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Can You Reverse Pre Diabetes With Diet?

Pre Diabetes Diet Plan

Pre Diabetes Diet Plan

It’s estimated that almost 50% of the American population has diabetes or prediabetes – a condition where blood sugar is higher than normal levels. It is accompanied by insulin resistance, a risk factor for full-blown diabetes, and other health complications. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data estimates the recent prevalence of total diabetes, diagnosed diabetes and undiagnosed diabetes’ US trends to be 12-14% among US adults. So, neither should you shrug off your doctor’s advice, nor should you be taking your elevated blood sugar levels lightly. Generally, the power of a pre-diabetes diet plan, for getting those numbers back on track, is underestimated. Prediabetes is diagnosed when fasting blood sugar levels range from 100 to 125 mg/dl, or hemoglobin A1C levels range from 5.7 to 6.4%. One needs to undergo regular prediabetes tests to be sure. But, with the right pre-diabetes diet plan, one starts to feel the difference in their energy levels soon enough. MORE: Take the Prediabetes Risk Test This is a chance to take control. Simple and daily lifestyle changes, like a balanced diet and regular exercise, that help you lose weight go a long way towards warding off the risk of progressing to full-blown type 2 diabetes. Pre-Diabetes Diet Plan: Changes You Need To Make Today If you already have pre-diabetes, you are likely to develop type 2 diabetes (T2D) within the next 10 years unless you make some changes, starting from today. It’s time to adopt a new pre-diabetes diet plan built on some basic principles: Don’t Skip Breakfast You may barely make it to office on time, but that doesn’t mean you skip breakfast. That means you wake up earlier! A healthy breakfast starts your day on the right note. It gives your metabolism the kick-sta Continue reading >>

Paleo And Prediabetes

Paleo And Prediabetes

Paleo and diabetes is a popular topic, but it’s much harder to find information about prediabetes, which actually isn’t the same problem! And the distinction is definitely worth making: prediabetes doesn’t inevitably lead to the real thing. You can be diagnosed with prediabetes, but never progress to outright diabetes, and even reverse the process to get back to a healthy metabolism – here’s a look at what prediabetes is, and what kinds of diet and lifestyle interventions have been studied for it. What Is Prediabetes (and How is it Different from Diabetes)? To define a specific disease, doctors have to establish some kind of number-based criteria for judging who has it and who doesn’t. Either you’re sick or you’re healthy, and the question is just about the cutoff point between “normal” and “disease”? For diabetes, there are a couple different cutoff points, where you’re officially “non-diabetic” on one side of the line, and officially “diabetic” on the other side of the line. HbA1C: this is a measure of long-term blood sugar control. Blood sugar test: this is a measure of how high your blood sugar is right now. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT): this is how well your body can respond to drinking a lot of sugar. But human bodies don’t always work like that. You don’t jump from 0 to diabetic overnight; it’s a slow process of getting steadily sicker and sicker. For example, the cutoff for “diabetes” as measured by HbA1C is 6.5. But people with an HbA1C of 6.49 aren’t doing just fine because they’re technically on the non-diabetic side of the line! And it certainly doesn’t make sense to delay treatment and tell them they’re doing just fine until bam, suddenly, diabetes out of nowhere. That’s where prediabetes comes in. Continue reading >>

Do I Have Prediabetes?

Do I Have Prediabetes?

National Diabetes Prevention Program The CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program offers scientifically proven and effective lifestyle change programs that can help you prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. The program can show you how to make better food choices, be more physically active, and find helpful ways to cope with problems and stress. You'll work with a trained lifestyle coach and a small group of people who are all working towards the same goal. It’ll last for 1 year (including meetings about once per week in the first 6 months). The hundreds of local community partners are required by CDC to meet high standards and prove results. You can do it in person, or online. This is a proven program to motivate and support people with prediabetes to make practical, real-life changes, and cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by more than half. That's kind of big news. The hundreds of organizations across the U.S. that offer these programs are focused on one thing only — positive results. So use our program locator to find one near you. Usually, your doctor can tell you if you qualify. It's generally based on your body mass index (which is based on your height and weight), your blood sugar levels (blood test), your age (must be 18 or older), and if you have a history of gestational diabetes (meaning you developed diabetes when you were pregnant). You may also qualify based on results from the online risk test. Just one more reason to take it! Costs for the program are often covered by insurance providers or employers. For some people, there may be a cost. Check with your employer or insurance provider to see if the program is a covered benefit for you. Watch how Mike joined the National Diabetes Prevention Program and found support to make healthy lifestyle Continue reading >>

Five Things You Should Know About Prediabetes

Five Things You Should Know About Prediabetes

After announcing the expansion of Diabetes Stops Here and asking you which topics you’d like covered, we received a specific request for more information about prediabetes. A staggering 79 million Americans deal with this condition, and while it can lead to crippling health consequences, it can be avoided. Here are five things you should know about prediabetes: 1. What is prediabetes? Before people develop type 2 diabetes, they almost always have prediabetes, a health condition where your blood glucose is higher than normal but not as high as if you had diabetes. 2. How can I find out if I have it? Your doctor can give you a blood test to tell if you have prediabetes (the same test that’s used to test for diabetes). At your next doctor visit, ask if you should be tested for prediabetes. 3. What can I do if I have prediabetes? If you have prediabetes, there are important steps you can, and should, take. Early intervention can turn back the clock and return elevated blood glucose levels to the normal range. Losing weight is an important step for most people with prediabetes, and the amount doesn’t have to be huge to make a difference. A weight loss of just 10 to 15 pounds can really stack the odds in your favor. Coupled with 30 minutes of exercise each day and healthy food choices, you’ll be on your way. Talk with your doctor and visit our website to learn more about other ways you can prevent or reverse the condition. 4. Does this mean I’m going to develop type 2 diabetes? Prediabetes can lead to type 2 diabetes…but it doesn’t have to. Scientific studies show taking the above steps can often halt or at least slow down the progression of prediabetes so it doesn’t take a turn for the worse. 5. Where can I find help? You are not alone. It’s never too late Continue reading >>

The New Way To Reverse Your Diabetes Risk That Really Couldn't Be More Simple

The New Way To Reverse Your Diabetes Risk That Really Couldn't Be More Simple

Clark knew it was time for a blood sugar rewind. The best part? Her numbers qualified her for a local, yearlong Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), an innovative, research-proven plan involving smart, doable lifestyle changes that reverse prediabetes. This intensive program is now offered by YMCAs, hospitals, churches, community centers, and workplaces across the nation. With 4 months of weekly classes, plus 6 to 8 months of motivational follow-up meetings, people learn how to make essential diet and exercise changes. And the results happen fast. "It's a new way of living. My husband has lost even more weight than I have." "It's all about making small, sustainable tweaks. Research suggests that losing even 5% of your weight is the tipping point for seeing results. That's lifesaving news," says Matt Longjohn, MD, MPH, national health officer at the YMCA of the USA. The Drug-Free Plan One in three American adults has prediabetes. Yet just one in nine knows it, according to the CDC. That means millions are missing out on the opportunity to become the boss of their own blood sugar—naturally. The DPP works better than a drug. In fact, in 2002, the National Institutes of Health stopped the original DPP study early because healthy lifestyle changes worked so much better than the participants' drugs that the researchers wanted everyone to switch over. In 2011, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute scientists who tracked just over 200,000 people for 11 years found that five factors—nutritious food, regular activity, a healthy weight, minimal-to-moderate alcohol consumption, and no smoking—cut diabetes risk by 84% for women and 72% for men. "It's powerful," says Osama Hamdy, MD, PhD, medical director of the obesity clinical program and director of the inpatient diabetes Continue reading >>

11 Ways To Start Reversing Type 2 Diabetes Today

11 Ways To Start Reversing Type 2 Diabetes Today

Whether you have a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or or you’ve been told you’re at risk, read on for 11 ways to start reversing the effects immediately. Type 2 diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions. There are 3.9 million people living with diabetes – 90 per cent those of being affected by type 2 diabetes. Here’s another shocking statistic: 1 in 3 UK adults has prediabetes, the condition that precedes diabetes. As you’ll soon see on BBC One’s Doctor in the House, it is entirely possible to both prevent as well as reverse type 2 diabetes. Unfortunately, a lot of the advice that is given for the condition is, in my opinion, unhelpful and misguided. Most people think of it as a blood sugar problem but this is the ultimate effect rather than the cause. WHAT IS TYPE 2 DIABETES? Type 2 diabetes is a condition that is characterised by chronically elevated blood sugar levels. However, the main cause as well as the driver for this condition is something called Insulin Resistance. When you eat certain foods, particularly refined carbohydrates, that food is converted to sugar inside your body. Your body’s way of dealing with this sugar is to produce a hormone called insulin. Insulin moves the sugar inside your cells so that it can be used for energy. Sounds great, right? Well, yes and no. When working efficiently, this is a fantastic system that helps your body to function well. But when you have type 2 diabetes, prediabetes or significant abdominal obesity, that system does not work so well. Eating too many refined carbohydrates elevates your insulin levels for long periods of time and your cells start to become resistant to the effects of insulin. Think of this a bit like alcohol. When you start to drink, a single glass of wine can make you feel drunk. Once your b Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes definition and facts Prediabetes means your blood sugar is higher than normal, but not high enough to diagnose type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes typically has no symptoms or signs; however, it has been associated with being overweight. Usually, blood sugar is high because of insulin resistance, meaning glucose can't get into the cells to be used for energy. Prediabetes is diagnosed with blood tests. Prediabetes levels of blood sugar fall in the range of 100-125 when blood glucose is measured fasting. Prediabetes is reversible by getting healthier. Treatment for prediabetes begins with getting more physically active. All exercise helps reverse prediabetes, especially exercise that helps build muscle. Following a low glycemic index, low carb diet, and following a healthier lifestyle helps reverse prediabetes. Medications and dietary supplements also can be used in reverse prediabetes management. Without making lifestyle changes (or taking medication), the "side effect" of prediabetes is that it is likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is the term used to describe elevated blood sugar (glucose) that has not yet reached the threshold of a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Consider pre-diabetes a warning sign that it is time to take your health more seriously. What is the difference between prediabetes and type 2 diabetes? Prediabetes occurs when there is too much sugar (glucose) in the blood. It is an early warning sign that the body has more sugar in the blood then it can use. Type 2 diabetes is a condition that occurs slowly over time. The pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to keep up with the increased need to move sugar into the cells for energy. Medication and lifestyle changes are necessary to manage blood sugar levels and avoid diabetes complications Continue reading >>

You Can Avoid Pre-diabetes With Small Changes To Your Diet

You Can Avoid Pre-diabetes With Small Changes To Your Diet

Charity Diabetes UK estimates that up to 11.5 million people in the UK are at a high risk of developing it. This statistic is backed up by research published last year in online medical journal BMJ Open which estimates a third of UK adults are at the stage known as pre-diabetes. If you’re one of them or think you might be, the main thing to know is that pre-diabetes can be reversed. In fact, it takes only simple lifestyle changes to cut your risk of going on to develop Type 2 diabetes. So what does the term mean? Although not a medically recognised condition, pre-diabetes is a term used when a person’s blood glucose levels are higher than normal, yet not high enough for the full diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes. Being told you have pre-diabetes serves as a warning that you’re at increased risk of developing the condition. It has other health implications, too, for example it raises risk of cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks and stroke. Incredible celebrity weight loss transformations Wed, June 28, 2017 Incredible celebrity weight loss transformations. If you’re diagnosed with pre-diabetes (also called impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance) but don’t have any signs of Type 2 diabetes, you’re likely to be seen every one to three years by your doctor, depending on your blood sugar levels. Now’s the time to take steps to reduce your risk. Diabetes UK is encouraging people to find out their level of risk of developing Type 2 and whether they have pre-diabetes. There is a quick Know Your Risk quiz on the charity’s website (diabetes.org.uk/risk) or you can check at your pharmacy or GP surgery. If you do discover you’re at risk, it means you’ll be able to get support and regular check-ups from your doctor. The biggest risk factor for Continue reading >>

Just Diagnosed With Prediabetes Or Diabetes? 5 Easy Steps To Maintain Normal Blood Sugar

Just Diagnosed With Prediabetes Or Diabetes? 5 Easy Steps To Maintain Normal Blood Sugar

Save If you are one of the millions of people who has been diagnosed with prediabetes, diabetes, metabolic syndrome or any other form of “insulin resistance,” maintaining normal blood sugar levels can be challenging. Over the past several decades, these chronic disorders have swept through the U.S. and many other nations, reaching epidemic proportions and causing serious, but often preventable, side effects like nerve damage, fatigue, loss of vision, arterial damage and weight gain. The good news is that there are ways to prevent and even naturally reverse prediabetes and diabetes. Elevated blood sugar levels maintained for an extended period of time can push someone who is “prediabetic” into having full-blown diabetes (which now affects about one in every three adults in the U.S.). Even for people who aren’t necessarily at a high risk for developing diabetes or heart complications, poorly managed blood sugar can lead to common complications, including fatigue, weight gain and sugar cravings. In extreme cases, elevated blood sugar can even contribute to strokes, amputations, coma and death in people with a history of insulin resistance. Blood sugar is raised by glucose, which is the sugar we get from eating many different types of foods that contain carbohydrates. Although we usually think of normal blood sugar as being strictly reliant upon how many carbohydrates and added sugar someone eats, other factors also play a role. For example, stress can elevate cortisol levels, which interferes with how insulin is used, and the timing of meals can also affect how the body manages blood sugar. How to Maintain Normal Blood Sugar Most of the habits that help us maintain healthy, normal blood sugar levels are fairly obvious and simple to carry out. However, some might Continue reading >>

Ask An Expert: Eating To Beat Prediabetes

Ask An Expert: Eating To Beat Prediabetes

Q: “I just found out I have prediabetes. All the dietary info I find online seems so complicated. Can you give me some simple guidelines for how to eat to get back to normal?” Answered by Daniel Norfleet, M.D., internal medicine, Providence Medical Group-Gateway Internal Medicine Sure! The truth is that most of the changes that help control prediabetes are pretty simple and straightforward. What makes them seem complicated and overwhelming is trying to focus on all of them at once. To keep it simple, I usually recommend trying just one or two small changes first. Work on these until they fit comfortably into your life. Once you’ve got them down, add a couple more, and then a couple more, working your way down the list gradually. This isn’t downplaying the importance of the changes you need to make. Prediabetes is a sign that your body is already having trouble using insulin – that’s the hormone that moves blood sugar (glucose) into your cells, where it can be used for fuel, instead of letting it float around in your blood, where it can do a lot of damage. Without making changes, you risk developing full-blown Type 2 diabetes; up to 70 percent of people with prediabetes eventually do. To turn things around, you do need to make some changes – you just don’t need to make them all at once. Focusing on one or two changes at a time allows you to adjust to new habits until, one day, they no longer look like changes at all – they’re just your normal life. Changing how – and how much – you eat One of the easiest ways to start making healthy changes, before you even look at what you eat, is to look at how much you eat. Carrying extra pounds, especially in your belly, makes blood sugar harder to control. Three simple portion-control tricks can help you trim Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Can Be Reversed

Prediabetes Can Be Reversed

Yes, you can stop diabetes before it begins, but you won’t receive the care you need if you don’t even know you have the problem. Screening is now recommended for everyone beginning at 45 years of age. Publisher’s Comment: Since you can have a normal fasting blood sugar and still have diabetes and prediabetes, why not use the A1c test. Even though the A1c test is not recommended for diagnosing diabetes and prediabetes, it is certainly and inexpensive and easy to do test. And if their A1c is in the high 5’s you can do a glucose tolerance test. You can delay or stop diabetes if you catch it before it truly begins. Doctors call this early stage prediabetes. The condition exists when your blood sugar levels rise higher than normal, yet remain lower than those found in diabetes. Studies show that effective treatments can prevent the progression of prediabetes to diabetes. Here’s where new guidelines from the American Diabetes Association enter. Based on the updated advice, many more people should get tested for prediabetes than in the past. And some folks should begin receiving the tests well before middle age, the association says. Scientists estimate that an unprecedented 54 million Americans have prediabetes. Without treatment, most people with the condition will go on to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus within 10 years, studies show. Full-blown diabetes causes abnormally high blood sugar levels that may lead to serious health problems. Even before then, though, people with prediabetes face many of the same health risks as diabetics. For example, people with prediabetes have 1 1/2 times greater risk of heart disease and stroke compared while diabetics have two to four times increased risk. The American Diabetes Association recommends a blood test for all adults Continue reading >>

How Diet Can Reverse Pre-diabetes

How Diet Can Reverse Pre-diabetes

We’re hearing a lot about type 2 diabetes reaching crisis point in the UK Diabetes UK estimates up to 11.5 million people in the UK are at a high risk of developing the condition. This statistic is backed up by research published last year in the online journal BMJ Open, which estimates a third of adults in the UK are at the stage known as pre-diabetes. If you’re one of them, or think you might be, the main thing to know is that pre-diabetes can be reversed. In fact, it only takes simple lifestyle changes to cut your risk of going on to develop type 2 diabetes. An alarm bell for your health Although it isn’t a medically recognised condition, pre-diabetes is a term that’s used when a person’s blood glucose levels are higher than normal, yet not high enough for the full diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Being told you have pre-diabetes serves as a warning that you’re at increased risk of developing the condition. It has other health implications, too – for example, it raises risk of cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks and stroke. Here’s what you can do… If you’re diagnosed with pre-diabetes (sometimes called impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance) but don’t have any signs of type 2 diabetes, you’re likely to be seen every one to three years by your doctor, depending on your blood sugar levels. Now’s the time to take steps to reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Take the Diabetes UK quiz Diabetes UK is encouraging people to find out their level of risk of developing type 2 and whether they have pre-diabetes. There’s a quick ‘Know your risk’ quiz on Diabetes UK’s website (diabetes.org.uk/risk), or you can check at your pharmacy or GP surgery. If you do discover you’re at risk, it means you’ll be able to Continue reading >>

Can Dramatically Changing Your Diet Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Dramatically Changing Your Diet Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

ATLANTA - About 30 million American adults have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. And the CDC says about 96 million are "pre-diabetic," meaning their blood sugar levels are too high. For years, experts have assumed that once a person was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, it was a done deal; the only option was to manage the illness. But a couple of small studies show that dramatic dietary changes may help some type 2 diabetics normalize their blood sugar levels. So, Emory internist Dr. Sharon Bergquist believes it's not too late for diabetics and pre-diabetics to change course, by rethinking the way you eat. "Studies show you can reduce average blood sugar, as measured by hemoglobin a1c by over 2 points, and that translates into over 100 blood sugar points," Dr. Bergquist says. "So, diet can be just as effective, and in some cases even more effective, than medication for managing blood sugar." In one British study, a small group of 13 type 2 diabetic volunteers, all overweight, switched to a plant-based diet: eating lots of whole grains, vegetables (especially greens), fruits, and getting most of their fat from nuts and seeds. The volunteers also cut back on animal products, getting just 10 percent of their daily calories from meat and dairy. Bergquist says the most beneficial foods for diabetics fall into two categories. "One is foods that are low in saturated fat," she says. "Because the underlying problem with diabetes is insulin resistance, and saturated fat seems to worsen insulin resistance." And Bergquist encourages her diabetic patients to eat "good" carbs found in whole foods like whole grains, vegetables, and fruit. She recommends steering clear of sugary foods like sodas, snacks and baked goods, and cutting back on refined (or processed) foods like white ric Continue reading >>

Prediabetes: 7 Steps To Take Now

Prediabetes: 7 Steps To Take Now

Getting diagnosed with prediabetes is a serious wake-up call, but it doesn't have to mean you will definitely get diabetes. There is still time to turn things around. “It’s an opportunity to initiate lifestyle changes or treatments, and potentially retard progression to diabetes or even prevent diabetes,” says Gregg Gerety, MD, chief of endocrinology at St. Peter’s Hospital in Albany, N.Y. Making these seven changes in your daily habits is a good way to start. Becoming more active is one of the best things you can do to make diabetes less likely. If it's been a while since you exercised, start by building more activity into your routine by taking the stairs or doing some stretching during TV commercials, says Patti Geil, MS, RD, author of What Do I Eat Now? “Physical activity is an essential part of the treatment plan for prediabetes, because it lowers blood glucose levels and decreases body fat,” Geil says. Ideally, you should exercise at least 30 minutes a day, five days a week. Let your doctor know about your exercise plans and ask if you have any limitations. If you're overweight, you might not have to lose as much as you think to make a difference. In one study, people who had prediabetes and lost 5% to 7% of their body weight (just 10-14 pounds in someone who weights 200 pounds) cut their chances of getting diabetes by 58%. See your doctor every three to six months, Gerety says. If you're doing well, you can get positive reinforcement from your doctor. If it's not going so well, your doctor can help you get back on track. "Patients like some tangible evidence of success or failure," Gerety says. Continue reading >>

Are You At Risk For Prediabetes?

Are You At Risk For Prediabetes?

Working as a physical therapist in Talent, Oregon, Jade Wilcoxson treated diabetic patients every day, but she never imagined she could become one of them. At 28, she had an athletic build, loved to mountain bike and play soccer on weekends, and ate what she considered a pretty healthy diet. So in 2006, she was shocked when she got a call from her doctor's office after having blood work done during a routine checkup. "My blood sugar was elevated," recalls Jade, now 36. Her doctor retested her a few times, but the results were conclusive: Jade had prediabetes, a condition that put her at higher risk for type 2 diabetes, a disease in which the body doesn't properly make or use insulin, the hormone that helps convert glucose into fuel for our cells. As a result, blood sugar builds up in the bloodstream and can damage nerves and organs. A prediabetes diagnosis means that has already begun to happen. Exactly why isn't known, but genetics, excess body fat and inactivity play a role. Jade was devastated. She knew that if she got diabetes, she would be at an increased risk for high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke and kidney disease. The good news: Prediabetes is reversible. She could clean up her diet, as her doctor suggested, cutting back on simple carbs and alcohol, and step up her exercise routine and/or take drugs to manage her glucose levels. "I worried that if I started taking medication I would become dependent on it," Jade says. "I wasn't ready to go down that route." She called her brother, Ryan, who suggested they train for a 100-mile bicycle race together as a way to exercise more consistently. "It took us about eight or nine hours to cross the finish line, but we made it," Jade says. Inspired, she kept training. "Once I started riding, I felt like eating bette Continue reading >>

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