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Controlling Diabetes With Diet

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Do you have type 2 diabetes, or are you at risk for diabetes? Do you worry about your blood sugar? Then you’ve come to the right place. The disease diabetes (any type) means that you have too much sugar in your blood. This page will show you how to best check this. You can normalize your blood sugar naturally as needed – without pills, calorie counting or hunger. Many people have already done so. As a bonus, a normalized blood sugar usually makes you healthier and leaner. Table of contents: A disastrous epidemic Two types of diabetes Normalize your blood sugar Become your own evidence A disastrous epidemic What’s wrong? Why do more and more people become diabetic? In the past, before our modern Western diet, diabetes was extremely rare. The disease is now becoming more and more common. Around the world, more and more people are becoming diabetic: The number of people with diabetes is increasing incredibly rapidly and is heading towards 500 million. This is a world epidemic. Will someone in your family be affected next? Your mother, father, cousin, your child? Or you? Is perhaps your blood already too sweet? Those affected by the most common form of diabetes (type 2) normally never regain their health. Instead, we take for granted that they’ll become a little sicker for every year that goes by. With time they need more and more drugs. Yet, sooner or later complications emerge. Blindness. Dialysis due to faulty kidneys. Dementia. Amputations. Death. Diabetes epidemic causes inconceivable suffering. Fortunately, there’s something that can be done. We just need to see through the mistake that has led to the explosion of disease – and correct it. This can normalize your blood sugar. Many have already succeeded in doing this. If you already know that you are diabe Continue reading >>

Control Or Reverse Diabetes Naturally

Control Or Reverse Diabetes Naturally

Can you control diabetes? Reverse it? Absolutely. We can beat diabetes. The disease process associated with diabetes (which leads to heart attacks, strokes, and other crippling illnesses) can be slowed and even partially reversed by controlling blood glucose and other cardiovascular disease risk factors. Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce and/or properly use insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas. When there are troubles with insulin, glucose builds up in the blood. A fasting glucose level below 100 is considered normal. A fasting glucose between 100 and 125 signals pre-diabetes. A fasting glucose of 126 or higher means you have diabetes. Though “silent,” at least at first, diabetes can turn into a horrible disease. It can greatly increase our risk of heart attacks, strokes, peripheral arterial disease, erectile dysfunction, blindness, diabetes neuropathy, poor wound healing, and kidney failure. There are two main types of diabetes – Type 1 and Type 2. At least 90% of diabetics in America have Type 2 diabetes. Studying the evolution and lifestyle habits of humankind, we can confidently assert that Type 2 diabetes is virtually entirely preventable. Worldwide, many populations are now suffering epidemic rates of Type 2 diabetes because many populations live in a “food toxic” environment and exercise little or not at all. All this suffering, all this early death, is preventable. It is the direct result of the way we live – by our sedentary habits and our Western-style diets, bereft of whole, fiber-rich foods and full of fast foods and other calorie-dense junk. Type 2 diabetes usually starts after the age of 40. But because of America’s childhood obesity epidemic, more and more of our youth are being diagnosed with the disease, including Continue reading >>

Halle Berry Reveals How She Controls Her Diabetes

Halle Berry Reveals How She Controls Her Diabetes

Halle Berry reveals how she controls her diabetes The actress credits the diet for keeping her healthy hellomagazine.com Halle Berry adopted ketogenic diet to help control diabetes. Find out how the diet has helped her Halle Berry credits her ketogenic diet with keeping her fit. The Monster's Ball star, 50, is known for her enviable physique and she explains not eating any sugars or carbohydrates - because she is diabetic - has helped her maintain her figure. "The idea of it is you train your body to burn healthy fats and so I eat healthy fats all day long," she told U.S. talk show Live! with Kelly and Ryan of her low-carb, high-fat diet rules. "Avocado, oil, coconut oil, butter, but don't have sugar. So when your body gets trained to burn fats and you're constantly on fat-burning mode, that's the secret." She also insisted love and happiness plays a part in leading a successful fit and healthy lifestyle. "It's all of that (too)," the mother-of-two smiled. Halle has been adamant about keeping her body healthy to help control her diabetes and she previously insisted she wouldn't put on a lot of weight for a movie role, because it could jeopardise her health. RELATED: What are the symptoms and treatment for type 1 and type 2 diabetes? "My heart would say yes because I feel like I would do anything for my craft, but my brain would say no because I'm diabetic and what that might do to me on a health level could be really dangerous, so that's probably the real reason I wouldn't," she told U.S. talk show host Wendy Williams in 2012. "Taking care of my health and keeping my weight a certain (level) is really very much a part of taking care of myself and being healthy and because I'm a mum now, I wouldn't take risks like that," she added. See the latest health and fitness stor Continue reading >>

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes With Natural Therapies

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes With Natural Therapies

Today’s Dietitian Vol. 14 No. 11 P. 28 Experts examine whether alternative approaches can cure the disease or at least send it into remission. John couldn’t seem to quench his thirst no matter how much water he drank. With his wife’s encouragement, he scheduled an appointment with his primary care doctor. A few days later, his doctor called him back into the office and told him, “You have severe type 2 diabetes.” Like many people who receive an unexpected diabetes diagnosis, John was frightened. He started surfing the Internet and reading as much as he could about the disease. Unfortunately, the information only left him reeling with more questions than answers. To make matters worse, his doctor prescribed medication that made him hypoglycemic. John spoke to several friends who had different health problems that had been either cured or treated by a doctor of naturopathy. He decided to schedule an appointment with the same doctor. At his first visit, the naturopathic doctor told John he’d be “off medication and free of diabetes in three months.” John left the doctor’s office with instructions to eat a low-carb diet. He’d been on a low-fat diet for years because of heart problems, but while he’d cut the fat, his meals included many highly processed foods. His new diet included “a lot of salads and healthful, organic foods.” He was given several whole food supplements that he says were “simple to mix and tasted good.” After two months under the care of the naturopath, John returned to his primary care doctor to discover that his hemoglobin A1c had dropped from 8.9% to 4.9%—a nondiabetic range. For eight months and counting, he’s been off all his diabetes medication. His last A1c reading was 5.1%. With the help of his naturopath, John seem Continue reading >>

Controlling Type 2 Diabetes Through Diet – Expert’s Panel

Controlling Type 2 Diabetes Through Diet – Expert’s Panel

Diabetes management can be efficiently done by following the right diet, being active, getting enough sleep, perhaps, in some cases, taking medication as prescribed by your doctor. So many factors have to be taken into consideration when it comes to regulating your blood sugar levels in order to avoid the lows and the highs. It is recommended by experts that one keep their blood sugars in control by diet, as in, eating healthy. For that, you have to make some healthy choices. But with so many internet articles and blogs about diabetes and eating healthy out there, who do you listen to? Who should you trust? What do you eat? What should you avoid? One small mistake and you can pay with your life, in some cases. We have compiled tips and suggestions from 29 respected experts who share with you their rules on how you can control your type 2 with diet. Read on to find out what they are. 1. Karen R. Koenig, LCSW, M.Ed I encourage my clients with Type 2 Diabetes to do the following: stop dieting and labeling foods “good” or “bad” and, instead, think of them as having high or low health benefits. The diet mentality only promotes rebound eating. The goal is to develop an internal, rather than an external, locus of control. I also encourage them to learn how to become “normal” or intuitive eaters by connecting to appetite cues for hunger, fullness and satisfaction, and eating with awareness, which often means without distractions. They also need to develop effective practices to manage stress and distress without turning to food. All this can be done with an eating disorders therapist or an intuitive eating coach and by reading books on any of the above topics. 2. Kelly Devine Rickert, MS, RDN, CSSD, LDN There are two main tips I tell people to help control their typ Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet

Diabetic Diet

If you have diabetes, your body cannot make or properly use insulin. This leads to high blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels. Healthy eating helps keep your blood sugar in your target range. It is a critical part of managing your diabetes, because controlling your blood sugar can prevent the complications of diabetes. A registered dietitian can help make an eating plan just for you. It should take into account your weight, medicines, lifestyle, and other health problems you have. Healthy diabetic eating includes Limiting foods that are high in sugar Eating smaller portions, spread out over the day Being careful about when and how many carbohydrates you eat Eating a variety of whole-grain foods, fruits and vegetables every day Eating less fat Limiting your use of alcohol Using less salt NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Your diabetes diet is simply a healthy-eating plan that will help you control your blood sugar. Here's help getting started, from meal planning to exchange lists and counting carbohydrates. Definition A diabetes diet simply means eating the healthiest foods in moderate amounts and sticking to regular mealtimes. A diabetes diet is a healthy-eating plan that's naturally rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories. Key elements are fruits, vegetables and whole grains. In fact, a diabetes diet is the best eating plan for most everyone. Purpose If you have diabetes or prediabetes, your doctor will likely recommend that you see a dietitian to help you develop a healthy eating plan. The plan helps you control your blood sugar (glucose), manage your weight and control risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure and high blood fats. When you eat excess calories and fat, your body responds by creating an undesirable rise in blood glucose. If blood glucose isn't kept in check, it can lead to serious problems, such as a dangerously high blood glucose level (hyperglycemia) and long-term complications, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. You can help keep your blood glucose level in a safe range by making healthy food choices and tracking your eating habits. For most people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss also can make it easier to control blood glucose and offers a host of other health benefits. If you need to lose weight, a diabetes diet provides a well-organized, nutritious way to reach your goal safely. Diet details A diabetes diet is based on eating three meals a day at regular times. This helps your body better use the insulin it produces or gets through a medication. A registered dietitian can help you put together a diet based on your health goals, tas Continue reading >>

Diabetes And A Paleo Diet

Diabetes And A Paleo Diet

Every minute, three people in the U.S. are diagnosed with diabetes, for a total of 20.9 million people living with the disease (as of 2011, so that number is probably even higher now). That’s up from just 5.6 million in 1980. Currently, about 7% of people in the US have diabetes, but that doesn’t actually tell the whole story. An estimated 86 million more have pre-diabetes (blood sugar high enough to be dangerous, but not enough to be diabetes. Diabetes is sometimes called a “lifestyle disease,” meaning that it’s caused by lifestyle factors like diet and exercise, rather than a particular germ or gene. It’s often (but not always!) associated with other lifestyle diseases like obesity, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure, because the same kinds of lifestyle patterns tend to cause more than one of those problems. When the Paleo crowd starts talking about diabetes, we typically start from the fact that it’s almost unknown in traditional cultures, even among people in later middle-age. The natural suggestion from there is to eat like people in those cultures – minimal processed and refined foods. But there are a few problems with this: All those traditional groups eat differently, so who do you want to imitate, the ultra low-carb and diabetes-free Maasai, or the high-carb and equally diabetes-free Kitavans? Diet isn’t the only difference. Lifestyle factors like sleep and exercise also have a huge effect on diabetes: it’s not just food. A diet that works in the context of one lifestyle might not work in another. Prevention isn’t the same as cure. People who’ve lived in the modern world their whole lives might need more intensive intervention than people who’ve always been healthy. For a really comprehensive look at diabetes, we need to get bey Continue reading >>

Alternatives To Insulin Injections

Alternatives To Insulin Injections

In most cases of feline diabetes, insulin is the treatment of choice. The thought of giving insulin injections daily is a scary prospect for many cat owners. As a result, if your cat is diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, you may be wondering if there is an alternative to treating with insulin. There may be other treatment options that are worth exploring in a situation where your cat's personality is not conducive to receiving daily or twice daily injections of insulin or where you are physically incapable of giving the insulin injections. Oral hypoglycemic medications such as glipizide and acarbose are one such option. These medications act to help lower the blood glucose levels. They are given by mouth and are most effective for cats with mild diabetes. They are effective for some, but not all, diabetic cats. Strictly Controlled Diet as Possible Alternative A strictly controlled diet can be useful in controlling the blood glucose levels of cats with diabetes. Diet by itself may or may not be completely effective, and it is most likely to work for cats that do not have severe diabetes. The most commonly recommended food for a cat with diabetes is a diet containing high levels of protein and low levels of carbohydrates. Canned cat foods are preferred if commercial diets are used (as opposed to kibble or dry food). A high protein, low carbohydrate diet can be combined with one of the oral hypoglycemic medications to further help regulate your cat's blood glucose levels. It is possible that this may be more effective than using diet or medication alone. Other Considerations in the Treatment of Diabetic Cats Another important consideration in treating a cat with diabetes, especially if the disease is caught early, is that remission is possible in many cases, if regulation o Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetic Diet - Can Diet Help Control Diabetes?

Pre-diabetic Diet - Can Diet Help Control Diabetes?

Because of a lot of junk foods and sugary snacks that are sold today, many doctors are suggesting that their patients switch to a pre-diabetic diet. This can be a little confusing to those who have never been officially diagnosed with diabetes though. After all, why worry about a condition that hasn’t happened yet? Well, the main reason is that it can help prevent and reverse the condition in those who have the highest risk of developing it. Want to know more about controlling pre-diabetes with diet? Then, keep reading to find out about all the key facts that prove that this could be one of the best diet plans to try. What is a Pre-Diabetic Diet? A pre-diabetic diet is a way of eating that allows the pancreas a chance to heal. It works by reducing the amount of inflammation and stress in the body by limiting the amount of sugary and fatty foods that are eaten. This is done by following a pre-diabetic diet menu plan that is given to a patient on a pre-diabetes diet PDF. Exercise is an important part of controlling pre-diabetes with diet too though. So a doctor will usually recommend that aerobic activities be performed for about an hour a day, such as walking or biking. Unlike other types of diets, there is a lot of emphasis on what liquids are consumed with a pre-diabetic diet. Drinking plenty of water is encouraged because it helps flush out the extra sugar from the body. But alcoholic beverages, sodas, and sweetened teas are prohibited because they work against the main goal to reduce sugar intake. [1] What Foods Are Used for the Pre-Diabetes Prevention Diet? Part of the main reason that people who want to try this diet need a pre-diabetes diet PDF is that the pre-diabetic diet food list of acceptable foods that can be eaten is fairly long. They also need to be eate Continue reading >>

The 14 Best Foods To Control Type 2 Diabetes

The 14 Best Foods To Control Type 2 Diabetes

The 14 Best Foods to Control Type 2 Diabetes By Jenny Hills, Medical Writer and Researcher Food & Nutrition , Health We all know that maintaining a healthy diet is vital in terms of type 2 diabetes prevention and treatment. Generally, the advice given to diabetics is relevant to the general population as well: consume adequate vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, poultry and fish, and less industrial sweets and foods high in fat and salt. It is known that patients who use professional advice and expert dieticians and nutritional supervision have a much better chance to maintain balanced levels of sugar, and avoid the complications of the disease. Diabetics should also keep meals at regular times throughout the day to avoid sharp rises in blood sugar levels. So what are the best foods to control diabetes and add to the menu? There are 12 foods that can help balance blood sugar in your body. These are olive oil, cinnamon, green tea, pulses, green vegetables and oats. These common foods that are already in our kitchen help maintaining adequate blood sugar and prevent diabetes complications: Oil lacks carbohydrates , and therefore does not raise blood sugar levels. In addition, it slows the absorption of foods eaten along with the oil. Olive oil is rich Omega 9 and Omega 3 which help maintain the flexibility of blood vessels, allowing good blood flow. Also oil does not increase insulin levels, thus reducing the non-insulin tolerance that exists in many people and causes an increase in blood sugar levels. Find here more information about the great health benefits of olive oil . Many studies show that consumption of one teaspoon cinnamon (2.5 g) to three teaspoons a day has a positive effect on reducing blood glucose levels. It was found that th Continue reading >>

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes diagnosed during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in about 7 percent of all pregnancies. It usually arises in the second half of pregnancy and goes away as soon as the baby is born. However, if gestational diabetes is not treated, you may experience complications. The first step in treating gestational diabetes is to modify your diet to help keep your blood sugar level in the normal range, while still eating a healthy diet. Most women with well-controlled blood sugar deliver healthy babies without any complications. One way of keeping your blood sugar levels in normal range is by monitoring the amount of carbohydrates in your diet. Carbohydrate foods digest and turn into blood glucose (a type of sugar). Glucose in the blood is necessary because it is the fuel for your body and nourishment your baby receives from you. However, it's important that glucose levels stay within target. Carbohydrates in Food Carbohydrates are found in the following foods: Milk and yogurt Fruits and juices Rice, grains, cereals and pasta Breads, tortillas, crackers, bagels and rolls Dried beans, split peas and lentils Potatoes, corn, yams, peas and winter squash Sweets and desserts, such as sugar, honey, syrups, pastries, cookies, soda and candy also typically have large amounts of carbohydrate. Carbohydrates in foods are measured in units called grams. You can count how many carbohydrates are in foods by reading food labels and learning the exchange lists. The two most important pieces of information on food labels for a carbohydrate-controlled diet is the serving size and grams of total carbohydrate in each serving. Dietary Recommendations It is important to be meet with a registered dietitian to have your diet assessed. The dietitian will calcula Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating For Diabetes Adapted For Punjabi Diet

Healthy Eating For Diabetes Adapted For Punjabi Diet

Introduction Eating and Diabetes Diabetes is a life-long condition. It occurs when the pancreas does not make enough insulin and/or the body cannot use the insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas that helps carry glucose (sugar) from the blood to cells in the body where it is used for energy. When not enough insulin is made or it cannot do its job properly, the body's cells do not receive their source of energy (glucose). This results in a high blood glucose level. Over time, high blood glucose levels can lead to heart, kidney, eye, nerve, and blood vessel problems. Attention to diet and exercise, blood glucose monitoring, and sometimes pills and/or insulin injections are needed to manage diabetes. If you are overweight, losing weight can help improve your diabetes control. The information in this fact sheet will help you balance your diet to help you reach your goal blood glucose level. Steps You Can Take Follow these steps for healthy eating with diabetes: 1. Eat regular meals and snacks. Eat at least three meals every day, at regular times. Space meals 4-6 hours apart. Try to eat meals that are the same size, especially with the same amount of carbohydrate. Snacks may be needed between meals and/or before bedtime. This can be determined for each person based on many factors such as: the amount of time between your meals whether you take insulin and/or pills for diabetes your risk for low blood glucose your exercise level and weight goals 2. Plan balanced meals that have foods from at least three of the four food groups listed below: Vegetables and Fruit Grains and Starches (roti, bread, cereal, rice, pasta, bun, potato), Milk and Alternatives (milk, lassi, yogurt, soy beverage, evaporated canned milk) Meat and Alternatives (fish, poultry, meat, eg Continue reading >>

Managing Type 2 Without Meds: 3 Stories

Managing Type 2 Without Meds: 3 Stories

My goal is to be as healthy as I can. If something happens and one day I'm back on medication, my goal is still to be healthy. It had been about a year since Akua Jitahadi felt like herself. But she was 51 and expected menopause to kick in soon. Plus, she and her daughter had just moved to oppressively hot Arizona. So she brushed off the tired, sluggish feeling as a side effect of being a middle-aged woman adjusting to sweltering temps. And then, overnight, her vision dimmed. Something was most definitely wrong. The verdict from her doctor: type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. "Of course, I broke down in tears," Jitahadi, now 55, says. "I wasn't ready to hear this. I always associated diabetes with 'Oh no, it's really bad.' " After Jitahadi spent a few weeks on medication, her vision cleared and she began to feel better. It didn't last long. "I hated metformin . I had all the colon and digestive issues on it," she says. "I never knew if I would be OK on it or if I'd be nauseous. I'd question whether I wanted to go out with my friends." When she asked for an alternative medication, her doctor said metformin was the best drug for the job, so Jitahadi stuck it out for a year. After that, she decided to make major lifestyle changes in hopes of quitting her medications. That proved more difficult than she had imagined. She hadn't seen a diabetes educator. The only dietitian covered by her insurer was too far away. And her doctor's sole advice was for Jitahadi to watch what she ate. "I was scared in the beginning," says Jitahadi. "It was through friends and starting to read [about diabetes] that I knew I could do this. I could get through this." Jitahadi bought books on diabetes, nutrition, the glycemic index, and diabetes-friendly meals. Instead of slightly modifying he Continue reading >>

Diabetes 'cure': Diet & Exercise Work For Some

Diabetes 'cure': Diet & Exercise Work For Some

People with Type 2 diabetes can reverse their condition with diet and exercise, although remission is not very common, according to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. After one year of regular counseling sessions to encourage weight loss and physical activity, 11.5 percent of obese adults with Type 2 diabetes saw their condition at least partially reverse — meaning their blood sugar levels decreased to those of a prediabetic, without the need for medication. Just 2 percent of those who did not receive intensive counseling partially reversed their diabetes. After four years, the rate of partial diabetes remission in the counseling group declined slightly, to 7 percent. Full remission — achieving normal blood sugar levels — was rarer, with just 1.3 percent of people in the counseling group and 0.1 percent in the non-counseling group meeting this goal after one year. Type 2 diabetes has traditionally been seen as a progressive disease that is managed rather than cured. Recent studies have suggested it can be reversed with weight loss surgery, or by following an extreme diet that mimics surgery. However, until this study, little was known about the rate of long-term diabetes reversal without surgery or extreme dieting. About 26 million Americans have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The study confirms that complete Type 2 diabetes remission is rare, but that partial remission is an obtainable goal for some patients, the researchers said. Experts said that, because the definitions of complete or partial diabetes remission are arbitrary, researchers should not focus on these measures. What's more important is that patients improve their weight and blood sugar levels, as people in this study did, said Dr Continue reading >>

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