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Can You Take Metformin Anytime

Macrobid And Metformin Interaction - Www.bad-petersen.de

Macrobid And Metformin Interaction - Www.bad-petersen.de

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Pcos: All Guides

Pcos: All Guides

PCOS is a common problem among teen girls and young women. In fact, almost 1 out of 10 women has PCOS. What is PCOS? Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormone imbalance that can cause irregular periods, unwanted hair growth, and acne. PCOS begins during a girl’s teen years and can be mild or severe. What are the signs of PCOS? Some of the most common signs of PCOS include: Irregular periods that come every few months, not at all, or too frequently Extra hair on your face or other parts of your body, called hirsutism (her-suit-is-em) Acne Weight gain and/or trouble losing weight Patches of dark skin on the back of your neck and other areas, called acanthosis nigricans (a-can-tho-sis ni-gri-cans) Could I have PCOS? If you have some or all of the above signs, you might have PCOS. There can be other reasons why you might have signs; however, only your health care provider can tell for sure. What causes PCOS? PCOS is caused by an imbalance in the hormones (chemical messengers) in your brain and your ovaries. PCOS usually happens when a hormone called LH (from the pituitary gland) or levels of insulin (from the pancreas) are too high, which then causes the ovaries to make extra amounts of testosterone. For a more detailed explanation, take a look at the female reproductive anatomy image: The pituitary (pi-tu-i-tary) gland in your brain makes the hormones luteinizing (lu-tin-iz-ing) hormone (LH) and follicle (fall-i-call) stimulating hormone (FSH). After getting the signal from the hormones LH and FSH, the ovaries make estrogen (es-tro-gen) and progesterone (pro-ges-ter-own), the female sex hormones. All normal ovaries also make a little bit of the androgen testosterone (an-dro-gen tes-tos-ter-own), a male sex hormone. The pancreas (pang-cree-us) is an organ that makes i Continue reading >>

Timing Your Metformin Dose

Timing Your Metformin Dose

The biggest problem many people have with Metformin is that it causes such misery when it hits their stomachs that they can't keep taking it even though they know it is the safest and most effective of all the oral diabetes drugs. In many cases all that is needed is some patience. After a rocky first few days many people's bodies calm down and metformin becomes quite tolerable. If you are taking the regular form of Metformin with meals and still having serious stomach issues after a week of taking metformin, ask your doctor to prescribe the extended release form--metformin ER or Glucophage XR. The extended release form is much gentler in its action. If that still doesn't solve your problem, there is one last strategy that quite a few of us have found helpful. It is to take your metformin later in the day, after you have eaten a meal or two. My experience with metformin--and this has been confirmed by other people--is that it can irritate an empty stomach, but if you take it when the stomach contains food it will behave. There are some drugs where it matters greatly what time of day you take the drug. Metformin in its extended release form is not one of them. As the name suggests, the ER version of the pill slowly releases the drug into your body over a period that, from my observations, appears to last 8 to 12 hours. Though it is supposed to release over a full 24 hours, this does not appear to be the case, at least not with the generic forms my insurer will pay for. Because there seems to be a span of hours when these extended release forms of metformin release the most drug into your blood stream, when you take your dose may affect how much impact the drug has on your blood sugars after meals or when you wake up. For example, the version I take, made by Teva, releases Continue reading >>

How Should I Take Metformin?

How Should I Take Metformin?

You should always follow your doctor’s specific instructions for taking any medication, including metformin. But there are some general rules that will probably apply to you: If you don’t notice a change in your blood glucose right away, don’t stop taking your metformin. It takes about three to four weeks for metformin to reach its full effect. If your symptoms go away or you decide you feel fine now, don’t stop taking metformin. You need this medication to stay well. If you forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it’s already time for your next dose, just take the usual amount. Do not double your dose. If you take extended-release metformin (Glucophage XR), be sure to swallow the pill whole. Don’t chew, crush or split the pill. If you don’t follow your meal plan -- you overeat, skip a meal or make a poor food choice -- don’t adjust your metformin dose. If you’re sick, most of the time, you should keep taking metformin as prescribed. However, if you’re throwing up or dehydrated, stop taking your metformin. Call your doctor for additional instructions. If you’re scheduled for a medical procedure, make sure that the doctor and nurses know that you take metformin. You might need to stop taking it for a short time if you have to fast beforehand or if you’re having a surgery or x-ray that uses contrast dye. Ask for instructions. Metformin (prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes) should be taken with meals. If you eat less than usual or start to exercise more, tell your doctor, as this can affect your blood sugar and your dosage may need adjusting. Limit or stop your alcohol intake if you are taking metformin. Certain drugs and supplements may interact with metformin, so make sure your doctor is aware of any other medications you take. Continue reading >>

Can You Stop Diabetes Meds?

Can You Stop Diabetes Meds?

When it comes to diabetes there are many success stories, especially among those who know that diet and exercise play a big part in blood sugar control. Medication is also key to getting your numbers into a healthy range. But if you’re like many people who take something daily for diabetes, you probably wonder if you can ever stop. Maybe -- if your blood sugar numbers are good and you’re committed to a healthy lifestyle. The first step is to talk to your doctor. Here’s what you can expect from that chat. Why Do You Want to Stop? First, know that it's OK to ask your doctor if you can stop taking meds once you’ve met the blood sugar goals you've both set, says Robert Gabbay, MD, PhD, chief medical officer of the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. And it can be done, he adds. The first step: Tell your doctor why you want to stop. Then he’ll ask you some questions. The doctor’s looking for specific answers, says endocrinologist Gregg Faiman, MD, of University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland. He wants to know: Is it too hard for you to keep up with taking your medicine? Do the side effects lower you quality of life? Is the medication too expensive? After that, you and your doctor have to agree about how you’re going to keep your blood sugar under control. You wouldn’t be on the drug if you didn’t need it, Faiman says. “Stopping a medication requires an in-depth discussion. You have to commit to keeping your diabetes under control.” Medication Matters If you take the drug metformin, a common treatment for type 2 diabetes, your doctor could lower it in stages as you lose weight and get fitter, Faiman says. You may even be able to stop it -- at least for a while -- if you’re making good lifestyle choices and you keep your blood sugar under cont Continue reading >>

About Metformin

About Metformin

Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes and sometimes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes doesn't work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. Metformin lowers your blood sugar levels by improving the way your body handles insulin. It's usually prescribed for diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not been enough to control your blood sugar levels. For women with PCOS, metformin stimulates ovulation even if they don't have diabetes. It does this by lowering insulin and blood sugar levels. Metformin is available on prescription as tablets and as a liquid that you drink. Key facts Metformin works by reducing the amount of sugar your liver releases into your blood. It also makes your body respond better to insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. It's best to take metformin with a meal to reduce the side effects. The most common side effects are feeling sick, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach ache and going off your food. Metformin does not cause weight gain (unlike some other diabetes medicines). Metformin may also be called by the brand names Bolamyn, Diagemet, Glucient, Glucophage, and Metabet. Who can and can't take metformin Metformin can be taken by adults. It can also be taken by children from 10 years of age on the advice of a doctor. Metformin isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to metformin or other medicines in the past have uncontrolled diabetes have liver or kidney problems have a severe infection are being treated for heart failure or you have recentl Continue reading >>

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

Metformin helps control blood sugar and increase your body's sensitivity to insulin. The drug is available only by prescription and sold under several different brand names, including Fortamet, Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage and Glucophage XR. Your dosage will depend on your normal diet and exercise habits -- too much metformin can lead to low blood sugar and hypoglycemia. Always follow your doctor's directions for taking your medication. Video of the Day Metformin works by limiting your liver's production of glucose and stopping your body from absorbing some of the glucose in your bloodstream. Additionally, metformin increases your body's sensitivity to insulin, allowing your pancreas to produce less insulin. Keeping blood sugar levels stable can decrease hunger and food cravings, leading to weight loss. Metformin is not an appetite suppressant, nor does it boost metabolism; to lose weight, you'll still need to pay close attention to your diet and increase your physical activity. Standard vs. Extended Release Options The amount of metformin you'll take depends on why you are using the medication, how often you take the medicine, other medications you might be taking and the time between doses. The National Institutes of Health explains that metformin is available as a tablet or a liquid solution. Tablets come in an extended release dose -- Glucophage XR -- or in a standard release option. Extended release pills are designed to be taken once daily, with your evening meal. Standard tablet and liquid solutions may be taken once or multiple times daily -- with meals. Metformin should be taken with food. Always follow your doctor's orders. It's typical to start with a 500 milligram dose once daily, then increase both the amount of medication and the frequency. If you're using Continue reading >>

Metformin, The Liver, And Diabetes

Metformin, The Liver, And Diabetes

Most people think diabetes comes from pancreas damage, due to autoimmune problems or insulin resistance. But for many people diagnosed “Type 2,” the big problems are in the liver. What are these problems, and what can we do about them? First, some basic physiology you may already know. The liver is one of the most complicated organs in the body, and possibly the least understood. It plays a huge role in handling sugars and starches, making sure our bodies have enough fuel to function. When there’s a lot of sugar in the system, it stores some of the excess in a storage form of carbohydrate called glycogen. When blood sugar levels get low, as in times of hunger or at night, it converts some of the glycogen to glucose and makes it available for the body to use. Easy to say, but how does the liver know what to do and when to do it? Scientists have found a “molecular switch” called CRTC2 that controls this process. When the CRTC2 switch is on, the liver pours sugar into the system. When there’s enough sugar circulating, CRTC2 should be turned off. The turnoff signal is thought to be insulin. This may be an oversimplification, though. According to Salk Institute researchers quoted on RxPG news, “In many patients with type II diabetes, CRTC2 no longer responds to rising insulin levels, and as a result, the liver acts like a sugar factory on overtime, churning out glucose [day and night], even when blood sugar levels are high.” Because of this, the “average” person with Type 2 diabetes has three times the normal rate of glucose production by the liver, according to a Diabetes Care article. Diabetes Self-Management reader Jim Snell brought the whole “leaky liver” phenomenon to my attention. He has frequently posted here about his own struggles with soarin Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way. You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the Continue reading >>

Glyburide And Metformin

Glyburide And Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take glyburide and metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking glyburide and metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking glyburide and metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking glyburide and metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking glyburide and metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking glyburide and metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizziness; lighthea Continue reading >>

T1 And Thyroid Drugs

T1 And Thyroid Drugs

I have diabetes (T1) for the last 17 years and currently I am on a pump and have been using Dexcom as well. Always had good control and could manage my weight pretty well 2 years ago I did a check-up and found that my TSH was high - the doc started with levothyroxine 25mcg/day. After 3 weeks he increase the dose to 50mcg. At that point my bgs started to climb It was very hard to keep the BG under control. I had to adjust the basal in 30-40% and my carb/insulin ratio changed as well. After living some months like that and injecting 40-50% more insulin, as expected, I started to gain weight. For weeks, I would run every day, eat a minimum amount of carbs / calories and still would not loose weight. I talked again to the doctor and she decided to prescribe metformin. After taking Metformin my life became way easier. I could reduce the basal even lower than pre-levo days. Now I can control my weight in a good manner again. I have read in so many places the interactions between levo and insulin/ bgs. Most of the people says that levo does not affect their BG or in some cases it affects BGs while you are not in the right dose. My dose keeps going up (today I am on 100mcg) and my TSH around 4. Can you please share you experience? I would like to eventually stop taking Metformin, but today I cannot do that at the expense of gaining a lot of weight. Hi! I do not have TD1, but I am a TD2 (not on insulin, so I will let someone else address that). I do have celiac disease and Hashimotos Thyroiditis. If you have hypothyroidism and Hashimotos is the cause (thyroid antibodies elevated), you might be experiencing thyroid flares causing your hormone replacement needs to fluctuate (you can swing from being hyper to hypo and that can drive both you and your doctor crazy trying to get a c Continue reading >>

What Time Of Day Do You Take Metformin?

What Time Of Day Do You Take Metformin?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I am on two 500 mg. Metformin twice a day. I'm unsure of when to take them, as I've read so many different things. Some people take them before eating, some after. The thing that most concerns me is what time of day should I be taking them? My bottle just says two twice day. Is it best to take them with breakfast early in the a.m. (I eat at 7:00 a.m.) and then wait until dinner (which varies for me--I don't eat "dinner" at a set time, but it is usually around 4 p.m. or so). When do YOU take Metforming (if that is the drug you are using). Thanks for any advice you can give. I've been taking Metformin earlier in the day (around 3 p.m.) and I eat snacks before bed (low carb), and also oftentimes take p.m. pain meds. I have found that my morning glucose reading is often too high (137-140). I can't sleep if my stomach is growling, so I have to eat something before I can sleep! It actually becomes a fairly personal thing as to when it suits you best to take your Metformin and depends on a few things. Some people experience gastric side effects for the first few weeks of taking Metformin, this can range from cramps, wind to diarrhea - for people who experience this, often the advice is to eat something before take the Metformin - the instruction from the Doctor can be "Take with food", which can be translated as don't take it on an empty stomach. I personally was very lucky and had no issues and so that didn't apply to me (I'm on the same dose as you). I generally don't eat breakfast, but take my Metformin just before leaving the house for work in the morning, or at weekends when I get up. The eveni Continue reading >>

How One Man Stopped Metformin After Losing Weight

How One Man Stopped Metformin After Losing Weight

Exercise and weight loss lower blood sugar because they both reduce the body's insulin resistance, the key problem in people with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, increasing exercise or losing weight can sometimes lower or eliminate your need for diabetes medication. It's easier to keep your blood sugar in check without medication if your body is more sensitive to the insulin your body does make (most people with type 2 diabetes make at least some of the hormone). I was able to stop taking metformin, the drug I had been taking to lower my glucose—Louis Sarkes, Type 2 Diabetes Patient Louis Sarkes, 50, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2006 after a routine blood test during his annual physical exam. "I was surprised, but motivated to do something right away," said Sarkes, who is a money manager based in Baltimore, Md. He went to an all-day session on weight loss at Johns Hopkins University (where his doctor is based). He listened to doctors, nutritionists, and other patients talk about weight loss and exercise strategies, setbacks and successes. More about diabetes and exercise "I chose a diet low in sugars and high in fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and kept carbohydrates at 30 to 35 grams per meal, or no more than 100 grams in a day," says Sarkes. He didnt count every calorie, but kept a general sense and tried to keep the daily limit of calories to 1,800. "To get as much information as I could, especially on tips for sticking with the diet, I met with the nutritionist on my own, and also read everything on the Internet I could find," he said. He followed the advice of his nutritionist and didn't feel guilty if he went over his carbohydrate or calorie limithe just started again as soon a possible. He found healthy snacks he liked and avoided high-fat, high calori Continue reading >>

Insulin And Metformin: Old Drugs, New Tricks

Insulin And Metformin: Old Drugs, New Tricks

Insulin and Metformin: Old Drugs, New Tricks Some pharmaceutical companies are developing new formulations of older medications to create new possibilities. Diabetes treatment is one area ripe for such disruption, as the incidence of diabetes will only increase in the coming years and prove to be a fruitful health care market. Taking that into consideration, diabetes treatments such as metformin and insulin are being targeted for innovation by certain players looking to capitalize on this trend. Pharmacists recognize that metformin is often a first-line agent for diabetes management, but its commonly experienced gastrointestinal (GI) side effects may discourage patient adherence. In light of this, several compounding pharmacies across the United States have started to create transdermal metformin products for their patients. Although transdermal metformin therapy is not necessarily a new invention, it has been generating some buzz for its potential large-scale application because it reduces GI side effects in patients by bypassing the GI tract. Westchase Compounding Pharmacy in Tampa, Florida, has actually patented the transdermal delivery of metformin therapy (US20120283332). The selling point is that patients only use approximately 10% of the usual dosage of metformin and apply anywhere from 50 mg to 200 mg topically to the inner wrists twice daily. Although a patent exists for transdermal metformin and other companies are exploring its use, the FDA has not approved the product, so we cant expect it to show up on our shelves anytime soon. An even larger market at play is insulin. Many pharmacists are familiar with patients fears of starting insulin therapy, which commonly stems from their fear of injecting it. With that in mind, several companies are looking to creat Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take For Metformin To Work For Conception?

How Long Does It Take For Metformin To Work For Conception?

Metformin, also known as Glucophage, is a medication that is used to regulate the levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Metformin accomplishes its task through three methods. First, it causes the liver to produce less glucose. Second, metformin helps your stomach to absorb less glucose from the food that you eat. Finally, metformin improves the efficiency of the insulin that the body produces, which reduces the amount of glucose that is in your blood. Metformin is often prescribed for people with Type II diabetes. How long it takes Metformin to work depends on the reason that a woman is taking metformin. If a woman is taking metformin to regulate her blood sugar, metformin typically will work within a few days or a few weeks at the most. For the woman with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) metformin can help to reduce the amount of insulin in the body. Once the insulin levels are under control, many women will then experience improved ovulation. If metformin is going to work for a woman who has experienced fertility problems because of her polycystic ovarian syndrome, it will typically help within three to six months. Unlike most fertility treatments, metformin does not cause a risk of having a multiple or twin pregnancy. If metformin alone does not help a woman with PCOS who is trying to conceive, a fertility doctor may prescribe Clomid, as well. If metformin is prescribed for a woman with PCOS to help restore a regular, normal menstrual cycle, metformin can work within 4 to 8 weeks. In addition, the stabilized levels of insulin may affect the other hormones in a woman’s body, and reduce other symptoms of PCOS. Some women, either with diabetes or PCOS, use metformin as a tool for weight loss. If this is the case, weight loss can occur somewhere between 1 and 5 wee Continue reading >>

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