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Can You Get Nausea From Metformin?

Does Anyone Else Still Get Sick From Taking Metformin?

Does Anyone Else Still Get Sick From Taking Metformin?

Does anyone else still get sick from taking Metformin? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Does anyone else still get sick from taking Metformin? I have been taking Metformin for 8 months now (1000 mg every morning, 1000 mg every night) and I still get sick!! But, only after taking it in the morning ... I get diarrhea and feel sick to my stomach most of the day ...doesn't matter whether I eat or not ... I still get sick. Being sick at work is a real drag. If I have someplace to go in the mornings on Saturday or Sunday ... I don't take my meds until I come home. my numbers are good ... most of the time ... if they are over 125 I take a pill and just suffer ... It was my understanding that the sickness was supposed to leave after few weeks ... but not for me Anyone else dealing with this problem or has solved this problem? Phranp, sorry you're having all the trouble with the metformin. For me, I had a little trouble the first couple of weeks, but it resolved and now I only have diarrhea if I eat a lot of greasy foods. The extended-relief metformin is supposed to help with the nausea/diarrhea, as it releases more slowly in your system. Perhaps your doctor could try you on this. I take the metformin ER 500 mg twice daily. I always take my meds as i'm getting ready to eat b/fast and make sure I have something in my stomach when I take the evening dose as well. Contact your doc and see if he'll switch you to the extended release. Hope this helps! Thanks PL, that sounds like a good idea ... I will ask my doc next time I go in. I have trouble off and on tolerating my 500 mg once daily dosage, for no reason apparent to me. I have gone t Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Causing My Nausea?

Is Diabetes Causing My Nausea?

Nausea comes in many forms. Sometimes it can be mild and short-lived. Other times, it can be severe and last for a long time. For people with diabetes, nausea is a common complaint. It can even be a sign of a life-threatening condition that requires swift medical attention. 5 common causes of nausea Factors related to your diabetes may cause you to feel nausea. Medication Metformin (Glucophage) is one of the more common medications used to treat diabetes. Nausea is a potential side effect for people taking this medication. Taking metformin on an empty stomach may make nausea worse. Injectable medications used to treat diabetes, such as exenatide (Byetta), liraglutide (Victoza), and pramlintide (Symlin), may also cause nausea. The nausea may go away after extended use. Your doctor may also start you on a lower dosage to try to reduce or eliminate nausea. Hypo- and hyperglycemia Hyperglycemia (elevated blood sugar levels) or hypoglycemia (blood sugar levels that are too low) may cause nausea. Check your blood sugar and respond appropriately if you suspect abnormal blood sugar levels. To avoid hypo- and hyperglycemia, stick to your diabetes meal plan, monitor your blood sugar, and take your medication as prescribed. You should also avoid exercising in extreme temperatures and keep cool by drinking cold liquids during outside activities, advises Sheri Colberg, PhD, author, exercise physiologist, and expert on diabetes management. Diabetic ketoacidosis Severe nausea may be a sign of diabetic ketoacidosis. This is a dangerous medical condition that must be treated to avoid coma or even death. Symptoms include: nausea excessive thirst frequent urination abdominal pain weakness or fatigue shortness of breath confusion fruity-scented breath If you suspect diabetic ketoacidosis, Continue reading >>

Surviving Metformin

Surviving Metformin

What was your first week on Metformin like? Horrendous? Terrible? Filled with waves of nausea? The sickest you’ve felt in your life? Let’s reminisce for a minute: About a dozen years ago, on December 24, I went to the doctor for a routine physical. Are you envious of my holiday plans? This was in the years before Pinterest, so I was carrying on with regular life activities on Christmas Eve morn rather than bedazzling the cap of an Elf on the Shelf. Anyway, at the Christmas Eve check-up, my physician mentioned that he had read promising things about Metformin being used in women with PCOS. We chatted about Metformin for a bit, talked about other PCOS things, finished up the tests, and then I headed to the pharmacy to pick up the prescription. We had our traditional Christmas Eve dinner of ham, funeral potatoes, salad with asparagus and strawberries; rolls, and other delicious items. Breaking with tradition, this year’s Christmas Eve dinner was followed by Metformin for me. After dinner, we read the Christmas story from the Bible, watched a short film depicting the events in Luke 2, read a new Christmas book, and headed off to bed. That’s when the fun began. In sum: Worst Christmas Ever. Pros: Family, friends, gifts, good music, good food. Cons: Visiting the loo every 15 minutes, constant nausea, wanting to curl up in bed and not wake up for days. Public Service Announcement: Do not start Metformin for the first time on the day prior to a major holiday. My first year on Metformin was pretty rough. I felt like I had morning sickness every single day. I had diarrhea and nausea every morning. When I skipped a few doses hoping for relief, my symptoms would be twice as bad when I re-started. Looking back, I’m actually amazed that I kept taking the medication. If I st Continue reading >>

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Fortamet Side Effects Center

Fortamet Side Effects Center

Fortamet (metformin hydrochloride) is an oral diabetes medicine for people with type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. Metformin is sometimes used in combination with insulin or other medications, but it is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Fortamet is available in generic form. Common side effects of Fortamet include headache, muscle pain, nausea, vomiting, stomach upset or pain, diarrhea, gas, weakness, or a metallic taste in the mouth. Fortamet does not usually cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Low blood sugar may occur if Fortamet is prescribed with other anti-diabetic medications. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. Tell your doctor if you experience serious side effects of Fortamet including shortness of breath, swelling or rapid weight gain, fever, body aches, or flu symptoms. Fortamet should be taken once daily. Dosage is individualized based on effectiveness and tolerance. The maximum recommended daily dose is 2500 mg. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) may result if you take Fortamet with drugs that raise blood sugar, such as: isoniazid, diuretics (water pills), steroids, phenothiazines, thyroid medicine, birth control pills and other hormones, seizure medicines, and diet pills, or medicines to treat asthma, colds or allergies. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) may result if you take Fortamet with drugs that lower blood sugar, such as: alcohol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), beta-blockers, or probenecid. It may also interact with furosemide, nifedipine, cimetidine or ranitidine, amiloride or triamterene, digoxin, morphine, procainamide, quinidine, trimethoprim, or Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin side effects include diabetic neuropathy, brain fog, and digestive issues. You can address them through diet, Vitamin B12, CoQ10, and exercise. Let us understand the drug Metformin in detail and study different forms of metformin, its uses and common metformin side effects along with how to deal with them. Metformin: What Is It Used For? Metformin is an old warhorse in the pharma battle against diabetes. It has been the mainstay in the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes for more than fifty years, often matching or outperforming newer drugs. In fact, many new combination drugs are often created with metformin as one of the main ingredients. Thanks to its long run in the pharmaceutical world, the side effects of Metformin are also well known. The Metformin-PCOS connection has been studied extensively since a majority of health complications associated with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) are due to hyperinsulinemia (high amounts of insulin in the blood stream). Metformin is known to reduce circulating insulin levels. The use of this drug in women with PCOS has shown highly encouraging results. RELATED: 10 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Diabetics Most Prescribed Names in Metformin Category Include: Fortamet: It is an extended-release formulation that contains metformin hydrochloride. The tablets are designed for once-a-day administration. They deliver either 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin. The tablet is made using a patented technology called SCOTTM that delivers the active compound slowly and at a constant rate. Glucophage: Glucophage tablets contain metformin hydrochoride. They contain either 500 mg, 850 mg or 1000 mg of the active compound. Glucophage tablets do not contain any special covering and need to be taken multiple times a day until the prescribed dosage is me Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Metformin doesn’t cure diabetes. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. Metformin needs to be taken long-term. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? » Metformin causes some common side effects. These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you. The more common side effects of metformin include: heartburn stomach pain nausea or vomiting bloating gas diarrhea constipation weight loss headache unpleasant metallic taste in mouth Lactic acidosis The most serious side effect metformin can cause is lactic acidosis. In fact, metformin has a boxed warning about this risk. A boxed warning is the most severe warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious problem that can occur due to a buildup of metformin in your body. It’s a medical emergency that must be treated right away in the hospital. See Precautions for factors that raise your risk of lactic acidosis. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis. If you have trouble breathing, call 911 right away or go to the nearest emergency room. extreme tiredness weakness decreased appetite nausea vomiting trouble breathing dizziness lighthea Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

For the Consumer Applies to metformin: oral solution, oral tablet, oral tablet extended release Along with its needed effects, metformin may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking metformin: More common Abdominal or stomach discomfort cough or hoarseness decreased appetite diarrhea fast or shallow breathing fever or chills general feeling of discomfort lower back or side pain muscle pain or cramping painful or difficult urination sleepiness Less common Anxiety blurred vision chest discomfort cold sweats coma confusion cool, pale skin depression difficult or labored breathing dizziness fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse feeling of warmth headache increased hunger increased sweating nausea nervousness nightmares redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest seizures shakiness shortness of breath slurred speech tightness in the chest unusual tiredness or weakness Rare Behavior change similar to being drunk difficulty with concentrating drowsiness lack or loss of strength restless sleep unusual sleepiness Some side effects of metformin may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them: More common Acid or sour stomach belching bloated excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines full feeling heartburn indiges Continue reading >>

Metformin 850mg Tablets

Metformin 850mg Tablets

1. WHAT METFORMIN IS AND WHAT IT IS USED FOR The name of this medicine is Metformin 500mg or 850mg Tablets (called metformin in this leaflet). It belongs to a group of medicines called biguanides (a type of oral hypoglycaemic). Metformin is used for the sort of diabetes called Type 2 diabetes or non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In type 2 diabetes, there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood. This is because your body does not make enough insulin or because it makes insulin that does not work properly. Insulin is a hormone that allows your body tissue to take glucose from the blood and use it for energy or for storage for future use. Metformin works by improving the sensitivity of your body to insulin. It helps your body to use glucose in the normal way again This medicine is given when diet and exercise alone has not been able to control your blood sugar levels. Metformin can be given on its own. However, sometimes it is given with other medicines for diabetes or with insulin. In patients who are overweight, long-term use of metformin also helps to lower the risk of any problems related to diabetes you are allergic (hypersensitive) to metformin or any of the other ingredients in this liquid (see section 6: Further information). An allergic reaction can include a rash, itching or shortness of breath. you have recently had a heart attack or any other heart problems you have severe circulation problems or difficulty in breathing you have had serious problems with your diabetes in the past called diabetic ketoacidosis. When you have this you lose weight quickly, feel sick (nausea) or are sick (vomiting). See also in Section 4: Possible side effects you have recently had a severe infection, injury or trauma (shock) you are going to have an X-ray where you will b Continue reading >>

Metformin (oral Route)

Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks that you take this medicine. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. This medicine may interact with the dye used for an X-ray or CT scan. Your doctor should advise you to stop taking it before you have any medical exams or diagnostic tests that might cause less urine output than usual. You may be advised to start taking the medicine again 48 hours after the exams or tests if your kidney function is tested and found to be normal. Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before having surgery or medical tests. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur with lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise or diet. Counseling on birth control and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in pregnancy for patients with diabetes. Travel—Keep a recent prescription and your medical history with you. Be prepared for an emergency as you would norm Continue reading >>

Coping With The Side Effects Of Metformin

Coping With The Side Effects Of Metformin

Metformin is prescribed for some people with diabetes to help keep their blood sugar levels under control. Metformin works by encouraging the body to burn energy, leading to lower blood glucose levels. If you take metformin it is usually more effective at lowering blood glucose levels than if you are just careful about what you eat. Nausea Metformin has a number of side effects, the most common of which are gastrointestinal. More than one in 10 people who take metformin experience side effects including nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach pain, increased flatulence or loss of appetite. More than one in 100 patients who take the medication experience changes to their sense of taste - usually a metallic taste. A number of other very rare symptoms have also been reported. Fewer than one in 10,000 people who take metformin may experience: What to do about side effects All medications take some getting used to. The NHS advises that patients can avoid the more common gastrointestinal side effects by taking the medication during or after a meal. In order to guard against vitamin B12 deficiency - which in rare cases becomes apparent in patients who have taken the medication for a long time - the charity Diabetes UK recommends eating a healthy, balanced diet including foods rich in vitamin B12 such as meat, dairy products and eggs. However, it is not recommended for those prescribed metformin to also take vitamin B12 supplements unless advised to by their doctor. Patients who feel unwell or who are concerned about a side effect should talk to their GP, pharmacist or practice nurse. Immediate medical attention should be sought in cases of breathing difficulties, muscle cramps, stomach pain, weakness or hypothermia, which can be symptoms of lactic acidosis. Continue reading >>

Metformin Is Making Me Nauseous And Gassy, Etc.

Metformin Is Making Me Nauseous And Gassy, Etc.

Metformin is making me nauseous and gassy, etc. Metformin is making me nauseous and gassy, etc. Any alternative med that I can discuss with my doc that's safe and has less side effects? It hadn't really bothered me until my dose was increased again---to 1500mg/day (I take it in 3 doses, with food) I'm sick and tired of feeling sick and tired! Tracy; does Metformin help with your BG? Some people (I'm starting to think most people) can't tolerate regular Metformin; there's an extended release version that seems a little easier on the stomach. D.D. Family T2 dx 3/07, tx w/very lo carb D&E Met, bolus R Metformin is one of the safest and any med can give you side effects. I didn't have any from metformin. Insulin is the only other one I can think of that will control your sugars and not run the risk of side effects. I don't know if you tried the extended release version. That is sometimes gentler on your stomach. Many times the GI distress is from the fact that Metformin delays the absorption of the carbs until lower in the intestines. When the unabsorbed carb-rich material hits the intestinal flora, they go "crazy" causing the GI distress. I don't know what your carb level is, but you could either change that, or move your med times away from meals and see if it makes any difference. 'Veni, Vidi, Velcro' - I came, I saw, I stuck around. Tracy, I feel your pain. I was started out at 500 of the Metformin extended release 4 years ago. Hit my tummy like a ton of bricks no matter how I took it. BUT I lost 13#'s in 6 weeks so decided to map out all the toilets in the city and continue to take it. Dr raised me gradually to 2000mg but at that level it was impossible to even leave the house. Dr. dropped me back down to 500mg but I finally made the decision the side effects outweigh Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

The fascinating compound called metformin was discovered nearly a century ago. Scientists realized that it could lower blood sugar in an animal model (rabbits) as early as 1929, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that a French researcher came up with the name Glucophage (roughly translated as glucose eater). The FDA gave metformin (Glucophage) the green light for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994, 36 years after it had been approved for this use in Britain. Uses of Generic Metformin: Glucophage lost its patent protection in the U.S. in 2002 and now most prescriptions are filled with generic metformin. This drug is recognized as a first line treatment to control blood sugar by improving the cells’ response to insulin and reducing the amount of sugar that the liver makes. Unlike some other oral diabetes drugs, it doesn’t lead to weight gain and may even help people get their weight under control. Starting early in 2000, sales of metformin (Glucophage) were challenged by a new class of diabetes drugs. First Avandia and then Actos challenged metformin for leadership in diabetes treatment. Avandia later lost its luster because it was linked to heart attacks and strokes. Sales of this drug are now miniscule because of tight FDA regulations. Actos is coming under increasing scrutiny as well. The drug has been banned in France and Germany because of a link to bladder cancer. The FDA has also required Actos to carry its strictest black box warning about an increased risk of congestive heart failure brought on by the drug. Newer diabetes drugs like liraglutide (Victoza), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia) have become very successful. But metformin remains a mainstay of diabetes treatment. It is prescribed on its own or sometimes combined with the newer d Continue reading >>

Metformin Nausea - Medhelp

Metformin Nausea - Medhelp

Common Questions and Answers about Metformin nausea hi everyone just a wee quick question on people taking metformin ,iv been taking it for over 6 months now and i still find that am getting side effects such as nausea and upset tummy,especially as soon as i eat somethin,does it get any easier the longer your on it,sometimes id rather not take it but were ttc, and from what iv read it has helped loads of people lose weight and helped people to conceieve, thanks ladies if u have time to reply. I am just curious because when I was diagnosed with PCOS some seven or eight (give or take) years ago I was put on metformin as well. I experienced severe nausea as well as vomitting, diarreah, upset stomach, etc., etc., etc. but this was something that I experience as soon as the metformin was in my system. As soon as I stopped taking it, it went away. Yes, one nasty side effect of Metformin is nausea . He should have been aware of this from reading the pharmaceutical paperwork that accompanied the Metformin bottle, or by his Pharmacist. Keep in mind, not everyone can tolerate the same medications. What he needs to do is notify his doctor asap as there are other oral diabetes medications that can be Rx'd. I'm a diabetic taking metformin . I am constantly feeling nausea symptoms all day long -- even after eating. When they are the worst two things happen that I can't seem to find answers for. (1) I get a severe cramping nausea in my upper stomach and (2) I can hear a noise in my head like a gland or something secreting or squirting, Can anyone tell me what this is and how to deal with it. It happens at all hours of the day. It even wakes me up in the middle of the night. Metformin has helped me lose 50+ lbs from being on it for a year. The first 2-4 weeks can be tricky, if you don Continue reading >>

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