diabetestalk.net

Can Paleo Diet Cause Ketosis

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Despite the similarity in name, ketosis and ketoacidosis are two different things. Ketoacidosis refers to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and is a complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus. It’s a life-threatening condition resulting from dangerously high levels of ketones and blood sugar. This combination makes your blood too acidic, which can change the normal functioning of internal organs like your liver and kidneys. It’s critical that you get prompt treatment. DKA can occur very quickly. It may develop in less than 24 hours. It mostly occurs in people with type 1 diabetes whose bodies do not produce any insulin. Several things can lead to DKA, including illness, improper diet, or not taking an adequate dose of insulin. DKA can also occur in individuals with type 2 diabetes who have little or no insulin production. Ketosis is the presence of ketones. It’s not harmful. You can be in ketosis if you’re on a low-carbohydrate diet or fasting, or if you’ve consumed too much alcohol. If you have ketosis, you have a higher than usual level of ketones in your blood or urine, but not high enough to cause acidosis. Ketones are a chemical your body produces when it burns stored fat. Some people choose a low-carb diet to help with weight loss. While there is some controversy over their safety, low-carb diets are generally fine. Talk to your doctor before beginning any extreme diet plan. DKA is the leading cause of death in people under 24 years old who have diabetes. The overall death rate for ketoacidosis is 2 to 5 percent. People under the age of 30 make up 36 percent of DKA cases. Twenty-seven percent of people with DKA are between the ages of 30 and 50, 23 percent are between the ages of 51 and 70, and 14 percent are over the age of 70. Ketosis may cause bad breath. Ket Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating Tips For People With Lupus The Magic Of A Ketogenic And Paleo Diets

Healthy Eating Tips For People With Lupus The Magic Of A Ketogenic And Paleo Diets

What is Lupus? The Mayo Clinic has defined Lupus as “a chronic inflammatory disease that occurs when your body’s immune system attacks its own tissues and organs.” Marked by a rash and multiple types of inflammation, lupus is hard to diagnose because it attacks so many different areas of the body. Lupus can affect the skin, joints, kidneys, brain, heart, and lungs. Doctors have noted that the cause for lupus is still unknown and that symptoms appear differently in each person. While the root cause is unknown, experts point to genetics and the environment as factors. The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases lists the most common symptoms as joint inflammation, muscle pain, fever, facial rash, chest pains, hair loss, swelling in legs and eyes and glands, mouth ulcers, and fatigue. They also list less common symptoms as anemia, headaches, dizziness, and seizures. Along with no known cause, there is also no known cure. The disease appears in episodes and can be aggravated by common environmental things like medication or even sunlight. If left untreated, lupus can cause serious complications like kidney failure, inflammation of the chest, heart and blood vessels, stroke or seizure. Managing Lupus with Diet Inflammation is the kind of symptom that can strike anywhere at any time. A study from Johns Hopkins University noted that “no overarching diet exists for people with lupus. [It] is a systemic disease, so maintaining good nutritional habits will help your body remain as healthy as possible”. The doctors at Johns Hopkins recommend a diet similar to the USDA’s Dietary Guidelines. To date, there are is no prescribed “lupus diet”. And unfortunately, there are few studies that actually test the effects of diet on this disease. H Continue reading >>

The Causes And Solutions For Bad Breath (ketosis Breath)

The Causes And Solutions For Bad Breath (ketosis Breath)

If you’re on a low-carb diet, not all the outcomes are good. One of the side effects you could notice is bad breath. It’s commonly nicknamed ketosis breath, whether it happens when following the ketosis diet, but it can happen with all low carb/high protein diets. In fact, bad breath is becoming an epidemic. This is because so many people now are following these low carb diets. So, you’re definitely not alone. In fact, scientists say that 40% of people on these types of diets report bad breath as one of the worst side effects. I’ve been in your position before with my low carb diets. Your best friend likely has, too. We just get so embarrassed about our bad breath that we tend not to mention it. We just hope that we can mask it with some breath mints. But what is the real cause of bad breath on the ketosis diet? Just why do low carb diets make us stink? And is there anything that we can do to stop the problem? I can share some very positive news. You can stop ketosis breath becoming an issue. You don’t need to become part of the growing epidemic. I’m going to share everything that you can do to stop ketosis breath becoming a problem. So, Why Do We Get Bad Breath? Let’s start with how low carb diets work. When we stop feeding ourselves as many carbs, our bodies have to get the energy in other ways. They do this through the burning of fat, which means the release of ketones in the body. It’s a chemical process since the body can’t create the carbohydrates that it would need to help It’s this process that is causing the bad breath. The great news is that you’re sticking to your diet and you will see a smaller waistline. It will be successful, and you will be able to lose weight. Of course, the downside is that you have to deal with the breath. The mos Continue reading >>

What Is The Ketogenic Diet And How Does It Compare To The Zone Diet?

What Is The Ketogenic Diet And How Does It Compare To The Zone Diet?

Over the past few months we’ve received a number of inquiries regarding Dr. Sears’ stance on the Ketogenic Diet and how it relates to the Zone in terms of health and weight loss. Is this just the next diet craze or is it as good for weight loss and health as it’s touted to be? What Is the Ketogenic Diet? The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, low carbohydrate diet consisting of approximately 75% fat, 20% protein and 5% carbohydrate. Compare this to the Zone which is moderate in these macronutrients and supplies 30% fat, 30% protein and 40% carbohydrate as total dietary calories. The Ketogenic Diet is based on getting the body into a state of ketosis (hence “keto”). Ketosis is a back-up metabolic system used to provide the brain with an energy source, called ketones, if glucose isn’t available or if blood levels fall too low. What’s the Buzz About? The popularity in the Ketogenic Diet stems from the quick weight loss it produces and its perceived health benefits. The diet is thought to increase the body’s ability to burn stored body fat and lower insulin levels. It’s important to note that the weight loss that stems from this diet isn’t necessarily fat loss, despite fat being the preferred/primary fuel on this eating plan. Weight Loss from the Ketogenic Is Not From Stored Body Fat In general, when we lose weight, it results from one of three factors: the loss of retained water, loss of muscle mass or loss of stored body fat. The ideal scenario would be to lose stored body fat. Ketogenic diets can promote an initial loss of retained water that comes with the depletion of glycogen (storage form of glucose). This is because stored glycogen retains significant levels of water. As the glycogen levels are reduced (due to limited carbohydrates in the diet), the r Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet Vs The Paleo Diet: Is Ketosis Better Than Paleo?

The Keto Diet Vs The Paleo Diet: Is Ketosis Better Than Paleo?

If you’re someone interested in improving their health or losing weight, you’ve likely heard of the ketogenic diet and the Paleo Diet at some point. It’s not uncommon for both of these dietary plans to be used in the same sentence and often lumped together as the same diet. While they do have similarities, they aren’t the same. So, what is the difference, exactly? Are they alike in many ways, or are they very different from one another? Let’s take a closer look at both plans and discuss the main differences between them to help you make a decision about which of the two best suits your needs. Most people aren’t aware the ketogenic diet was never originally developed for mainstream use like it’s implemented today. It was actually created to help people control and diminish the effects of epilepsy. There is a proven proven link between fasting and successfully mitigating the risk of seizures in those with epilepsy, and the ketogenic diet has been shown to alter the internal chemistry of the body by vastly reducing the dietary elements associated with making epilepsy worse without the individual having to fast. Today, the ketogenic diet is more popularly used in other ways: Losing body fat at a rapid rate Competing in bodybuilding contests Reducing their reliance on carbohydrates as a fuel source Keto for Fat Loss As a fat loss tool, the ketogenic diet is certainly one of the most popular nutrition programs available. The reason it has such a dramatic effect on the body for weight loss is due to the reduction of carbohydrates to such a low percentage. For most people, this shocks the system dramatically, in the short term at least, and forces it to scramble for an alternative energy source in the form of fat. Plus, carbohydrates can also lead to a great deal Continue reading >>

Which High-protein Diet Is Best: Atkins, Dukan, Or Ketogenic?

Which High-protein Diet Is Best: Atkins, Dukan, Or Ketogenic?

If you've been on the lookout for a new way to lose weight, you've probably noticed that low-carb, high-protein diets—like Atkins, the ketogenic diet, and the Dukan diet—have become kind of a big deal. Not only did all three make the cut on Google's annual list of most searched diets, but two (Atkins and Dukan) are also on the 2016 US News & World Report's roundup of best weight-loss diets. Each of these diets follow the same basic premise: limiting carbs means the body turns to stored fat for fuel. But is one of these plans more likely to lead to pounds-shedding success? We caught up with Edwina Clark, R.D., head of nutrition and wellness at Yummly, to find out how these three diets compare. "The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, moderate protein, low-carb diet," says Clark. Up to 75 percent of your daily calories come from fat, 5 to 10 percent from carbs, and the rest from protein. By severely limiting carbs to 50 grams or less, this diet forces your bod to burn fat for energy, a process known as ketosis. Unlike the Atkins and Dukan diets, the keto plan doesn't work in phases. Instead, you sustain the low-carb, high-fat, high-protein eating ratios until you reach your goal weight. There is no maintenance plan once you reach your goal. Unsurprisingly, limiting your carb intake this much means missing out on quite a few (delish) foods, including legumes, root vegetables, and most fruits. Starchy veggies, such as squash and sweet potatoes, are also off the table, along with refined carbs. Thanks to carb counting and food restrictions, meal prepping is paramount to following this plan. The rapid weight loss you'll experience at the start of this diet might be helpful in the motivation department, but you're not dropping fat from the get-go, says Clark. "Carbs are stored w Continue reading >>

The Keto And Paleo Diets For Mesothelioma And Cancer Patients

The Keto And Paleo Diets For Mesothelioma And Cancer Patients

Diet trends tend to come and go, but there are several reasons why the ketogenic diet and the paleo diet continue to be popular: They are easy to follow, don’t require calorie counting, and really do make weight loss easier. But, can these popular diets actually benefit cancer and mesothelioma patients? Researchers are finding out ways that these diets may help cancer patients, but at the very least eating a healthier diet overall can help reduce inflammation, reduce side effects from treatment, and improve quality of life. What is the Paleo Diet? Among the many modern diet and healthy-eating trends that has stuck around for a while is the paleo diet. Perhaps one reason it has consistently remained popular is its simplicity. The diet states that people should only eat foods that would have been available to what humans ate during the Paleolithic period, when we were still hunters and gatherers nearly 10,000 years ago. During that time, agriculture had not yet been developed, so people did not eat cultivated grains or dairy from farmed animals. Instead humans would have eaten meat, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts, and seeds, anything that could be collected through hunting and gathering. The diet avoids grains, legumes and beans, dairy, salt, refined sugar, and any processed foods, including vegetable oils. The idea behind the diet is that agriculture developed rather quickly. What we are eating today may not be what our genetics have evolved for us to eat. If we eat what we evolved eating for millions of years, so the diet’s proponents claim, we will be healthier. Studies have shown there are some benefits of the paleo diet: Lower blood pressure Greater weight loss without counting calories Better tolerance of glucose Greater ability to control appetite Lower levels Continue reading >>

Should You Combine A Ketogenic Diet With Paleo?

Should You Combine A Ketogenic Diet With Paleo?

Have you noticed that you feel better after adopting a Paleo diet? There’s actually one more tweak to your diet that you can make to feel more energized, lose weight faster, and become mentally clearer. That tweak is to convert your Paleo diet to a Paleo/ketogenic (Keto) diet. Fair warning, a Keto diet isn’t appropriate for all people, but by the end of this article you will know if giving it a try is worth it. A Crash Course In Keto Glycolysis and ketogenesis are the two processes that the body uses to produce usable energy for your cells. Glycolysis is dominant when carbohydrates are available. It involves converting glucose into pyruvate, which produces a net gain of ATP (Adenosine Triphosphate, the basic unit of cellular energy). But when your carbohydrate stores run out, that’s when it’s ketogenesis’ time to shine. Compared to the small amount of carbohydrate stores you have at any time, you have a massive reserve of fat that can be used for energy. Through ketogenesis, stored fat is broken down and converted to ketone bodies (a type of molecule) which can then be used to create ATP. When your body is relying on ketone bodies for energy, it is said to be in a state of ketosis. The image below shows a simplistic version of these two energy systems. Note that almost all of the ATP is made in the dark blue citric acid cycle (TCA) at the bottom. What is a Ketogenic Diet? Remember that ketosis only occurs when you are more or less out of carbs. A ketogenic diet is designed to keep you in ketosis, mainly by limiting how many carbohydrates you eat during a day. The typical starting guideline is 50 grams per day, but some people need to restrict further than that, while others can eat more and still remain in ketosis. It’s important to understand that the body Continue reading >>

How To Avoid A Heart Attack While Doing A Ketogenic (or Any Other) Diet

How To Avoid A Heart Attack While Doing A Ketogenic (or Any Other) Diet

One of the biggest questions that anyone asks in relation to a high fat diet is this: “will eating a high fat diet cause heart disease.” And this is where everyone starts to lose their minds. On one side, we have the lipid hypothesis, which points at fat as the main cause of heart disease while ignoring every other possible hypothesis and every study that demonstrates that there is not a relationship between fat intake and heart disease all while tapping its finger on its Ivy League medical diploma. On the other side we have the low carb high fat cult that argues for high fat intake as if it is some verse from the bible. In the minds of these people, carbohydrate in all of its forms is the devil and they point their fingers and laugh at the non converted as if they are on a one way road to high blood sugar hell. Very few have ever tried to meet in the middle. Now, I’m obviously someone who believes in the benefits of a high fat diet. I helped create a course called Keto Camp for God’s sake. But I also think that this madness needs to stop. We are doing nothing but talking past each other. This is not me saying that the lipid hypothesis isn’t wrong. Evidence in recent years has consistently pointed to the fact that there is no relationship between fat intake and heart disease in both epidemiological and human subject studies. Evidence has also demonstrated that a high fat, low carbohydrate diet can help athletes to perform as well or better than they would on a high carb low fat diet. But what I am saying is this: there are other paths to healthy living besides a ketogenic diet, and there is a right way and a wrong way to do a ketogenic diet, and if done the wrong way, the ketogenic diet can be very unhealthy. So here are four ways to ensure that your ketogenic Continue reading >>

Which Diet Works Best Of Paleo, Ketogenic, And Whole 30

Which Diet Works Best Of Paleo, Ketogenic, And Whole 30

Diets Decoded: Paleo, Ketogenic and Whole30 When it comes to diets like Whole30, Paleo and Ketogenic, I always defer to our Registered Dietitian. How can we pull the greatest benefits from some of these diets and still enjoy eating? Stephanie, R.D., will show us that a lot of these diets have the same principles and how they can work best for you For meal planning and a Recipe Box that caters to the I dont wanna diet, but I love the benefits of keto and Whole30 JOIN ME HERE ! Your friend shows up to a playdate, slightly grumpy, but looking a little trimmer so you ask what shes doing. Next thing you know youre knee-deep in the intricacies of the keto-Whole30-Paleo plan shes following for the month. It is very attractive to hear, and you may be wondering if one of these diets is right for you. In my practice as a dietitian Ive found different approaches click for different people there is not one perfect approach. When designing a balanced meal plan for women wanting to lose weight and eat more wholesome foods, I aim for about 30-50% carbs each day. Almost every gram of carb comes from whole grains, fruits, and vegetables so even if you arent following a meal plan, you can focus on increasing these three things. Additionally, I restrict refined sugars, only allowing those sugars that are found naturally in foods such as fruit (fructose) and milk (lactose). To balance the good carbs, I also average 100-112 grams of protein each day approximately 30% of a 1500 calorie diet plan. This leaves the rest of the plate for good fats (think avocado, healthy oils, nuts, and seeds). You can find this meal plan and the Moms Into Fitness workouts here . Like many things, you want to consider what is healthy AND sustainable for you as a mom. When it comes to some of the most popular di Continue reading >>

Paleo Diet & Ketosis

Paleo Diet & Ketosis

The Paleo diet is based on foods humans used to eat during the Paleolithic period, which ended 10,000 years ago. The idea is that human genes have evolved to eat particular foods, which have been replaced by many refined and processed foods in our diet nowadays. Advocates of the Paleo diet claim that it is the best one for keeping your weight under control and optimizing health. Video of the Day The Paleo diet focuses on unprocessed and whole foods. Carbohydrates are almost nonexistent on a Paleo diet, since agriculture had not been introduced at that time. Therefore grains, legumes, any food made from flour, as well as dairy products and sugars are excluded from this diet plan. Instead, the Paleo diet is based on an adequate amount of protein from grass-fed meat, free-range poultry and eggs and wild-caught fish. The diet also includes generous servings of healthy fats, including avocado, olives and olive oil, coconut oil, nuts and seeds. Seasonal fruits and vegetables are also part of the foods allowed on the Paleo diet. What Is Ketosis Low-carb diets are usually ketogenic diets because they induce a metabolic pathway called ketosis. When you consume very limited amounts of carbohydrates, the body needs to switch from using carbohydrates to using fat as its main source of energy, as explained by Dr. Michael Eades. By burning fat for fuel, the body produces ketone bodies that can be used by different organs, such as your muscles, brain and heart. Ketosis constitutes a normal metabolic pathway and is not harmful, say diet proponents. Following low-carb diets, such as the Paleo diet, is a good way to induce ketosis and force your body into fat-burning mode. In addition to burning fat for energy, ketogenic diets have been shown to make people feel fuller on fewer calories. Continue reading >>

Experts Weigh In On Ketogenic Diet For Diabetes Type 2

Experts Weigh In On Ketogenic Diet For Diabetes Type 2

Ketogenic diet has taken us by the wind in the recent years. There are numerous resources available online for people who are considering going on one. A ketogenic diet, in very simple terms, is a very low-carb diet. It has been claimed that going on a ketogenic diet is beneficial for people seeking to lose weight and to improve their health. This probably sounds very charming to a person with diabetes who is looking to lose excess weight and to improve their overall general health to avoid or prevent any diabetes related complications. But, is it really worth all the hype it has generated? For someone who has diabetes, a healthy and nutritional lifestyle is extremely important. Though lowering the consumption of carbs from your diet can aid you, is it actually recommended to restrict yourself to a very low carb diet if you have diabetes? We can’t claim to know but we reached out to respected experts who have shared their thoughts on the diet and whether they recommend it to their patients. Read on to find out whether or not you could benefit from going on a Ketogenic diet. 1. Gina Keatley, CDN I would not recommend the ketogenic diet to any patients other than those suffering with epilepsy. The proper ratio of fat to protein to carbohydrate calories (80-15-5) is extremely difficult to maintain over any period of time. In many research studies over half of the participants drop out of studies before they have completed due to this difficulty and in other studies the researchers do not get institutional approval for such a strict limit of carbohydrates and use one with far more protein and carbohydrate (usually a 60-30-10 ratio). That being said what has been shown to lower blood sugar levels over the long term is losing weight–a diet that is calorie controlled and f Continue reading >>

Eating The Right Protein On The Ketogenic Diet

Eating The Right Protein On The Ketogenic Diet

When selecting a diet, the first question you should ask yourself is, “Is this healthy?” With diets that range from borderline healthy to downright bizarre, finding a healthy diet backed by science can be a challenge. Ketogenic diets, which were originally used to help control and prevent seizures in epilepsy patients, have grown in popularity in recent years as an effective fat-burning diet. These high-fat, low-carb diets are also heavy in protein, but the type of protein you eat can determine whether or not a keto diet is a healthy choice. Ketogenic Diet Basics A ketogenic diet (also called a keto diet, low-carb diet, or low-carb high-fat diet) is a diet that consists of low-carb, low to moderate-protein, high-fat foods. This diet reduces almost all carbohydrates and replaces them with fat. When you eat foods high in carbohydrates, your body produces glucose, which is typically the first place the body goes for energy. When glucose is being used as the primary source of energy, the fat you consume is mostly stored. With the keto diet, the absence of carbohydrates forces the body into a metabolic state called ketosis, which causes the body to burn fat for energy instead of glucose from carbohydrates. Keep in mind that ketosis is different from ketoacidosis, a serious condition that occurs when the body creates an abnormal amount of ketones. The body does release ketones during ketosis, but not in great enough amounts to cause ketoacidosis. Low-carb diets like paleo diets or the Atkins diet are also very low-carb diets, but they have some important differences from the keto diet. With the keto diet, the focus is on keeping the body in a state of ketosis. With Atkins, paleo, and other low-carb diets, ketosis is typically only reached in the earliest stages of the die Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

Tweet Ketogenic diets are very effective at achieving two common aims of diabetes control, lowering blood glucose levels and reducing weight What is the ketogenic diet? A ketogenic diet is a very low-carb diet, considered to be when you eat a level of carbohydrate of around 30g of carbohydrates per day or below. This encourages the body to get its energy from burning body fat which produces an energy source known as ketones. The diet helps to lower the body's demand for insulin which has benefits for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Note that it is important that you speak to your doctor if you are considering following the diet as precautions may need to be taken before starting. How a ketogenic diet works On a ketogenic diet, blood glucose levels are kept at a low but healthy level which encourages the body to break down fat into a fuel source known as ketones. The process of breaking down or ‘burning’ body fat is known as ketosis. People on insulin will typically require smaller doses of insulin which leads to less risk of large dosing errors. The diet helps burn body fat and therefore has particular advantages for those looking to lose weight, including people with prediabetes or those otherwise at risk of type 2 diabetes. How to follow a ketogenic diet Based on the understanding that carbohydrate is the macronutrient that raises blood glucose the most, the primary goal of a ketogenic diet is to keep consumption lower than that of a traditional low carbohydrate diet with moderate protein and a very high fat content. This will determine the nutrient density of the ketogenic diet as well as how to follow it, as different foods will have different effects on insulin and blood sugar levels. Which foods to eat on a ketogenic diet There are a number of differen Continue reading >>

Why A Low Carb Diet May Not Be Best For You

Why A Low Carb Diet May Not Be Best For You

Does Low Carb = Low Energy? I have yet to meet a woman on a long-term, low carb diet who is loving life. I’m here to explain why I think this may be the case. While we have, collectively, reacted to the low-fat brainwashing of the past half-century, with a defiant, “Fat rules!” attitude, this zeal may be taking us too far astray. I am passionate about the ancestral diet and everything implied by “going back to our roots”, but I also raise a brow at more rigid interpretations, assumptions, and academic flourishes about true replication of a Paleolithic diet. We’ve relinquished Darwin and redeemed Lamarck, so the truth is that we can evolve (or devolve) within one generation. Adaptations to stress and environmental exposures can change our biology and impact our grandchildren. Thanks to the work of Weston Price, we may not have to go back as far as the Paleolithic to send the body a signal of safety. As recently as the early 1900s, he found traditional cultures flourishing, many with incorporation of agricultural foods like grains and legumes. That said, we also know that the microbiome plays a powerful role in adaptation to these foods, and that some of our guts may not be up for the challenge. Back in my self-experimentation days, I spent two months on a carb-restricted diet, kicking starchy veggies, fruit, and grains to the curb. I felt great for two weeks, and not a day after. I felt cloudy, tired, and started obsessing about moisturizer and conditioner. Perhaps this is most relevant for those with a history of compromised thyroid function, as the Jaminets have discussed, but I believe it’s relevant to many women. Many Body Types = Many Right Diets I look to the Hadza whose women foster gender-distinct microbial profiles, ostensibly related to their cons Continue reading >>

More in diabetic diet