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Cdc Tips For Eating Healthy With Diabetes

Essential Foods For Seniors With Diabetes

Essential Foods For Seniors With Diabetes

One in 10 Americans have diabetes and another 84 million adults in the United States are at high risk of developing the disease, according to Health.gov. One of the best ways for people with diabetes to lower their risk, is to eat right and live a healthier life. November is American Diabetes Month and to recognize the month, we’ve compiled a list of must-have foods, shopping tips and resources for seniors with diabetes. Foods for Seniors with Diabetes Making healthy food choices can be challenging — particularly for seniors with diabetic restrictions — but it’s a critical part of managing diabetes without health complications. Simply by controlling portion size, eating right and sticking to regular mealtimes, it’s possible to help keep blood sugar and body weight within the target range. That’s the core of a diabetes diet. A diabetes diet, according to A Place for Mom Senior Nutrition experts, is also naturally rich in nutrients and low in calories and fat, with an emphasis on fruits, vegetables and whole grains. But what does that mean for your shopping list? Foods That Diabetics Should Avoid If you or a loved one has diabetes, there are a handful of foods whose intake must be limited. It doesn’t mean you have to go through your kitchen and pitch every grain of sugar you see, but it does mean paying attention to how much of these items you consume. Seniors with diabetes should avoid or limit: Alcohol intake Cholesterol: The Mayo Clinic suggests no more than 200 mg per day Fat: In particular, avoid foods containing saturated fat or trans fat Salt: Canned, packaged and processed foods are often culprits when it comes to hidden sodium — you want to aim for 2,000 mg per day or less Sugar: Watch out for extra sugar in drinks and packaged snack foods Foods T Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association Concurs With Cdcs Call For Continued Urgency To Decrease The Burden Of Diabetes

American Diabetes Association Concurs With Cdcs Call For Continued Urgency To Decrease The Burden Of Diabetes

American Diabetes Association Concurs with CDCs Call for Continued Urgency to Decrease the Burden of Diabetes The American Diabetes Association (Association) urges renewed attention to and investment in stemming the diabetes epidemic, following the release of the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions (CDC) National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017 . The new report reviewed 2015 data to confirm more than 114 million Americans have diabetes or prediabetes. While the rate of new diabetes diagnoses remains steady, the report details 30.3 million Americans 9.4 percent of the U.S. population have diabetes; an increase from 29.1 million in 2014. Another 84.1 million have prediabetes, a condition in which blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than normal, but not high enough for a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. In addition, the rate of diabetes among ethnic minorities continues to be higher: American Indians/Alaska Natives (15.1 percent); non-Hispanic blacks (12.7 percent); and Hispanics (12.1 percent); Asians (8.0 percent); compared to non-Hispanic whites (7.4 percent). Diabetes and prediabetes remain serious threats for more than one-third of Americansthe statistics are staggering, said the Associations Chief Scientific, Medical & Mission Officer William T. Cefalu, MD. We must continue to innovate in scientific research and to translate findings to the clinical level to decrease the prevalence of diabetes. This data clearly confirms it is critical for us to continue to provide the education and support needed to improve health outcomes and decrease the daily burden of diabetes. We must reduce the incidence of diabetes and its enormous costs, including both the financial costs and the human toll of lost quality of life and lives, to our communities across the country. Peo Continue reading >>

Eat Well!

Eat Well!

When you have diabetes, deciding what, when, and how much to eat may seem challenging. So, what can you eat, and how can you fit the foods you love into your meal plan? Eating healthy food at home and choosing healthy food when eating out are important in managing your diabetes. The first step is to work with your doctor or dietitian to make a meal plan just for you. As soon as you find out you have diabetes, ask for a meeting with your doctor or dietitian to discuss how to make and follow a meal plan. During this meeting, you will learn how to choose healthier foods—a variety of vegetables and fruits, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat dairy foods, lean meats, and other proteins. You will also learn to watch your portion sizes and what to drink while staying within your calorie, fat, and carbohydrate (carbs) limits. You can still enjoy food while eating healthy. But how do you do that? Here are a few tips to help you when eating at home and away from home. Eating Healthy Portions An easy way to know portion sizes is to use the “plate method.” Looking at your basic 9-inch dinner plate[PDF – 14 MB], draw an imaginary line down the middle of the plate, and divide one side in half. Fill the largest section with non-starchy vegetables, like salad, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and carrots. In one of the smaller sections, put a grain or starchy food such as bread, noodles, rice, corn or potatoes. In the other smaller section, put your protein, like fish, chicken, lean beef, tofu, or cooked dried beans. Learn more at Create Your Plate, an interactive resource from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) that shows how a healthy plate should look. This tool allows you to select different foods and see the portion sizes you should use in planning your meal Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Feet

Diabetes And Your Feet

If you have diabetes, here’s a way to keep standing on your own two feet: check them every day—even if they feel fine—and see your doctor if you have a cut or blister that won’t heal. There’s a lot to manage if you have diabetes: checking your blood sugar, making healthy food, finding time to be active, taking medicines, going to doctor’s appointments. With all that, your feet might be the last thing on your mind. But daily care is one of the best ways to prevent foot complications. Between 60% and 70% of people with diabetes have diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage). You can have nerve damage in any part of your body, but nerves in your feet and legs are most often affected. Nerve damage can cause you to lose feeling in your feet. Feeling No Pain Some people with nerve damage have numbness, tingling, or pain, but others have no symptoms. Nerve damage can also lower your ability to feel pain, heat, or cold. Living without pain sounds pretty good, but it comes at a high cost. Pain is the body’s way of telling you something’s wrong so you can take care of yourself. If you don’t feel pain in your feet, you may not notice a cut, blister, sore, or other problem. Small problems can become serious if they aren’t treated early. Risk Factors Anyone with diabetes can develop nerve damage, but these factors increase your risk: Nerve damage, along with poor circulation—another diabetes complication—puts you at risk for developing a foot ulcer (a sore or wound) that could get infected and not heal well. If an infection doesn’t get better with treatment, your toe, foot, or part of your leg may need to be amputated (removed by surgery) to prevent the infection from spreading and to save your life. When you check your feet every day, you can catch problems early Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet

Diabetic Diet

If you have diabetes, your body cannot make or properly use insulin. This leads to high blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels. Healthy eating helps keep your blood sugar in your target range. It is a critical part of managing your diabetes, because controlling your blood sugar can prevent the complications of diabetes. A registered dietitian can help make an eating plan just for you. It should take into account your weight, medicines, lifestyle, and other health problems you have. Healthy diabetic eating includes Limiting foods that are high in sugar Eating smaller portions, spread out over the day Being careful about when and how many carbohydrates you eat Eating a variety of whole-grain foods, fruits and vegetables every day Eating less fat Limiting your use of alcohol Using less salt NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

Change Your Ways, Reduce Your Risk: 7 Tips For Preventing Diabetes

Change Your Ways, Reduce Your Risk: 7 Tips For Preventing Diabetes

Piggybacking the obesity epidemic, diabetes rates continue to surge. On June 10, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new and alarming statistics on diabetes. An estimated 29 million Americans have the disease, a nearly 12 percent increase from the 26 million diabetics in 2010. One-fourth of people don’t know they have diabetes—a scary fact, given the complications of chronically high blood sugar: heart attack, stroke, sight-robbing eye disease, kidney failure, foot amputation. Worse, another 86 million adults have prediabetes, a condition of elevated blood sugar just below the threshold for diabetes. The vast majority of cases are type 2 diabetes, a condition characterized by insulin resistance, meaning cells fail to respond to insulin. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin. The good news is type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. A seminal 2006 study demonstrated that intensive lifestyle modification reduced the risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent, as compared to a 31 percent risk reduction achieved with the antidiabetes drug metformin. 7 tips to help reduce your risk: Lose excess body fat. Being overweight is a big risk factor for diabetes. In contrast, every kilogram (2.2 pounds) of weight lost reduces diabetes risk by 16 percent. Follow a plant-based, low-calorie diet. Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables—a dietary pattern studies show reduces diabetes risk. Foods to avoid are those rich in trans fats (also called hydrogenated fat), saturated fat, and sugar. Drink water. Studies link sugar-sweetened beverages with obesity and diabetes. Cut them out of your diet and the risk of both conditions falls. Move your body. Physical inactivity raises the risk of diabetes. Exercise renders cells more sensitive t Continue reading >>

Stay Healthy | Living With Diabetes | Diabetes | Cdc

Stay Healthy | Living With Diabetes | Diabetes | Cdc

To receive email updates about this page, enter your email address: Its very important for you to take your diabetes medicines exactly as directed. Not taking medications correctly may lower the level of glucose and cause the insulin your body to go up. The medicines then become less effective when taken. Some people report not feeling well as a reason for stopping their medication or not taking it as prescribed. Tell your doctor if your medicines are making you sick. He or she may be able to help you deal with side effects so you can feel better. Dont just stop taking your medicines, because your health depends on it. This section provides information about staying healthy with your diabetes. What routine medical examinations and tests are needed for people with diabetes? Measure your blood pressure at every visit. Check your feet for sores at every visit, and give a thorough foot exam at least once a year. Give you a hemoglobin A1C test at least twice a year to determine what your average blood glucose level was for the past 2 to 3 months. Test your urine and blood to check your kidney function at least once a year. Test your blood lipids (fats)total cholesterol; LDL, or low-density lipoprotein (bad cholesterol); HDL, or high-density lipoprotein (good cholesterol); and triglycerides at least once a year. You should also get a dental checkup twice a year, a dilated eye exam once a year, an annual flu shot, and a pneumonia shot. For more information, see Tests and Goals for Each Visit and Tests and Goals for Each Year from the Center for Disease Control and Preventions (CDC) publication, Take Charge of Your Diabetes. How does maintaining healthy blood glucose levels help people with diabetes stay healthy? Research studies in the United States and other countries have s Continue reading >>

5 Healthy Eating Tips For The Holidays

5 Healthy Eating Tips For The Holidays

Your recipe for staying on track no matter whats cooking. Tis the season for family, festivity, and foodlots of food. Temptations are everywhere, and parties and travel disrupt daily routines. Whats more, it all goes on for weeks. How do you stick to your diabetes meal plan when everyone around you seems to be splurging? Here are 5 tips that can help: You may not be able to control what food youre served, and youre bound to see other people eating a lot of tempting treats. Meet the challenges armed with a plan: Eat close to your usual times to keep your blood sugar steady. If your meal is served later than normal, eat a small snack at your usual mealtime and eat a little less when dinner is served. Invited to a party? Offer to bring a healthy dish along. If you have a sweet treat, cut back on other carbs (like potatoes and bread) during the meal. Dont skip meals to save up for a feast. It will be harder to keep your blood sugar in control, and youll be really hungry and more likely to overeat. If you slip up, get right back to healthy eating with your next meal. Have pumpkin pie instead of pecan pie. Even with a dollop of whipped cream, youll cut calories and sugar by at least a third. Break physical activity up into smaller chunks so it fits into your schedule, like walking 10 minutes several times a day. Schedule some me time every daya nap, dog walk, or hot bath to get your energy back for the next celebration. When you face a spread of delicious holiday food, make healthy choices easier: Have a small plate of the foods you like best and then move away from the buffet table. Start with vegetables to take the edge off your appetite. Eat slowly. It takes at least 20 minutes for your brain to realize youre full. Avoid or limit alcohol. If you do have an alcoholic drink Continue reading >>

Dinner Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Dinner Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Every 23 seconds, someone in the United States is diagnosed with diabetes. But although diabetes is widespread, public awareness and understanding of the disease can be limited. The Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC) report that 29 million Americans currently have diabetes, but a quarter of them do not know it. Another 86 million adults have prediabetes, with 90 percent of them being unaware. Diabetes is a serious disease that can, if uncontrolled, lead to loss of eyesight, cardiovascular problems, kidney damage, and even amputation of lower limbs. The good news is, it can be managed and these serious health problems can be avoided. Diet techniques for diabetes The even better news is that diabetes can be managed through a combination of exercise, health care, and diet. Despite popular belief, a diet can be varied, tasty, and fulfilling. The "diabetic plate" Maintaining a consistent, well-balanced diet can help people with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels under control. Portion control is also important, which is where the "diabetic plate" comes in. Endorsed by several organizations, including the American Diabetes Association, the "diabetic plate" can be very helpful when planning dinners. Follow these simple steps: Draw an imaginary line down the center of your plate. Divide one half into two further sections, so that your plate is now divided into three. Fill the biggest section with non-starchy vegetables, such as spinach, green beans, salsa, mushrooms, broccoli, or others. Use proteins to fill one of the smaller sections. Good options are skinless chicken, salmon, shrimp, tempeh or tofu, eggs, and much more. Legumes can fit in either the protein or the starch section because they provide both protein and carbohydrate. Grains, legumes and starch Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating And Cooking

Healthy Eating And Cooking

To receive email updates about Diabetes Education enter your email address: Healthy eating is an important part of diabetes management, but it can be hard to know where to start. Use these resources to help you eat healthier at home and away from home. Eat Right Learning how to eat right is an important part of managing your diabetes. This web page provides tips on healthy eating, weight management, recipes, and special diets. Remember, eating healthy is not just for people with diabetes. Tips for Enjoying Summer Gatherings if You Have Diabetes Making healthy food choices, even while on vacation, is a key step to staying healthy. NDEP has tips for eating healthy over the summer, especially when youre with a group of people. Healthy Eating During Winter Gatherings for People with Diabetes Winter is a season of holiday celebrations, football playoffs, and other occasions when family and friends get together over meals and snacks. Learn to make healthy food choices and limit portion sizes without giving up all your favorite foods. These culturally-tailored tip sheets help people with diabetes make healthy food choices at holidays, celebrations and buffets. Continue reading >>

U.s. Doctors, Cdc Join Forces In New Diabetes Prevention Effort Webmd

U.s. Doctors, Cdc Join Forces In New Diabetes Prevention Effort Webmd

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing the number of Americans with type 2 diabetes is a new mission shared by the American Medical Association (AMA) and the leading U.S. health agency, officials said Thursday. "Our health care system cannot sustain the growing number of people developing diabetes ," Ann Albright, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's division of diabetes translation, said during a morning news conference announcing the partnership. More than 86 million Americans are living with prediabetes , the precursor to type 2 diabetes , but nearly 90 percent don't know it, the CDC said. "That's one in every three people. This isn't just a concern -- it's a crisis," AMA President Dr. Robert Wah said during the news conference. Untreated, type 2 diabetes can lead to kidney disease , amputations and vision loss . The chronic disease, associated with being overweight and sedentary, has increased alongside the U.S. obesity epidemic. The new program's goal is to make doctors aware that they should order blood tests to screen their patients for prediabetes, and refer these borderline patients to diabetes prevention programs. Lifestyle changes that involve healthy eating , weight loss and physical activity can help delay or prevent the debilitating disease, experts said. "Research shows that screening, testing and referring people who are at risk for prediabetes is critical," added Albright. "Research also shows that when people know they have prediabetes they are more likely to take action." The new program is called Prevent Diabetes STAT (Screen, Test, Act Today). Diabetes costs more than $245 billion each year in health care spending and reduced productivity, Wah said. Albright explained that prediabetes occurs when blood su Continue reading >>

Taking Care Of Your Diabetes

Taking Care Of Your Diabetes

To receive email updates about Diabetes Education enter your email address: Taking care of yourself and your diabetes can help you feel good today and in the future. Use these booklets, tip sheets, and fact sheets to help you take control of your health by working with your health care team and adopting healthy behaviors to avoid complications and enjoy a healthier life. This booklet helps people with diabetes understand, monitor, and manage their diabetes to help them stay healthy. It is especially useful for people who have recently been diagnosed with diabetes or who just want to learn more about managing the disease. Available in English, Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, French, Gujarati, Haitian, Hindi, Korean, Spanish, Tagalog, Urdu and Vietnamese. Tips to Help You Stay Healthy With Diabetes Use this tip sheet to help you manage your diabetes and live a long and active life. Print and use the Diabetes Care Record and Action Plan. This web page offers guidance on how to manage your diabetes to stay healthy and how to deal with financial costs, complications, and other issues that people with diabetes might face. Learn how to manage your diabetes with the help of your health care team with this tip sheet and patient care checklist. Managing your medicines is very important for people with diabetes. Use this fact sheet to learn how to manage your medicines and get your doctors and pharmacists involved in the management of your diabetes. Continue reading >>

Your Game Plan To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Your Game Plan To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes prevention is proven, possible, and powerful. Taking small steps, such as eating less and moving more to lose weight, can help you prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and related health problems. The information below is based on the NIH-sponsored Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) research study, which showed that people could prevent or delay type 2 diabetes even if they were at high risk for the disease. Follow these steps to get started on your game plan. If you are overweight, set a weight-loss goal that you can reach. Try to lose at least 5 to 10 percent of your current weight. For example, if you weigh 200 pounds, a 10-percent weight-loss goal means that you will try to lose 20 pounds. Research shows that you can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing weight by following a reduced-calorie eating plan and being more active each day. Find ways to be active every day. Start slowly and add more activity until you get to at least 30 minutes of physical activity, like a brisk walk, 5 days a week. Keep track of your progress to help you reach your goals. Use your phone, a printed log, online tracker, app, or other device to record your weight, what you eat and drink, and how long you are active. Ask your health care team about steps you can take to prevent type 2 diabetes. Learn about other ways to help reach your goal, such as taking the medicine metformin. Also, ask if your health insurance covers services for weight loss or physical activity. It’s not easy to make and stick to lifelong changes in what you eat and how often you are active. Get your friends and family involved by asking them to support your changes. You can also join a diabetes prevention program to meet other people who are making similar changes. Set a weight-loss goal If you are ov Continue reading >>

Prevent Type 2 Diabetes In Children, Teens | Raising Austin

Prevent Type 2 Diabetes In Children, Teens | Raising Austin

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention want parents to think about Type 2 Diabetes, thats what used to be called adult-onset diabetes. It almost never happened to kids or teens, instead kids would get Type 1 or juvenile diabetes. Now with about one-third of American children being overweight, doctors are starting to see Type 2 diabetes in kids, sometimes as young as 10 years old. Typically its happening in their teen years when hormone fluctuations make it harder for the body to absorb insulin. A lot of obesity prevention programs are done in schools. In 2009, Lizbeth Lopez was jumping rope during class time at Walnut Creek Elementary School. American-Statesman 2009 Worry about weight. People who are overweight or more likely to have insulin resistance, especially if they have excess weight around their bellies. Limit TV time (and the mindless eating that comes with it.) Shop on a full stomach so youre not tempted to buy unhealthy food. Teach your kids to read food labels to understand which foods are healthiest. Have meals together as a family as often as you can. Serve small portions; let kids ask for seconds. Get active.Kids should get 60 minutes of activity a day. It doesnt have to be all together, but it should add up to an hour of movement. That activities helps keep kids at a healthier weight and helps the body better use insulin. Take parent and kid fitness classes together. Make physical activity more fun; try new things. Ask kids what activities they like best everyone is different. Have a fit kit available a jump rope, hand weights, resistance bands. Plan active outings, like hiking or biking. Move more in and out of the house vacuuming, raking leaves, gardening. Turn chores into games, like racing to see how fast you can clean the house. Care about Continue reading >>

Cdc Tips For Prediabetes Prevention And Treatment

Cdc Tips For Prediabetes Prevention And Treatment

CDC tips for prediabetes prevention and treatment CDC tips for prediabetes prevention and treatment Prediabetes does not always show clear symptoms; however, it can lead to type 2 diabetes, heart disease, or stroke. According to the CDC, 86 million American adultsmore than 1 in 3have prediabetes, and 90% of those with prediabetes do not realize they have it. Prediabetes does not always show clear symptoms, so it often is undetected until serious health problems arise. Risk factors for prediabetes include: Having a parent or sibling with type 2 diabetes Being physically active fewer than 3 times a week Either having gestational diabetes or giving birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds Race and ethnicity also play a role in the development of prediabetes; African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, Pacific Islanders, and some Asian Americans have a higher risk. The risk for developing prediabetes can decrease with modest weight loss and enhanced physical activity. Modest weight loss requires 5% to 7% of body weight, and regular physical activity includes 150 minutes a week of brisk walking or jogging. The CDC National Diabetes Prevention Program helps people make lifestyle changes to prevent type 2 diabetes. They include: Discovering how to eat healthy and incorporate daily physical activity Understanding how to manage stress, stay motivated, and solve problems that can slow progress The Surprising Truth About Prediabetes [CDC feature]. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. January 25, 2017. Continue reading >>

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