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Can You Take Metformin With Or Without Food?

Does Metformin Cause Weight Loss? What To Know Before You Take It

Does Metformin Cause Weight Loss? What To Know Before You Take It

If you’re managing type 2 diabetes with metformin (Glucophage), you might be well acquainted with unwanted side effects of this drug — namely, upset stomach, diarrhea, muscle aches, and sleepiness. These can be a figurative and literal pain, but you might welcome one side effect of metformin with open arms, particularly if you’ve struggled to lose weight. Metformin isn’t a weight loss drug, but researchers have found a link between the drug and weight loss. In fact, a long-term study published in April 2012 in the journal Diabetes Care that was conducted by the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) concluded that the drug could serve as a treatment for excess body weight, although more studies are needed. What Is Metformin and How Does It Work? “[Metformin] has been considered a first-line medication in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, and it mainly acts by lowering the amount of glucose released by the liver,” says Minisha Sood, MD, an endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “It also helps a hormone called insulin to work better by helping muscles use glucose in a more efficient manner. When insulin works better (and insulin sensitivity improves), a person’s insulin levels are lower than they would be otherwise.” There’s no cure for type 2 diabetes, but the right combination of medication and healthy lifestyle can stabilize blood sugar levels, which, of course, is the end goal of any diabetes treatment. As the medication helps your body properly metabolize food and restores your ability to respond to insulin, you’ll not only feel better, you can potentially avoid complications of high blood sugar, such as heart disease, kidney damage, nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy), and eye damage (retinopathy). Why Does Metformin Cause Weight Lo Continue reading >>

Not Eating And Metformin

Not Eating And Metformin

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I'm a College student so I don't always get to eat. Should I still take my metformin on a empty stomach? I always take my metformin on an empty stomach. I never take it with meals. Since Metformin works in the liver not the pancreas there is no way your bg will go too low, because of the metformin ( usually). Metformin takes time to build up in your system and it is the accumulated amount that lowers your bg. But I do think as a diabetic it is important to eat on a somewhat schedule to get the best bgs. Often if you go long amounts of time in between meals or snacks your liver can dump glucose which raises your bgs. When I am very busy I will carry nuts, cheese and low carb protein bars with me to munch on. I generally take my metformin on an empty stomach, before eating in the morning (which I often don't do first thing) and then before bed at night. So long as you don't experience the side effects some people find with Metformin, you are likely to be ok. I always take my metformin on an empty stomach. I never take it with meals. Since Metformin works in the liver not the pancreas there is no way your bg will go too low, because of the metformin ( usually). Metformin takes time to build up in your system and it is the accumulated amount that lowers your bg. But I do think as a diabetic it is important to eat on a somewhat schedule to get the best bgs. Often if you go long amounts of time in between meals or snacks your liver can dump glucose which raises your bgs. When I am very busy I will carry nuts, cheese and low carb protein bars with me to munch on. It all depends on what you mean Continue reading >>

About Metformin

About Metformin

Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes and sometimes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes doesn't work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. Metformin lowers your blood sugar levels by improving the way your body handles insulin. It's usually prescribed for diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not been enough to control your blood sugar levels. For women with PCOS, metformin stimulates ovulation even if they don't have diabetes. It does this by lowering insulin and blood sugar levels. Metformin is available on prescription as tablets and as a liquid that you drink. Key facts Metformin works by reducing the amount of sugar your liver releases into your blood. It also makes your body respond better to insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. It's best to take metformin with a meal to reduce the side effects. The most common side effects are feeling sick, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach ache and going off your food. Metformin does not cause weight gain (unlike some other diabetes medicines). Metformin may also be called by the brand names Bolamyn, Diagemet, Glucient, Glucophage, and Metabet. Who can and can't take metformin Metformin can be taken by adults. It can also be taken by children from 10 years of age on the advice of a doctor. Metformin isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to metformin or other medicines in the past have uncontrolled diabetes have liver or kidney problems have a severe infection are being treated for heart failure or you have recentl Continue reading >>

What Are The Effects Of Taking Metformin Without Food?

What Are The Effects Of Taking Metformin Without Food?

The answer depends very much on whether metformin is being taken alone or with insulin or other diabetes treatments. Metformin helps the body to use glucose more effectively, without raising insulin levels. When taken by itself, metformin carries a very low risk of hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar). I take metformin alone for type 2 diabetes. I make sure I take metformin with, or after, food because this minimises the chance of stomach irritation and other digestive problems. I am not concerned about hypoglycaemia. I have been on metformin for four years now and have not had problems with hypoglycaemia. If metformin is not effective by itself, doctors typically add drugs which raise insulin levels and/or insulin injections. These combinations carry a higher chance of hypoglycaemia than metformin alone, although it is still not common if patients follow the instructions they are given. Patients will be given detailed advice of the potential side-effects of their treatment and of the precautions they should take. Taking Metmorfin or for that matter any diabetic medicine , and not eating within half an hour or max one hour , could prove fatal. You will suffer with Hypoglycemia (low blood glucose ). Your body will start to shiver , under deficiency of glucose. You will feel dizzy, get abnormal sweating , burning feet and nausea. You may go into diabetic coma. Never ever skip eating food , after taking any diabetic medicine. Continue reading >>

Timing Your Metformin Dose

Timing Your Metformin Dose

The biggest problem many people have with Metformin is that it causes such misery when it hits their stomachs that they can't keep taking it even though they know it is the safest and most effective of all the oral diabetes drugs. In many cases all that is needed is some patience. After a rocky first few days many people's bodies calm down and metformin becomes quite tolerable. If you are taking the regular form of Metformin with meals and still having serious stomach issues after a week of taking metformin, ask your doctor to prescribe the extended release form--metformin ER or Glucophage XR. The extended release form is much gentler in its action. If that still doesn't solve your problem, there is one last strategy that quite a few of us have found helpful. It is to take your metformin later in the day, after you have eaten a meal or two. My experience with metformin--and this has been confirmed by other people--is that it can irritate an empty stomach, but if you take it when the stomach contains food it will behave. There are some drugs where it matters greatly what time of day you take the drug. Metformin in its extended release form is not one of them. As the name suggests, the ER version of the pill slowly releases the drug into your body over a period that, from my observations, appears to last 8 to 12 hours. Though it is supposed to release over a full 24 hours, this does not appear to be the case, at least not with the generic forms my insurer will pay for. Because there seems to be a span of hours when these extended release forms of metformin release the most drug into your blood stream, when you take your dose may affect how much impact the drug has on your blood sugars after meals or when you wake up. For example, the version I take, made by Teva, releases Continue reading >>

Foods To Avoid When On Metformin

Foods To Avoid When On Metformin

Metformin is often one of the first medications prescribed to people with diabetes, according to the Canadian Diabetes Association (see reference 2 under Highlights of Revisions). It helps lower your blood sugar levels by decreasing the amount of glucose, or sugar, produced by your liver. It also helps your insulin, the hormone that gets the sugar out of your blood and into your cell, work better. (see reference 1 pg 1 under Clinical Pharmacology under Mechanism of Action para 1). While you do not need to avoid any foods when taking metformin, you may need to limit or avoid alcohol (see reference 1 pg 8 under alcohol intake.). Metformin and Alcohol If your doctor has prescribed metformin to help you get better control over your blood sugar, you should not drink an excessive amount of alcohol, including beer, wine or hard liquor (see reference 1 pg 8 under Alcohol Intake). Too much alcohol causes metformin to breakdown too much lactate, which is a by-product of glucose and amino acids, and may lead to lactic acidosis (see reference 1 pg 8 under Alcohol Intake). If you drink alcohol, it's OK to have moderate amounts while on metformin, which means up to 1 drink a day for women and 2 drinks a day for men (see reference 3 pg x). But everyone is different, so be sure to talk to your doctor first to a safe amount of alcohol for you. Lactic acidosis is actually not very common when taking metformin, but it can be dangerous, and even deadly, according to the Food and Drug Administration (see reference 1 pg 15). Symptoms that warrant an immediate call to your doctor include difficulty breathing, stomach pain, diarrhea, muscle cramps, unusual sleepiness or weakness or an all-around achiness. Continue reading >>

Question From Practice: Diabetes - Missing Meals And Doses

Question From Practice: Diabetes - Missing Meals And Doses

A. This patient is a good example of how real life can affect adherence to therapy. Two main issues for the pharmacist to address in this situation are medication options and dietary habits but he or she could also consider supportive advice in terms of this patient’s employment concerns. Medication Metformin has a large evidence base for reducing both morbidity and mortality and it is, rightfully, first-line therapy in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This is recommended not only by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, but also the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.1,2 Metformin lowers plasma glucose via four mechanisms. It: Reduces hepatic glucose production Increases insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle Improves peripheral glucose uptake and usage Delays glucose absorption in the gastrointestinal tract Importantly, metformin does not stimulate insulin secretion3 so although there is a small risk of hypoglycaemia if taken without food, this is minimal compared with other antidiabetic drugs. Metformin can, however, increase the risk of hypoglycaemia if used in combination with other antidiabetic medicines. The mechanisms above mean that metformin predominantly increases insulin efficacy and so should be taken with meals when endogenous insulin is produced. Gastrointestinal side effects with metformin — especially diarrhoea and nausea — are widely recognised. To minimise them, patients can be advised to take their tablets after meals rather than before and the dose should be titrated slowly, over a period of weeks. Frequently these side effects are most noticeable in the first few weeks after initiation. If patients are forewarned of side effects and told about the excellent benefits of metfor Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way. You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the Continue reading >>

If I'm Sick And Can't Eat, Can I Take My Metformin Without Food?

If I'm Sick And Can't Eat, Can I Take My Metformin Without Food?

You should always take the diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage, Fortamet) with a meal, so if you get sick and don't feel like eating, let your doctor know right away. You may need to stop taking metformin temporarily. If you've been vomiting and/or have had diarrhea, your doctor will need to know that too. Both can lead to dehydration, which increases your risk of a condition called lactic acidosis, a buildup of lactic acid that can be extremely serious, and even cause death. Continue Learning about Metformin Videos Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs. Continue reading >>

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

Metformin helps control blood sugar and increase your body's sensitivity to insulin. The drug is available only by prescription and sold under several different brand names, including Fortamet, Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage and Glucophage XR. Your dosage will depend on your normal diet and exercise habits -- too much metformin can lead to low blood sugar and hypoglycemia. Always follow your doctor's directions for taking your medication. Video of the Day Metformin works by limiting your liver's production of glucose and stopping your body from absorbing some of the glucose in your bloodstream. Additionally, metformin increases your body's sensitivity to insulin, allowing your pancreas to produce less insulin. Keeping blood sugar levels stable can decrease hunger and food cravings, leading to weight loss. Metformin is not an appetite suppressant, nor does it boost metabolism; to lose weight, you'll still need to pay close attention to your diet and increase your physical activity. Standard vs. Extended Release Options The amount of metformin you'll take depends on why you are using the medication, how often you take the medicine, other medications you might be taking and the time between doses. The National Institutes of Health explains that metformin is available as a tablet or a liquid solution. Tablets come in an extended release dose -- Glucophage XR -- or in a standard release option. Extended release pills are designed to be taken once daily, with your evening meal. Standard tablet and liquid solutions may be taken once or multiple times daily -- with meals. Metformin should be taken with food. Always follow your doctor's orders. It's typical to start with a 500 milligram dose once daily, then increase both the amount of medication and the frequency. If you're using Continue reading >>

Why Is Metformin To Be Taken With Food?

Why Is Metformin To Be Taken With Food?

Question Originally asked by Community Member Pablo Why Is Metformin To Be Taken With Food? Answer Pablo- Hello! You don’t want to puke, like Frank said:) and you do not want to mess up the lining in your stomach. Have you ever tried taking metformin w/o food? it’s nasty. You are also taking a risk in having hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). If you don’t take it with food try using milk. Cherise Community Moderator You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Answered By: Cherise Nicole Continue reading >>

Can Take Metformin Without Food 444166 Jim Shaw

Can Take Metformin Without Food 444166 Jim Shaw

Should I Take Metformin With Food?: Diabetes Forecast A nurse recently told me that metformin doesn t work without food. Should I Take Metformin With Food? Alcohol use can cause blood glucose to If I 39;m sick and can 39;t eat, can I take my metformin without You should always take the diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage, Fortamet) with a meal, If I 39;m sick and can 39;t eat, can I take my metformin without food?What happens with Metformin if you don 39;t eat, anything I 39;ve done and taken Metformin without food and been okay yet this What happens if you take Metformin but I think metformin taken without can cause a big bs Do you take Metformin if you haven 39;t had a meal? Diabetes UKHello I am prescribed 3 x 500 metformin tablets per day, to be taken one tablet with each meal. Sometimes I skip a meal (just can 39;t face food firstCan I take metformin without food? WebMD AnswersWebMD experts and contributors provide answers to: Can I take metformin without food?Metformin (Oral Route) Proper Use Mayo ClinicMetformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few the number of doses you take each day, Can you take metformin without food Things You Didn 39;t KnowCan you take metformin without food What causes you to have to take food with metformin? To lessen your. Chance of intestinal upset.Can You Take Metformin Without Food BestBuyCan You Take Metformin Without Food BestBuy 25mg, 50mg, 100mg tablets available today. Lowest Prices. Cheap pills online. Best medications for real men. Available metformin with or without food MedHelpBut now, when I take my metformin (with or without food), I get a yellow, frothy stool. Metformin is not in this category. You can go on and off it, Can You Take Metformin Without Continue reading >>

Metformin 850mg Tablets

Metformin 850mg Tablets

1. WHAT METFORMIN IS AND WHAT IT IS USED FOR The name of this medicine is Metformin 500mg or 850mg Tablets (called metformin in this leaflet). It belongs to a group of medicines called biguanides (a type of oral hypoglycaemic). Metformin is used for the sort of diabetes called Type 2 diabetes or non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In type 2 diabetes, there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood. This is because your body does not make enough insulin or because it makes insulin that does not work properly. Insulin is a hormone that allows your body tissue to take glucose from the blood and use it for energy or for storage for future use. Metformin works by improving the sensitivity of your body to insulin. It helps your body to use glucose in the normal way again This medicine is given when diet and exercise alone has not been able to control your blood sugar levels. Metformin can be given on its own. However, sometimes it is given with other medicines for diabetes or with insulin. In patients who are overweight, long-term use of metformin also helps to lower the risk of any problems related to diabetes you are allergic (hypersensitive) to metformin or any of the other ingredients in this liquid (see section 6: Further information). An allergic reaction can include a rash, itching or shortness of breath. you have recently had a heart attack or any other heart problems you have severe circulation problems or difficulty in breathing you have had serious problems with your diabetes in the past called diabetic ketoacidosis. When you have this you lose weight quickly, feel sick (nausea) or are sick (vomiting). See also in Section 4: Possible side effects you have recently had a severe infection, injury or trauma (shock) you are going to have an X-ray where you will b Continue reading >>

Explainer: Why Must Some Medications Be Taken With Food?

Explainer: Why Must Some Medications Be Taken With Food?

Have you ever been advised to take a medicine with food? How about taking a medicine with cola or avoiding grapefruit? Hundreds of medicines have food-related dosing instructions. With four out of five Australians aged above 50 taking daily medication, most people will encounter instructions about medicines and food at some point in their lives – some of which may seem rather strange. If a medicine isn’t taken as recommended with respect to food, the medicine may not have an effect. Worse, it could lead to side effects. The timing of the meal, the size of the meal, and the types of food and drinks consumed can all affect the body’s response to a medicine. Absorption of medicines from the gut Eating food triggers multiple physiological changes, including increased blood flow to the gut, the release of bile, and changes in the pH (acidity) and motility of the gut. These physiological changes can affect the amount of medicine absorbed from the gut into the bloodstream, which can then impact on the body’s response to a medicine. Certain medicines are recommended to be given with food because the physiological changes after eating can increase the amount of medicine absorbed by the body. Itraconazole capsules (used to treat certain fungal infections), for instance, should be taken with food, and in some cases acidic drinks such as cola, because this product needs an acidic environment to be absorbed. In other cases, changes in gut secretions and the digestive process can reduce the effectiveness of a medicine. Certain antibiotics, such as phenoxymethylpenicillin (also known as penicillin V), are best taken on an empty stomach as they can be less effective after prolonged exposure to acidic conditions. Food can act as a physical barrier to the surface of the gut wall Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage): Drug Whys

Metformin (glucophage): Drug Whys

Generic name: Metformin (multiple manufacturers) Common U.S. brand names: Glucophage (Bristol-Myers Squibb, USA) Popularity: Sixteenth most commonly prescribed drug between 2002-2006 (U.S.) Class: Antidiabetic Treatment Uses — For treatment of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) when drug therapy is necessary. Metformin is the first drug of choice for Type 2 diabetics. In obese patients, unlike some other antidiabetic agents, it is not associated with weight gain and actually promotes weight loss. May afford better glycemic control when used as an adjunct to insulin therapy in Type 1 DM. Beneficial for preventing development of gestational diabetes in women with insulin resistance or polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In combination with carbohydrate-modified diet, metformin has been used to help nondiabetic, hyperinsulinemic, obese women and adolescents achieve and sustain long-term weight loss. In combination with other agents, metformin reduces a variety of symptoms in adolescents with hyperinsulinemic hypersecretion of ovarian androgens. In PCOS, metformin has increased return of normal menses and ovulation in obese women and is being studied for treatment of infertility. Metformin is not effective for prevention of DM in high-risk patients, in prevention of fibrosis (progressive damage) in non-alcoholic fatty liver, or in reducing fat deposits in HIV patients taking protease inhibitors. In maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) — an inherited genetic mutation — metformin performs significantly worse at controlling disease than gliclazide (a different type of antidiabetic agent). Diabetes is relatively common: 20.8 million Americans — 7 percent of the total population — have it. Treatment for diabetes is evolving rapidly and will continue to progress with th Continue reading >>

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