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Diabetes And Kidney Disease Diet

Eating Right For Chronic Kidney Disease

Eating Right For Chronic Kidney Disease

You may need to change what you eat to manage your chronic kidney disease (CKD). Work with a registered dietitian to develop a meal plan that includes foods that you enjoy eating while maintaining your kidney health. The steps below will help you eat right as you manage your kidney disease. The first three steps (1-3) are important for all people with kidney disease. The last two steps (4-5) may become important as your kidney function goes down. The first steps to eating right Step 1: Choose and prepare foods with less salt and sodium Why? To help control your blood pressure. Your diet should contain less than 2,300 milligrams of sodium each day. Buy fresh food often. Sodium (a part of salt) is added to many prepared or packaged foods you buy at the supermarket or at restaurants. Cook foods from scratch instead of eating prepared foods, “fast” foods, frozen dinners, and canned foods that are higher in sodium. When you prepare your own food, you control what goes into it. Use spices, herbs, and sodium-free seasonings in place of salt. Check for sodium on the Nutrition Facts label of food packages. A Daily Value of 20 percent or more means the food is high in sodium. Try lower-sodium versions of frozen dinners and other convenience foods. Rinse canned vegetables, beans, meats, and fish with water before eating. Look for food labels with words like sodium free or salt free; or low, reduced, or no salt or sodium; or unsalted or lightly salted. Step 2: Eat the right amount and the right types of protein Why? To help protect your kidneys. When your body uses protein, it produces waste. Your kidneys remove this waste. Eating more protein than you need may make your kidneys work harder. Eat small portions of protein foods. Protein is found in foods from plants and animals. Continue reading >>

Kidney Disease

Kidney Disease

Kidney disease – known as nephropathy – is a serious complication associated with long-term diabetes. Over the years, high blood glucose (sugar) levels and high blood pressure can damage the kidneys and prevent them from functioning properly or even cause them to fail completely. Diseases of the kidney are common in people with diabetes. In fact, up to 50% of people with diabetes demonstrate signs of kidney damage in their lifetime, but good diabetes management and regular screening can prevent or delay the loss of kidney function. What do the kidneys do? The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs located just below the ribs, near the back. They filter the blood, removing waste through the urine. The kidneys also regulate the amount of fluid and salts in the body and are important in controlling blood pressure. How does diabetes affect the kidneys? Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney disease in Canada. Over the long term, high blood glucose (sugar) levels damage tiny blood vessels in the kidneys, impairing their ability to filter the blood properly. As a result, a type of protein called "albumin" spills into the urine instead of being processed into the blood stream. Tiny amounts of protein in the urine is called microalbuminuria; as kidney disease progresses, more protein is found in the urine, a condition called proteinuria. Without treatment, the kidneys will eventually fail (this is known as "end-stage renal failure") and dialysis or a kidney transplant will be required. Diabetes can also affect kidneys by damaging the nerves that tell you when your bladder is full. The pressure from a full bladder can damage the kidneys. As well, if urine remains in the bladder for a long time, it can increase your risk of developing a urinary tract infection, which can spread Continue reading >>

Diet And Kidney Disease In High-risk Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Diet And Kidney Disease In High-risk Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Flowchart of Number of Participants and Outcomes at 5.5 Years of Follow-up GFR indicates glomerular filtration rate; ONTARGET, Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination With Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial; and UACR, urinary albumin-creatinine ratio. Single-Variable Multinomial Logit Models Adjusted With Known Confounders Confounders (at study entry) are age, duration of type 2 diabetes mellitus, albuminuria status, glomerular filtration rate, sex, Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination With Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial randomization arms, and urinary-albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR) to progression, which was defined as the difference between the participant-specific cutoff point of developing new microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria and UACR at baseline on the log scale. Association of modified Alternate Healthy Eating Index (mAHEI) and 24-hour urinary sodium and relative odds (solid line) with 95% CI (shaded area) with chronic kidney disease (CKD) (A) or death (B) and respective histograms. The horizontal line on the top shows tertiles, and the numbers within each tertile give the percentage of participants experiencing the respective event. Forest Plot for Single-Variable Multinomial Logit Models Adjusted With Known Confounders For confounders, see the legend to Figure 2 . If not stated otherwise, food items are given in servings per week. Renal Outcome column gives odds ratios (ORs) comparing participants alive with chronic kidney disease (CKD) with participants alive but without CKD; Death column reports ORs comparing participants who died during follow-up with participants alive without CKD. For continuous independent variables, the ORs for the median of the second tertile (50.0th percentile [solid circle]) and the median of the third tertile (83.3rd per Continue reading >>

Following A Diet For Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Following A Diet For Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Both of these illnesses can be difficult to manage alone, but can create even more stress when you have to manage both. Many Americans suffer from both conditions though and according to the End-Stage Renal Disease Incident and Prevalent Quarterly Update, approximately 37% of patients with ESRD have diabetes. (1) Diet becomes even more important for patients with both conditions. You will need to pay more attention to the amount of carbohydrates (sugars) that you eat. Carbohydrates can be found in many foods such as fruits, milk, breads, deserts and many drinks. Sodium remains important for both CKD and diabetic patients. Keeping your diet lower in sodium helps to lower blood pressure and reduce fluid retention. Protein is another nutrient that has enhanced importance and too much protein can be harmful for diabetic patients. It is important to talk to your dietician and nephrologist to determine the levels appropriate for your care. Another major change from only a kidney friendly diet is emphasis on eating on a routine and balancing out your meals and snacks. Peritoneal dialysis patients that also are diabetic need to be extra careful with their sugar levels, because dialysate solutions used to clean the body are normally sugar based solutions. Your care team will help determine what solution is best for you and help you adjust your diet to account for the extra sugar in the dialysate. Your care team should be aware of your status as a diabetes patient, however be proactive and make sure your dialysis care team is aware of your condition. The Following are examples of foods and drinks that are can be exchanged and are good for both diets: Fruits Good alternatives: Berries, grapes, cherries, apples, plums Avoid: Cantaloupe, mangos, kiwi, oranges, pomegranate Vegetables Continue reading >>

Nutrition For Advanced Kidney Disease

Nutrition For Advanced Kidney Disease

Knowing what to eat when you have kidney disease can be confusing. You may read recommendations for a “renal diet” but there is no one renal diet appropriate for everyone with kidney disease. Kidney disease progresses at different rates for different people and the need for dietary restrictions may arise at different times during this disease process. To find out the appropriate renal diet for you, speak with your nephrologist and then see a renal dietitian for advice on how to alter your eating habits to fit these restrictions. Your kidneys have many important jobs in the body: Regulate the amount of water in the body Remove waste products Produce hormones for a variety of purposes, including making red blood cells and regulating blood pressure Maintain the body’s balance of different minerals and chemicals Make Vitamin D active to keep your bones strong When kidney function is reduced, many important activities of the body are affected and imbalances can occur. Thus, when you have advanced kidney disease, you may have to watch your consumption of various nutrients. The restrictions you need to follow depend on the imbalances which you have. Possible restrictions include: Potassium If your kidneys can no longer filter out excess potassium and/or if the medications you take contribute to retention of potassium, you will need to limit potassium intake from foods. Phosphorus If your kidneys are no longer able to maintain a good balance of phosphorus and calcium in the blood, you may need to limit phosphorus intake from foods. Protein If your kidneys no longer filter out all waste products from protein metabolism, then you need to limit protein to prevent the build-up of protein wastes. However, restricting protein too much can cause breakdown of muscle mass. A renal Continue reading >>

Kidney Disease Of Diabetes

Kidney Disease Of Diabetes

Kidney Disease of Diabetes Facts* *Kidney Disease of Diabetes Facts Medically Edited by: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis, Treatment, Medication Medical Author: Melissa Conrad Stoppler, MD Medical Editor: Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) Proper nutrition is essential for anyone living with diabetes. Control of blood glucose levels is only one goal of a healthy eating plan for people with diabetes. A diet for those with diabetes should also help achieve and maintain a normal body weight as well as prevent heart and vascular disease, which are frequent complications of diabetes. There is no prescribed diet plan for those with diabetes. Rather, eating plans are tailored to fit an individual's needs, schedules, and eating habits. A diabetes diet plan must also be balanced with the intake of insulin and oral diabetes medications. In general, the principles of a healthy diabetes diet are the same for everyone. Consumption of a variety of foods including whole grains, fruits, non-fat dairy products, beans, and lean meats or vegetarian substitutes, poultry and fish is recommended to achieve a healthy diet. Each year in the United States, more than 100,000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure, a serious condition in which the kidneys fail to rid the body of wastes. Kidney failure is the final stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Diabetes is the most common cause of kidney failure, accounting for nearly 44 percent of new cases. Even when diabetes is controlled, the disease can lead to chronic kidney disease and kidney failure. Most people with diabetes do not develop chronic kidney disease that is severe enough to progress to kidney failure. Nearly 24 million people in the United States have diabetes, and nearly 200,000 people are living with kidney failure a Continue reading >>

What Diet Should A Diabetic Kidney Patient Follow?

What Diet Should A Diabetic Kidney Patient Follow?

Home Frequently asked Questions on Health What diet should a diabetic kidney patient follow? What diet should a diabetic kidney patient follow? Answered by: Ms Arunima Saha | Nutrition Counsellor, Q:I am a 62 years old diabetic male suffering from chronic kidney disease. My doctor has asked me not to take meat, eggs and all types of saags. Do I really need to cut all these foods from my diet? What kind of a diet should I follow? A:Poor glycaemic (sugar) control may contribute to risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), nephropathy (kidney disease), retinopathy. Improving the treatment of hyperglycaemia (high sugar), hypertension (high blood pressure), and hyperlipidaemia (high cholesterol/triglycerides) will help you control these complications.Symptoms of Chronic kidney disease (CKD) may tend to develop when it becomes more severe. The symptoms at first tend to be vague and nonspecific, such as feeling tired, having less energy than usual, and just not feeling well. Advancing further, the CKD may result in- You may have increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, such as heart disease, stroke. This is why reducing any other cardiovascular risk factors like high saturated fat intake (as in red meats) is so important. Medication to lower your cholesterol level may be needed.You must- Eat a healthy diet which includes a low salt intake. Also, in the patients having advanced CKD, it becomes difficult to remove the potassium from the body as kidney loses its functions. So, controlling potassium is very important. The following foods supply potassium to our bodies and therefore must be limited- milk, yogurt; fruits like avocado, kiwis, oranges, papayas, banana, cantaloupe; Legumes - nuts; vegetables like beans, potatoes, tomatoes, spinach and fellow leafy ve Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Renal Failure: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes And Renal Failure: Everything You Need To Know

Unfortunately, renal failure or nephropathy (commonly referred to as kidney failure) and unmanaged diabetes go hand in hand. In addition, 50 percent of people with diabetes will experience some form of kidney damage in their lifetime, even if they never experience kidney failure or end up on dialysis. In this article, we will look at how renal failure and insufficiency can have an impact on people with diabetes, and how people with diabetes can avoid renal failure and dialysis. We will look at risk factors, causes, and symptoms, as we explore the relationship between renal failure, diabetes, and high blood glucose. We will also look at what happens to a person with diabetes when their kidneys fail. We will discuss dialysis and kidney transplantation. First, let’s see what Lydia had to say when she contacted TheDiabetesCouncil. Lydia’s story Lydia had received a laboratory result from her doctor that was very alarming to her. She had an excess amount of protein in her urine, usually an early sign of kidney damage. He informed Lydia that her kidneys were being affected by her diabetes, and she needed to work on self-managing her diabetes. He ordered some more tests to further look at her kidneys. Was Lydia headed to the kidney dialysis center? Her friend Tracey, whom she’d met in a diabetes support group had been the first person she knew who was on dialysis. Tracey seemed to have a very difficult life in and out of the dialysis center. Lydia was afraid to end up like Tracey. Lydia knew that she hadn’t been efficiently self-managing her diabetes. Her A1C had been greater than 8 percent a few times over the last few years. While most of the time she kept it around 7.5 percent, she was aware that her doctor wanted her to get it below 7 percent, and keep it there in Continue reading >>

Diet And Diabetic Kidney Disease: Plant Versus Animal Protein

Diet And Diabetic Kidney Disease: Plant Versus Animal Protein

Diet and Diabetic Kidney Disease: Plant Versus Animal Protein Microvascular ComplicationsNephropathy (M Afkarian, Section Editor) The goal of this review is to present an overview of the evidence on the effectiveness of plant-based diets in delaying progression of diabetic kidney disease (DKD). The ideal quantity of dietary protein has been a controversial topic for patients with DKD. Smaller studies have focused on protein source, plant versus animal, for preventing progression. Limited evidence suggests that dietary patterns that focus on plant-based foods, those that are lower in processed foods, or those that are lower in advanced glycation end products (AGE) may be useful in prevention of DKD progression. Increasing plant-based foods, incorporating diet patterns that limit processed foods, or potentially lowering AGE contents in diets may be beneficial for dietary management of DKD. However, dietary studies specifically targeted at DKD treatment are sparse. Further, large trials powered to assess outcomes including changes in kidney function, end-stage kidney disease, and mortality are needed to provide more substantial evidence for these diets. NephropathyProteinAdvanced glycation end productsDietary patterns This article is part of the Topical Collection on Microvascular ComplicationsNephropathy An erratum to this article is available at . This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access Dr. Moorthi reports grants from NIH NIDDK K23 DK102824-01A1. Dr. Hill Gallant reports grants from NIH NIDDK K01 DK102864. Ranjani N. Moorthi, Colby J. Vorland, and Kathleen M. Hill Gallant declare that they have no conflict of interest. Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed Continue reading >>

Kidney-friendly Diet For Ckd

Kidney-friendly Diet For Ckd

You need to have a kidney-friendly meal plan when you have chronic kidney disease (CKD). Watching what you eat and drink will help you stay healthier. The information in this section is for people who have kidney disease but are not on dialysis. This information should be used as a basic guide. Everybody is different and everybody has different nutrition needs. Talk to a renal dietitian (someone who is an expert in diet and nutrition for people with kidney disease) to find a meal plan that works for you. Ask your doctor to help you find a dietitian. Medicare and many private insurance policies will help pay for appointments with dietitians. Check with your insurance company to see if your policy covers medical nutrition therapy (MNT). Why is an eating plan important? What you eat and drink affects your health. Staying at a healthy weight and eating a balanced diet that is low in salt and fat can help you control your blood pressure. If you have diabetes, you can help control your blood sugar by carefully choosing what you eat and drink. Controlling high blood pressure and diabetes may help prevent kidney disease from getting worse. A kidney-friendly diet may also help protect your kidneys from further damage. A kidney-friendly diet limits certain foods to prevent the minerals in those foods from building up in your body. Healthy diet basics With all meal plans, including the kidney-friendly diet, you need to track how much of certain nutrients you take in, such as: Calories Protein Fat Carbohydrates To make sure you are getting the right amounts of these nutrients, you need to eat and drink the right portion sizes. All of the information you need to keep track of your intake is on the “Nutrition Facts” label. Use the nutrition facts section on food labels to learn m Continue reading >>

The Correct Diet Can Help Avoid Kidney Disease

The Correct Diet Can Help Avoid Kidney Disease

The Correct Diet Can Help Avoid Kidney Disease Bad diet choices and habits like smoking and obesity are linked to an increased risk for kidney disease, suggests a new study published in the American Journal of Kidney Disease. A group of investigators, led by Alex Chang, MD, of Johns Hopkins University, discovered that people with regular kidneys whose diet quality was bad - high in processed and red meats, sodium, and sugar-sweetened beverages, and low in fruit, nuts, legumes, whole grains, and low-fat dairy - were more likely to develop kidney disease. Just one percent of people without unhealthy diet or lifestyle choices developed protein in their urine - an early sign of kidney damage. On the other hand, 13% of participants who had at least three unhealthy factors such as obesity , smoking, and poor diet developed protein in their urine. Obese people, i.e. those with a body mass index ( BMI ) of at least 30, were twice as likely to develop kidney disease, the authors reported. A poor diet independently influenced risk for chronic kidney disease after adjusting for weight and other influential factors. The investigators also pinpointed a link between those who currently smoke and the development of chronic kidney disease. Smokers were found to be 60% more likely to develop kidney disease. In the first study conducted on this topic, researchers analyzed kidney disease risk factors in healthy young people using longitudinal data ranging over 15 years, including information on more than 2,300 black and white adults aged between 28 and 40 years from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. "Unlike family history of kidney disease, diet, smoking, and obesity are modifiable lifestyle factors that we can all control. By eating well, quitting smok Continue reading >>

Dietary Restriction And Exercise For Diabetic Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review

Dietary Restriction And Exercise For Diabetic Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review

Abstract Obesity and sedentary lifestyle are major health problems and key features to develop cardiovascular disease. Data on the effects of lifestyle interventions in diabetics with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have been conflicting. We retained 11 studies. There are insufficient data to evaluate the effect on mortality to promote negative energy balance. None of the studies reported a difference in incidence of Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events. Reduction of energy intake does not alter creatinine clearance but significantly reduces proteinuria (mean difference from −0.66 to −1.77 g/24 h). Interventions with combined exercise and diet resulted in a slower decline of eGFR (−9.2 vs. −20.7 mL/min over two year observation; p<0.001). Aerobic and resistance exercise reduced HbA1c (−0.51 (−0.87 to −0.14); p = 0.007 and −0.38 (−0.72 to −0.22); p = 0.038, respectively). Exercise interventions improve the overall functional status and quality of life in this subgroup. Aerobic exercise reduces BMI (−0.74% (−1.29 to −0.18); p = 0.009) and body weight (−2.2 kg (−3.9 to −0.6); p = 0.008). Resistance exercise reduces trunk fat mass (−0,7±0,1 vs. +0,8 kg ±0,1 kg; p = 0,001−0,005). In none of the studies did the intervention cause an increase in adverse events. There is insufficient evidence to evaluate the effect of negative energy balance interventions on mortality in diabetic patients with advanced CKD. Overall, these interventions have beneficial effects on glycaemic control, BMI and body composition, functional status and quality of life, and no harmful effects were observed. Citation: Van Huffel L, Tomson CRV, Ruige J, Nistor I, Van Biesen W, Bolignano D (2014) Dietary Restriction and Exercise for Diabetic Patients with Chronic Kidney Di Continue reading >>

5 Foods Which Most Chronic Kidney Disease And Diabetics Are Eating But Should Completely Avoid

5 Foods Which Most Chronic Kidney Disease And Diabetics Are Eating But Should Completely Avoid

The basic idea of the Renal or Diabetic diet for Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic patients is to, " keep the levels of electrolytes, minerals, and fluid in your body balanced," according to Medline Plus. Most of the time the Renal and Diabetic diets are rather straight-forward, right? Lists and charts of foods to avoid are handed out at Doctors' offices, Dialysis Centers, and are easily accessible online. Yet what happens when your diet restrictions are not as clear, and harmful foods which you thought were manageable, sneak into your diet? Recommended Reading: High Levels Of Sodium And Saturated Fat May Be Hidden In Recipes Frequently Used By CKD Patients You should keep in mind that nutrition needs vary from person to person depending on body size, activity, the stage of Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetes and other health concerns. However, the following are often restricted foods that creep into Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic patients' Renal and Diabetic diets. Recommended Reading: The Big "Fat" Surprise About Saturated Fat And Its Real Effects On CKD, Diabetics And Others At Risk 1.) Processed Deli Meat: You are hungry and you grab what you consider to be a healthy dish - a bologna sandwich or a chicken salad using cold cuts. Did you make the best lunch choice for your Renal or Diabetic diet? You may be surprised to learn that you in fact did not. Processed meats can be a significant source of sodium, nitrate and phosphorus, all of which are bad for Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic patients. Instead choose leaner fresh meats such as roasted chicken or lean pork chops which are lower in harmful minerals as well as a better source of protein. Recommended Reading: Unprecedented Food And Drug Administration Ban Set To Hit The Chronic Kidney Disease Community 2. Continue reading >>

Kidney Disease Diet Tips For People With Diabetes

Kidney Disease Diet Tips For People With Diabetes

Individualized nutrition plans are an important component of the treatment and management of kidney disease. Depending on your kidney function and treatment plan you may need to adhere to certain dietary restrictions. When your kidneys are not working at full capacity they have a hard time getting rid of extra nutrients, toxins, and fluids that build up in your blood. During this time it is extremely important to follow a good eating plan. Most of the time people who have an advanced stage of kidney disease are referred to a renal dietitian - a dietitian that specializes in kidney disease. A proper kidney disease diet takes into account your specific treatment goals and health status. If you have type 2 diabetes and kidney disease it can become difficult to balance good nutrition when dealing with dietary restrictions, but it is not impossible. There are certain key nutrients that must be taken into consideration: Sodium Although sodium is necessary for your body to function properly, it can build up when kidneys start to fail. Excess sodium in the body can cause fluid to accumulate in the tissues. This is called edema. Edema usually occurs in the face, hands, and lower extremities. A low-sodium diet is usually the first line of defense when kidney function starts to decrease. Most organizations recommend limiting sodium to 1,500-2,300mg/daily. The best way to reduce sodium in the diet is to cut back on processed foods. Learning how to read labels will help you to cut back on your sodium too. Limit high sodium foods such as bacon and ham; cold cuts; bottled sauces (soy, barbecue sauce); bouillon cubes; canned, dehydrated or instant soup; canned vegetables; cheese; crackers; salted nuts; olives; pickles; potato chips; processed convenience foods; sauerkraut; and (of cour Continue reading >>

Kidney Disease Diet For Patients Not On Dialysis

Kidney Disease Diet For Patients Not On Dialysis

Kidney Disease Diet for Patients Not on Dialysis For patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) but who are not on dialysis, it is useful to know some basic information before learning about their dietary needs. For example, kidney function is sometimes expressed as the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Normal GFR is 90 to 130 milliliters (mL)/minute. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) is normally 5 to 25 mL/deciliter (dL). Urea is a product from the metabolism of protein. Normal kidneys maintain the BUN range of 5 to 25 mg/dL. When the kidneys begin to fail to eliminate urea in the urine, urea will build up in the blood, and BUN levels will increase. The 5 stages of kidney disease, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), are: Stage 1GFR is more than 90 mL/minute, with persistent protein in the urine Stage 2GFR is 6089 mL/minute, with persistent protein in the urine (mild disease) Stage 3GFR is 3059 mL/minute (moderate disease) Stage 5GFR is less than 15 or individual is on dialysis (kidney failure) Approximately 14% of people in the United States have some stage of kidney disease. Many of these people have diabetes or high blood pressure. At present, about 460,000 people are on dialysis (Stage 5) (NIH NIDDK). _____________________________________________________________________________ Continue reading >>

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