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Can You Reverse Pre Diabetes With Diet?

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Print Overview Prediabetes means that your blood sugar level is higher than normal but not yet high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Without lifestyle changes, people with prediabetes are very likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. If you have prediabetes, the long-term damage of diabetes — especially to your heart, blood vessels and kidneys — may already be starting. There's good news, however. Progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes isn't inevitable. Eating healthy foods, incorporating physical activity in your daily routine and maintaining a healthy weight can help bring your blood sugar level back to normal. Prediabetes affects adults and children. The same lifestyle changes that can help prevent progression to diabetes in adults might also help bring children's blood sugar levels back to normal. Symptoms Prediabetes generally has no signs or symptoms. One possible sign that you may be at risk of type 2 diabetes is darkened skin on certain parts of the body. Affected areas can include the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and knuckles. Classic signs and symptoms that suggest you've moved from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Blurred vision When to see a doctor See your doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any type 2 diabetes signs or symptoms. Ask your doctor about blood glucose screening if you have any risk factors for prediabetes. Causes The exact cause of prediabetes is unknown. But family history and genetics appear to play an important role. Inactivity and excess fat — especially abdominal fat — also seem to be important factors. What is clear is that people with prediabetes don't process sugar (glucose) properly anymore. As a result, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead o Continue reading >>

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

By some estimates, diabetes cases have increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years. One in four Americans now have either diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose) Type 2 diabetes is completely preventable and virtually 100 percent reversible, simply by implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle changes, one of the most important of which is eliminating sugar (especially fructose) and grains from your diet Diabetes is NOT a disease of blood sugar, but rather a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling. Elevated insulin levels are not only symptoms of diabetes, but also heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and obesity Diabetes drugs are not the answer – most type 2 diabetes medications either raise insulin or lower blood sugar (failing to address the root cause) and many can cause serious side effects Sun exposure shows promise in treating and preventing diabetes, with studies revealing a significant link between high vitamin D levels and a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome By Dr. Mercola There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes — and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes aren’t aware of their circumstances, either. Diabetes: Symptoms of an Epidemic The latest diabetes statistics1 echo an increase in diabetes ca Continue reading >>

How To Help Your Body Reverse Diabetes

How To Help Your Body Reverse Diabetes

Diabetes rates are rising, in fact it is now considered an “epidemic” in the medical community. The American Diabetes Association reports that: 23.6 million Americans have diabetes 57 million Americans are pre-diabetic 1.6 new cases of diabetes are reported each year For those over age 60, almost 1 in 4 have diabetes Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death Diabetes increases heart attack risk and 68% of diabetes related death certificates report heart related problems 75% of adults with diabetes will develop high blood pressure Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness, kidney failure and nervous system disorders Diabetes costs $174 billion annually Diabetes is a well-established problem and a multi-billion dollar industry. It is medically characterized by Fasting Blood Glucose higher than 126 mg/dL , which ranges between 100-125 mg/dL are considered pre-diabetic and ranges below 99 mg/dL are considered normal. Studies are finding that a fasting blood glucose below 83 mg/dL is actually a better benchmark, as risk of heart disease begins to increase at anything above that. IMPORTANT: There is a difference between Type 1 diabetes (an autoimmune condition) and Type 2 diabetes (lifestyle related). This article refers specifically to Type 2 diabetes. Some medical professionals use an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) to test for diabetes. If you’ve ever been pregnant and had to drink the sickeningly sweet sugar cocktail and then have blood drawn, you are familiar with this one. Basically, a patient is given 50-75 grams of glucose in concentrated solution and his blood sugar response is measured. I’m not a fan of this test because no one should be ingesting that much concentrated glucose, and the test is not a completely accurate measure. (Just a side note: if yo Continue reading >>

The New Way To Reverse Your Diabetes Risk That Really Couldn't Be More Simple

The New Way To Reverse Your Diabetes Risk That Really Couldn't Be More Simple

Clark knew it was time for a blood sugar rewind. The best part? Her numbers qualified her for a local, yearlong Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), an innovative, research-proven plan involving smart, doable lifestyle changes that reverse prediabetes. This intensive program is now offered by YMCAs, hospitals, churches, community centers, and workplaces across the nation. With 4 months of weekly classes, plus 6 to 8 months of motivational follow-up meetings, people learn how to make essential diet and exercise changes. And the results happen fast. "It's a new way of living. My husband has lost even more weight than I have." "It's all about making small, sustainable tweaks. Research suggests that losing even 5% of your weight is the tipping point for seeing results. That's lifesaving news," says Matt Longjohn, MD, MPH, national health officer at the YMCA of the USA. The Drug-Free Plan One in three American adults has prediabetes. Yet just one in nine knows it, according to the CDC. That means millions are missing out on the opportunity to become the boss of their own blood sugar—naturally. The DPP works better than a drug. In fact, in 2002, the National Institutes of Health stopped the original DPP study early because healthy lifestyle changes worked so much better than the participants' drugs that the researchers wanted everyone to switch over. In 2011, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute scientists who tracked just over 200,000 people for 11 years found that five factors—nutritious food, regular activity, a healthy weight, minimal-to-moderate alcohol consumption, and no smoking—cut diabetes risk by 84% for women and 72% for men. "It's powerful," says Osama Hamdy, MD, PhD, medical director of the obesity clinical program and director of the inpatient diabetes Continue reading >>

Can Dramatically Changing Your Diet Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Dramatically Changing Your Diet Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

ATLANTA - About 30 million American adults have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. And the CDC says about 96 million are "pre-diabetic," meaning their blood sugar levels are too high. For years, experts have assumed that once a person was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, it was a done deal; the only option was to manage the illness. But a couple of small studies show that dramatic dietary changes may help some type 2 diabetics normalize their blood sugar levels. So, Emory internist Dr. Sharon Bergquist believes it's not too late for diabetics and pre-diabetics to change course, by rethinking the way you eat. "Studies show you can reduce average blood sugar, as measured by hemoglobin a1c by over 2 points, and that translates into over 100 blood sugar points," Dr. Bergquist says. "So, diet can be just as effective, and in some cases even more effective, than medication for managing blood sugar." In one British study, a small group of 13 type 2 diabetic volunteers, all overweight, switched to a plant-based diet: eating lots of whole grains, vegetables (especially greens), fruits, and getting most of their fat from nuts and seeds. The volunteers also cut back on animal products, getting just 10 percent of their daily calories from meat and dairy. Bergquist says the most beneficial foods for diabetics fall into two categories. "One is foods that are low in saturated fat," she says. "Because the underlying problem with diabetes is insulin resistance, and saturated fat seems to worsen insulin resistance." And Bergquist encourages her diabetic patients to eat "good" carbs found in whole foods like whole grains, vegetables, and fruit. She recommends steering clear of sugary foods like sodas, snacks and baked goods, and cutting back on refined (or processed) foods like white ric Continue reading >>

The 4 Common Mistakes All Prediabetics Must Avoid To Prevent Diabetes

The 4 Common Mistakes All Prediabetics Must Avoid To Prevent Diabetes

Just a “little touch of sugar?” iStock/stocksnapper If you’re among the 79 million Americans with prediabetes—higher-than-normal levels of blood sugar, which boost your risk for full-blown diabetes and related health problems—don’t shrug it off. New research published in the journal The Lancet found that prediabetic patients who had at least one normal blood sugar reading, even for a short period of time, were 56 percent more likely to avoid progressing to diabetes during nearly six years of follow-up after the study. In other words, “This is your chance to take control,” says Matt Longjohn, MD, MPH, senior director of chronic disease prevention for the YMCA-USA. “Research proves that some simple, daily lifestyle changes can dramatically cut the risk for developing diabetes over the next couple of years by 58 percent, which is better than what is seen with frequently prescribed medications like metformin.” The key? Avoid these four roadblocks between you and a healthier future. iStock/martinedoucet The landmark Diabetes Prevention Program study, which followed 3,234 people with prediabetes for three years, revealed that everyday changes—switching up their eating habits and adding more physical activity—helped participants lose a little weight. Trimming just 5 percent to 7 percent of their body weight (that’s 12.5 pounds for a 180 pound person) and exercising slashed the odds for developing full-blown diabetes by a whopping 58 percent. This helps trim abdominal fat—the deep belly fat that settles in your torso, wraps itself around your internal organs, and even invades your liver. It messes with your liver’s ability to regulate blood sugar by pumping out inflammation-boosting compounds that make your body stop obeying insulin. Smart Move: St Continue reading >>

How To Eat To Reverse Prediabetes

How To Eat To Reverse Prediabetes

If you’ve heard the diagnosis of prediabetes from your physician, you might be frightened. That is the initial feeling of most of my clients who have been told their insulin is no longer sufficient to control blood sugar to a normal level. Prediabetes is underdiagnosed, due to the lack of symptoms. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported this year that an estimated 84 million Americans, or about 1 in 3 people in the U.S., have it. The good news is that prediabetes can be reversed. The bad news is that once it becomes diabetes, you are stuck. If you have risk factors for diabetes, like being overweight or family history, talk to your doctor so that prediabetes can be detected and reversed. If you have it, take action. This is urgent and can make a huge difference in managing and potentially reversing prediabetes. Here are the basics to get you started. Lower your sugar intake. I’m not talking about natural sugars from fruit and dairy. Added sugars in the form of sweetened beverages, desserts and prepackaged foods need to be eliminated or greatly reduced if Type 2 diabetes is to be prevented. Start by tracking your sugar intake and limiting it to less than 25 grams per day of added sugar. Don’t eliminate carbohydrates — instead choose the right ones at the right times. It is more about consistent carbohydrates intake than none at all. The best way to consume carbs is to have one to three servings per meal or snack, of a variety of whole-grain carbohydrates and/or starchy vegetables and fruits. One serving is 15 grams of carbohydrate. Examples of this are: 1 small slice of whole-grain bread, 1/3 cup brown rice, ½ cup whole-grain pasta, medium apple, or 1-ounce of whole-grain crackers. Pair your carbs with protein such as cottage cheese or healthy f Continue reading >>

Stopping Prediabetes In Its Tracks

Stopping Prediabetes In Its Tracks

Print Font: Oct. 30 — Nearly 20 million Americans are headed down the road to diabetes, but modest weight loss and a bit more activity would be enough to turn them around. These people have prediabetes, meaning their above-normal blood sugar levels signal a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. More women opting for preventive mastectomy - but should they be? Rates of women who are opting for preventive mastectomies, such as Angeline Jolie, have increased by an estimated 50 percent in recent years, experts say. But many doctors are puzzled because the operation doesn't carry a 100 percent guarantee, it's major surgery -- and women have other options, from a once-a-day pill to careful monitoring. A combination of obesity, inactivity and genetics is responsible. But most people with prediabetes aren’t aware they have it, and insurers may not cover testing for or treatment of the condition. “It’s really quite a remarkable opportunity, but it’s not as if everyone is rushing to be identified,” says Dr. Daniel Einhorn of the Scripps Whittier Institute for Diabetes in La Jolla, Calif. Many people may be reluctant to get tested — and labeled — especially if they’re feeling fine, he adds. But catching the condition before it turns into full-blown diabetes can be a lifesaver. People with Type 2 diabetes either lose the ability to respond to insulin, or their bodies no longer make enough of the hormone. Insulin helps the body use glucose as fuel, so without it sugar builds up in the bloodstream. Over time, especially if blood sugar levels are not kept in check, diabetes can boost a person’s risk of heart disease and cause damage to the eyes, kidneys, nerves and other body tissues. Prediabetes used to be called impaired fasting glucos Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – The Quick Start Guide

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – The Quick Start Guide

It’s possible to simply reverse type 2 diabetes. There are only two things you need to do. By reading this brief post you’ll know what they are, and how to get started. Or skip ahead to the two steps right away > Quick start Twenty years ago, when you bought a brand sparkly new VCR machine, you would also get a thick instruction manual. Read this thoroughly before you start, the manufacturer would implore. There would be detailed setup procedures and troubleshooting guides. Most of us ignored the manual, just plugged it in and tried to figure out the rest. That’s why we all had the blinking 12:00 on. Today, most new electronics now come with a quick start guide which has the most basic 4 or 5 steps to get your machine working and then anything else you needed, you could reference the detailed instruction manual. Instruction manuals are just so much more useful this way. Well, I don’t know much about VCRs, but I do know about type 2 diabetes. I can write an entire book about obesity (oh, wait, I did that already), or fasting (oh, wait, coming up) or type 2 diabetes (next up for 2018). But many of you will not want to go through the entire instruction manual. So this is the quick start guide for reversing your type 2 diabetes. A fully reversible disease Most doctors, dietitians and diabetes specialists claim that type 2 diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease. The American Diabetes Association, for example, almost proudly proclaims this on its website. Once you get the diagnosis, it’s a life sentence. But, it’s actually a great big lie. Type 2 diabetes is almost always reversible and this is almost ridiculously easy to prove. This is great news for the more than 50% of American adults who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes. Recognizing thi Continue reading >>

Q&a: I Have Prediabetes. What Should I Eat?

Q&a: I Have Prediabetes. What Should I Eat?

(Bigstock) QWhat should I eat if I’ve been told by my health-care provider that I have prediabetes? I’m confused by the conflicting messages I hear and read. ANovember is an apt month to answer this increasingly common question. It’s American Diabetes Month. You didn’t detail the conflicting messages you’ve gotten, but as a dietitian and diabetes educator, I hear and read many. Let me take a guess. Your health-care provider, to offer simple advice, might have said “don’t eat anything white” or “lose weight.” If you scoured the Internet, you probably spotted promises of reversal or a cure if you “eat only low-glycemic-index foods” or “eat low-carb.” Or you might hear pleas to become vegan. “Many people think their number-one priority is to no longer let sugary foods and sweets pass their lips. That’s in part because diabetes has been synonymous with sugar through the ages,” says dietitian and diabetes educator Tami Ross, the 2013 president of the American Association of Diabetes Educators and co-author of “What Do I Eat Now? A Step-by-Step Guide to Eating Right With Type 2 Diabetes.” Yes, the nutrition advice you’ll hear for prediabetes can be contradictory, oversimplified and impractical for the long haul. Yet research has revealed plenty about how a person with prediabetes should eat to remain diabetes-free as long as possible. The central goal? Reverse insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is the body’s inability to effectively use the insulin it makes. To keep glucose in control, the pancreas goes into overdrive to produce an increasing supply of insulin. At the same time, the body’s insulin supply is slowly dwindling. At the point when there isn’t enough insulin to control glucose levels, glucose rises higher than norma Continue reading >>

8 Actions To Take If You Have Prediabetes

8 Actions To Take If You Have Prediabetes

Changing the Path to Type 2 A whopping 86 million Americans have prediabetes. That’s according to the latest statistics from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) -- that's 37 percent of American adults over age 20 and 51 percent of adults over age 65. Research shows about 70 percent of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes over time. Despite these scary stats, only 11 percent of people who have prediabtes know it. The good news is you can prevent or slow the progression of prediabetes to type 2. Numerous research studies conducted over the last 30 years show that early and aggressive management with continued vigilance over time is what prevents or delays type 2 diabetes. And the earlier you detect it and put your plan into action, the better. Here are eight ways to manage prediabetes. 1. Get Tested to Know for Sure. Do you have family -- parents or siblings -- with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes? Are you carrying extra weight around your middle? Don't get enough exercise? These are a few of the risk factors for prediabetes. A good first step to see if you are at high risk is to use the American Diabetes Association (ADA) Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test. You can take the test by visiting diabetes.org/risk. If you’re at high risk, schedule an appointment with your health care provider to get a check of your blood glucose level -- or, better yet, your A1C (an average of your blood glucose over two to three months). See the blood test results to diagnose prediabetes on the next page. 2. Max Out Your Insulin-Making Reserves. It's well known that at the center of the storm of the slow and steady onset of prediabetes is insulin resistance -- the body's inability, due to excess weight and genetic risk factors, to effectively use the insulin th Continue reading >>

Reverse Pre-diabetes With Diet And Exercise

Reverse Pre-diabetes With Diet And Exercise

Everywhere you look, there they are: cakes, cookies, pies, breads and pastas. They’re foods that taste delicious, are easily accessible in supermarkets, restaurants and bakeries — and for most people, they’re hard to resist. But these same irresistible foods come with certain dangers: not only can too much sugar consumption pack on the pounds, it also can open the door to a potentially life threatening condition called type 2 diabetes. “Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way the body metabolizes sugar (glucose), the body's most important source of fuel,” explains Dr. Himani Chandra, an endocrinologist with NewYork-Presbyterian Hudson Valley Hospital in Cortlandt Manor. “With Type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin (a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells) or it doesn't produce enough to maintain a normal glucose level.” The American Diabetes Foundation reports that 86 million Americans age 20 and older have pre-diabetes, a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. Says Dr. Chandra, “Pre-diabetes is not a clinical condition per se, but it does represent an increased risk for diabetes and the complications that go along with it — including cardiovascular disease, obesity, high cholesterol and blood pressure levels, heart disease, kidney disease, vision problems, neurological problems in the hands and feet, and stroke.” Know your risk factors Pre-diabetes does not have symptoms but there are individuals who are at increased risk and should be tested — in particular, if they are overweight or obese, with a Body Mass Index of greater than 25 (a Body Mass Index of greater than 23 for Asian Americans) — and have one Continue reading >>

How Diet Can Reverse Pre-diabetes

How Diet Can Reverse Pre-diabetes

We’re hearing a lot about type 2 diabetes reaching crisis point in the UK Diabetes UK estimates up to 11.5 million people in the UK are at a high risk of developing the condition. This statistic is backed up by research published last year in the online journal BMJ Open, which estimates a third of adults in the UK are at the stage known as pre-diabetes. If you’re one of them, or think you might be, the main thing to know is that pre-diabetes can be reversed. In fact, it only takes simple lifestyle changes to cut your risk of going on to develop type 2 diabetes. An alarm bell for your health Although it isn’t a medically recognised condition, pre-diabetes is a term that’s used when a person’s blood glucose levels are higher than normal, yet not high enough for the full diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Being told you have pre-diabetes serves as a warning that you’re at increased risk of developing the condition. It has other health implications, too – for example, it raises risk of cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks and stroke. Here’s what you can do… If you’re diagnosed with pre-diabetes (sometimes called impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance) but don’t have any signs of type 2 diabetes, you’re likely to be seen every one to three years by your doctor, depending on your blood sugar levels. Now’s the time to take steps to reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Take the Diabetes UK quiz Diabetes UK is encouraging people to find out their level of risk of developing type 2 and whether they have pre-diabetes. There’s a quick ‘Know your risk’ quiz on Diabetes UK’s website (diabetes.org.uk/risk), or you can check at your pharmacy or GP surgery. If you do discover you’re at risk, it means you’ll be able to Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes Diet Plan

Pre Diabetes Diet Plan

It’s estimated that almost 50% of the American population has diabetes or prediabetes – a condition where blood sugar is higher than normal levels. It is accompanied by insulin resistance, a risk factor for full-blown diabetes, and other health complications. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data estimates the recent prevalence of total diabetes, diagnosed diabetes and undiagnosed diabetes’ US trends to be 12-14% among US adults. So, neither should you shrug off your doctor’s advice, nor should you be taking your elevated blood sugar levels lightly. Generally, the power of a pre-diabetes diet plan, for getting those numbers back on track, is underestimated. Prediabetes is diagnosed when fasting blood sugar levels range from 100 to 125 mg/dl, or hemoglobin A1C levels range from 5.7 to 6.4%. One needs to undergo regular prediabetes tests to be sure. But, with the right pre-diabetes diet plan, one starts to feel the difference in their energy levels soon enough. MORE: Take the Prediabetes Risk Test This is a chance to take control. Simple and daily lifestyle changes, like a balanced diet and regular exercise, that help you lose weight go a long way towards warding off the risk of progressing to full-blown type 2 diabetes. Pre-Diabetes Diet Plan: Changes You Need To Make Today If you already have pre-diabetes, you are likely to develop type 2 diabetes (T2D) within the next 10 years unless you make some changes, starting from today. It’s time to adopt a new pre-diabetes diet plan built on some basic principles: Don’t Skip Breakfast You may barely make it to office on time, but that doesn’t mean you skip breakfast. That means you wake up earlier! A healthy breakfast starts your day on the right note. It gives your metabolism the kick-sta Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Here's a fact: Most people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes had pre diabetes symptoms that if known, could have alerted them to make diet and lifestyle changes before their diagnosis. Most physicians only pay attention to fasting blood sugar when watching for diabetes. For instance, if a patient's blood sugar is between 110-125, mg/dL, it indicates prediabetes. But blood sugar results can test in normal ranges even as diabetes is developing. If people with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis knew ALL of the pre diabetic symptoms for which to watch, it could help them avoid being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is defined medically as the state in which fasting blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Blood sugars in the prediabetic range (between 100 - 126 mg/dl) indicate insulin resistance is developing, and a metabolic syndrome diagnosis is more likely in the future. Insulin resistance (IR) is a condition in which chronically elevated blood sugar and insulin levels have resulted in an inability of body cells to respond to them normally. IR is the driving factor as insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes and diabetes are all linked together on a continuum. Pre Diabetes Symptoms: It's Not Just About Blood Sugar Medical information about pre diabetes comes from medical associations such as the American Diabetes Association. The ADA guidelines say that prediabetes is a function of a fasting blood sugar is between 100-125 mg/dl. However, I am convinced that signs of prediabetes can be spotted even when blood tests indicated blood sugars below 100 mg/dl. I saw this in my own life. Eight years ago, I had many of the pre diabetic symptoms listed below, but my fasting blood sugar was still classified as "n Continue reading >>

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