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Controlling Diabetes With Diet Alone

Preventing Prediabetes: Is Diet Or Exercise More Important?

Preventing Prediabetes: Is Diet Or Exercise More Important?

Diet may have a slight edge over exercise when it comes to losing weight, but pairing that healthy diet with a regular exercise routine is key if you’re looking to prevent prediabetes. According to a study published in the Summer 2014 issue of The Permanente Journal, an estimated 34 percent of adults in the United States have prediabetes, which means their blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to qualify as full-blown type 2 diabetes. You can chalk some of that up to genetics, but your chances of developing diabetes aren't based on family history alone. Think of it this way: You might inherit a predisposition to the disease, but then something in your environment has to trigger it, according to the Joslin Diabetes Center. “While certain genetic factors influence the likelihood of developing insulin resistance, it’s the lifestyle factors — what we do about it — that determine whether metabolic health worsens or stays intact,” says Theresa Link, RD, CDE, with Virta Health in San Francisco. That means prediabetes is preventable — so long as you make healthy choices. This leads us to the age-old question: Does exercise or diet play a bigger role in keeping you healthy? The Case for a Healthy Diet According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the single most important way to prevent diabetes is to control your weight. Research has shown that losing 5 to 10 percent of your body weight can lower your chances of developing the disease by 58 percent, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine. And when weight loss is the No. 1 goal, diet beats out exercise, according to a study published in October 2014 in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. After all, losing weight comes down to caloric deficit, and most p Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And The Diet That Cured Me

Type 2 Diabetes And The Diet That Cured Me

Why me? At 59 I was 10st 7lb, 5ft 7in, and had never been overweight. I ran and played cricket regularly and didn't drink alcohol excessively. Yet at a routine check-up I was told that I had type 2 diabetes. In 10 years I could be dependent on insulin, it could affect my sight, feet, ears, heart and I had a 36% greater chance of dying early. In type 1 diabetes, the body produces none of the insulin that regulates our blood sugar levels. Very high glucose levels can damage the body's organs. Patients with type 2 diabetes, however, do produce insulin - just not enough to keep their glucose levels normal. Because I was fit and not overweight (obesity is a major risk factor in type 2 diabetes; however, a number of non-obese people, particularly members of south Asian communities, are also prone to it), my doctor told me I could control my condition with diet alone. Desperate for information, I headed to the web, where I found a report about a research trial at Newcastle University led by Professor Roy Taylor. His research suggested type 2 diabetes could be reversed by following a daily 800-calorie diet for eight weeks. When our bodies are deprived of normal amounts of food they consume their own fat reserves, with the fat inside organs used up first. The idea of Taylor's diet is to use up the fat that is clogging up the pancreas and preventing it from creating insulin, until normal glucose levels return. With my GP's blessing and a home glucose-testing kit, I began my experiment. The diet was strict: three litres of water a day, three 200-calorie food supplements (soups and shakes) and 200 calories of green vegetables. Thanks to my doctor's dietary guidance, and running three times a week, I had already lost a stone. Yet my glucose levels were still above 6mmol/L (millimols Continue reading >>

New To Forum- Can I Control Diabetes With Diet Alone?

New To Forum- Can I Control Diabetes With Diet Alone?

I was on this forum about 13 years ago with my cat Tucker, who is now gone. Today I found out that my cat Woody is diabetic, so here I am again! Luckily I knew the diabetes symptoms so I took him to the vet and he has a 326 BG. Here's my question. I'm on vacation, and my "vacation" vet says that since Woody is below 400, we can try to help him with diet alone to see if we can get his BG down below 250. The vet says his target range for diabetic cats getting insulin is 80-250, so he wants to try first by eliminating dry food and feeding only Science Diet canned M/D. If he falls to 250 or lower, we would just continue on the diet without insulin. I called my "regular" vet and she says that we should start insulin right away. Her experience is that about 50% of newly diabetic cats given long-acting insulin (Glargine or Lantus) plus the M/D have gone into remission. He has only become diabetic in last couple months, when symptoms started (excess drinking). His BG was completely normal last April. Q: should I try the M/D alone or do insulin plus M/D? Do you like M/D? How about Glargine or Lantus insulin? Woody is a 9 year old long hair rescued sealpoint Siamese mix neutered male, perfect weight at 13 pounds. To add to the issue, he gets struvite crystals and has had most teeth pulled due to resorbtive disease. Vets say that M/D is okay for crystal cats, as it acidifies the urine. The change in diet to a low carb/high protein diet will definitely help with lowering Tucker's BG levels. However, there are better food choices than M/D. Many Friskies and Fancy Feast canned foods have a lot less carbs than the M/D. You can find of list of cat foods with the protein & carb values here . You want to look for foods that have 10 or less in the carbs column and a high number in the pr Continue reading >>

Treating Diabetes With Diet And Exercise

Treating Diabetes With Diet And Exercise

Recently, I was reading some of the readers’ postings on this Web site. Some of these postings expressed fairly strong opinions about how one should best manage his or her diabetes. Of course, one of the many good things about living in the United States is our right to freedom of speech, and postings such as these certainly get people thinking. However, it’s all too common for misconceptions about diabetes to abound. Whether it’s the belief that eating sugar causes diabetes, or that starting on insulin can make you go blind, or that having to start taking diabetes pills or insulin means that you’re a “bad diabetic,” as a dietitian and diabetes educator, I feel compelled to set the record straight whenever I can. So, what’s the best way to control diabetes? When it comes to Type 1 diabetes, which accounts for 5% to 10% of all diabetes cases, that’s a no-brainer. A person with Type 1 diabetes must take insulin to survive. His pancreas has—to put it simply—”pooped out,” meaning that it no longer makes enough insulin. Of course, a person with Type 1 diabetes has choices as to how he takes insulin. The choices nowadays range from the traditional vial and syringe to an insulin pen to an insulin pump to an inhaler. The future holds more possibilities for insulin delivery as well. People with Type 1 diabetes must still incorporate meal planning and physical activity into their daily management. About 90% to 95% of people with diabetes have Type 2. But Type 2 diabetes is a little less clear-cut in terms of how it’s best managed. The reason is that Type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition. When someone is first diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, the cornerstones of management are often, initially, what many health-care professionals term “diet and exer Continue reading >>

7 Powerful Food Combos To Control Diabetes

7 Powerful Food Combos To Control Diabetes

Shutterstock The Need-to-Know Nutrient Combo It's important for all of us to eat a diet that supports and controls blood sugar, whether we have diabetes or not. All you need to remember is one simple formula to ensure that every meal fills you up and keeps levels stable: Protein + carbs + healthy fats. While whole-grain carbs are satisfying, eating them alone can lead to changes in blood-sugar levels that take your mood and energy on a roller coaster ride. Adding a dose of protein and healthy fats provides sustained energy and stabilizes blood-glucose levels. Ready to give it a try? These simple food pairings take all three nutrients into account for a tasty, satisfying dish. Continue reading >>

How The Mediterranean Diet Alone Can Fight Diabetes

How The Mediterranean Diet Alone Can Fight Diabetes

There is no ultimate diet, but if there were, the Mediterranean plan would come darn close. Featuring staples like olive oil, nuts and vegetables, the Mediterranean diet has been heralded as a game changer for health and longevity. Countless studies have connected the eating plan to lower risks of heart attack and stroke and some have suggested the diet can even slow or prevent memory loss. Researchers speculate that the protective benefits likely stem from the combined effect of the diet’s healthy fats and nutrients. Now a new study shows that the Mediterranean diet alone may be enough to reduce the risk of diabetes, without the need to lose weight or exercise. The research, published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, involved more than 3,500 elderly adults who were at high risk for heart disease but did not yet have diabetes. The participants were split into three groups. The first ate a Mediterranean diet high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and fish, and low in red or processed meat, butter and sweets, supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil. The second group had a Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts, and the final group, the control group, consumed a low-fat diet. All the participants were told that they did not have to restrict calories or increase their physical activity. (MORE: Eat More Mediterranean Foods Now: Your Later Self Will Thank You) After four years, the researchers found that the individuals who developed diabetes were most likely to be in the control group. Of all the participants, 273 developed diabetes; 101 were in the control group. Among those eating the Mediterranean diet, 80 participants in the olive-oil group developed diabetes and 92 in the nut group did. Interestingly, there were no differences in weight loss among the Continue reading >>

Can Diet Alone Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Diet Alone Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

Research funded by Diabetes UK and carried out by a team from Newcastle University has discovered that Type 2 diabetes can be reversed by an extremely low-calorie diet alone. In an early stage clinical trial of 11 people, all reversed their diabetes by drastically cutting their food intake to just 600 calories a day for two months. And three months later, seven remained free of diabetes. ‘Remarkable’ results Professor Roy Taylor of Newcastle University, who led the study and is also Director of the Newcastle Magnetic Resonance Centre, said: “To have people free of diabetes after years with the condition is remarkable - and all because of an eight-week diet. “This is a radical change in understanding Type 2 diabetes. It will change how we can explain it to people newly diagnosed with the condition. While it has long been believed that someone with Type 2 diabetes will always have the disease, and that it will steadily get worse, we have shown that we can reverse the condition.” Liquid diet drinks and non-starchy vegetable diet Under close supervision of a medical team, the participants’ diet consisted of liquid diet drinks and non-starchy vegetables. They were matched to a control group of people without diabetes and then monitored over eight weeks. Insulin production from their pancreas and fat content in the liver and pancreas was studied. Pancreas regained ability to make insulin After just one week, the Newcastle University team found that their pre-breakfast blood glucose levels had returned to normal. A special MRI scan of their pancreas revealed that the fat levels in the pancreas had returned from an elevated level (8%) to a normal (6%) level. In step with this, the pancreas regained the normal ability to make insulin and as a result, blood glucose af Continue reading >>

Is Reversing Diabetes Possible With Diet Alone?

Is Reversing Diabetes Possible With Diet Alone?

With commentary by Roy Taylor, MD, MBChB, professor of medicine and metabolism, Newcastle University, U.K. Reversing type 2 diabetes, at least for some, might be possible by following a very low-calorie diet and then keeping that weight off, even if they're still overweight or obese, says a U.K. doctor who has been researching the idea for several years. Roy Taylor, MD, MBChB, professor of medicine and metabolism at the Newcastle University, knows he has some convincing to do. "Old ideas die hard," he says. While several studies have now found that bariatric surgery and the resulting weight loss can reverse type 2 diabetes, Dr. Taylor's regimen involves no surgery. In his most recent report, published in Diabetes Care earlier this year, he found that 12 of 30 volunteers with type 2 diabetes reversed their diabetes and remained free of the condition six months later. At the six-month mark, the 13th participant had a reversal.1 The 12 responders had fasting blood glucose levels below 7 mmol/L (or 126 mg/dl), defined as the start of diabetes, after returning to a normal diet, he found. Those who responded tended to have had the diagnosis a shorter period of time and had higher insulin levels at the study start. Now, Dr. Taylor is in the middle of yet another study, hoping to eventually enroll 280 to follow the plan. The Participants & The Plan For the recently published study, Dr. Taylor and his team enrolled 30 men and women who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 6 months to 23 years earlier. They all stopped their diabetes medicine at the beginning of the study. They ate a daily diet of 600 to 700 calories. They lost, on average, about 30 pounds (14 kilograms). Even with the weight loss, they stayed overweight or obese. The secret? Dr. Taylor says it's all about a c Continue reading >>

Control Or Reverse Diabetes Naturally

Control Or Reverse Diabetes Naturally

Can you control diabetes? Reverse it? Absolutely. We can beat diabetes. The disease process associated with diabetes (which leads to heart attacks, strokes, and other crippling illnesses) can be slowed and even partially reversed by controlling blood glucose and other cardiovascular disease risk factors. Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce and/or properly use insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas. When there are troubles with insulin, glucose builds up in the blood. A fasting glucose level below 100 is considered normal. A fasting glucose between 100 and 125 signals pre-diabetes. A fasting glucose of 126 or higher means you have diabetes. Though “silent,” at least at first, diabetes can turn into a horrible disease. It can greatly increase our risk of heart attacks, strokes, peripheral arterial disease, erectile dysfunction, blindness, diabetes neuropathy, poor wound healing, and kidney failure. There are two main types of diabetes – Type 1 and Type 2. At least 90% of diabetics in America have Type 2 diabetes. Studying the evolution and lifestyle habits of humankind, we can confidently assert that Type 2 diabetes is virtually entirely preventable. Worldwide, many populations are now suffering epidemic rates of Type 2 diabetes because many populations live in a “food toxic” environment and exercise little or not at all. All this suffering, all this early death, is preventable. It is the direct result of the way we live – by our sedentary habits and our Western-style diets, bereft of whole, fiber-rich foods and full of fast foods and other calorie-dense junk. Type 2 diabetes usually starts after the age of 40. But because of America’s childhood obesity epidemic, more and more of our youth are being diagnosed with the disease, including Continue reading >>

Controlling Type 2 Diabetes Through Diet – Expert’s Panel

Controlling Type 2 Diabetes Through Diet – Expert’s Panel

Diabetes management can be efficiently done by following the right diet, being active, getting enough sleep, perhaps, in some cases, taking medication as prescribed by your doctor. So many factors have to be taken into consideration when it comes to regulating your blood sugar levels in order to avoid the lows and the highs. It is recommended by experts that one keep their blood sugars in control by diet, as in, eating healthy. For that, you have to make some healthy choices. But with so many internet articles and blogs about diabetes and eating healthy out there, who do you listen to? Who should you trust? What do you eat? What should you avoid? One small mistake and you can pay with your life, in some cases. We have compiled tips and suggestions from 29 respected experts who share with you their rules on how you can control your type 2 with diet. Read on to find out what they are. 1. Karen R. Koenig, LCSW, M.Ed I encourage my clients with Type 2 Diabetes to do the following: stop dieting and labeling foods “good” or “bad” and, instead, think of them as having high or low health benefits. The diet mentality only promotes rebound eating. The goal is to develop an internal, rather than an external, locus of control. I also encourage them to learn how to become “normal” or intuitive eaters by connecting to appetite cues for hunger, fullness and satisfaction, and eating with awareness, which often means without distractions. They also need to develop effective practices to manage stress and distress without turning to food. All this can be done with an eating disorders therapist or an intuitive eating coach and by reading books on any of the above topics. 2. Kelly Devine Rickert, MS, RDN, CSSD, LDN There are two main tips I tell people to help control their typ Continue reading >>

Managing Type 2 Without Meds: 3 Stories

Managing Type 2 Without Meds: 3 Stories

My goal is to be as healthy as I can. If something happens and one day I'm back on medication, my goal is still to be healthy. It had been about a year since Akua Jitahadi felt like herself. But she was 51 and expected menopause to kick in soon. Plus, she and her daughter had just moved to oppressively hot Arizona. So she brushed off the tired, sluggish feeling as a side effect of being a middle-aged woman adjusting to sweltering temps. And then, overnight, her vision dimmed. Something was most definitely wrong. The verdict from her doctor: type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. "Of course, I broke down in tears," Jitahadi, now 55, says. "I wasn't ready to hear this. I always associated diabetes with 'Oh no, it's really bad.' " After Jitahadi spent a few weeks on medication, her vision cleared and she began to feel better. It didn't last long. "I hated metformin . I had all the colon and digestive issues on it," she says. "I never knew if I would be OK on it or if I'd be nauseous. I'd question whether I wanted to go out with my friends." When she asked for an alternative medication, her doctor said metformin was the best drug for the job, so Jitahadi stuck it out for a year. After that, she decided to make major lifestyle changes in hopes of quitting her medications. That proved more difficult than she had imagined. She hadn't seen a diabetes educator. The only dietitian covered by her insurer was too far away. And her doctor's sole advice was for Jitahadi to watch what she ate. "I was scared in the beginning," says Jitahadi. "It was through friends and starting to read [about diabetes] that I knew I could do this. I could get through this." Jitahadi bought books on diabetes, nutrition, the glycemic index, and diabetes-friendly meals. Instead of slightly modifying he Continue reading >>

Can You Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

Can You Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

It sounds too good to be true: reversing type 2 diabetes through exercise and healthy eating. While certain lifestyle changes are key to managing diabetes, whether you can actually turn back time so that it's like you never had diabetes is a different matter. That depends on how long you've had the condition, how severe it is, and your genes. "The term 'reversal' is used when people can go off medication but still must engage in a lifestyle program in order to stay off," says Ann Albright, PhD, RD. She's the director of diabetes translation at the CDC. Shedding extra pounds and keeping them off can help you better control your blood sugar. For some people, reaching a healthier weight will mean taking fewer medications, or in rarer cases, no longer needing those medications at all. Losing 5% to 10% of your body weight and building up to 150 minutes of exercise a week may help you to slow or stop the progress of type 2 diabetes. "If you sit [inactive] most of the day, 5 or 10 minutes is going to be great," Albright says. "Walk to your mailbox. Do something that gets you moving, knowing that you're looking to move towards 30 minutes most days of the week." In one study, people with type 2 diabetes exercised for 175 minutes a week, limited their calories to 1,200 to 1,800 per day, and got weekly counseling and education on these lifestyle changes. Within a year, about 10% got off their diabetes medications or improved to the point where their blood sugar level was no longer in the diabetes range, and was instead classified as prediabetes. Results were best for those who lost the most weight or who started the program with less severe or newly diagnosed diabetes. Fifteen percent to 20% of these people were able to stop taking their diabetes medications. Continue reading >>

10 Diet And Exercise Tricks To Control Diabetes

10 Diet And Exercise Tricks To Control Diabetes

Small goals make a big difference When it comes to type 2 diabetes, you need diet and exercise goals that encourage you to succeed—not ones that set you up to fail, says Ann Goebel-Fabbri, PhD, a psychologist and investigator at the Joslin Diabetes Center, in Boston. "I think goals have to be small and well spelled out for people. Everyone has the experience of going to a health practitioner and being told something vague: 'You know, you really ought to lose weight.' What does that mean? Goals need to be broken down into small nuts and bolts," she says. First step: See where you stand now Margaret Savoca, PhD, an assistant professor in the department of nutrition at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, suggests that you stop and look at your eating and exercise habits, and figure out what will be the easiest changes to make, rather than making huge changes that are tough to sustain. "Diabetes is a marathon, not a sprint," says Elizabeth Hardy, 47, a Dallas resident who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2005. For Hardy it was easiest to make changes in her life one step at a time. Here are 10 ways to start. Bring your own lunch Avoid eating lunch at restaurants or fast-food joints. Restaurant meals "can go out of control easily," Savoca says. They tend to have large portions, lots of calories, and high amounts of fat. Research has found an association between eating out more and having a higher body weight. When you make your own lunch, you control the ingredients and your portion sizes. If making your own lunch every day is too much, you might want to try twice a week to start. Use a pedometer These handy devices—available for less than $20 at sporting goods stores—clip on to your waistband and record the number of steps you take. Use one to estimat Continue reading >>

Just Say No: When It Makes Sense Not To Take Your Medicine

Just Say No: When It Makes Sense Not To Take Your Medicine

It sounds like something a quack would support, but it’s true. There’s growing evidence that lifestyle changes such as eating a healthier diet and exercising more may be enough to prevent and even treat conditions ranging from diabetes to cancer. The latest comes from a review of studies, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, that analyzed the effects of a combination of behaviors that reduced the rate of Type 2 diabetes among those at high risk of developing the disease. Making over their diets and boosting their amount of daily exercise, as well as quitting smoking and managing their stress were enough to help the participants, all of whom had high blood-sugar levels that precede diabetes, lower their glucose and avoid getting diagnosed with the disease. And it’s not the first study to hint at the power of the pharmaceutical-free approach. A study published this month in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention reported that brisk walking cut postmenopausal women’s breast-cancer risk by 14% compared with those who didn’t walk. Women who exercised more vigorously enjoyed a 25% drop in risk of developing the disease. Another report in the journal Lancet Oncology found that a plant-based diet, stress management and other lifestyle changes contributed to longer-lived cells among men with prostate cancer. Those results echoed previous work that documented that the same lifestyle-based changes contributed to fewer recurrent tumors among men who had been treated for prostate cancer. Taken together, the data has more doctors putting away their prescription pads when they see certain patients. The pill-free route isn’t for everyone, however, so it’s important for physicians and patients to understand when it’s appropriate and when it isn Continue reading >>

Diabetes Remission Possible With Diet, Exercise

Diabetes Remission Possible With Diet, Exercise

In a four-year-long study, overweight and obese diabetics placed on a calorie-restrictive diet along with nearly three hours of exercise per week fared much better than controls After one year, 11.5 percent of the program participants no longer needed medication to keep their blood sugar levels below the diabetes threshold. Only two percent of the non-intervention group experienced any significant improvement in their condition Obesity has now become a greater global health crisis than hunger. It is also the leading cause of disabilities around the world According to a national study there’s been a modest decline in obesity rates among 2- to 4-year-olds from poor families. While the cause for the drop is unclear, some of the potential contributors include a massive increase in breastfeeding over the past three decades, and reduced advertising of junk food to young children By Dr. Mercola It has taken decades, but medical professionals are finally starting to give diet and exercise for the prevention and reversal of type 2 diabetes some well-deserved attention. "... the new study can give people with the disease hope that through lifestyle changes, they could end up getting off medication and likely lowering their risk of diabetes-related complications," Reuters Health reports.1 The research,2 also featured by MedPage Today,3 demonstrates that diet and physical activity are the answer diabetics have been searching for, which is exactly what I've been teaching since I started this web site, 16 years ago. It's worth noting that I do not at all agree with some of the dietary recommendations given to the participants in this study. For example, I believe including healthy saturated fats and avoiding processed liquid meal replacements would be a wise move. I also believe fo Continue reading >>

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