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Cdc Diabetes Education

Diabetes - Home

Diabetes - Home

The Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) is working on diabetes prevention and control through the HealthPromotion andChronic Disease Control Partnership. IDPH collaborates with private and public agenciesand promote and provide education about diabetes prevention and control through training for health care providers; provide educational materials for communities, health care providers, and certified outpatient diabetes education programs; certify community-based outpatient diabetes education programs; maintain involvement with diabetes care providers and educators statewide; monitor, evaluate and report diabetes-related data, and promote and support community-based self-management programs for people with or at risk for chronic disease. Iowa is part of a national effort for health promotion and chronic disease prevention and management. To learn more about the work being done inIowa, including work related to diabetes prevention and management, click here . About 1 in 3adults inthe U.S.have prediabetes. About 9 out of 10 people with prediabetes do not know they have it. Prediabetes is when your blood sugar level is higher than normal but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Fortunately, people with prediabetes can take steps to prevent type 2 diabetes. The National Diabetes Prevention Program is a proven lifestyle change program that can help prevent or delay getting type 2 diabetes. (Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Prediabetes-Related Links for General Public Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. About 1 in 11 people have diabetes in the U.S. Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes. If current trends continue, about 1 in 3 Americans will develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. R Continue reading >>

Cdc Report Highlights Need For Diabetes Self-management Education In Remote Areas

Cdc Report Highlights Need For Diabetes Self-management Education In Remote Areas

In Focus Blog Published on: April 27, 2017 CDC Report Highlights Need for Diabetes Self-Management Education in Remote Areas While the report documents the shortage of DSME programs in rural areas, it does not address the reimbursement challenges that confront the use of telehealth to reach underserved groups. Diabetes self-management education (DSME) has a proven track record of helping patients improve and maintain glycemic control. According to a new study from the CDC, however, DSME programs are harder to find in remote counties if the people who live there have less education and higher rates of unemployment. The trouble with this, the researchers find, is that diabetes tends to be prevalent among disadvantaged groups. The study, published today in CDCs Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, finds that only 38% of the nonmetropolitan counties in the United States have a DSME program. For purposes of the study, CDC included programs either recognized by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) or accredited by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). The requirements are significant, and the CDC report identified a lack of qualified educators as a reason for fewer programs in remote areas. CDC found that the odds of nonmetropolitan areas having a DSME program increased as the share of people with insurance coverage rose. Chances of having access to DSME in a rural area also rose along with the level of education or employment. While program location did not necessarily track with the expected rates of diabetes, it did align with overall numbers of people diagnosed with diabetes. Counties without programs, the authors wrote, were less affluent, had more black and Hispanic persons, and had higher prevalence and incidence rates of diabetes compared with n Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

To protect, promote and improve the health of our community Im not worried about diabetes anymore. Before I started the DPP class on April 5, 2016, I WAS worried about diabetes every time I went for my check-up. I wondered each time, would this be the visit where I would be told I was now a diabetic? At my last doctors appointment before starting the DPP class, my hemoglobin A1C was 6.4. At the bottom of the lab result it said that a result of 6.5 was diagnostic of diabetes. I also weighed more at that visit than I had ever weighed in my life. I left the office that day almost in tears and knew I had to do something or I would have diabetes like my mother, brother, and many of my aunts and uncles. The DPP class has taught me how I can eat healthier and have a healthier lifestyle. In the class we work together, we support each other, and we laugh together. I love that the class helped us set a realistic goal for weight loss and stressed the importance of exercise. I did meet the weight loss goal set by the class and am now working on my next personal goal for weight loss. Before starting the class, I rarely got exercise. Now my husband and I walk in the evenings as many days as the weather allows. Since starting the class, probably the day that stood out most to me was when my sons, who live two or more hours away, came home for the weekend. Both asked me how much weight I had lost as soon as they walked through the door and saw me. When my boys noticed, it made me realize that this was really working for me and making a difference in my life. It was also a good day when I had a hemoglobin A1C of 5.8 several weeks after starting the class. Im looking forward to my next check-up now because I know my A1C will be even lower. I would encourage anyone who has risks for diab Continue reading >>

Betsy Rodrguez, Rn, Msn, Cde

Betsy Rodrguez, Rn, Msn, Cde

Deputy Director, CDCs National Diabetes Education Program Betsy Rodrguez is Deputy Director, National Diabetes Education Program, and a public health advisor for the Health Education and Promotion Team at the Translation, Health Education and Evaluation Branch in the Division of Diabetes Translation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Ms. Rodrguez is a diabetes educator and health disparities supporter of racial and ethnic minorities and vulnerable populations in the United States and Latin America. She works as a bicultural specialist in health communication strategies and the development of diabetes educational resources for Hispanics/Latinos and other ethnic minority groups. For the past 15 years, Ms. Rodrguez has been diligently working to support Hispanics and Latinos living in the States and Latin America that experienced some inequity due to diabetes. She has developed multiple diabetes educational resources that are culturally and linguistically appropriate for this population. She conducts trainings to professionals and community health workers (promotores) across the U.S., Puerto Rico, Central and South America, Mexico and the U.S.-Mexico border. Ms. Rodrguez has been instrumental in forming numerous health and human services organizations locally, regionally and nationally, such as the HHS/OMH Promotores de Salud/Community Health Workers Initiative. She provides advice on Latino and minority health issues, diabetes education and CHWs to many local, state, regional and national organizations, including academia, and presents her work at national and international conferences throughout the year. She is currently contributing to the Community Guides review of Interventions Engaging Community Health Workers for Diabetes Management. Currently, Bet Continue reading >>

Diabetes Resources Arkansas Department Of Health

Diabetes Resources Arkansas Department Of Health

Diabetes Self-Management Education Programs (DSME) Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Education Programs (DSME/S) recognized by the American Diabetes Association or accredited by the American Association of Diabetes Educators meet National Standards for DSME/S. The programs assure patients and payers that the practice offers quality, comprehensive diabetes education and care, and meet criteria for Medicare Reimbursement. For more information onapplying or receiving technical assistance with the DSME application process contact the Arkansas Department of Health,Chronic Disease Prevention and Control Branch at 501-661-2942. The American Medical Association (AMA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) joined forces to take urgent action to Prevent Diabetes STAT and are urging others to join in this critical effort. Prevent Diabetes STAT: Screen, Test, Act - Today, is a multi-year initiative to reach more Americans with prediabetes and stop the progression to type 2 diabetes. The AMA and CDC have co-developed a toolkit to serve as a guide for physicians and other health care providers on the best methods to screen and refer high-risk patients to diabetes prevention programs in their communities. There is also an online screening tool for patients at www.preventdiabetesstat.org to help them determine their risk for type 2 diabetes. The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) has created the Small Steps. Big Rewards. Prevent type 2 Diabetes campaign. The NDEP has created campaign messages and materials for people at risk for diabetes, including those at high risk: African Americans, Hispanic and Latino Americans, Native Americans and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, women with a history of gestational diabetes and older adults. In Continue reading >>

Diabetes Education Maine, Diabetes Patient Education Maine, Diabetes Care And Education Maine

Diabetes Education Maine, Diabetes Patient Education Maine, Diabetes Care And Education Maine

diabetes education maine, diabetes patient education maine, diabetes care and education maine Home Services Outpatient Services Diabetes Education Our Diabetes Program began in 1992 and has grown steadily through the years. We work very closely with the Diabetes Prevention and Control (DCPC) program of Maine, which is part of a CDC state funded program. This DCPC program, in existence since 1972, was the model program for all other states diabetes education programs. Blue Hill Memorial Hospitals Diabetes Education Program is not only Maine-state certified but has also been recognized nationally by the ADA (American Diabetes Association) as a Certified Diabetes Program since 2001, with the director being a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE). The ADEF/DSMT (Ambulatory Diabetes Education and Follow-up/Me CDC and Diabetes Self-Management Training/American Diabetes Association) Program meets the standards set by the state of Maine as well as the National Standard set by the ADA. The diabetes program empowers individuals with diabetes to learn more about self-management of their disease so they can live longer and more healthfully with diabetes. Continue reading >>

Webinars | National Diabetes Education Program | Diabetes | Cdc

Webinars | National Diabetes Education Program | Diabetes | Cdc

To receive email updates about Diabetes Education enter your email address: Enhance your professional development with NDEPs webinars. Learn new approaches for engaging communities, increasing cultural competence, and promoting diabetes prevention and management. Click here for information about continuing education for the webinar series [PDF 47K] . Community Collaboration to Prevent and Manage Diabetes Collaboration involving a variety of partners is critical to the delivery of effective and efficient type 2 diabetes prevention and management education within high risk/high burden communities. Webinar participants will hear how diabetes prevention and management is being addressed through community collaboration in rural, urban and high-risk/high-burden settings. To receive continuing education click here . Food Insecurity and Its Impact on Diabetes Management: Identifying Interventions That Make a Difference Food insecurity can negatively affect health outcomes. It can impact diabetes self-management, glucose control, health care utilization, and ones ability to cope with a chronic illness. This NDEP webinar will focus on defining food insecurity, its association with diabetes, and strategies that diabetes educators, health educators, and community health workers can use to help people with diabetes improve self-care. Web on Demand: Start Date March 23, 2017 Expiration Date March 23, 2021 To receive continuing education click here . The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines: What Are They, How Have They Changed, and How Can You Use Them in Practice? To receive continuing education click here . Effective patient-provider communication is the foundation for providing patient-centered diabetes care. Webinar presenters describe strategies that diabetes educators, health educator Continue reading >>

Education And Support

Education And Support

To receive email updates about this page, enter your email address: Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support (DSMES) services help people with diabetes learn how to take the best care of themselves. Ask your doctor for a referral to DSMES services to help you manage your diabetes. When you learn that you have diabetes, your first question might be, What can I eat? DSMES will answer this question and many others. Your first step should be ask your doctor to refer you for DSMES. If your doctor does not talk to you about these services, bring it up during your visit. DSMES services include a health care team who will teach you how to stay healthy and how to make what you learn a regular part of your life. Make better decisions about your diabetes. Work with your health care team to get the support you need. Understand how to take care of yourself and learn the skills to: Cope with the emotional side of diabetes. Reduce your risk of other health problems. People who have the knowledge and support to manage their diabetes are healthier than those who do not. Learning how to control your diabetes will save money and time, and help you have fewer emergency and hospital visits. Knowing how and when to take your medication, how to monitor your blood sugar (glucose), and how to take care of yourself, helps you manage your diabetes better. Managing your diabetes will help you avoid or delay serious health complications. The skills you learn will help you take better care of yourself. Diabetes management starts with you. Its important to go for DSMES services when you first find out you have diabetes so you can learn how to take care of yourself. However, there are three other times DSMES can help you. Read about them in the table below. When you first find out that you have Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention And Management Resources

Diabetes Prevention And Management Resources

General Public, Health Care Providers and Other Health Professionals The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) The AADE is a multi-disciplinary professional membership organization dedicated to improving diabetes care through innovative education, management and support. Practice and patient resources, research, news and publications, and other materials are available at the AADE website. American Association of Diabetes Educators American Diabetes Association (ADA) This organization funds research and delivers services to help prevent diabetes and help those who have diabetes live healthier lives. The ADA website includes basic information about diabetes, diabetes risk tests, information about living with diabetes, among other services. American Diabetes Association American Medical Association (AMA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Preventing Type 2 Diabetes: A Guide This guide provides information to help health care providers refer patients with prediabetes to an evidence-based diabetes prevention program. American Medical Association (AMA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Preventing Type 2 Diabetes: A Guide Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – Diabetes Page The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Diabetes page includes basic information about diabetes prevention and control, diabetes programs and initiatives, and data and statistics relating to diabetes in the United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Diabetes Centers for Disease Control (CDC) National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) On the CDC NDPP page, people can learn about prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, how to join a CDC-recognized diabetes prevention lifestyle change program to help prevent or delay type 2 diabet Continue reading >>

Diabetes Resources And Information

Diabetes Resources And Information

Headaches in people who generally dont have them A doctor may have to run a series of tests in order to make a diagnosis of diabetes . The most common test for diabetes is checking the blood for sugar levels. In this test, a doctor, nurse, or technician pricks finger and uses a test strip and meter to get a blood glucose reading. Your doctor can also test your blood sugar when they take blood for other reasons, such as at a yearly physical. No matter which way your blood is tested, youll get a reading that will show whether your blood sugar level is high or not. Your doctor may ask you to fast first and take a sugar reading first thing in the morning. Thats the most accurate way to see how well your body is processing sugar. For those who have Type I diabetes and some people who have Type II and must take insulin to control it, testing blood sugar several times a day may become standard. That can be especially important around mealtimes, because youll need to know how many units of insulin to take to balance out the meal youre consuming. Testing is also important for long-term control, and a test called the A1c can provide you with a summary of how well your blood sugar control is doing over the course of a three-month period. That way you can see if you need to adjust your treatment, and if you take medication your doctor may have some suggestions to help you control your blood sugar better. A diagnosis of diabetes is serious, but it isnt a reason to panic. There are many ways to control and treat it, depending on whether you have Type I, Type II, or gestational diabetes. If you arent a woman and arent pregnant, you can rule out gestational diabetes right away. If youre past your teenage years, you can generally rule out Type I diabetes as well. While its possible for Continue reading >>

About Diabetes

About Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic (long-lasting) disease that affects how your body turns food into energy. Most of the food you eat is broken down into sugar (also called glucose) and released into your bloodstream. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin, which acts like a key to let the blood sugar into your body’s cells for use as energy. If you have diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use the insulin it makes as well as it should. When there isn’t enough insulin or cells stop responding to insulin, too much blood sugar stays in your bloodstream, which over time can cause serious health problems, such as heart disease, vision loss, and kidney disease. There isn’t a cure yet for diabetes, but healthy lifestyle habits, taking medicine as needed, getting diabetes self-management education, and keeping appointments with your health care team can greatly reduce its impact on your life. 30.3 million US adults have diabetes, and 1 in 4 of them don’t know they have it. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the US. Diabetes is the No. 1 cause of kidney failure, lower-limb amputations, and adult-onset blindness. In the last 20 years, the number of adults diagnosed with diabetes has more than tripled as the American population has aged and become more overweight or obese. Types of Diabetes There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant). Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistake) that stops your body from making insulin. About 5% of the people who have diabetes have type 1. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes often develop quickly. It’s usually diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults. If you have type 1 diabetes, you’ll need t Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating And Cooking

Healthy Eating And Cooking

To receive email updates about Diabetes Education enter your email address: Healthy eating is an important part of diabetes management, but it can be hard to know where to start. Use these resources to help you eat healthier at home and away from home. Eat Right Learning how to eat right is an important part of managing your diabetes. This web page provides tips on healthy eating, weight management, recipes, and special diets. Remember, eating healthy is not just for people with diabetes. Tips for Enjoying Summer Gatherings if You Have Diabetes Making healthy food choices, even while on vacation, is a key step to staying healthy. NDEP has tips for eating healthy over the summer, especially when youre with a group of people. Healthy Eating During Winter Gatherings for People with Diabetes Winter is a season of holiday celebrations, football playoffs, and other occasions when family and friends get together over meals and snacks. Learn to make healthy food choices and limit portion sizes without giving up all your favorite foods. These culturally-tailored tip sheets help people with diabetes make healthy food choices at holidays, celebrations and buffets. Continue reading >>

For People With Diabetes

For People With Diabetes

To receive email updates about Diabetes Education enter your email address: If you are living with diabetes or have a loved one with the disease, its important to work together to manage diabetes. Use these resources to learn how to make healthy lifestyle choices to help manage diabetes, prevent complications, and improve your quality of life. Diabetes means that your blood sugar (glucose) level is too high. Learn about the different types of diabetes and which groups are more likely to develop diabetes. Emotional issuessuch as depressionoften go along with diabetes. Learn how to cope with emotional struggles while managing your diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common in young people. Learn about the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and find out how to lower your childs risk for getting type 2 diabetes. Take control of your health by working with your health care team and adopting healthy behaviors to avoid complications and enjoy a healthier life. Physical activity is a great way to help manage diabetes and stay at a healthy weight. Use these resources to learn how to incorporate exercise into your daily life. Type 2 diabetes occurs in people of all ages, but its more common in older adults. NDEP offers resources that can help older adults learn how to better manage their diabetes. People with diabetes are at risk for complications that may affect their hearts, eyes, feet, kidneys, and other parts of the body. Read about how to prevent these complications. Healthy eating is an important part of diabetes management, but it can be hard to know where to start. Use these resources to help you eat healthier at home, at work, and when dining out. Emergencies and natural disasters can seriously affect people with diabetes. Find out how to be prepared Continue reading >>

Cdc: More Than 100 Million U.s. Adults Have Diabetes Or Pre-diabetes

Cdc: More Than 100 Million U.s. Adults Have Diabetes Or Pre-diabetes

The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes greatly varies by region, race and age, according to a new report from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. While the rate of new diabetes cases is steady, a report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that a third of adults in the United States currently are living with diabetes or prediabetes. The National Diabetes Statistics Report found that as of 2015 30.3 million Americans are living with diagnosed diabetes and another 84.1 million have prediabetes, a condition that if left untreated leads to diabetes within five years. “Although these findings reveal some progress in diabetes management and prevention, there are still too many Americans with diabetes and prediabetes,” said CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald, M.D. in a statement. “More than a third of U.S. adults have prediabetes, and the majority don’t know it. Now, more than ever, we must step up our efforts to reduce the burden of this serious disease.” The report, which is released every two years, provides information on diabetes prevalence and incidence, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, mortality and costs in the U.S. According to the CDC, diabetes continues to represent a growing health problem. It was the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2015, and the disease is more prevalent in some area of the country than others. The southern and Appalachian areas of the United States had the highest rates of diagnosed diabetes and of new diabetes cases. While it can often be managed through physical activity, diet and the appropriate use of insulin and other medications to control blood sugar levels, people with diabetes are at increased risk of serious health complications Continue reading >>

Self-management Education: Learn More. Feel Better.

Self-management Education: Learn More. Feel Better.

If you are one of the millions of people living with diabetes, we have good news. Participating in a self-management education (SME) program can help you manage your diabetes, prevent complications, and take control of diabetes symptoms such as tiredness, pain, and depression. Find out how an SME program can help you learn more and feel better. Diabetes-Specific SME Programs Diabetes Self-Management Education and Training (DSME/T) Cost: Varies by organization; often covered by health insurance. Format: In person, in the community. Diabetes Self-Management Education and Training (DSME/T) programs provides knowledge and skills for people who want to manage their type 2 diabetes and related conditions. Diabetes educators conduct each program, which addresses the needs, goals, and life experiences of people with diabetes. This program teaches you how to eat healthy, be active, monitor blood sugar levels, take medication, problem solve, reduce risk for other health conditions, and cope with your disease. Visit the American Association of Diabetes Educators website to learn more about Diabetes Self-Management Education and Training (DSME/T). Top of Page Diabetes Self-Management Program Cost: Varies by organization, rarely more than $50. Format: In-person workshop. The Diabetes Self-Management Program (DSMP) is a 6-week group program for people with type 2 diabetes. Developed by Stanford University, this program can help you deal with the symptoms of diabetes— including tiredness, pain, and emotional issues—by helping you learn how to eat and sleep better, manage your day-to-day activities more effectively, and more. This interactive workshop meets for 2.5 hours per week for 6 weeks in convenient community locations. It is led by trained leaders, at least one of whom has a Continue reading >>

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