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Can You Get Fat With Type 1 Diabetes?

Diabetes Is Making Me Fat

Diabetes Is Making Me Fat

It’s popular knowledge now in America that the obesity epidemic has given rise to an epidemic of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. In other words, (with the right genetic predisposition) being fat can make you a diabetic. What is less appreciated is that being a diabetic can make you fat. If I were to characterize my diabetes care, I would say I aggressively treat to range. If I see my blood glucose (BG) start to rise, I bolus early, rather than waiting until I am actually high and correcting. I admit it– I prefer to run a little low rather than a little high. The benefit of this aggressive treatment is that I can prevent some degree of hyperglycemia. The downside? I frequently have to correct on the other end– eating to bring my BG back up because I too aggressively treated a high. I correct usually with 5 – 10 grams of carbohydrates, in the form of dry crackers, or straight sugar if I’m below 60 mg/dL. (I don’t like glucose tabs much, and I try not to correct with foods I actually like because, as a diabetic, my relationship with food is screwed up enough as it is.) I am fairly insulin and exercise sensitive at this point in my life, so I end up needing to correct frequently. On average, I end up eating about 40 grams of corrective carbohydrates per day. That’s 160 extra calories (ignoring for simplicity any extra non-carb calories the crackers contain) a day. One hundred and forty extra, totally non-nutritive calories. And not enjoyed, either– it’s medicine, not food. Ugh. To gain one pound, on average, a person needs to eat an extra 3,500 calories. At 160 extra calories per day, I will gain a pound about every three weeks. Over the course of a year, I will gain 17 pounds. The way I treat my diabetes is making me fat. So what are my options? T Continue reading >>

Can Type 1s Ever Get Fat?

Can Type 1s Ever Get Fat?

Hi, I'm new here and I just would like to know whether it is still possible for me to become overweight in middle-age? As a t1 I've never had any weight issues and am quite slim (people actually call me very slim but I don't see it as my BMI is 23). A lot of my friends now in their 40s are fatter than. I'm starting to wonder whether t1 gives us a sort of natural protection against obesity compared to the rest of the population? D.D. Family Metabolic Syndrome (T2) since 2003 Insulin plays an important role in fat storage... too little and we are unable to store any fat, too much and we tend to store excess fat. As a Type 1 -- with little or no endogenous insulin secretion -- I'd suggest that your default is not to store fat... look at photos of children in pre-insulin days. You can control this by virtue of insulin injections. 52, Metabolic Syndrome (Type 2) Diagnosed March 2003 - MDI then Pump(ed) 5+ years Real whole food diet, including natural fats; avoiding starches, grains and most fruit -- physically active -- Levemir 6u each night D.D. Family T1 for 54 years - on Pump since 03/2008 Of course we can. We are human after all, and if we eat too much or don't have enough exercise - we get fat. Then there's the thyroid problem alot of diabetics get. As a woman, the problem seems to be a bit worse - what with menopause etc., and having babies. My diabetes educator told me it is a "fat promoter" and a "fat storer." Insulin plays an important role in fat storage... too little and we are unable to store any fat, too much and we tend to store excess fat. As a Type 1 -- with little or no endogenous insulin secretion -- I'd suggest that your default is not to store fat... look at photos of children in pre-insulin days. You can control this by virtue of insulin injections. Ric Continue reading >>

11 Ways To Gain Weight If You Have Diabetes

11 Ways To Gain Weight If You Have Diabetes

Although diabetes is often associated with being overweight, especially type 2 diabetes, it’s a myth that everyone with diabetes has a high body mass index (BMI). Some people have trouble gaining weight. In fact, unexplained or unintentional weight loss can be a symptom of undiagnosed diabetes. Issues with weight management center around insulin, a hormone produced by your pancreas. People with diabetes are unable to use or produce enough insulin to transport excess sugar out of their blood and into their cells, where it can be used as energy. This can cause your body to burn its existing fat stores and muscle tissue in order to supply your cells with energy. If your sugar levels are constantly in flux, your body will continue to chip away at its fat stores, resulting in weight loss. Diabetes food plans are often geared toward helping people lose, rather than gain, weight. This can make it harder to figure out how to gain weight in a healthy way. Before trying the tips below, talk with your doctor or dietician. They can help you set the right diet and exercise goals for you, as well as answer any questions you may have. There are many apps available to help you manage your condition and make the right food choices. Look for apps that help you track blood sugar and BMI. Some options include: GlucOracle: This glucose forecasting app uses crowdsourcing to analyze the estimated amount of carbohydrates, protein, fat, calories, and fiber in each meal. It also predicts what your glucose level will be after eating. SuperTracker: This app helps you gain weight by providing comprehensive nutritional information on over 8,000 food items. It also tracks your nutritional targets, diet, and activity levels against your goals. If these don’t appeal to you, we’ve also rounded up Continue reading >>

Why Did I Gain Weight When I Started Taking Insulin?

Why Did I Gain Weight When I Started Taking Insulin?

There are several factors at work to lead you to believe that insulin is "to blame" for your weight gain. People who have poorly controlled diabetes also sometimes experience weight loss because their bodies are unable to properly convert food into energy. This is because they either are not producing enough insulin or their bodies are unable to use the insulin they produce properly. This food winds up as excess glucose circulating in the blood (resulting in high blood glucose!). Ultimately the body can't use all that extra glucose circulating in the blood and so it is eliminated in the urine. When your blood glucose runs high, you can become dehydrated as your body works to clear itself of all that excess glucose — which makes you think you've lost weight, but you've only lost water. Then, when you start taking insulin and get your blood glucose under better control, you start over-retaining fluids initially to make up for your dehydration, which makes you think you've rapidly gained a lot of weight. You associate it with taking insulin, but really what is happening is taking your insulin properly is just enabling your body to better use food and maintain a proper water balance. Also, once you start taking insulin injections and start getting your blood glucose under control, you now have enough insulin circulating in your blood to help the glucose get into the body's cells where it can be used as energy. So the glucose produced by the food you eat is no longer spending time in your bloodstream and being excreted out as urine. You gain weight. Your high blood glucose may have also made you feel more hungry because not all the food you were eating was able to get into the cells as energy to nourish the cells. Then, you started taking insulin — and continued to eat t Continue reading >>

Insulin Causes Weight Gain – Hormonal Obesity Iv

Insulin Causes Weight Gain – Hormonal Obesity Iv

In our previous post, we were reviewing the link between insulin and obesity. It appears that insulin is not merely associated with obesity but causes obesity. Click here for Hormonal Obesity Part I, Part II, and Part III. For decades we believed the Caloric Reduction as Primary (CRaP) hypothesis of obesity that turned out to be as useful as a half-built bridge. Study after study showed that reducing calories did NOT lead to weight loss. Patient after patient tried to lose weight by restricting calories with consistent failure. But we couldn’t abandon the calorie model so what was left to do? Blame the patient, of course! Since patients were not losing weight, there was only 2 possibilities. Either the advice to eat a low fat, calorie restricted diet and exercise more was wrong or the patient was not following this advice. So the doctors and dieticians berated, ridiculed, belittled, rebuked, chided and reprimanded. We said – Eat less, Move more – as if that would cure their problems. After all, the food pyramid couldn’t be wrong, could it? But the excess weight was still as persistent as a nagging tooth. Doctors, of course, were drawn to this CRaP hypothesis as bathers to a seashore. Obesity was now not our failure to understand it, but their lack of willpower and/or laziness (gluttony or sloth). It was our favourite game – blame the patient. But, of course, the problem was the CRaP hypothesis. It was just wrong. Increased calories did not cause obesity so reducing calories didn’t cause weight loss. Exercise didn’t work either, as we will see in a future series. So, what was the real aetiology of obesity? Insulin. What happens when we give high doses of insulin to patients? Insulin makes you gain weight. The more insulin you take, the more weight you gain. Continue reading >>

How To Put On Weight When You Have Diabetes

How To Put On Weight When You Have Diabetes

Not everybody with diabetes needs to lose weight. Some people have the opposite problem; the pounds just won’t stay on. Although certainly a great source of calories, filling up on hot fudge sundaes isn’t the best way to fill out your frame if you have diabetes. Before we talk about some healthful strategies for weight gain, it is important to make sure your efforts to add a few pounds are not sabotaged by out of control blood glucose numbers. If your glucose level is very high, all the extra calories in the world won’t have the desired effect. When the body perceives it is starving –that is essentially what occurs when it can’t use all the glucose building up in the blood stream– glucose (energy or calories) spills into the urine. So instead of keeping those precious calories to add muscle and some fat you will end up losing weight. If you are losing weight and your glucose levels are in good control then a visit to your health care provider is in order to look for other causes of weight loss. The old adage says; to gain a pound a week, add 500 calories a day to your current calorie level. Now new research tells us that this isn’t entirely accurate, but it is still a good place to start. You can find out about how many calories you are eating now by using any one of a hundreds of nutrition management websites on the internet: Caloriecount.com, Myfitnesspal.com and Fitday.com are three options. One of the first things to look at when you are trying to gain weight is low calorie foods to eliminate. Plain beverages such as black coffee or tea, broth soups, low calorie salads all fill you up without providing much in the way of calories. All of your food chooses should be as calorie dense as possible. If you like salads for example, keep the lettuce to a mini Continue reading >>

11 Ways To Gain Weight If You Have Diabetes

11 Ways To Gain Weight If You Have Diabetes

Although diabetes is often associated with being overweight, especially type 2 diabetes, it’s a myth that everyone with diabetes has a high body mass index (BMI). Some people have trouble gaining weight. In fact, unexplained or unintentional weight loss can be a symptom of undiagnosed diabetes. Issues with weight management center around insulin, a hormone produced by your pancreas. People with diabetes are unable to use or produce enough insulin to transport excess sugar out of their blood and into their cells, where it can be used as energy. This can cause your body to burn its existing fat stores and muscle tissue in order to supply your cells with energy. If your sugar levels are constantly in flux, your body will continue to chip away at its fat stores, resulting in weight loss. Diabetes food plans are often geared toward helping people lose, rather than gain, weight. This can make it harder to figure out how to gain weight in a healthy way. Before trying the tips below, talk with your doctor or dietician. They can help you set the right diet and exercise goals for you, as well as answer any questions you may have. There are many apps available to help you manage your condition and make the right food choices. Look for apps that help you track blood sugar and BMI. Some options include: GlucOracle: This glucose forecasting app uses crowdsourcing to analyze the estimated amount of carbohydrates, protein, fat, calories, and fiber in each meal. It also predicts what your glucose level will be after eating. SuperTracker: This app helps you gain weight by providing comprehensive nutritional information on over 8,000 food items. It also tracks your nutritional targets, diet, and activity levels against your goals. If these don’t appeal to you, we’ve also rounded up Continue reading >>

How To Put On Weight When You Have Diabetes

How To Put On Weight When You Have Diabetes

Not everybody with diabetes needs to lose weight. Some people have the opposite problem; the pounds just won’t stay on. Although certainly a great source of calories, filling up on hot fudge sundaes isn’t the best way to fill out your frame if you have diabetes. Before we talk about some healthful strategies for weight gain, it is important to make sure your efforts to add a few pounds are not sabotaged by out of control blood glucose numbers. If your glucose level is very high, all the extra calories in the world won’t have the desired effect. When the body perceives it is starving –that is essentially what occurs when it can’t use all the glucose building up in the blood stream– glucose (energy or calories) spills into the urine. So instead of keeping those precious calories to add muscle and some fat you will end up losing weight. If you are losing weight and your glucose levels are in good control then a visit to your health care provider is in order to look for other causes of weight loss. The old adage says; to gain a pound a week, add 500 calories a day to your current calorie level. Now new research tells us that this isn’t entirely accurate, but it is still a good place to start. You can find out about how many calories you are eating now by using any one of a hundreds of nutrition management websites on the internet: Caloriecount.com, Myfitnesspal.com and Fitday.com are three options. One of the first things to look at when you are trying to gain weight is low calorie foods to eliminate. Plain beverages such as black coffee or tea, broth soups, low calorie salads all fill you up without providing much in the way of calories. All of your food chooses should be as calorie dense as possible. If you like salads for example, keep the lettuce to a mini Continue reading >>

Insulin Causes Weight Gain – Hormonal Obesity Iv

Insulin Causes Weight Gain – Hormonal Obesity Iv

In our previous post, we were reviewing the link between insulin and obesity. It appears that insulin is not merely associated with obesity but causes obesity. Click here for Hormonal Obesity Part I, Part II, and Part III. For decades we believed the Caloric Reduction as Primary (CRaP) hypothesis of obesity that turned out to be as useful as a half-built bridge. Study after study showed that reducing calories did NOT lead to weight loss. Patient after patient tried to lose weight by restricting calories with consistent failure. But we couldn’t abandon the calorie model so what was left to do? Blame the patient, of course! Since patients were not losing weight, there was only 2 possibilities. Either the advice to eat a low fat, calorie restricted diet and exercise more was wrong or the patient was not following this advice. So the doctors and dieticians berated, ridiculed, belittled, rebuked, chided and reprimanded. We said – Eat less, Move more – as if that would cure their problems. After all, the food pyramid couldn’t be wrong, could it? But the excess weight was still as persistent as a nagging tooth. Doctors, of course, were drawn to this CRaP hypothesis as bathers to a seashore. Obesity was now not our failure to understand it, but their lack of willpower and/or laziness (gluttony or sloth). It was our favourite game – blame the patient. But, of course, the problem was the CRaP hypothesis. It was just wrong. Increased calories did not cause obesity so reducing calories didn’t cause weight loss. Exercise didn’t work either, as we will see in a future series. So, what was the real aetiology of obesity? Insulin. What happens when we give high doses of insulin to patients? Insulin makes you gain weight. The more insulin you take, the more weight you gain. Continue reading >>

Young People With Type 1 Increasingly Likely To Be Obese, Experts Urge Dietary Changes

Young People With Type 1 Increasingly Likely To Be Obese, Experts Urge Dietary Changes

Young people with type 1 diabetes are increasingly likely to be obese, according to new research. The study, which was conducted by researchers from T1D Exchange, suggested that excessive consumption of processed foods was to blame, and urged people with type 1 diabetes to maintain a healthy diet and plenty of exercise. The study does not suggest that obesity is a cause. In fact a dramatic loss of weight is one of the key symptoms of type 1 diabetes. Rather the problem of weight gain and obesity can develop in some people with type 1 diabetes following their diagnosis. Traditionally, people with type 1 diabetes have tended to be underweight. This is because insulin and blood glucose management technologies were less advanced, and as a result, more glucose - and therefore calories - pass out of the body through the urine. However, as diabetes management has improved, more glucose and calories have been retained. Coupled with the same over-consumption of unhealthy foods that affects many people in society, it has meant that people with type 1 diabetes have been affected by the obesity crisis. Obesity in people with type 1 diabetes increases their risk of insulin resistance, severe hypoglycemia and cardiovascular disease. The research was conducted by examining the data of 33,000 pediatric diabetes patients aged to between two and 18, using their height and weight to judge their Body Mass Index (BMI.) Of those patients, nearly 40 per cent were classed as "overweight." The study, which was the first to compare data of young type 1 patients from a variety of countries, also found that higher BMI in people with type 1 diabetes was closely linked to higher HbA1c levels. The researchers blamed unhealthy diets for the rise in type 1 obesity, and urged young people to develop hea Continue reading >>

Can Type 1s Ever Get Fat?

Can Type 1s Ever Get Fat?

Hi, I'm new here and I just would like to know whether it is still possible for me to become overweight in middle-age? As a t1 I've never had any weight issues and am quite slim (people actually call me very slim but I don't see it as my BMI is 23). A lot of my friends now in their 40s are fatter than. I'm starting to wonder whether t1 gives us a sort of natural protection against obesity compared to the rest of the population? D.D. Family Metabolic Syndrome (T2) since 2003 Insulin plays an important role in fat storage... too little and we are unable to store any fat, too much and we tend to store excess fat. As a Type 1 -- with little or no endogenous insulin secretion -- I'd suggest that your default is not to store fat... look at photos of children in pre-insulin days. You can control this by virtue of insulin injections. 52, Metabolic Syndrome (Type 2) Diagnosed March 2003 - MDI then Pump(ed) 5+ years Real whole food diet, including natural fats; avoiding starches, grains and most fruit -- physically active -- Levemir 6u each night D.D. Family T1 for 54 years - on Pump since 03/2008 Of course we can. We are human after all, and if we eat too much or don't have enough exercise - we get fat. Then there's the thyroid problem alot of diabetics get. As a woman, the problem seems to be a bit worse - what with menopause etc., and having babies. My diabetes educator told me it is a "fat promoter" and a "fat storer." Insulin plays an important role in fat storage... too little and we are unable to store any fat, too much and we tend to store excess fat. As a Type 1 -- with little or no endogenous insulin secretion -- I'd suggest that your default is not to store fat... look at photos of children in pre-insulin days. You can control this by virtue of insulin injections. Ric Continue reading >>

Insulin And Weight Gain

Insulin And Weight Gain

Q. I am 13 and have had diabetes for seven years and I used to be very big. It wasn't just 'puppy fat', I over eat a lot. At 10 I was very insecure and decided to lose loads of weight. At 12 I was very secure; I looked great and couldn't weight for summer bikinis to come to round it all off. Now I have started excessively eating again, and mum has noticed I am looking 'bigger'. I don't know what to do?! Is it the insulin? What can I do to help this. I really don't want to be upset by the way I look again. A. I do get a lot of queries about whether insulin puts weight on. Insulin does not put the weight on, however, if someone is trying to lose weight it can take longer. From what I understand from reading your question is that you're worried that you're going to start feeling upset about the way you look. This is because you have been feeling good about the way you look previously. You write about eating excessively, so I suppose the first thing to do is to think about that. Now of course you are 13 and that means your body is going to be changing. When you go through adolescence your body is just flooded with a huge amount of hormones. You feel physical changes because of this and you feel emotional changes because of this, also. Physical changes As a teenager you want to look good and fit in with your mates, and I think the trick to looking good is to work with your body and not against it. So if you are thinking about diets to lose weight, the most successful way to do this is start with small steps. Crash diets All the diets you see celebrities doing are crash diets for rapid weight loss. They do this by usually eliminating a food group and this kind of starves the body of what it needs for energy and so the body is forced to break down muscle and fat. The side effe Continue reading >>

Weight And Diabetes

Weight And Diabetes

A balanced diet and an active lifestyle can help all kids maintain a healthy weight. For kids with diabetes, diet and exercise are even more important because weight can affect diabetes and diabetes can affect weight. This is true for kids and teens with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, the body doesn't use glucose properly. Glucose, a sugar, is the main source of energy for the body. Glucose levels are controlled by a hormone called insulin , which is made in the pancreas. In type 1 diabetes , the pancreas does not make enough insulin. Undiagnosed or untreated type 1 diabetes can cause weight loss. Glucose builds up in the bloodstream if insulin isn't available to move it into the body's cells. When glucose levels become high, the kidneys work to get rid of unused sugar through urine (pee). This causes weight loss due to dehydration and loss of calories from the sugar that wasn't used as energy. Kids who develop type 1 diabetes often lose weight even though they have a normal or increased appetite. Once kids are diagnosed and treated for type 1 diabetes, weight usually returns to normal. Developing type 1 diabetes isn't related to being overweight, but keeping a healthy weight is important. Too much fat tissue can make it hard for insulin to work properly, leading to both higher insulin needs and trouble controlling blood sugar. In type 2 diabetes , the pancreas still makes insulin, but the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should and blood sugar levels get too high. Most kids and teens are overweight when they're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese increases a person's risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Also, weight gain in people with type 2 diabetes makes blood sugar levels even harder to control. People with type 2 di Continue reading >>

How To Gain Weight And Maintain Blood Glucose

How To Gain Weight And Maintain Blood Glucose

By Lara Rondinelli-Hamilton, RD, LDN, CDE Yes, you read the title correctly—there are people with diabetes that are actually trying to gain weight. These people are underweight and need to put on a few pounds without creating extremely high blood sugar levels. Note: If you have diabetes and are losing weight or having difficulty gaining weight, your first step is making sure the issue isn’t due to high blood glucose levels. Uncontrolled hyperglycemia, which is typical with undiagnosed type 1 diabetes (or misdiagnosed type 2), can lead to weight loss and is a dangerous state for your body. If your weight loss or inability to gain weight is unexpected, make sure to discuss it right away with your doctor. It may be that your medication needs to be adjusted for better glycemic control. If, on the other hand, your blood glucose levels are controlled, here are few tips to help you gain weight without spiking your sugar. 1. Eat three meals a day. Don’t skip meals. If you are trying to gain weight, you need to increase your daily caloric intake. If you skip breakfast (or any meal), you could be missing out on an extra 400 to 500 calories per day, which if done consistently could lead to a one-pound weight loss per week. So, even if you are not a breakfast person, find some foods that you can eat for breakfast, such as a fruit-vegetable smoothie (you can add flax seed and coconut oil to increase calories, fiber, and satiety). A quick smoothie could be a few handfuls of spinach, 1 cup frozen berries, ½ banana, 1-2 tablespoons coconut oil, 1 tablespoon ground flax seed and ½-1 cup coconut milk. Serve the smoothie with a side of egg and chicken sausage. You might also try an egg, cheese, and avocado sandwich on a low-carb wrap or tortilla. 2. Eat snacks. Snacks and small me Continue reading >>

Can’t Lose Weight? Here Are Four Reasons Why…

Can’t Lose Weight? Here Are Four Reasons Why…

Spring is here and many of you are probably looking forward to wearing shorts, bathing suits, and flip-flops. And it’s often this time of year when people somewhat guiltily reflect back on their eating habits over the winter. Did you gain a few pounds? Are your spring pants or skirts feeling a little tight around the waistband? It’s actually normal to put weight on over the winter. After all, you may not have been as active as you usually are, and maybe you opted for those comfort foods over lower-calorie fare, like salads. But the time is here to shed that winter weight. It’s not always easy. And sometimes people find that despite eating fewer calories, cutting out the snacks, and stepping up the exercise, the weight is stubbornly refusing to come off — or it’s taking its own sweet time. This week, I’d like to point out some reasons why it might be harder for you to lose weight (or, why you’re gaining weight). Now, most weight gain occurs because of an imbalance between food intake and physical activity (that is to say, calories in exceed calories out). But if you’ve been struggling to drop those pounds, you might consider these possible causes: Hypothyroidism. It seems all too easy to blame your weight gain on “hormones” that are out of whack. But, as I wrote back in January, thyroid disorders are more common in people with diabetes, especially among people with Type 1 diabetes. Hypothyroidism, or too having too little thyroid hormone, can not only make you feel sluggish and tired, it can cause you to gain weight (or at least, make it hard to lose weight). Have your thyroid hormone (TSH and T4) levels checked every year. If you take thyroid medicine, take it as directed and work with your health-care provider to get your dose regulated, if needed. Continue reading >>

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