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Can You Reverse Pre Diabetes With Diet?

Prediabetes & Insulin Resistance

Prediabetes & Insulin Resistance

What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas, an organ located behind the stomach. The pancreas contains clusters of cells called islets. Beta cells within the islets make insulin and release it into the blood. Insulin plays a major role in metabolism—the way the body uses digested food for energy. The digestive tract breaks down carbohydrates—sugars and starches found in many foods—into glucose. Glucose is a form of sugar that enters the bloodstream. With the help of insulin, cells throughout the body absorb glucose and use it for energy. Insulin's Role in Blood Glucose Control When blood glucose levels rise after a meal, the pancreas releases insulin into the blood. Insulin and glucose then travel in the blood to cells throughout the body. Insulin helps muscle, fat, and liver cells absorb glucose from the bloodstream, lowering blood glucose levels. Insulin stimulates the liver and muscle tissue to store excess glucose. The stored form of glucose is called glycogen. Insulin also lowers blood glucose levels by reducing glucose production in the liver. In a healthy person, these functions allow blood glucose and insulin levels to remain in the normal range. What happens with insulin resistance? In insulin resistance, muscle, fat, and liver cells do not respond properly to insulin and thus cannot easily absorb glucose from the bloodstream. As a result, the body needs higher levels of insulin to help glucose enter cells. The beta cells in the pancreas try to keep up with this increased demand for insulin by producing more. As long as the beta cells are able to produce enough insulin to overcome the insulin resistance, blood glucose levels stay in the healthy range. Over time, insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes and prediabetes because the bet Continue reading >>

Five Things You Should Know About Prediabetes

Five Things You Should Know About Prediabetes

After announcing the expansion of Diabetes Stops Here and asking you which topics you’d like covered, we received a specific request for more information about prediabetes. A staggering 79 million Americans deal with this condition, and while it can lead to crippling health consequences, it can be avoided. Here are five things you should know about prediabetes: 1. What is prediabetes? Before people develop type 2 diabetes, they almost always have prediabetes, a health condition where your blood glucose is higher than normal but not as high as if you had diabetes. 2. How can I find out if I have it? Your doctor can give you a blood test to tell if you have prediabetes (the same test that’s used to test for diabetes). At your next doctor visit, ask if you should be tested for prediabetes. 3. What can I do if I have prediabetes? If you have prediabetes, there are important steps you can, and should, take. Early intervention can turn back the clock and return elevated blood glucose levels to the normal range. Losing weight is an important step for most people with prediabetes, and the amount doesn’t have to be huge to make a difference. A weight loss of just 10 to 15 pounds can really stack the odds in your favor. Coupled with 30 minutes of exercise each day and healthy food choices, you’ll be on your way. Talk with your doctor and visit our website to learn more about other ways you can prevent or reverse the condition. 4. Does this mean I’m going to develop type 2 diabetes? Prediabetes can lead to type 2 diabetes…but it doesn’t have to. Scientific studies show taking the above steps can often halt or at least slow down the progression of prediabetes so it doesn’t take a turn for the worse. 5. Where can I find help? You are not alone. It’s never too late Continue reading >>

Just Diagnosed With Prediabetes Or Diabetes? 5 Easy Steps To Maintain Normal Blood Sugar

Just Diagnosed With Prediabetes Or Diabetes? 5 Easy Steps To Maintain Normal Blood Sugar

Save If you are one of the millions of people who has been diagnosed with prediabetes, diabetes, metabolic syndrome or any other form of “insulin resistance,” maintaining normal blood sugar levels can be challenging. Over the past several decades, these chronic disorders have swept through the U.S. and many other nations, reaching epidemic proportions and causing serious, but often preventable, side effects like nerve damage, fatigue, loss of vision, arterial damage and weight gain. The good news is that there are ways to prevent and even naturally reverse prediabetes and diabetes. Elevated blood sugar levels maintained for an extended period of time can push someone who is “prediabetic” into having full-blown diabetes (which now affects about one in every three adults in the U.S.). Even for people who aren’t necessarily at a high risk for developing diabetes or heart complications, poorly managed blood sugar can lead to common complications, including fatigue, weight gain and sugar cravings. In extreme cases, elevated blood sugar can even contribute to strokes, amputations, coma and death in people with a history of insulin resistance. Blood sugar is raised by glucose, which is the sugar we get from eating many different types of foods that contain carbohydrates. Although we usually think of normal blood sugar as being strictly reliant upon how many carbohydrates and added sugar someone eats, other factors also play a role. For example, stress can elevate cortisol levels, which interferes with how insulin is used, and the timing of meals can also affect how the body manages blood sugar. How to Maintain Normal Blood Sugar Most of the habits that help us maintain healthy, normal blood sugar levels are fairly obvious and simple to carry out. However, some might Continue reading >>

Are You At Risk For Prediabetes?

Are You At Risk For Prediabetes?

Working as a physical therapist in Talent, Oregon, Jade Wilcoxson treated diabetic patients every day, but she never imagined she could become one of them. At 28, she had an athletic build, loved to mountain bike and play soccer on weekends, and ate what she considered a pretty healthy diet. So in 2006, she was shocked when she got a call from her doctor's office after having blood work done during a routine checkup. "My blood sugar was elevated," recalls Jade, now 36. Her doctor retested her a few times, but the results were conclusive: Jade had prediabetes, a condition that put her at higher risk for type 2 diabetes, a disease in which the body doesn't properly make or use insulin, the hormone that helps convert glucose into fuel for our cells. As a result, blood sugar builds up in the bloodstream and can damage nerves and organs. A prediabetes diagnosis means that has already begun to happen. Exactly why isn't known, but genetics, excess body fat and inactivity play a role. Jade was devastated. She knew that if she got diabetes, she would be at an increased risk for high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke and kidney disease. The good news: Prediabetes is reversible. She could clean up her diet, as her doctor suggested, cutting back on simple carbs and alcohol, and step up her exercise routine and/or take drugs to manage her glucose levels. "I worried that if I started taking medication I would become dependent on it," Jade says. "I wasn't ready to go down that route." She called her brother, Ryan, who suggested they train for a 100-mile bicycle race together as a way to exercise more consistently. "It took us about eight or nine hours to cross the finish line, but we made it," Jade says. Inspired, she kept training. "Once I started riding, I felt like eating bette Continue reading >>

Can Dramatically Changing Your Diet Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Dramatically Changing Your Diet Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

ATLANTA - About 30 million American adults have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. And the CDC says about 96 million are "pre-diabetic," meaning their blood sugar levels are too high. For years, experts have assumed that once a person was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, it was a done deal; the only option was to manage the illness. But a couple of small studies show that dramatic dietary changes may help some type 2 diabetics normalize their blood sugar levels. So, Emory internist Dr. Sharon Bergquist believes it's not too late for diabetics and pre-diabetics to change course, by rethinking the way you eat. "Studies show you can reduce average blood sugar, as measured by hemoglobin a1c by over 2 points, and that translates into over 100 blood sugar points," Dr. Bergquist says. "So, diet can be just as effective, and in some cases even more effective, than medication for managing blood sugar." In one British study, a small group of 13 type 2 diabetic volunteers, all overweight, switched to a plant-based diet: eating lots of whole grains, vegetables (especially greens), fruits, and getting most of their fat from nuts and seeds. The volunteers also cut back on animal products, getting just 10 percent of their daily calories from meat and dairy. Bergquist says the most beneficial foods for diabetics fall into two categories. "One is foods that are low in saturated fat," she says. "Because the underlying problem with diabetes is insulin resistance, and saturated fat seems to worsen insulin resistance." And Bergquist encourages her diabetic patients to eat "good" carbs found in whole foods like whole grains, vegetables, and fruit. She recommends steering clear of sugary foods like sodas, snacks and baked goods, and cutting back on refined (or processed) foods like white ric Continue reading >>

Ask An Expert: Eating To Beat Prediabetes

Ask An Expert: Eating To Beat Prediabetes

Q: “I just found out I have prediabetes. All the dietary info I find online seems so complicated. Can you give me some simple guidelines for how to eat to get back to normal?” Answered by Daniel Norfleet, M.D., internal medicine, Providence Medical Group-Gateway Internal Medicine Sure! The truth is that most of the changes that help control prediabetes are pretty simple and straightforward. What makes them seem complicated and overwhelming is trying to focus on all of them at once. To keep it simple, I usually recommend trying just one or two small changes first. Work on these until they fit comfortably into your life. Once you’ve got them down, add a couple more, and then a couple more, working your way down the list gradually. This isn’t downplaying the importance of the changes you need to make. Prediabetes is a sign that your body is already having trouble using insulin – that’s the hormone that moves blood sugar (glucose) into your cells, where it can be used for fuel, instead of letting it float around in your blood, where it can do a lot of damage. Without making changes, you risk developing full-blown Type 2 diabetes; up to 70 percent of people with prediabetes eventually do. To turn things around, you do need to make some changes – you just don’t need to make them all at once. Focusing on one or two changes at a time allows you to adjust to new habits until, one day, they no longer look like changes at all – they’re just your normal life. Changing how – and how much – you eat One of the easiest ways to start making healthy changes, before you even look at what you eat, is to look at how much you eat. Carrying extra pounds, especially in your belly, makes blood sugar harder to control. Three simple portion-control tricks can help you trim Continue reading >>

Prediabetes: 7 Steps To Take Now

Prediabetes: 7 Steps To Take Now

Getting diagnosed with prediabetes is a serious wake-up call, but it doesn't have to mean you will definitely get diabetes. There is still time to turn things around. “It’s an opportunity to initiate lifestyle changes or treatments, and potentially retard progression to diabetes or even prevent diabetes,” says Gregg Gerety, MD, chief of endocrinology at St. Peter’s Hospital in Albany, N.Y. Making these seven changes in your daily habits is a good way to start. Becoming more active is one of the best things you can do to make diabetes less likely. If it's been a while since you exercised, start by building more activity into your routine by taking the stairs or doing some stretching during TV commercials, says Patti Geil, MS, RD, author of What Do I Eat Now? “Physical activity is an essential part of the treatment plan for prediabetes, because it lowers blood glucose levels and decreases body fat,” Geil says. Ideally, you should exercise at least 30 minutes a day, five days a week. Let your doctor know about your exercise plans and ask if you have any limitations. If you're overweight, you might not have to lose as much as you think to make a difference. In one study, people who had prediabetes and lost 5% to 7% of their body weight (just 10-14 pounds in someone who weights 200 pounds) cut their chances of getting diabetes by 58%. See your doctor every three to six months, Gerety says. If you're doing well, you can get positive reinforcement from your doctor. If it's not going so well, your doctor can help you get back on track. "Patients like some tangible evidence of success or failure," Gerety says. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a “pre-diagnosis” of diabetes—you can think of it as a warning sign. It’s when your blood glucose level (blood sugar level) is higher than normal, but it’s not high enough to be considered diabetes. Prediabetes is an indication that you could develop type 2 diabetes if you don’t make some lifestyle changes. But here's the good news: . Eating healthy food, losing weight and staying at a healthy weight, and being physically active can help you bring your blood glucose level back into the normal range. Diabetes develops very gradually, so when you’re in the prediabetes stage—when your blood glucose level is higher than it should be—you may not have any symptoms at all. You may, however, notice that: you’re hungrier than normal you’re losing weight, despite eating more you’re thirstier than normal you have to go to the bathroom more frequently you’re more tired than usual All of those are typical symptoms associated with diabetes, so if you’re in the early stages of diabetes, you may notice them. Prediabetes develops when your body begins to have trouble using the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells via the bloodstream. In pre-diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or it doesn’t use it well (that’s called insulin resistance). If you don’t have enough insulin or if you’re insulin resistant, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps prediabetes. Researchers aren’t sure what exactly causes the insulin process to go awry in some people. There are several risk factors, though, that make it more likely that you’ll develop pre-diabetes. These are Continue reading >>

Should You Follow A Prediabetes Diet Plan?

Should You Follow A Prediabetes Diet Plan?

Before I offer answers to the questions about what to eat if you have pre diabetes and whether you should follow a pre diabetes diet plan, let’s get clear on what pre diabetes is, who’s at risk and actions to take that can help prevent type 2 diabetes. What is Pre Diabetes? Pre diabetes occurs when blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes.1 (Pre diabetes refers to the condition that typically occurs before one develops type 2 diabetes.) The number of people estimated to have pre diabetes is simply staggering. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) puts the estimate at 84 million Americans. That’s one out of three adults at risk for diabetes! Most people don’t know they have pre diabetes because often there are no symptoms, nor have they been tested for it or told they have it.1 November is American Diabetes Month®. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) now recommends that all adults over 45 years of age be screened for pre diabetes.2 Other risk factors for pre diabetes or type 2 diabetes include being overweight or obese, having one or more parents or siblings who have or had type 2 diabetes or women who have had gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy).2 Pre Diabetes Tests According to the ADA, any of the following lab tests with the corresponding results can be used to diagnose pre diabetes:2 Fasting Blood Glucose: 100-125 mg/dL 2 hours after the start of an oral glucose tolerance test: 140-199 mg/dL A1c test (A1c approximates an average of all the ups and downs of blood glucose over the previous two to three months): 5.7 to 6.4 percent People can develop pre diabetes and have it for several years or more before blood glucose levels rise high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

Reverse Pre-diabetes With Diet And Exercise

Reverse Pre-diabetes With Diet And Exercise

Everywhere you look, there they are: cakes, cookies, pies, breads and pastas. They’re foods that taste delicious, are easily accessible in supermarkets, restaurants and bakeries — and for most people, they’re hard to resist. But these same irresistible foods come with certain dangers: not only can too much sugar consumption pack on the pounds, it also can open the door to a potentially life threatening condition called type 2 diabetes. “Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way the body metabolizes sugar (glucose), the body's most important source of fuel,” explains Dr. Himani Chandra, an endocrinologist with NewYork-Presbyterian Hudson Valley Hospital in Cortlandt Manor. “With Type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin (a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells) or it doesn't produce enough to maintain a normal glucose level.” The American Diabetes Foundation reports that 86 million Americans age 20 and older have pre-diabetes, a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. Says Dr. Chandra, “Pre-diabetes is not a clinical condition per se, but it does represent an increased risk for diabetes and the complications that go along with it — including cardiovascular disease, obesity, high cholesterol and blood pressure levels, heart disease, kidney disease, vision problems, neurological problems in the hands and feet, and stroke.” Know your risk factors Pre-diabetes does not have symptoms but there are individuals who are at increased risk and should be tested — in particular, if they are overweight or obese, with a Body Mass Index of greater than 25 (a Body Mass Index of greater than 23 for Asian Americans) — and have one Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes definition and facts Prediabetes means your blood sugar is higher than normal, but not high enough to diagnose type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes typically has no symptoms or signs; however, it has been associated with being overweight. Usually, blood sugar is high because of insulin resistance, meaning glucose can't get into the cells to be used for energy. Prediabetes is diagnosed with blood tests. Prediabetes levels of blood sugar fall in the range of 100-125 when blood glucose is measured fasting. Prediabetes is reversible by getting healthier. Treatment for prediabetes begins with getting more physically active. All exercise helps reverse prediabetes, especially exercise that helps build muscle. Following a low glycemic index, low carb diet, and following a healthier lifestyle helps reverse prediabetes. Medications and dietary supplements also can be used in reverse prediabetes management. Without making lifestyle changes (or taking medication), the "side effect" of prediabetes is that it is likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is the term used to describe elevated blood sugar (glucose) that has not yet reached the threshold of a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Consider pre-diabetes a warning sign that it is time to take your health more seriously. What is the difference between prediabetes and type 2 diabetes? Prediabetes occurs when there is too much sugar (glucose) in the blood. It is an early warning sign that the body has more sugar in the blood then it can use. Type 2 diabetes is a condition that occurs slowly over time. The pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to keep up with the increased need to move sugar into the cells for energy. Medication and lifestyle changes are necessary to manage blood sugar levels and avoid diabetes complications Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Print Overview Prediabetes means that your blood sugar level is higher than normal but not yet high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Without lifestyle changes, people with prediabetes are very likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. If you have prediabetes, the long-term damage of diabetes — especially to your heart, blood vessels and kidneys — may already be starting. There's good news, however. Progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes isn't inevitable. Eating healthy foods, incorporating physical activity in your daily routine and maintaining a healthy weight can help bring your blood sugar level back to normal. Prediabetes affects adults and children. The same lifestyle changes that can help prevent progression to diabetes in adults might also help bring children's blood sugar levels back to normal. Symptoms Prediabetes generally has no signs or symptoms. One possible sign that you may be at risk of type 2 diabetes is darkened skin on certain parts of the body. Affected areas can include the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and knuckles. Classic signs and symptoms that suggest you've moved from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Blurred vision When to see a doctor See your doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any type 2 diabetes signs or symptoms. Ask your doctor about blood glucose screening if you have any risk factors for prediabetes. Causes The exact cause of prediabetes is unknown. But family history and genetics appear to play an important role. Inactivity and excess fat — especially abdominal fat — also seem to be important factors. What is clear is that people with prediabetes don't process sugar (glucose) properly anymore. As a result, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead o Continue reading >>

Prediabetes: What You Need To Know

Prediabetes: What You Need To Know

Note: If you have just found out you have prediabetes then make sure to download our free diabetes starter’s guide. Prediabetes is a very early form of diabetes. The first thing you should know about prediabetes is that it is reversible and does not have to lead to full blown diabetes. The second thing you should know about prediabetes is that you –and really only you—have the power to reverse it. How can you do that? By incorporating some significant dietary and lifestyle changes into your life—these are significant changes, but not terribly difficult ones. But first, some basic information so that you understand why these changes can change a prediabetic condition to a non-diabetic condition. The Basics of Prediabetes A person with prediabetes has levels of blood sugar that is higher than normal, but the levels of blood glucose (sugar) are not quite high enough to be confidently diagnosed as diabetes. But, anyone with consistently higher levels of fasting blood glucose has a higher risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes (T2D)—about 15-30% of people with prediabetes develop Type-2 diabetes. In prediabetes, the cells of the body do not respond effectively to insulin– they are resistant to the insulin. Because the cells of the body are resistant, they don’t absorb sugar from the blood– these cells are essentially “ignoring” the signals from insulin. How Prediabetes Can Develop Every cell in our body uses glucose (sugar) for producing the energy needed for the cells to do their jobs. This glucose is derived from the foods we eat, primarily from carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are one of the main groups of nutrients—the other are fats and proteins. Carbohydrates are molecules composed of chains of various different sugars, including glucose. The glucose is d Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Here's a fact: Most people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes had pre diabetes symptoms that if known, could have alerted them to make diet and lifestyle changes before their diagnosis. Most physicians only pay attention to fasting blood sugar when watching for diabetes. For instance, if a patient's blood sugar is between 110-125, mg/dL, it indicates prediabetes. But blood sugar results can test in normal ranges even as diabetes is developing. If people with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis knew ALL of the pre diabetic symptoms for which to watch, it could help them avoid being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is defined medically as the state in which fasting blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Blood sugars in the prediabetic range (between 100 - 126 mg/dl) indicate insulin resistance is developing, and a metabolic syndrome diagnosis is more likely in the future. Insulin resistance (IR) is a condition in which chronically elevated blood sugar and insulin levels have resulted in an inability of body cells to respond to them normally. IR is the driving factor as insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes and diabetes are all linked together on a continuum. Pre Diabetes Symptoms: It's Not Just About Blood Sugar Medical information about pre diabetes comes from medical associations such as the American Diabetes Association. The ADA guidelines say that prediabetes is a function of a fasting blood sugar is between 100-125 mg/dl. However, I am convinced that signs of prediabetes can be spotted even when blood tests indicated blood sugars below 100 mg/dl. I saw this in my own life. Eight years ago, I had many of the pre diabetic symptoms listed below, but my fasting blood sugar was still classified as "n Continue reading >>

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