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Diabetes And Kidney Disease Diet

Renal Diabetic Diet Grocery List

Renal Diabetic Diet Grocery List

When you're dealing with diabetes and kidney disease, what you eat matters. The foods you include in your diet not only affect your blood sugar but also the amount of waste products and fluid your kidneys need to process and eliminate. If you're armed when you go to the grocery store with a ready list of foods you can eat, you're already well on your way to better managing your renal diabetic diet. Consult your doctor or dietitian to help you determine your individual nutritional needs and diet plan. Video of the Day Fruits and veggies are a source of potassium. When you have kidney disease, your body has a tough time getting rid of potassium, which can cause levels to build up in your blood, leading to an abnormal heart rate or even death. Loading your cart with mostly low-potassium fruits and veggies is a good start, but you also need to limit the amount you eat each day to keep potassium levels under control. Low-potassium fruits and veggies to add to your grocery list include apples, blueberries, peaches, pears, green beans, carrots, cabbage, eggplant, peppers and zucchini. When buying canned or frozen fruits and veggies, look for varieties without added salt or sugar. Better Off With Refined Grains and Starches While whole grains are most often recommended to people with diabetes to help with blood sugar control, whole grains are a source of potassium and phosphorus and may not be a healthy choice when you have kidney disease too. You need to be careful about getting too much phosphorus in your diet. High levels of phosphorus in your blood can lead to weak bones. To keep a lid on potassium and phosphorus intake, add foods such as white bread products, unsweetened refined cereals, flour tortillas, unsalted crackers, pasta or white rice to your grocery list. Meat, po Continue reading >>

A Kidney-friendly Eating Plan

A Kidney-friendly Eating Plan

Heres a sample day of a kidney-friendly eating plan. 1/2 cup low-calorie cranberry-apple juice 1/4 cup egg substitute scrambled with 1Tbsp. each chopped onions and green peppers, cooked with 2tsp. soft tub margarine in a nonstick pan 1 1- to 2.5-inch plain mini bagel with 2tsp. soft tub margarine and 1tsp. sugar-free strawberry spread 1/2 cup brewed decaf coffee with 1Tbsp. nondairy creamer and sugar substitute 3 oz. grilled chicken breast on a kaiser roll with a large lettuce leaf and 2tsp. mayonnaise 1 cup fresh-brewed iced tea with fresh lemon and sugar substitute 4 oz. baked or broiled fish such as flounder with fresh lemon and dill 1/2 cup sliced carrots cooked in 2 tsp. soft tub margarine 1 salad with 1/4cup Bibb lettuce, 3small radishes, and 2Tbsp. chopped cucumber with 2tsp. extra-virgin olive oil and 1/2tsp. balsamic vinegar 1 small slice angel food cake with 1/4cup sliced fresh strawberries and 2Tbsp. nondairy whipped topping 3 graham cracker squares with 2tsp. cream cheese Nutrition Facts for the Days Menu: Fat exchanges 11, Starch exchanges 6, Lean meat exchanges 8, Fruit exchanges 3.5, Carbohydrate exchanges 3, Vegetable exchanges 3, Calories 1,820, Calories from Fat 640, Total Fat 71g (Saturated Fat 14.7g, Trans Fat 1.8g), Cholesterol 185mg, Sodium 1,650mg, Potassium 2,180mg, Total Carbohydrate 218g (Dietary Fiber 15g, Sugars 72g), Protein 82g, Phosphorus 1,030mg, Calcium 400mg Created by Sharon Schatz, MS, RD, CSR, CDE, a certified diabetes educator and expert in renal nutrition who works at a dialysis center in Lumberton, N.J. Continue reading >>

Nutrition For Advanced Kidney Disease

Nutrition For Advanced Kidney Disease

Knowing what to eat when you have kidney disease can be confusing. You may read recommendations for a “renal diet” but there is no one renal diet appropriate for everyone with kidney disease. Kidney disease progresses at different rates for different people and the need for dietary restrictions may arise at different times during this disease process. To find out the appropriate renal diet for you, speak with your nephrologist and then see a renal dietitian for advice on how to alter your eating habits to fit these restrictions. Your kidneys have many important jobs in the body: Regulate the amount of water in the body Remove waste products Produce hormones for a variety of purposes, including making red blood cells and regulating blood pressure Maintain the body’s balance of different minerals and chemicals Make Vitamin D active to keep your bones strong When kidney function is reduced, many important activities of the body are affected and imbalances can occur. Thus, when you have advanced kidney disease, you may have to watch your consumption of various nutrients. The restrictions you need to follow depend on the imbalances which you have. Possible restrictions include: Potassium If your kidneys can no longer filter out excess potassium and/or if the medications you take contribute to retention of potassium, you will need to limit potassium intake from foods. Phosphorus If your kidneys are no longer able to maintain a good balance of phosphorus and calcium in the blood, you may need to limit phosphorus intake from foods. Protein If your kidneys no longer filter out all waste products from protein metabolism, then you need to limit protein to prevent the build-up of protein wastes. However, restricting protein too much can cause breakdown of muscle mass. A renal Continue reading >>

Kidney Disease Diet Tips For People With Diabetes

Kidney Disease Diet Tips For People With Diabetes

Individualized nutrition plans are an important component of the treatment and management of kidney disease. Depending on your kidney function and treatment plan you may need to adhere to certain dietary restrictions. When your kidneys are not working at full capacity they have a hard time getting rid of extra nutrients, toxins, and fluids that build up in your blood. During this time it is extremely important to follow a good eating plan. Most of the time people who have an advanced stage of kidney disease are referred to a renal dietitian - a dietitian that specializes in kidney disease. A proper kidney disease diet takes into account your specific treatment goals and health status. If you have type 2 diabetes and kidney disease it can become difficult to balance good nutrition when dealing with dietary restrictions, but it is not impossible. There are certain key nutrients that must be taken into consideration: Sodium Although sodium is necessary for your body to function properly, it can build up when kidneys start to fail. Excess sodium in the body can cause fluid to accumulate in the tissues. This is called edema. Edema usually occurs in the face, hands, and lower extremities. A low-sodium diet is usually the first line of defense when kidney function starts to decrease. Most organizations recommend limiting sodium to 1,500-2,300mg/daily. The best way to reduce sodium in the diet is to cut back on processed foods. Learning how to read labels will help you to cut back on your sodium too. Limit high sodium foods such as bacon and ham; cold cuts; bottled sauces (soy, barbecue sauce); bouillon cubes; canned, dehydrated or instant soup; canned vegetables; cheese; crackers; salted nuts; olives; pickles; potato chips; processed convenience foods; sauerkraut; and (of cour Continue reading >>

5 Foods Which Most Chronic Kidney Disease And Diabetics Are Eating But Should Completely Avoid

5 Foods Which Most Chronic Kidney Disease And Diabetics Are Eating But Should Completely Avoid

The basic idea of the Renal or Diabetic diet for Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic patients is to, " keep the levels of electrolytes, minerals, and fluid in your body balanced," according to Medline Plus. Most of the time the Renal and Diabetic diets are rather straight-forward, right? Lists and charts of foods to avoid are handed out at Doctors' offices, Dialysis Centers, and are easily accessible online. Yet what happens when your diet restrictions are not as clear, and harmful foods which you thought were manageable, sneak into your diet? Recommended Reading: High Levels Of Sodium And Saturated Fat May Be Hidden In Recipes Frequently Used By CKD Patients You should keep in mind that nutrition needs vary from person to person depending on body size, activity, the stage of Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetes and other health concerns. However, the following are often restricted foods that creep into Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic patients' Renal and Diabetic diets. Recommended Reading: The Big "Fat" Surprise About Saturated Fat And Its Real Effects On CKD, Diabetics And Others At Risk 1.) Processed Deli Meat: You are hungry and you grab what you consider to be a healthy dish - a bologna sandwich or a chicken salad using cold cuts. Did you make the best lunch choice for your Renal or Diabetic diet? You may be surprised to learn that you in fact did not. Processed meats can be a significant source of sodium, nitrate and phosphorus, all of which are bad for Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic patients. Instead choose leaner fresh meats such as roasted chicken or lean pork chops which are lower in harmful minerals as well as a better source of protein. Recommended Reading: Unprecedented Food And Drug Administration Ban Set To Hit The Chronic Kidney Disease Community 2. Continue reading >>

Sample Renal Meal Plan

Sample Renal Meal Plan

For people with diabetes who have kidney disease, it is essential to follow a diet that takes your individual health needs into account. Depending on those needs, a meal plan for one day may resemble the following one. Estimated totals: 1600 calories, 60 grams protein, 1500 mg sodium, 2300 mg potassium, 800 mg phosphorus. BREAKFAST 4 ounces unsweetened grape juice 1 cup Rice Krispies cereal 4 ounces liquid nondairy creamer 1/2 English muffin 1 teaspoon low-sodium margarine 1 tablespoon fruit jam LUNCH 2 slices low-calorie white bread 2 ounces sliced fresh roasted turkey Lettuce and onion for sandwich (one slice each) 1 teaspoon light mayonnaise 1 medium apple (three-inch diameter) 1 cup raw baby carrots 4 vanilla wafers 12 ounces Diet Sprite DINNER 3 ounces baked pork tenderloin (seasoned with rosemary, garlic powder, and black pepper) 1/3 cup white rice topped with one sliced scallion 1 cup steamed fresh green beans 12 seedless grapes 1 small white roll 2 teaspoons low-sodium margarine Water BEDTIME SNACK 1 small slice plain sponge cake 1/2 cup unsweetened canned peaches 2 tablespoons light nondairy whipped topping Water Continue reading >>

Kidney Disease

Kidney Disease

Kidney disease – known as nephropathy – is a serious complication associated with long-term diabetes. Over the years, high blood glucose (sugar) levels and high blood pressure can damage the kidneys and prevent them from functioning properly or even cause them to fail completely. Diseases of the kidney are common in people with diabetes. In fact, up to 50% of people with diabetes demonstrate signs of kidney damage in their lifetime, but good diabetes management and regular screening can prevent or delay the loss of kidney function. What do the kidneys do? The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs located just below the ribs, near the back. They filter the blood, removing waste through the urine. The kidneys also regulate the amount of fluid and salts in the body and are important in controlling blood pressure. How does diabetes affect the kidneys? Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney disease in Canada. Over the long term, high blood glucose (sugar) levels damage tiny blood vessels in the kidneys, impairing their ability to filter the blood properly. As a result, a type of protein called "albumin" spills into the urine instead of being processed into the blood stream. Tiny amounts of protein in the urine is called microalbuminuria; as kidney disease progresses, more protein is found in the urine, a condition called proteinuria. Without treatment, the kidneys will eventually fail (this is known as "end-stage renal failure") and dialysis or a kidney transplant will be required. Diabetes can also affect kidneys by damaging the nerves that tell you when your bladder is full. The pressure from a full bladder can damage the kidneys. As well, if urine remains in the bladder for a long time, it can increase your risk of developing a urinary tract infection, which can spread Continue reading >>

Dietary Restriction And Exercise For Diabetic Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review

Dietary Restriction And Exercise For Diabetic Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review

Abstract Obesity and sedentary lifestyle are major health problems and key features to develop cardiovascular disease. Data on the effects of lifestyle interventions in diabetics with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have been conflicting. We retained 11 studies. There are insufficient data to evaluate the effect on mortality to promote negative energy balance. None of the studies reported a difference in incidence of Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events. Reduction of energy intake does not alter creatinine clearance but significantly reduces proteinuria (mean difference from −0.66 to −1.77 g/24 h). Interventions with combined exercise and diet resulted in a slower decline of eGFR (−9.2 vs. −20.7 mL/min over two year observation; p<0.001). Aerobic and resistance exercise reduced HbA1c (−0.51 (−0.87 to −0.14); p = 0.007 and −0.38 (−0.72 to −0.22); p = 0.038, respectively). Exercise interventions improve the overall functional status and quality of life in this subgroup. Aerobic exercise reduces BMI (−0.74% (−1.29 to −0.18); p = 0.009) and body weight (−2.2 kg (−3.9 to −0.6); p = 0.008). Resistance exercise reduces trunk fat mass (−0,7±0,1 vs. +0,8 kg ±0,1 kg; p = 0,001−0,005). In none of the studies did the intervention cause an increase in adverse events. There is insufficient evidence to evaluate the effect of negative energy balance interventions on mortality in diabetic patients with advanced CKD. Overall, these interventions have beneficial effects on glycaemic control, BMI and body composition, functional status and quality of life, and no harmful effects were observed. Citation: Van Huffel L, Tomson CRV, Ruige J, Nistor I, Van Biesen W, Bolignano D (2014) Dietary Restriction and Exercise for Diabetic Patients with Chronic Kidney Di Continue reading >>

Which Diet For Diabetic Patients With Chronic Renal Failure?

Which Diet For Diabetic Patients With Chronic Renal Failure?

Which diet for diabetic patients with chronic renal failure? Henri Gin, Service Nutrition et Diabtologie, Hpital du Haut-Lvque, F-33064 Pessac, France. Search for other works by this author on: Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, Volume 14, Issue 11, 1 November 1999, Pages 25772579, Henri Gin, Vincent Rigalleau, Michel Aparicio; Which diet for diabetic patients with chronic renal failure?, Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, Volume 14, Issue 11, 1 November 1999, Pages 25772579, Moderate or severe protein restriction may be proposed in chronic renal failure both to fight its symptoms and to slow its progression [ 1 , 2 ]. Diabetic patients, whether insulin-dependent or non-insulin-dependent, have a chronic disease that has generally existed for a number of years before the occurrence of renal failure. Dietary protein restriction is effective in the progression of diabetic nephropathy [ 3 5 ] but several such patients have already been observing dietary recommendations, usually involving carbohydrates and fats for some time and are sometimes unwilling to give up eating habits acquired over a long period. Furthermore, when renal failure develops, the patient may get the impression that the different specialists managing his health have contradictory objectives and give opposing nutritional advice. It is important for the patient not to imagine that the diabetologist and the nephrologist are giving conflicting dietary directives when, in fact, most of the time their objectives converge. Nutritional rules for patients with uncomplicated insulin-dependent diabetes Insulin-dependent diabetes is characterized by a loss of endocrine pancreas function; there is no interference with the peripheral action of insulin. In other words, there is no more, or practically no more produ Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Renal Failure: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes And Renal Failure: Everything You Need To Know

Unfortunately, renal failure or nephropathy (commonly referred to as kidney failure) and unmanaged diabetes go hand in hand. In addition, 50 percent of people with diabetes will experience some form of kidney damage in their lifetime, even if they never experience kidney failure or end up on dialysis. In this article, we will look at how renal failure and insufficiency can have an impact on people with diabetes, and how people with diabetes can avoid renal failure and dialysis. We will look at risk factors, causes, and symptoms, as we explore the relationship between renal failure, diabetes, and high blood glucose. We will also look at what happens to a person with diabetes when their kidneys fail. We will discuss dialysis and kidney transplantation. First, let’s see what Lydia had to say when she contacted TheDiabetesCouncil. Lydia’s story Lydia had received a laboratory result from her doctor that was very alarming to her. She had an excess amount of protein in her urine, usually an early sign of kidney damage. He informed Lydia that her kidneys were being affected by her diabetes, and she needed to work on self-managing her diabetes. He ordered some more tests to further look at her kidneys. Was Lydia headed to the kidney dialysis center? Her friend Tracey, whom she’d met in a diabetes support group had been the first person she knew who was on dialysis. Tracey seemed to have a very difficult life in and out of the dialysis center. Lydia was afraid to end up like Tracey. Lydia knew that she hadn’t been efficiently self-managing her diabetes. Her A1C had been greater than 8 percent a few times over the last few years. While most of the time she kept it around 7.5 percent, she was aware that her doctor wanted her to get it below 7 percent, and keep it there in Continue reading >>

Diet And Diabetic Kidney Disease: Plant Versus Animal Protein

Diet And Diabetic Kidney Disease: Plant Versus Animal Protein

Diet and Diabetic Kidney Disease: Plant Versus Animal Protein Microvascular ComplicationsNephropathy (M Afkarian, Section Editor) The goal of this review is to present an overview of the evidence on the effectiveness of plant-based diets in delaying progression of diabetic kidney disease (DKD). The ideal quantity of dietary protein has been a controversial topic for patients with DKD. Smaller studies have focused on protein source, plant versus animal, for preventing progression. Limited evidence suggests that dietary patterns that focus on plant-based foods, those that are lower in processed foods, or those that are lower in advanced glycation end products (AGE) may be useful in prevention of DKD progression. Increasing plant-based foods, incorporating diet patterns that limit processed foods, or potentially lowering AGE contents in diets may be beneficial for dietary management of DKD. However, dietary studies specifically targeted at DKD treatment are sparse. Further, large trials powered to assess outcomes including changes in kidney function, end-stage kidney disease, and mortality are needed to provide more substantial evidence for these diets. NephropathyProteinAdvanced glycation end productsDietary patterns This article is part of the Topical Collection on Microvascular ComplicationsNephropathy An erratum to this article is available at . This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access Dr. Moorthi reports grants from NIH NIDDK K23 DK102824-01A1. Dr. Hill Gallant reports grants from NIH NIDDK K01 DK102864. Ranjani N. Moorthi, Colby J. Vorland, and Kathleen M. Hill Gallant declare that they have no conflict of interest. Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed Continue reading >>

Kidney-friendly Diet For Ckd

Kidney-friendly Diet For Ckd

You need to have a kidney-friendly meal plan when you have chronic kidney disease (CKD). Watching what you eat and drink will help you stay healthier. The information in this section is for people who have kidney disease but are not on dialysis. This information should be used as a basic guide. Everybody is different and everybody has different nutrition needs. Talk to a renal dietitian (someone who is an expert in diet and nutrition for people with kidney disease) to find a meal plan that works for you. Ask your doctor to help you find a dietitian. Medicare and many private insurance policies will help pay for appointments with dietitians. Check with your insurance company to see if your policy covers medical nutrition therapy (MNT). Why is an eating plan important? What you eat and drink affects your health. Staying at a healthy weight and eating a balanced diet that is low in salt and fat can help you control your blood pressure. If you have diabetes, you can help control your blood sugar by carefully choosing what you eat and drink. Controlling high blood pressure and diabetes may help prevent kidney disease from getting worse. A kidney-friendly diet may also help protect your kidneys from further damage. A kidney-friendly diet limits certain foods to prevent the minerals in those foods from building up in your body. Healthy diet basics With all meal plans, including the kidney-friendly diet, you need to track how much of certain nutrients you take in, such as: Calories Protein Fat Carbohydrates To make sure you are getting the right amounts of these nutrients, you need to eat and drink the right portion sizes. All of the information you need to keep track of your intake is on the “Nutrition Facts” label. Use the nutrition facts section on food labels to learn m Continue reading >>

Meat-heavy, High-acid Diet Poses Risk For Those With Kidney Disease: Study Webmd

Meat-heavy, High-acid Diet Poses Risk For Those With Kidney Disease: Study Webmd

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients struggling with chronic kidney disease who routinely consume meat-rich, highly acidic diets may boost their risk for kidney failure, a new study suggests. According to the U.S. National Institutes of Health, kidney dysfunction can hamper the organ's elimination of acid from the body, causing a high-acid condition known as metabolic acidosis . Experts have long suspected that a highly acidic diet -- one higher in meat, low in fruits and vegetables -- might aggravate this state. The theory has been supported by "randomized studies in which alkali supplementation slowed the loss of kidney function in patients with chronic kidney disease," explained Dr. Jaime Uribarri, a professor of nephrology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. Uribarri was not involved in the new study, which was led by Tanushree Banerjee of the University of California, San Francisco. Banerjee's team conducted a nutritional analysis of nearly 1,500 kidney disease patients over a roughly 14-year period. All were participants enrolled in a large U.S. government health study. The researchers tracked each patient's intake of high-acid foods such as meat, as opposed to their intake of low-acid foods such as fruits and vegetables . The result: those who consumed high-acid diets appeared to face triple the risk of kidney failure compared with those who consumed low-acid diets. The finding, reported Feb. 12 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, builds on prior research that has indicated that diet can have a substantial impact on kidney function, the authors said. "Patients with chronic kidney disease may want to pay more attention to diet consumption of acid-rich foods to reduce progression to kidney failure, in a Continue reading >>

Diet And Kidney Health: Protein Vs. Sugar

Diet And Kidney Health: Protein Vs. Sugar

When it comes to chronic diseases, the big names are cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Chronic kidney disease doesn’t really get much press – which is weird, because about 10% of the population has it. Kidney disease is painful and exhausting to live with, and most people eventually need dialysis or a kidney transplant to survive. Like most chronic diseases, kidney disease is affected by diet. There’s an old warning, born in the 1980s, that eating protein damages the kidneys, but the evidence actually proves otherwise: healthy people don’t need to worry about protein hurting their kidneys. Sugar, on the other hand, is really not your kidneys’ best friend. Meet your Kidneys The kidneys don’t have a particularly glamorous job. They filter out waste from your blood and direct it into your urine to get it out of your body. If this job didn’t get done, you wouldn’t be able to regulate the balance of salt and other electrolytes in your body, keep your blood at the right pH, or maintain a normal blood pressure. It’s pretty important stuff, even if it’s not something most people spend a lot of time thinking about it. The kidney is kind of like the highway repair crew of your body. If it’s working right, you barely notice it and everything just hums along smoothly and feels automatic. But if it’s not working right, you’re in trouble. So how does diet play into that? Protein and the Kidneys Before handling anything else, let’s tackle the old myth that protein is bad for your kidneys. The idea that protein causes kidney damage sounds logical on the surface. When you break down protein, your body produces certain waste products in the process. If those waste products stay in the blood, they’re very dangerous, so the kidneys filter them out in Continue reading >>

Kidney Diseases | Food And Nutrition Information Center | Nal | Usda

Kidney Diseases | Food And Nutrition Information Center | Nal | Usda

DHHS. NIH. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. ASPEN . Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease HHS . NIH . NIDDK . National Kidney Disease Education Program View or order up to 10 copies of fact sheets specifically for educating patients with CKD . Topics include: Eating Right for Kidney Health - English | Spanish How to Read a Food Label - English | Spanish HHS . NIH . NIDDK . National Kidney Disease Education Pr Find resources for using MNT to help patients with CKD maintain good nutritional status, slow progression, and treat complications. Resources include: CKD Nutrition Management Training Program - Prepare for counseling patients who have CKD with a series of five training modules that use engaging activities and case studies. CKD and Diet: Assessment, Management, and Treatment (PDF|1.30 MB) - Find information intended to help RDs provide effective MNT to CKD patients who are not on dialysis. Continue reading >>

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