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Controlling Type 2 Diabetes With Diet And Exercise

Type 2 Diabetes And Diet: What You Should Know

Type 2 Diabetes And Diet: What You Should Know

Why does my diet matter? It’s no secret that diet is essential to managing type 2 diabetes. Although there isn’t a one-size-fits-all diet for diabetes management, certain dietary choices should act as the foundation for your individual diet plan. Your diet plan should work with your body — not against it — so it’s important that the food you eat won’t spike your blood sugar levels to high. According to the American Diabetes Association, the normal blood sugar range for people with diabetes is between 80 to 130 mg/dL before meals. It should be less than 180 mg/dL about two hours after you begin eating. Your doctor will provide you with personalized target blood sugar values. Keep reading to learn more about how what you eat can affect your blood sugar, as well as which foods you may want to pick up at the grocery store or toss out of your pantry. Check out: Type 1 diabetes diet » When someone with diabetes has low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), a spoonful of sugar or honey can help raise glucose levels. However, sugar is often considered the nemesis of diabetes because of how quickly it can spike blood glucose levels when eaten alone. If you have diabetes, you should closely monitor your consumption of foods with a high glycemic index (GI). The GI measures how quickly a particular food raises blood sugar. Those foods with a high GI can cause unwanted spikes. This is especially true of refined sugar and other forms of simple carbohydrates like white rice, bread, and pasta. Make sure that most of your carb choices are whole-grain, high-fiber options. For example, if you’d like to have a piece of chocolate cake with frosting, eat it immediately after eating a balanced meal with lean protein, healthy fats, vegetables, and high-fiber carb options such as beans. Ea Continue reading >>

Controlling Type 2 Diabetes Through Diet And Exercise

Controlling Type 2 Diabetes Through Diet And Exercise

Heart Disease is still the No. 1 cause of death in the United States, but diabetes or dangerously high blood sugar levels, the No. 6 killer, is becoming more of a national concern. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) reported that 21 million people, about 7 percent of the population, have diabetes. More than 90 percent have type 2, a combination of relative insulin deficiency and insulin resistance, a condition where the body fails to properly use insulin, according to the ADA. Insulin, a hormone produced in the pancreas, is essential for converting sugar, starches, and other food into energy that the body draws upon for daily life. The medical community has yet to pinpoint exactly why an individual develops diabetes, but holistic nutritionist, Luanne Pennesi said that pre-diabetes occurs when a person's blood glucose or sugar levels are higher than normal, which over time taxes the body, particularly the pancreas, and if not treated through diet and exercise can lead to multiple chronic diseases. Overweight conditions, she said, can also contribute to the onset of diabetes, but can often be controlled with a low-fat, low carbohydrate diet and daily exercise. "In time," said Pennesi, "high glucose or sugar levels can literally cut your life short and is the primary cause of new cases of blindness, renal disease, increased risk in heart disease, painful peripheral nerve damage and amputations." Change of Life According to Pennesi, there are many ways that individuals can control diabetes and continue to live a normal, long and fulfilling life. "I have worked with many people who have changed their lifestyles for the better," she said. "One gentleman who was morbidly obese lost over 100 pounds in one year, and his blood sugar stabilized, his blood pressure is now norm Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating And Meal Planning

Healthy Eating And Meal Planning

Diet and nutrition: an introduction What kinds of foods you eat and how much you eat play a key role in diabetes management. Food has a direct effect on blood glucose and also contributes to weight gain (which increases risk for diabetes). It is a factor that can contribute to risk for high blood pressure and abnormal blood lipids. Along with regular physical activity, healthy eating can be a powerful tool in managing the “ABCDEs” (A1C, blood pressure, cholesterol, drugs to protect heart, exercise, and smoking cessation) of diabetes control Healthy eating, along physical activity and dosing of medication, is one of the important factors that determine control of blood glucose. Even small changes in what you eat can affect blood glucose levels. That’s why for a person with type 2 diabetes it is important to eat a consistent amount of the right foods on a daily basis. Along with taking medications as prescribed and getting regular exercise, healthy eating can help you control blood glucose and decrease your risk for several serious complications associated with diabetes, including cardiovascular disease (heart attack, stroke), kidney disease, and neuropathy (diseases affecting the nerves).1 Despite the importance of healthy eating in controlling type 2 diabetes, it can be very difficult to make and stick with changes to the way we eat. Studies have found that as many as 6 in 10 people with diabetes have difficulty sticking with a healthy eating plan.2 However, because what we eat is so central to managing diabetes, it is important for you to work with your healthcare provider, a certified diabetes educator, and a registered dietitian (you may be able to find a diabetes educator who is also a dietitian) to come up with a healthy eating plan that will work for you and Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: The Fitness You Need

Type 2 Diabetes: The Fitness You Need

Type 2 diabetes is not inevitable. Preventing and even reversing the onset of diabetes is entirely possible, but it takes commitment. Taking charge of your health involves a two-pronged approach: diet and exercise. Both are crucial for long-term success and optimal health. Diet and exercise Diet and exercise are both key components of a successful strategy to beat or manage diabetes. Studies show that diet and exercise can sharply lower the likelihood of diabetes, even in people who are at high risk of developing it. Learn about the risk factors for type 2 diabetes » Other studies also show that lifestyle interventions can improve insulin sensitivity and blood lipid profiles and help lower high blood sugar levels. Diet and exercise help lower body weight — and excess body weight is closely linked to the onset of diabetes. A major clinical study called the Diabetes Prevention Program studied people at risk for diabetes. It showed that lifestyle changes involving 150 minutes of exercise per week decreased the risk of progressing to type 2 diabetes by 58 percent. Keep in mind that diet and exercise should go hand in hand. For instance, even if you regularly exercise, a diet with lots of sugar and fat and very little fiber or phytonutrients (beneficial plant compounds) could more than counteract those efforts. On the other hand, you can eat a healthful diet, but if you never get up and move, your cardiovascular health will almost certainly suffer. Cardiovascular health and diabetes are also intricately linked. Committing to a better diet and daily exercise promotes better blood sugar levels, blood lipid control, and mood. It also leads to higher energy levels, which makes it easier to exercise. Daily exercise helps keep blood vessels healthy, makes you feel better about Continue reading >>

Preventing & Controlling Type 2 Diabetes

Preventing & Controlling Type 2 Diabetes

“Wha’ sweeten goat mout does bun ‘e tail” This ‘Bajan’ proverb truly captures the story of diabetes in Barbados and its impact on our growing population. With sugary treats, and fried and fatty foods becoming a staple of the Barbadian diet, these poor eating habits, coupled with increased stress and an inactive lifestyle, have contributed to a startling increase in the incidence of Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases (CNCDs). CNCDs account for some 80 per cent of deaths in Barbados and a quarter of adult Barbadians are living with such diseases. Out of that figure, more than 17 per cent of Barbadians over 40 are living with diabetes, with Government spending in excess of BDS $75 million a year on diabetic care. The complications of diabetes most prevalent in Barbados are diabetic foot, blindness and kidney disease. On average, it costs BDS$5, 000 per month to treat one dialysis patient at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital while over 190 diabetes-related amputations are performed at the hospital each year. The good news is that type 2 diabetes is preventable and if you’re already diabetic, the disease can be controlled but close attention must be paid to diet and lifestyle. Speak to your physician to develop a health programme which is best suited for you. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a condition in which sugar (glucose) in the blood is too high. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas produces little or no insulin. With type 2, the cells do not respond to insulin as they should. Type 2 is linked to poor lifestyle choices, genetics and obesity. What is pre-diabetes? Pre-diabetes is a condition when blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Although not everyone who has pre-diabetes will develop diabetes, a lot of them will. Wit Continue reading >>

How To Control Type 2 Diabetes

How To Control Type 2 Diabetes

Controlling blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes involves a combination of lifestyle interventions and, if needed, medication together with frequent blood glucose monitoring. Achieving lower blood glucose levels is important as this can substantially lower the risk of developing long term health complications. Weight control Statistically, the majority of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, or were, at the time of their diagnosis. Research has shown that increases in body weight in people with type 2 diabetes is associated with a lower sensitivity to insulin. What this means is that if you are overweight and can shed some of the excess weight, it is common for your blood sugar levels to show signs of improvement. In some cases, losing significant amounts of body weight has allowed people to reduce their dependence on diabetes medication. In addition, keeping your body weight under control also has a number of other benefits including: Improved heart health Increased energy Enhanced mobility Diet Diet is often one of the most powerful ways in which you can control type 2 diabetes. Generally, most people with type 2 diabetes will be advised to follow a low calorie diet to help with weight management and to benefit blood glucose levels. Other popular options for people with diabetes are diets based on low GI foods (such as whole grain foods) or foods with low carbohydrate values. For more information, see our Food and Diet section Exercise Regular physical activity is recommended for a number of reasons, including: Assists weight management Can reduce blood sugar levels Can help improve circulation Can improve mood and increase motivation Exercise needn’t mean anything too strenuous. Walking, for example, has been shown to be particularly effective in reducing a Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms

A A A Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is a chronic medical condition that results from an inability of the body to properly use insulin. Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes, in which the body is unable to produce sufficient levels of insulin. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes include A fasting blood sugar level of 126 mg/dl or greater on two different days establishes the diagnosis of diabetes. A number of both oral and injectable medications have been developed fo A hemoglobin A1c (HBA1c) level of 6.5% or greater indicates diabetes. Managing type 2 diabetes includes following a healthy eating plan and exercise, as well as medications in many cases. r the treatment of type 2 diabetes. A healthy eating plan and regular physical activity are important components of a type 2 diabetes treatment plan. There is no one recommended "diabetes diet" for all people with type 2 diabetes. Regular physical activity and modest weight loss can help reduce or prevent type 2 diabetes. Common complications of diabetes include cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, eye problems, and nerve damage. A A A Type 2 Diabetes (cont.) Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes mellitus. In type 2 diabetes, there is an elevated level of sugar (glucose) in the bloodstream due to the body's inability to properly respond to insulin. Insulin is a hormone that allows the body to utilize glucose for energy. Insulin is produced by specialized cells in the pancreas. An elevated level of blood glucose is known as hyperglycemia. The excessive levels of glucose in the blood spill over into the urine, leading to the presence of glucose in the urine (glucosuria). Type 2 diabetes is an enormous public health problem. It is estimated that about 29.1 million Americans (9.1% of all Americans) have Continue reading >>

Common Questions About Diabetes Medicines

Common Questions About Diabetes Medicines

How do I know if my diabetes pill is working? The best way to find out how well your diabetes pill is working is to test your blood sugar. Ask a member of your health care team what time of day is best for testing. You'll want to test when your diabetes medicine is expected to be most active in your body. Keep a record of your blood sugar levels (PDF) during that time to see if they're at or near your goal. If your levels are at or near your goal and you're not having any problems with the medicine, then it's probably working well. If you're still not sure, talk to your doctor or other member of your care team. Can I stop taking my diabetes medicine after my blood sugar is under control? It's reasonable to think that after a person gets good blood sugar control, it means the end of managing diabetes. But that's not the case. People with type 1 diabetes aren't able to make their own insulin, so they will always need to take insulin shots every day. For people with type 2 diabetes who are on medicine, the answer isn't as clear. Sometimes when people are first diagnosed, they start on pills or insulin right away. If the person also works hard to control diabetes with diet and exercise, he or she can lower the need for medicine and might be able to stop taking it altogether. As long as the person is able to keep blood sugar levels normal with diet and exercise, there isn't a need for medicine. However, type 2 diabetes changes over time. The change can be fast or slow, but it does change. This means that even if a person was able to stop taking medicine for a while, he or she might need to start taking it again in the future. If a person is taking medicine to keep blood sugar normal, then it's important to keep taking it to lower the chances for heart disease and other healt Continue reading >>

Controlling Type 2 Diabetes With A Healthy Lifestyle

Controlling Type 2 Diabetes With A Healthy Lifestyle

People who have type 2 diabetes can sometimes control their condition with diet and exercise, and avoid medication or reduce the dose they take. Even if you need medication to help control your diabetes, following a healthy meal plan and getting regular physical activity can help with control. A healthy lifestyle will help you attain and maintain a healthy weight, manage your blood glucose level, lower blood pressure if you have high blood pressure, reduce stress and improve your mood. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), people with type 2 diabetes need to be aware of their total daily caloric intake. They also need to make sure they get appropriate amounts of carbohydrates, protein and fat, and adequate amounts of vitamins and minerals each day. Here are healthy eating tips from the ADA: Eat a wide variety of foods each day. Try new foods and eat a variety of foods within each section of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's My Pyramid food plan. Visit the USDA website at for more information. Eat foods that are high in fiber. These include whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Eat less fat. Fats, particularly saturated fats and cholesterol, increase the risk for heart disease. Having type 2 diabetes puts you at greater risk for heart disease. Use less added sugar. You don't have to give up dessert if you have type 2 diabetes, but you should practice moderation. Many sugar-free, low-calorie and low-fat desserts are available. Don’t salt your food. When shopping or eating out, choose foods that are lower in sodium. Most of your daily sodium intake comes from processed foods. Engage in moderate to vigorous physically activity daily. Try to get at least 30 to 60 minutes of moderate exercise each day, which can help with weight management and blood sugar Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes During Pregnancy

Type 2 Diabetes During Pregnancy

There’s lots of good news these days for pregnant women with type 2 diabetes (a condition in which the body doesn’t respond as it should to insulin). In fact, with the right medical help and diligent self-care, you have about the same excellent chances of having a successful pregnancy and a healthy baby as any other expectant mom. The key to managing type 2 diabetes during pregnancy? Achieving normal blood glucose levels six months before conception and maintaining those levels throughout the nine months following it. So if you’ve been on top of keeping your diabetes under control, it’s more important than ever to continue your routine now that there are two of you on board. Here's what to think about if you're heading into pregnancy with type 2 diabetes: Your care team How does diabetes affect babies during pregnancy? If you have type 2 diabetes, you already have higher levels of glucose circulating in your blood; issues can come up if your blood sugar levels aren’t well monitored and managed. That’s because extra sugar can be transferred to baby while you're expecting — and a fetus that’s served too much glucose reacts by producing an increased supply of insulin (which can result in a too-large baby and other complications). READ MORE: Gestational Diabetes Finding your pregnancy and diabetes care team Be prepared: You’ll have a lot more prenatal visits than other expectant moms and will probably be given more doctors’ orders to follow (all for a good cause). So it’s a good idea to get your medical team in place as soon as you think you might want to get pregnant. The OB or midwife who supervises your pregnancy should have plenty of experience caring for diabetic moms-to-be, and he or she should work together with the doctor who has been in charge Continue reading >>

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes: Exercise, Eating And Evidence

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes: Exercise, Eating And Evidence

Let’s get a couple of things straight at the start. We don’t know what causes type 1 diabetes or how to prevent it. We do know that type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. We’re too fat, too sedentary and too many of us now have type 2 diabetes. Now for a bit of detail. The first World Health Organization (WHO) Global report on diabetes, published this week ahead of World Health Day, makes no bones about the scale of the problem (422 million adults living with diabetes, four times as many as in 1980) or that the skyrocketing numbers of people who are overweight or obese is a significant factor behind this alarming increase, much of it in developing countries. The report reminds us that type 2 diabetes “comprises the majority of people with diabetes around the world, and is largely the result of excess body weight and physical inactivity”. Increasingly, this includes children. The WHO report highlights the need to address gaps in the diabetes knowledge base. Systematic reviews are a great way to bring together the best available evidence from primary research so we can see what is known to help us make decisions about health and where important gaps remain. WHO advice on preventing type 2 diabetes The WHO says that “simple lifestyle measures have been shown to be effective in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes. To help prevent type 2 diabetes and its complications, people should: achieve and maintain healthy body weight; be physically active – at least 30 minutes of regular, moderate-intensity activity on most days. More activity is required for weight control; eat a healthy diet, avoiding sugar and saturated fats intake; and avoid tobacco use – smoking increases the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.” Diet and exercise: bett Continue reading >>

Diet And Exercise With Type 1/2 Diabetes

Diet And Exercise With Type 1/2 Diabetes

While keeping your blood glucose levels within safe limits is a hugely important part of managing your diabetes, the guidance to staying healthy in pregnancy is similar to that for staying healthy at any other time of life with diabetes. Your diet in pregnancy with type 1 or 2 diabetes When you are pregnant you may find that you need to make changes to your diet to help curb spikes and dips in your blood glucose levels. Try to aim for a varied diet that includes a combination of: carbohydrates such as breads, rice, pasta, grains and potatoes. Choose wholegrain varieties where possible fruit and vegetables pulses, such as baked beans, butter beans or lentils dairy products such as milk, hard cheese and yogurt lean meats and fish. The amount of carbohydrates you eat has the biggest impact on your blood glucose levels after eating. Ask to be referred to a dietitian if you have not seen one already. Pregnancy is not a time to be on a calorie controlled diet so speaking to a dietitian will help you to make small changes to your diet that are safe for you and your baby. 'I did have cravings while I was pregnant – I did really want some chocolate and so I would buy myself just really dark chocolate so I could have just something.' Maria, mum of one No need to 'eat for two' It is all too easy to over-eat during pregnancy, but the phrase ‘eating for two’ is a myth. In fact, your baby will grow well for the first two trimesters of pregnancy without you eating any extra calories at all. During the last trimester of your pregnancy you may need up to 200 extra calories per day – the equivalent of a small snack. Find general guidance on safe exercising in pregnancy here. Supplements You must take 5mg of folic acid, which you should receive on prescription, from when you start Continue reading >>

10 Diet And Exercise Tricks To Control Diabetes

10 Diet And Exercise Tricks To Control Diabetes

Small goals make a big difference When it comes to type 2 diabetes, you need diet and exercise goals that encourage you to succeed—not ones that set you up to fail, says Ann Goebel-Fabbri, PhD, a psychologist and investigator at the Joslin Diabetes Center, in Boston. "I think goals have to be small and well spelled out for people. Everyone has the experience of going to a health practitioner and being told something vague: 'You know, you really ought to lose weight.' What does that mean? Goals need to be broken down into small nuts and bolts," she says. First step: See where you stand now Margaret Savoca, PhD, an assistant professor in the department of nutrition at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, suggests that you stop and look at your eating and exercise habits, and figure out what will be the easiest changes to make, rather than making huge changes that are tough to sustain. "Diabetes is a marathon, not a sprint," says Elizabeth Hardy, 47, a Dallas resident who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2005. For Hardy it was easiest to make changes in her life one step at a time. Here are 10 ways to start. Bring your own lunch Avoid eating lunch at restaurants or fast-food joints. Restaurant meals "can go out of control easily," Savoca says. They tend to have large portions, lots of calories, and high amounts of fat. Research has found an association between eating out more and having a higher body weight. When you make your own lunch, you control the ingredients and your portion sizes. If making your own lunch every day is too much, you might want to try twice a week to start. Use a pedometer These handy devices—available for less than $20 at sporting goods stores—clip on to your waistband and record the number of steps you take. Use one to estimat Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Diet

The Diabetes Diet

What's the best diet for diabetes? Whether you’re trying to prevent or control diabetes, your nutritional needs are virtually the same as everyone else, so no special foods are necessary. But you do need to pay attention to some of your food choices—most notably the carbohydrates you eat. While following a Mediterranean or other heart-healthy diet can help with this, the most important thing you can do is to lose a little weight. Losing just 5% to 10% of your total weight can help you lower your blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. Losing weight and eating healthier can also have a profound effect on your mood, energy, and sense of wellbeing. Even if you’ve already developed diabetes, it’s not too late to make a positive change. By eating healthier, being more physically active, and losing weight, you can reduce your symptoms or even reverse diabetes. The bottom line is that you have more control over your health than you may think. The biggest risk for diabetes: belly fat Being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor for type 2 diabetes. However, your risk is higher if you tend to carry your weight around your abdomen as opposed to your hips and thighs. A lot of belly fat surrounds the abdominal organs and liver and is closely linked to insulin resistance. You are at an increased risk of developing diabetes if you are: A woman with a waist circumference of 35 inches or more A man with a waist circumference of 40 inches or more Calories obtained from fructose (found in sugary beverages such as soda, energy and sports drinks, coffee drinks, and processed foods like doughnuts, muffins, cereal, candy and granola bars) are more likely to add weight around your abdomen. Cutting back on sugary foods can mean a slimmer waistline as well as a lowe Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Food Choices

Type 2 Diabetes And Food Choices

You make food choices every day. Whole wheat or white bread? A side of french fries or fresh fruit? Eat now or later? Choices about what, when, and how much you eat affect your blood glucose. Understanding how food affects blood glucose is the first step in managing diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, following a diabetes meal plan can help you keep your blood glucose levels on track. Prevent problems Having type 2 diabetes means that your body doesn’t control blood glucose well. When blood glucose stays too high for too long, serious health problems can develop. By controlling your blood glucose through diet, exercise, and medicine, you can delay or prevent kidney, eye, and heart disease, and other complications of diabetes. Control carbohydrates Carbohydrates are foods that have the biggest effect on your blood glucose levels. After you eat carbohydrates, your blood glucose rises. Fruit, sweet foods and drinks, starchy foods (such as bread, potatoes and rice), and milk and milk products contain carbohydrates. Although carbohydrates are important for health, when you eat too many at once, your blood glucose can go too high, especially if you do not have or take adequate insulin for that food. Some carbohydrates—potatoes, sweets and white bread, for instance—may raise blood glucose more than others. Better choices are less processed foods with more fiber and nutrients, such as 100% whole wheat bread, oatmeal, brown rice, and nonstarchy vegetables. Learn to use food labels that indicate added sugar and try to find healthier alternatives, particularly if you are overweight. Food and medicine Insulin helps glucose move from the blood into your muscle cells, where it can be used for energy. Some oral diabetes medicines help you make more insulin Continue reading >>

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