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Can You Drink Diet Soda With Diabetes?

Diet Sodas May Raise Risk Of Dementia And Stroke, Study Finds

Diet Sodas May Raise Risk Of Dementia And Stroke, Study Finds

People who drink diet sodas daily have three times the risk of stroke and dementia compared to people who rarely drink them, researchers reported Thursday. It’s yet another piece of evidence that diet drinks are not a healthy alternative to sugary drinks, and suggests that people need to limit both, doctors said. While the findings do not prove that diet drinks damage brains, they support other studies that show people who drink them frequently tend to have poorer health. The researchers, led by Matthew Pase of the Boston University School of Medicine and colleagues, studied more than 4,000 people for their report, published in the journal Stroke. “We found that those people who were consuming diet soda on a daily basis were three times as likely to develop both stroke and dementia within the next 10 years as compared to those who did not consume diet soda,” Pase told NBC News. “Both sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened soft drinks may be hard on the brain.” “Our study provides further evidence to link consumption of artificially sweetened beverages with the risk of stroke,” the team wrote. “To our knowledge, our study is the first to report an association between daily intake of artificially sweetened soft drink and an increased risk of both all-cause dementia and dementia because of Alzheimer’s disease.” The team did not ask people which artificial sweetener they used. Some of those in the diet drinks were likely saccharin, acesulfame, aspartame, neotame, or sucralose, the researchers said. To their surprise, the team did not find the same risk for sugar-sweetened beverages. But they found other troubling signs. “In our first study we found that those who more frequently consume sugary beverages such as fruit juices and sodas had greater ev Continue reading >>

Will Diet Coke Raise Blood Sugar Levels Up In Diabetics?

Will Diet Coke Raise Blood Sugar Levels Up In Diabetics?

People with diabetes often switch to sugar-free products if they want to indulge a craving. For example, they might try sugar-free cookies or diet products that are made especially for diabetics or contain no added sugars. Based on that concept, switching to drinking Diet Coke might seem like the best choice. However, diabetics need to consider certain things before trying diet sodas. Video of the Day Diet Coke contains two sweeteners: aspartame and acesulfame-K, also known as acesulfame potassium. Diet Coke also contains artificial colorings and flavorings that have no effect on blood sugar. Blood Sugar Reactions Both sweeteners used in Diet Coke are considered safe for diabetes, according to Mayo Clinic. However, while the artificial sweeteners won’t raise blood sugar, the caffeine in it might. A 2004 study led by researchers at Duke University showed that caffeine consumption can increase blood sugar levels by up to 8 percent. Scientists are not sure why caffeine has this effect on glucose but are still recommending diabetic patients cut down their caffeine consumption as much as possible. Although the sweeteners in Diet Coke don’t directly affect blood sugar levels, they can still lead to other problems. According to the Harvard School of Public Health, the sweet taste of Diet Coke can confuse your brain. In normal circumstances, sweet foods have lots of calories. When you drink diet soda, your brain is expecting you to consume calories. When you don’t, your hunger will increase, forcing you to eat more to make up for the calories your brain is expecting. The cravings for extra food can be cravings for carbohydrates as well, which would affect your blood sugar. So indirectly, Diet Coke can affect your glucose if you don’t pay attention and give in to the cra Continue reading >>

Carbonated Water: Is It A Good Drink For Diabetes?

Carbonated Water: Is It A Good Drink For Diabetes?

Carbonated water—also called sparkling or effervescent water, club soda, seltzer water, tonic water, fizzy water—is water that contains carbon dioxide gas dissolved under pressure—the bubbles are the carbon dioxide (CO2) escaping the liquid once the pressure has been released by opening the bottle or container. There are some differences between these types of carbonated water—club soda, for example, tends to contain added minerals while tonic water contains quinine and a small amount of sugar, usually high fructose corn syrup. Flavors can be added to any of these forms of carbonated water.[1] There are many different makers of carbonated water, but read the labels, especially if you are on a sodium-restricted diet, to see how much if any sodium may be in the carbonated water. You also want to be certain that the water is pure without any additional sugars, flavorings or color agents. I recommend reading the following articles too: Is Carbonated Water Healthy? Maybe the question should be—if you want a “YES!” answer—is carbonated water healthier than other beverages? In this case, the answer is definitely yes! Carbonated water is healthier than diet or regular soda, healthier than alcoholic drinks, healthier in general than coffee, healthier in some ways than juices and possibly healthier than some teas, particularly in some circumstances. Carbonated water is healthier than diet or regular soda because it contains nothing but CO2 and water—carbonated mineral water will have extra minerals in it as well, but diet and regular soda contains sugars, sugar substitutes, concentrated sugars like High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS), phosphates and phosphoric acid, caffeine, added colors and preservatives, artificial and natural flavors, and other substances. On to Continue reading >>

Does Drinking Soda Really Give You Diabetes?

Does Drinking Soda Really Give You Diabetes?

Chugging too much soda won’t just give you a gut: Soda might also raise your risk of developing prediabetes as well, a new study published in The Journal of Nutrition suggests. In a study of over 1,600 people, those who drank regular soda more than 3 times a week were 46 percent more likely to develop prediabetes—a disease where your blood sugar is elevated, but not quite at the diabetes threshold—over a 14-year period than those who didn’t drink any of the beverage. Even just one 12-ounce can of soda more than three times a week is enough to raise your health risk. This link between soda and prediabetes persisted even after the researchers adjusted for potential factors that may be skewing the relationship, like calorie consumption, physical activity levels, and body mass indexes (BMI). (Here are 15 ways to cut hundreds of calories a day.) One possible reason is that the sugar content of regular soda may overwhelm the drinker’s system with excess glucose and fructose, says lead study author Nicola McKeown, Ph.D., of Tufts University. The extra sugar rush raises the amount of sugar in your body in the short-term. But it can also mess with your system long-term, by changing the way the pancreas releases insulin, a hormone that allows your body to absorb glucose for energy. As a result, you can develop insulin resistance, a condition where your body needs higher and higher amounts of insulin to function, says McKeown. When your body can’t churn out enough insulin to keep up with that demand, the glucose builds up in your blood, and you can develop prediabetes, and eventually diabetes. Diet soda, on the other hand, doesn’t contain sugar, which may be why the study saw no link between the consumption of that kind of soft drink and prediabetes risk. (Still, oth Continue reading >>

10 Reasons To Give Up Diet Soda

10 Reasons To Give Up Diet Soda

Bubble trouble When taken at face value, diet soda seems like a health-conscious choice. It saves you the 140-plus calories you'd find in a sugary soft drink while still satisfying your urge for something sweet with artificial sweeteners like aspartame, saccharin, and sucralose. But there's more to this chemical cocktail than meets the eye. It could lead to weight gain, not weight loss Diet soda is calorie-free, but it won't necessarily help you lose weight. Researchers from the University of Texas found that over the course of about a decade, diet soda drinkers had a 70% greater increase in waist circumference compared with non-drinkers. And get this: participants who slurped down two or more sodas a day experienced a 500% greater increase. The way artificial sweeteners confuse the body may play a part, but another reason might be psychological, says Minnesota-based dietitian Cassie Bjork. When you know you're not consuming any liquid calories, it might be easier to justify that double cheeseburger or extra slice of pizza. It makes drinking more dangerous Using diet soda as a low-calorie cocktail mixer has the dangerous effect of getting you drunk faster than sugar-sweetened beverages, according to research from Northern Kentucky University. The study revealed that participants who consumed cocktails mixed with diet drinks had a higher breath alcohol concentration than those who drank alcohol blended with sugared beverages. The researchers believe this is because our bloodstream is able to absorb artificial sweetener more quickly than sugar. It's associated with depression A recent study presented at a the American Academy of Neurology meeting found that over the course of 10 years, people who drank more than four cups or cans of soda a day were 30% more likely to deve Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Do Diet Sodas Cause Diabetes?

Do Diet Sodas Cause Diabetes?

I’m confused by news that drinks containing artificial sweeteners can lead to diabetes. I know you advise against the use of artificial sweeteners, but does this study mean that we should drink “regular” instead of diet sodas? You will be much better off not drinking any sodas at all. The results of the study connecting artificial sweeteners with metabolic syndrome, a collection of conditions that together dramatically increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes, by no means vindicate sugar. Instead, they suggest that artificial sweeteners are as bad for health as too much sugar. The study, from Israel, showed that artificial sweeteners altered the collection of bacteria (known as the microbiome) in the digestive tract in a way that caused blood glucose levels to rise higher than expected and to fall more slowly than they otherwise would. This finding may solve the longstanding mystery of why drinking artificially sweetened diet sodas doesn’t lead to weight loss. It also strongly suggests that the use of artificial sweeteners has been contributing to the worldwide obesity epidemic and rising rates of type 2 diabetes. To arrive at their conclusions, the Israeli researchers gave 10-week old mice water sweetened with saccharin, sucralose or aspartame, plain water, or sugar-sweetened water. After one week, the mice that received the artificially sweetened water had developed glucose intolerance, the first step on the path to metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. With glucose intolerance, the body cannot easily handle large amounts of sugar. The researchers next gave the mice antibiotics, which killed the bacteria in the animals’ digestive systems. The glucose intolerance disappeared, supporting the hypothesis that this condition is caused by a change Continue reading >>

Why Diet Soda Is Bad For You

Why Diet Soda Is Bad For You

By now you’ve probably heard that the idea of diet soda being healthier than regular soda is nothing more than a myth. Sure, regular soda is far from healthy, but diet soda could be even more dangerous. This news is mind-boggling for most and may leave them wondering “why?” or “how?”. The truth about diet soda Fortunately, we have the truth about diet soda and what makes it so dangerous. It leads to more weight gain Before recent studies were released on the dangers of diet soda, many individuals who wanted to lose weight would swap their regular soda for diet. You can only imagine their surprise when they not only failed to lose weight, but actually ended up gaining more! So, how exactly does diet soda contribute to weight gain? It’s simple: while diet soda doesn’t contain real sugar or calories it does contain a lot of additives and artificial ingredients including sweeteners. These ingredients are full of unnatural chemicals that can cause your body to crave more high-calorie and sugar-laden foods. Artificial sweeteners may also confuse your body into miscalculating the number of calories you are actually consuming which can then cause your metabolism to slow down, making it more challenging to burn off calories and lose weight. It has been linked to type-2 diabetes Think diet soda is safe for diabetics due to the lack of sugar? Think again. The artificial sweeteners in diet soda can actually cause a spike in blood sugar and insulin levels which in turn can lead to diabetic shock for those who have already been diagnosed with diabetes. Don’t have diabetes? You’re not out of danger, either. Diet soda may greatly increase your risk of developing type-2 diabetes. As previously mentioned, diet soda can cause weight gain and a lower metabolism rate. Thes Continue reading >>

Ask The Diabetes Team

Ask The Diabetes Team

Question: From The Netherlands: My boyfriend's son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes about three months ago. I always do my best to give him healthy food and try to avoid sugary drinks as much as possible. My boyfriend, however, thinks a little differently about it and says that, for example, Coca Cola doesn't harm his son's health that much. He believes that because Coca Cola makes your blood sugar rise quickly, it also disappears quickly from your body. I don't agree with that statement. I've been trying to find the explanation of what really happens with the blood sugar after drinking a regular Coca Cola and what the consequences are of drinking it, but I can't find anything that goes deeper than it makes your blood sugar rise fast and that's bad for you weight. Does is make a difference if you mix a sugar soft drink with a healthy food? Can you explain it in details and be specific as much as possible? Answer: It is important for everyone to eat healthy foods and to enjoy their food. For a person with type 1 diabetes, balancing nutritious foods and glucose control is an art and a science. Take time to learn about how different foods affect glucose and make an informed decision. For example, carbohydrates have the biggest effect on glucose levels for people with type 1 diabetes. Tools such as blood glucose monitoring and continuous glucose monitoring will help you understand the affect of the foods eaten on glucose levels. (Know that in the first months of diabetes, he may still be making some insulin, which would affect the impact of foods on glucose). In my experience, most people with type 1 diabetes typically decide to limit their regular soda to periods of hypoglycemia or to prevent hypoglycemia related to exercise, as regular soda may cause a significant rise Continue reading >>

What To Drink When You Have Diabetes

What To Drink When You Have Diabetes

Your body is made up of nearly two-thirds water, so it makes sense to drink enough every day to stay hydrated and healthy. Water, tea, coffee, milk, fruit juices and smoothies all count. We also get fluid from the food we eat, especially from fruit and veg. Does it matter what we drink? Yes, particularly when it comes to fruit juices and sugary drinks – you can be having more calories and sugar than you mean to because you’re drinking them and not noticing. Five ways to stay hydrated… Water is the best all-round drink. If your family likes flavoured waters, make your own by adding a squeeze of lemon or lime, or strawberries. Children often need reminding to drink, so give them a colourful water bottle with a funky straw. Tea, coffee, chai and hot chocolate – cut back on sugar and use semi-skimmed or skimmed milk. Herbal teas can make a refreshing change and most are caffeine-free. Fruit juices (100 per cent juice) contain vitamins and minerals and 150ml provides one portion of our five a day – but remember, fruit juices only count as one portion, however much you drink. They can harm teeth, so for children, dilute with water and drink at meal times. Milk is one of the best drinks to have after sport. It’s hydrating and a good source of calcium, protein and carbohydrate. Choose skimmed or semi-skimmed milk. …and two drinks that are great for hypos Fizzy sugary drinks provide little else apart from a lot of sugar, so only use these to treat hypos. Otherwise, choose sugar-free alternatives Energy drinks – the only time when these drinks can be helpful in diabetes is when you need to get your blood glucose up quickly after a hypo. Energy drinks are high in sugar and calories. Quick quenchers Add slices of cucumber, lemon, or mint leaves to a glass of iced wa Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Drink Diet Coke Or Diet Pepsi?

Can Diabetics Drink Diet Coke Or Diet Pepsi?

I’m disappointed in the quality of the other answers thus far, so I’m going to give you some useful advice here. Yes, in general, diabetics can consume diet soft drinks without a risk to raising their blood sugar. There are a few caveats to this, however, and you should keep this in mind: In some countries, “diet soda” is actually low-sugar soda. That is, it’s made with less sugar, not zero sugar. This kind of diet soda will definitely raise your blood sugar, so be careful. Know what you’re putting into your body. Many diet sodas contain caffeine, and caffeine has been found to elevate blood sugar levels in a certain percentage of the population. I’m one of the lucky ones, so I can drink all the caffeine I want to. But you might be one of the unlucky ones. The best thing to do is test before and after drinking a diet soda and determine for yourself what happens to your body. If you drink “fountain drinks” in restaurants, be aware of the fact that sometimes the employees attach the fountain spigot to the wrong bottle of syrup. You’ll think you’re getting diet soda, but you might get the genuine article. With practice, you’ll be able to taste the difference, but sometimes you won’t know for sure. In that case, you can usually tell by dipping your finger in the soda. Real soda will become sticky on your finger when it dries. Diet soda will not. Artificial sweeteners are still sugars! They are sugars that are a couple of orders of magnitude sweeter than table sugar, so a lower quantity of sweeteners results in an equivalent level of “sweetness.” What this means is that if you consume a large amount of diet soda all at once (like a liter or more), your blood sugar will still probably rise because there are carbs in artificial sweeteners. If you Continue reading >>

Does Drinking Diet Soda Increase Your Blood Sugar?

Does Drinking Diet Soda Increase Your Blood Sugar?

If you're watching your blood sugar levels, you're probably aware that drinking regular soda can quickly cause your blood sugar levels to spike due to the large amounts of easily absorbed sugars it contains. But you might not be aware that diet soda may also have an effect on your blood sugar levels, although research in this area isn't conclusive. Drinking diet soda by itself isn't likely to cause spikes in your blood sugar levels. A study published in "Diabetes Care" in December 2009 found that drinking diet soda had the same effect on blood sugar and insulin levels as drinking carbonated water. When consumed along with carbohydrates in the form of glucose, however, the diet soda did increase the amount of a substance called GLP-1 in the blood that may delay stomach emptying and minimize the effect of the carbohydrates on after-meal blood sugar levels, although more research is needed to verify this effect. Fasting Blood Sugar Consuming diet soda at least once a day was associated with an increased fasting blood sugar level and a higher waist circumference compared to not consuming any soda, according to a study published in "Diabetes Care" in April 2009. This translated to a 67 percent higher chance of developing type-2 diabetes and a 36 percent higher risk for metabolic syndrome. Another study, published in the "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition" in April 2012, compared the effects of drinking diet soda on people following either a healthier diet or a typical Western diet and found that people following the healthier diet had a lower risk for metabolic syndrome than those following the Western diet. In addition, the study indicated that drinking diet soda sometimes, but not always, increased the risk for metabolic syndrome somewhat even when following the healt Continue reading >>

Diet Soda And Diabetes: Things To Consider

Diet Soda And Diabetes: Things To Consider

Diabetes is a condition characterized by high amounts of sugar in the blood. These high blood sugar levels are a result of the body's inability to either produce or use a hormone called insulin. Insulin's role is to move sugar from the blood and into the cells of the body where it is used to make energy. Contents of this article: Sugary sodas and diabetes Diabetes is marked by high blood sugar, known medically as hyperglycemia. As such, drinks which have a lot of sugar in them should be avoided as they cause spikes in blood sugar. There are three major types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. The immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. There is no direct cause of type 1 diabetes. Factors that can increase the risk of type 1 diabetes include: Drinking cow's milk at an early age may also play a role in type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. The body is unable to use insulin fully or make enough of it to keep up with sugar intake. Type 2 diabetes shows links to: Inactivity Genes Age Family history of type 2 diabetes Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes affects women during pregnancy. If the body cannot make enough insulin to carry the sugar to cells to be used or if there is insulin resistance present, the woman may be diagnosed with gestational diabetes. One recent study posted in the BMJ found a link between drinking sugary drinks and the risk of type two diabetes. Another study posted in Diabetes Care found that people who drink 1-2 sugar-sweetened drinks every day have a 26 percent greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who do not. Other things to consider about sugar-sweetened sodas: Plaque loves soda: The bacteria that make Continue reading >>

Diet Soda May Alter Our Gut Microbes And Raise The Risk Of Diabetes

Diet Soda May Alter Our Gut Microbes And Raise The Risk Of Diabetes

The debate over whether diet sodas are good, bad or just OK for us never seems to end. Some research suggests zero-calorie drinks can help people cut calories and fend off weight gain. But in recent years, the idea that artificial sweeteners may trick the brain and lead to "metabolic derangements," as one researcher has theorized, has gained traction, too. Now, a new study published in the journal Nature introduces a new idea: Diet sodas may alter our gut microbes in a way that increases the risk of metabolic diseases such as Type 2 diabetes — at least in some of us. In the paper, researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel describe what happened when they fed zero-calorie sweeteners, including saccharin, aspartame and sucralose, to mice. "To our surprise, [the mice] developed glucose intolerance," Weizmann researcher Eran Elinav tells us. Intrigued by the findings, Elinav and his colleague Eran Segal set out to determine whether this might happen in people as well. First, they analyzed data collected from a group of about 400 people who are enrolled in an ongoing nutrition study. They found that people who were heavy consumers of artificial sweeteners had slightly elevated HbA1C levels (a long-term measure of blood sugar) — compared with people who rarely or never consumed artificial sweeteners. Next, they recruited seven volunteers — people who were not in the habit of drinking diet drinks — and asked them to start consuming the equivalent of 10-12 of those fake sugar packets during a one-week experiment. "What we find is that a subgroup [four of the seven people] developed significant disturbances in their blood glucose even after short-term exposure to artificial sweeteners," Elinav says. For example, results of a glucose tolerance test found Continue reading >>

5 Healthy And Delicious Alternatives To Diet Soda

5 Healthy And Delicious Alternatives To Diet Soda

Be honest- how many diet sodas do you drink in a day? One? Two? A 2 liter? It’s ok… I won’t tell. In fact, I can’t even hear what you’re saying! Diet soda is one of those things in the diabetes community that is everywhere. People LOVE the stuff. It’s considered a “free food” so the amount you can have is limitless… Or is it? Personally, I am not a fan of diet soda. I only drink it when I’m sick. But others drink it all the time. I am not the food police, but I know that diet soda isn’t the best thing to be drinking all day long. If you have one every now and then, it’s not a big deal. Moderation is the key to a happy life. You shouldn’t deprive yourself of something that you enjoy and makes you happy. But you also shouldn’t over-indulge either. There is a lot of debate about whether diet soda is bad for you. Does aspartame causes cancer? Does diet soda help promote weight loss or weight gain? I am no scientist. I don’t know what the truth is. I do know that health benefits or problems aside, we all should be drinking more water. And no… diet soda is not a replacement for water. Water is THE best thing you can give your body to drink. So we all know that water makes up roughly 70% of your body. We are water. Our muscles, blood, organs and brain are all mostly water. Water helps everything from our skin, to our hair to our joints and all of our systems. Ever notice when you are dehydrated that you feel lethargic? Well, dehydration can also be the cause of chronic pains in the joints and muscles, lower back pain (hi DAD!), headaches, and constipation. No fun. As PWDs we have enough to worry about. I don’t want to worry about dehydration. Especially when my blood sugar is high. So I reach for water. I can’t expect that people will replac Continue reading >>

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