes in the United States is ~0.26%. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is far higher, ~1–2% in Caucasian Americans and up to 40% in Pima Indians. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, hepatitis C alone chronically infects more than 1.8% of the A Continue reading >>

What Every Diabetic Should Know About Liver Disease

What Every Diabetic Should Know About Liver Disease

What Every Diabetic Should Know About Liver Disease Did you know that diabetics are 50% more likely to develop liver disease? Particularly fatty liver disease. Fatty liver disease is incredibly common in overweight people; nearly everyone with excess weight on their abdomen has some degree of fatty liver. Type 2 diabetics are prone to carrying excess weight on their abdomen, but even slim diabetics often have a fatty liver. It is well known that diabetes increases the risk of kidney disease, nerve damage, blood vessel damage, infections, blindness, erectile problems and heart disease, but you may not realise diabetes has terrible effects on the liver. You can’t see or feel the effects it’s having on your liver until liver cells become damaged. According to Gillian Booth, MD, MSc, of St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, in a population-based study, newly diagnosed diabetes was linked with a near doubling in the rate of cirrhosis, liver failure or liver transplant compared with non-diabetics. Clearly these are significant findings that should be taken seriously. Insulin resistance (syndrome X) is the driving force behind the development of fatty liver. Insulin resistance is a forerunner to type 2 diabetes. If the insulin resistance becomes severe enough, a person usually develops type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually develops in childhood, although by the time they are in their mid 30s, most type 1 diabetics have developed insulin resistance as well, and they face the same risks as type 2 diabetics when they get older. People with insulin resistance have high levels of insulin in their bloodstream. Insulin signals to your liver to manufacture fat, especially triglycerides and cholesterol. This promotes the accumulation of fat inside the liver, inside other organs, Continue reading >>

High Protein, Low-carb Diet Helps Reverse Fatty Liver In People With Type 2 Diabetes

High Protein, Low-carb Diet Helps Reverse Fatty Liver In People With Type 2 Diabetes

A diet high in animal or plant protein, and relatively low in carb, has been shown to significantly reduce liver fat in people with type 2 diabetes patients and alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is a disease characterised by excessive fat content in the liver, which is associated with increased risks for metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Previous studies have shown that diets that are higher in carbohydrates, high in animal protein and high in fat tend to increase liver fat. In this study, published in the journal Gastroenterology, German researchers placed 37 patients with type 2 diabetes and NAFLD on two different high protein, moderate fat and low carbohydrate diets for six weeks. Calories weren't restricted and were split between 30 per cent of energy from protein, 30 per cent from fat, and 40 per cent from carbohydrates - which is lower in carbohydrate than the 45-60 per cent recommended by Public Health England. One diet was high in animal protein and consisted of consuming meals rich in meat and dairy foods, while the other was based upon plant protein obtained from legumes. The study indicates that no matter what the protein source is, a higher protein content in the diet, in combination with lower carbohydrate, can significantly reduce liver fat. Specifically, after six weeks, liver fat content decreased by 48 per cent in the animal protein group, and by 35.7 per cent in the plant-based protein group. Nine patients (three from the animal protein group and six from the plant protein group) even saw their degree of hepatic fat content drop below what is considered as having NAFLD, meaning that they no longer had it. These reductions were unrelated to variation in the participants' body weight, that the researchers monitored throughout the experim Continue reading >>

Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (nafld)

Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (nafld)

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the term for a range of conditions caused by a build-up of fat in the liver. It's usually seen in people who are overweight or obese. A healthy liver should contain little or no fat. It's estimated that up to 1 in every 3 people in the UK has early stages of NAFLD where there are small amounts of fat in their liver. Early-stage NAFLD doesn't usually cause any harm, but it can lead to serious liver damage, including cirrhosis, if it gets worse. Having high levels of fat in your liver is also associated with an increased risk of problems such as diabetes, heart attacks and strokes. If detected and managed at an early stage, it's possible to stop NAFLD getting worse and reduce the amount of fat in your liver. Stages of NAFLD NAFLD develops in 4 main stages. Most people will only ever develop the first stage, usually without realising it. In a small number of cases, it can progress and eventually lead to liver damage if not detected and managed. The main stages of NAFLD are: simple fatty liver (steatosis) – a largely harmless build-up of fat in the liver cells that may only be diagnosed during tests carried out for another reason non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) – a more serious form of NAFLD, where the liver has become inflamed; this is estimated to affect up to 5% of the UK population fibrosis – where persistent inflammation causes scar tissue around the liver and nearby blood vessels, but the liver is still able to function normally cirrhosis – the most severe stage, occurring after years of inflammation, where the liver shrinks and becomes scarred and lumpy; this damage is permanent and can lead to liver failure (where your liver stops working properly) and liver cancer It can take years for fibrosis or cirrhosis Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diet To Treat Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease – Does It Make Sense?

Low-carb Diet To Treat Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease – Does It Make Sense?

Approximately 30 percent of people in the United States have a disease that is characterized by abnormal deposits of fat in the liver. The disease is not contagious, and unlike many other disorders of the liver, it is not caused by overconsumption of alcohol. It is called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and has become the leading cause of chronic liver disease in many countries around the world (1). It is normal to have fat in the liver. However, if the amount of fat is more than 5-10 percent of the weight of the liver, fatty liver disease is probably present. But why is having much fat in the liver a bad thing? NAFLD may progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) which is associated with inflammation and may result in chronic scarring of the liver and liver cancer (2). Furthermore, patients with NAFLD have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. (3). The prevalence of NAFLD has increased steadily during the last 25-30 years, along with the prevalence of central obesity, type 2 diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome (4). Most individuals with NAFLD have increased abdominal fat and signs of insulin resistance which is reflected in high blood levels of triglycerides, low HDL-cholesterol, and increased risk of type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure (hypertension). So, an educated guess might be that NAFLD is caused by eating too much or that it is caused by eating too much of the wrong thing. The Role of Insulin Resistance and Carbohydrates It is primarily triglycerides that accumulate in the liver in patients with NAFLD. Triglycerides are composed of three fatty acids attached to a molecule of glycerol. But, where do the fatty acids come from and why do they load up in the liver? The Role of Insulin Resistance Insulin is a hormone produced by beta cell Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Fatty Liver

How To Reverse Fatty Liver

Two recent studies have come up with some useful information about what it takes to reverse nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. This is a condition where fat accumulates in the liver. It is often considered "benign"--that is not associated with any adverse health effects. But in rare cases it can lead to liver damage and, very rarely, this damage may lead to liver failure. Fatty liver disease is caused by--or found in association with--the taking of certain medications, gastric bypass surgery, high cholesterol, high levels of triglycerides in the blood, malnutrition, metabolic syndrome, obesity, rapid weight loss, toxins and chemicals, such as pesticides, Type 2 diabetes, and Wilson's disease. The drugs reported as causing fatty liver include total parenteral nutrition, methotrexate (Rheumatrex), griseofulvin (Grifulvin V), tamoxifen (Nolvadex), steroids, valproate (Depakote), and amiodarone (Cordarone). However, most people with Type 2 diabetes who develop fatty liver probably develop it because of exposure to the very high triglycerides that result from uncontrolled high sugars. If you are diagnosed with fatty liver, you will probably be told that losing weight will reverse fatty liver, and this appears to be true. The two studies I want to discus here tell us two things: how much weight you have to lose to reverse your fatty liver and what the most effective diet might be for doing that. How Much Weight Loss Reverses Fatty Liver The first study Orlistat for overweight subjects with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: A randomized, prospective trial. was another drug company supported trial that hoped to prove that the drug, Orlistat, which blocks the digestion of fat would reverse steatohepatitis, which is the term for the inflammatory liver condition that develops in some p Continue reading >>

Fatty Liver Disease

Fatty Liver Disease

The normal treatment for , whether it's alcohol-related or not, is to work toward a healthy weight through diet and exercise. What should have a place on your plate? Generally speaking, foods that fight cell damage, make it easier for your body to use insulin, or lower inflammation can help reverse the condition. Since every person is different, you should work with your doctor to come up with an eating plan that's right for you. A Mediterranean Diet Although it wasn't originally meant for people with fatty liver disease, this style of eating combines the kinds of foods that help reduce fat in your liver: healthy fats, antioxidants, and complex carbohydrates. Things you're likely to see on the table that you should reach for include: Fruits Grains Nuts Olive oil Vegetables The Right Fats Your cells use glucose, a kind of sugar, for energy. The hormone insulin helps get the glucose from your digested food into your cells. People with fatty liver disease are often insulin resistant. Their bodies make insulin, but it doesn't work well. Glucose builds up in the blood, and the liver turns that extra sugar into fat. Certain fats in your diet can improve your sensitivity to, or ability to use, insulin. Your cells can take in glucose, so your liver doesn't need to make and store fat. Omega-3 fatty acids are found in fish, fish oil, vegetable oils, nuts (especially walnuts), flaxseeds and flaxseed oil, and leafy veggies. Monounsaturated fats are plentiful in plant sources, like olives, nuts, and avocados. Steer clear of saturated fats, though. Eat less meat and dairy products. Avoid baked goods and fried foods made with palm or coconut oils. These lead to more fatty deposits in your liver. Antioxidants Another reason fat builds up is that liver cells can be damaged when nutrient Continue reading >>

Spectrum Of Liver Disease In Type 2 Diabetes And Management Of Patients With Diabetes And Liver Disease

Spectrum Of Liver Disease In Type 2 Diabetes And Management Of Patients With Diabetes And Liver Disease

It is estimated that 20.8 million people, i.e., 7.0% of the U.S. population, have diabetes (1). Type 2 diabetes, with its core defects of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency, accounts for 90–95% of those with the disease. Another 5.2 million people are estimated to have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. It is the sixth leading cause of death (1) in the U.S. and accounts for 17.2% of all deaths for those aged >25 years (2). Liver disease is an important cause of death in type 2 diabetes. In the population-based Verona Diabetes Study (3), cirrhosis was the fourth leading cause of death and accounted for 4.4% of diabetes-related deaths. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR), i.e., the relative rate of an event compared with the background rate, for cirrhosis was 2.52 compared with 1.34 for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In another prospective cohort study (4), cirrhosis accounted for 12.5% of deaths in patients with diabetes. Diabetes, by most estimates, is now the most common cause of liver disease in the U.S. Cryptogenic cirrhosis, of which diabetes is, by far, the most common cause, has become the third leading indication for liver transplantation in the U.S. (5,6). Virtually the entire spectrum of liver disease is seen in patients with type 2 diabetes. This includes abnormal liver enzymes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and acute liver failure. In addition, there is an unexplained association of diabetes with hepatitis C. Finally, the prevalence of diabetes in cirrhosis is 12.3–57% (7). Thus, patients with diabetes have a high prevalence of liver disease and patients with liver disease have a high prevalence of diabetes. The management of diabetes in patients with liver disease is theoretically complicated b Continue reading >>

What Does Liver Disease Have To Do With Diabetes?

What Does Liver Disease Have To Do With Diabetes?

The American College of Gastroenterology released new guidelines on liver chemistry tests in December 2016. Changed level recommendations were included for ALT- alanine aminotransferase, AST- aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin levels. In the past, ALT levels were accepted at a range from 30-40 IU/L and up to 70-80 IU/L while being hospitalized (body under stress). The new acceptable levels are 19-25 IU/L for women and 29-33IU/L for men. The vast change in “normal levels” of liver enzymes were updated since “multiple studies have demonstrated that if you have ALT levels even innocuously elevated, your risk of liver related death is significantly higher” according to Paul Kwo, MD from Stanford University. Liver disease can stem from alcohol, viral hepatitis A, B or C, genetic disorders, liver injury, drugs, supplements, Lyme disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease – NAFLD. Liver disease can often tell us about your overall health and liver function tests should be part of the work up utilized by your MD. What does this all mean for people with type 2 diabetes? What Does the Liver Do? The liver turns food into nutrients and filters toxins from the blood. The toxins include alcohol, medications, supplements, pollutants and insecticides. When the fat content of the liver reaches 10%, due to weight gain especially around the middle section and in visceral organs (internal fat), the spongy texture of the liver becomes coarse and the function declines. Liver problems begin. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease – NAFLD Elevated ALT levels are common in people with pre-diabetes or diabetes and are often the first documented abnormal lab test, even prior to elevated fasting blood sugars or A1C values. NAFLD is common worldwide but muc Continue reading >>

Effect Of Aerobic Exercise And Diet On Liver Fat In Pre-diabetic Patients With Non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Effect Of Aerobic Exercise And Diet On Liver Fat In Pre-diabetic Patients With Non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial

The study aimed to assess whether aerobic exercise (AEx) training and a fibre-enriched diet can reduce hepatic fat content (HFC) and increase glycaemic control in pre-diabetic patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Six-hundred-and-three patients from seven clinics in Yangpu district, Shanghai, China were recruited. Of them 115 individuals aged 50–65-year fulfilled the inclusion criteria (NAFLD with impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance) and were randomly assigned into exercise (AEx n = 29), diet (Diet n = 28), exercise plus diet (AED n = 29), or no-intervention (NI n = 29) groups. Progressive supervised AEx training (60–75% VO2max intensity) was given 2-3 times/week in 30–60 min/sessions, and the diet intervention was provided as lunch with 38% carbohydrate and diet fibre of 12 g/day for 8.6-month. HFC was assessed by 1H MRS. We found that HFC was significantly reduced in the AEx (−24.4%), diet (−23.2%), and AED (−47.9%) groups by contrast to the 20.9% increase in the NI group (p = 0.001 for all) after intervention. However, only AED group significantly decreased HbA1c (−4.4%, p = 0.01) compared with the NI group (−0.6%). Aerobic exercise training combined with fibre-enriched diet can reduce HFC more effectively than either exercise or increased fibre-intake alone in pre-diabetic patients with NAFLD. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the developing world, and occurs in 17–30% of the population in Western countries and 2–4% worldwide1. In China the prevalence of NAFLD is 10–30% and up to 75% among obese and type 2 diabetes (T2D)2. At the same time, a recent large national survey estimated that 10% of Chinese adults may have diabetes and 50% may have predi Continue reading >>

Proper Diet Is Critical For Patients With Liver Disease

Proper Diet Is Critical For Patients With Liver Disease

Transcript Interviewer: You've been diagnosed with liver disease. How is that going to affect your diet? We'll talk about that next on The Scope. Announcer: Medical news and research from University of Utah physicians and specialists you can use for a happier and healthier life. You're listening to The Scope. Interviewer: After you've been diagnosed with liver disease, dietary changes can make a difference. We're going to find out what you should be eating and what you should be avoiding right now, with Doctor Juan Gallegos. He's a liver expert at the University of Utah hospital. Tell us about diet and the importance of diet with liver disease. Dr. Juan Gallegos: Thank you, Scot. It is very important because the liver receives most of the nutrition that you get through your mouth. It actually makes it into the blood from the small bowel and, then, that blood has to go and get through the liver. The liver cells, basically, detoxify your blood, and are very important in making proteins, making cholesterol, and it's basically like a chemical factory. Interviewer: So, very important diet. Dr. Juan Gallegos: Yes. Most of the time when I see patients in my clinic who have chronic liver disease, my main recommendation for them is, first, abstain from alcohol because we know alcohol has a direct toxic effect on the liver. So, if somebody already has liver disease, we strongly recommend that they abstain from alcohol so as not to damage the liver even further. In regards to any particular change in their diet, I do recommend that they try to eat healthy. Meaning, have adequate portions of fruits and vegetables, trying to limit their simple sugars, like a lot of flour, and bread, things of that nature. The other main thing, especially in patients that have very advanced liver dis Continue reading >>

Keto: The Best Fatty Liver Diet

Keto: The Best Fatty Liver Diet

Fatty liver disease is exactly what the name suggests – a disease characterized by the build up of fat in the liver. There are two main types of fatty liver disease: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease Alcoholic fatty liver disease (also called alcoholic steatohepatitis) Both types of fatty liver disease are diagnosed when fat makes up at least 10% of the liver, but the cause of the fat build up is different for each type. The cause of alcoholic fatty liver disease is obvious. The amount of alcohol it takes to cause fatty build up in the liver, however, is not so obvious. The Liver Foundation suggests consuming no more than 14 drinks a week for men and 7 drinks a week for women. Anything more than may cause fat to build up in the liver. The treatment for alcoholic fatty liver disease is simple enough — stop drinking alcohol. Studies confirm that cessation of alcohol consumption can reverse alcoholic fatty liver disease. However, the cause and treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease are not as obvious. This is because many different factors (other than alcohol) can cause fat to build up in the liver. The Truth About Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease affects 20-30% of adult populations in developed countries, but the mechanisms underlying its cause are incompletely understood. We can, however, take some clues from other common diseases to figure out why this happens. In epidemiological studies including people with type 2 diabetes, 62 to 69% of them also had nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Another study found that 50% of patients with dyslipidemia (abnormally elevated cholesterol levels) had nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Obesity, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease are also closely linked with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease Continue reading >>

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