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Can Metformin Cause You To Gain Weight?

Is It Possible To Stop Weight Gain From Metformin? If Yes, Then How?

Is It Possible To Stop Weight Gain From Metformin? If Yes, Then How?

Metformin is a medication that treats the symptoms of type 2 diabetes. Dont stop taking metformin without talking to your doctor first. You may be able to safely stop taking metformin if your blood sugar is under control. Metformin (Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage, Fortamet) is the most common medication people use to treat diabetes worldwide. It can help control high blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. Its usually available as either small, white tablets or clear liquid. In both cases, you take it orally, or by the mouth, before meals multiple times per day. Metformin doesnt treat the underlying causes of diabetes. Instead, it treats the symptoms of diabetes by lowering blood sugar and increasing the use of glucose in peripheral muscles and the liver. Metformin does several good things in addition to improving blood sugar: It lowers lipids, resulting in a decrease in blood triglyceride levels. It slightly decreases your bad cholesterol, or low-density lipoprotein (LDL). It slightly increases the good cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Stopping metformin removes the benefits it provides, namely lower blood sugar. It may be possible to stop taking medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes if you make certain lifestyle changes, such as losing weight and getting more exercise. You should only stop taking metformin under the care of your doctor to avoid the risk of high blood glucose levels. In some cases, metformin leads to poor absorption of vitamin B-12. That can lead to a vitamin B-12 deficiency. Taking metformin doesnt lead to weight gain. However, it might lead to a small amount of weight loss. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, might occur since metformin lowers blood sugar. Its important to monitor your blood sugar regularly and adjust your d Continue reading >>

Weight Loss Or Gain On Metformin?

Weight Loss Or Gain On Metformin?

Metformin is a drug primarily prescribed to patients with Type 2 diabetes to help control blood sugar. This drug has been studied to determine its safety and effectiveness for weight loss in nondiabetic patients. Doctors have prescribed metformin for a variety of alternative uses; talk to your doctor to determine whether this medication is right for you. Video of the Day Metformin controls the amount of sugar, also known as glucose, in your blood, by decreasing the amount of glucose your liver makes and reducing the amount of glucose your body absorbs from the foods you eat. Additionally, metformin improves how the body responds to insulin, the body's natural control factor for glucose regulation in the bloodstream. Side Effects of Metformin Metformin has minimal adverse side effects when taken as directed. The most common is gastrointestinal upset that may lead to nausea, diarrhea and vomiting. Some patients also experience side effects similar to hypoglycemia, which should be discussed with a doctor immediately. Patients on metformin often experience the added benefit of weight maintenance or weight loss. This side effect can be attributed to the primary function of this drug, which is to help the body monitor blood glucose and insulin levels, two factors that play a significant role in weight management. Metformin for Weight Loss Currently, doctors are not prescribing metformin to patients who are simply looking to lose weight. Aside from the discomfort of the initial side effects, metformin is only safe and effective for individuals who are overweight or obese and suffering from impaired insulin secretion. A 2001 study by the New York Medical College found that nondiabetic women who gained weight midlife and had excess insulin benefited from a daily dose of metformi Continue reading >>

And Weight Gain

And Weight Gain

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinking; get dehydrated (lose large amounts of body fluids, w Continue reading >>

Why Am I Gaining Weight Still? Does Metformin Cause Weight Gain????

Why Am I Gaining Weight Still? Does Metformin Cause Weight Gain????

Why am I gaining weight still? Does Metformin cause weight gain???? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Why am I gaining weight still? Does Metformin cause weight gain???? Since i've been so diligent with eating and been taking Metformin for about 3 weeks now. Though I am only taking 3/4 (going to 500 mgs in another day or two) of a 500 mg pill and my blood sugar numbers have been even in the 80's and very little fast foods, I was blown away when I stepped on the scale this a.m. I thought low carb helped you to lose weight and i've been doing really good at it and doing cardio, running even, on my treadmill and it felt good!. Have not been using any weights yet so it isnt muscle, I wish...I'm just really bummed to see the scale going up or at least if it was the same I would of been happy but nooooooooo... I've been active more in the house too, finding projects to do instead of sitting on my butt.. I dont know happened...can someone tell me what i'm doing wrong please.. I thought lower blood sugar numbers meant losing weight. I've not had a BS in a week over 109 and my a.m. fastings have been 93 to 100 everyday and since I stopped taking thyroid pill in the morning an hour later my BS has only gone up 4 numbers, stayed the same and one day Ok well you get the idea....ive done everything I can to lower my numbers and its working so WOW really bummed to see the weight gain...cant imagine why Do you think Metformin can cause weight gain too? I'm so bummed and disappointed for all my hard work Metformin usually helps people lose weight, so I don't think that is the reason. Plus you are taking a very small dose. Many people when th Continue reading >>

Can You Take Metformin For Weight Loss? A Look At The Numbers

Can You Take Metformin For Weight Loss? A Look At The Numbers

Metformin is a medication said to cause weight loss, but is it true? Should you be worried if you are underweight, or should you use it if you want a slimmer waistline? This article takes a looks at the current evidence and if you can take metformin for weight loss. What is Metformin? Metformin belongs to the class of medications called “oral hypoglycemics.” This means it’s taken by mouth to help reduce blood sugar (glucose) levels. For this reason, metformin is commonly used for the management of type 2 diabetes. How Does Metformin Work? The way metformin works isn’t fully understood yet. However, what is known is that it reduces the production of sugar by liver cells (1). Metformin also improves insulin sensitivity and influences the bacterial community in the gut. It may have anti-inflammatory effects that could be beneficial for metabolic health too (2, 3). Metformin may also cause weight loss by reducing food intake and blocking gastrointestinal absorption of glucose, at least in theory (4). Summary: Commonly prescribed for type 2 diabetes, metformin is a medication that influences the metabolism and absorption of sugar. What is Metformin Used For? Metformin has been approved for treating type 2 diabetes. This medication is also sometimes prescribed for the following: Research continues on other uses for metformin including: Anti-aging or anti-cancer effects (8) Helping manage type 1 diabetes (9) Reducing the risk of heart disease (10). Summary: Metformin has been approved for the management of type 2 diabetes. It is sometimes prescribed for other conditions that involve abnormal blood sugar, such as diabetes during pregnancy. Can You Take Metformin For Weight Loss? Metformin helps manage type 2 diabetes, a health condition associated with being overweight. Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Reduce Weight Gain In Pregnancy?

Can Metformin Reduce Weight Gain In Pregnancy?

Excessive weight gain during pregnancy is a well-established risk factor for both mother and child. Now a paper by Argyro Syngelaki and colleagues from the UK, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, suggests that the anti-diabetes drug metformin may limit weight gain in pregnant non-diabetic women with obesity and also reduce the incidence of pre-eclampsia. The researchers randomised 450 pregnant women with a BMI greater than 35 and no diabetes to either metformin (3 g/day) or placebo from weeks 12-18 weeks of gestation till delivery in a double-blind fashion. Among the 400 women who completed the study, those on metformin gained about 2 Kg less weight than the placebo group. There was also an almost 75% decrease in the risk of developing preeclampsia. Despite these effects, metformin did not significantly reduce the incidence of large-for-gestational-age babies or other adverse neonatal outcomes. While these findings may be somewhat disappointing with regard to outcomes in the offspring, the reduction in pre-eclampsia is impressive and, if confirmed, could well be an interesting use of this compound in high-risk pregnancies. @DrSharma Kelowna, BC Continue reading >>

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin weight loss claims are something that are often talked about by health professionals to be one of the benefits of commencing metformin therapy, but are they true? At myheart.net we’ve helped millions of people through our articles and answers. Now our authors are keeping readers up to date with cutting edge heart disease information through twitter. Follow Dr Ahmed on Twitter @MustafaAhmedMD Metformin is possibly one of the most important treatments in Type II Diabetes, so the question of metformin weight loss is of the utmost importance, as if true it could provide a means to lose weight as well as control high sugar levels found in diabetes. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic medication – meaning it reduces levels of sugar, or more specifically glucose in the blood. It is so effective that the American Diabetes Association says that unless there is a strong reason not to, metformin should be commenced at the onset of Type II Diabetes. Metformin comes in tablet form and the dose is gradually increased until the maximum dose required is achieved. How Does Metformin Work & Why Would it Cause Weight Loss? Metformin works by three major mechanisms – each of which could explain the “metformin weight loss” claims. These are: Decrease sugar production by the liver – the liver can actually make sugars from other substances, but metformin inhibits an enzyme in the pathway resulting in less sugar being released into the blood. Increase in the amount of sugar utilization in the muscles and the liver – Given that the muscles are a major “sink” for excess sugar, by driving sugar into them metformin is able to reduce the amount of sugar in the blood. Preventing the breakdown of fats (lipolysis) – this in turn reduces the amount of fatt Continue reading >>

My Diabetes Is Controlled But Why Am I Gaining Weight?

My Diabetes Is Controlled But Why Am I Gaining Weight?

Exercise, eat right, and stay at a healthy weight. These goals are at the core of every type 2 diabetes treatment plan. And, for some people, that’s enough. When it’s not, insulin therapy is one treatment option that can help patients, but one possible side effect is weight gain. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy This can become a cycle for patients who need to control both diabetes and their weight. It’s frustrating when you feel the treatment is part of the problem. With diabetes, however, you have to get the blood sugar under control first. Insulin is used because it works. The cost of insulin can vary, but lower-cost insulin is associated with more weight gain. In a way, weight gain is a sign that the insulin is working — your body is more effectively utilizing sugar, fat and protein. Your body also has the ability to store them, which means if you don’t adjust your food intake, more of those calories turn to fat. Also, insulin is not necessarily the only factor. When you’re managing your diabetes, your body has a better chance to rehydrate, which also can cause weight gain. Of course, dehydration is a greater risk if you have diabetes, with frequent urination and thirst as two common signs of the condition. Drugs you take for other conditions also sometimes cause weight gain. So, what are your options if weight gain and insulin are an issue? Try these three tips: The simplest answer is to adjust your diet and exercise . Talk to your doctor and to a nutrition specialist about a food plan that takes the insulin effects into account. Work a bit more activity or exercise into each day. Don’t self- Continue reading >>

Metformin And Weight Gain Thoughts

Metformin And Weight Gain Thoughts

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Was dignosed with type 2 about 18 months ago. In the last few months I have increased my excercise regime (couch to 5k, resitance machines, swimming). I lose a few lbs then it creeps back on again. I regularly drink water and watch what i eat. Is it down to my Metformin? (500g twice daily) All thoughts welcome as i have a review in a couple of weeks and TBH I am stumped and getting a bit peeved A lot will depend on what you mean by "watch what i eat." Could you give an example of a typical day's food? Ensure i get my 5 a day but more veg than fruit Portion size? Booze? Increased muscle mass? Hard to tell. I have not personally read of anyone putting on weight due to metformin. Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) Well-Known Member My experience so far (only four weeks) has been that my appetite has lessened since starting Metformin. I guess it can affect different people in different ways? Hi. Metformin does not cause weight gain and in fact it can help reduce it a bit. You mention calories when you should be thinking carbs. These need to be kept down and don't worry about fats and protein. Can you let us know how many carbs you have per day. Many need to stay below 150gm/day and many here stay below 100 or less. You seem to be taking the right approach but just be aware that even the good low-GI carbs are still carbs which turn to glucose. DavidGrahamJones Type 2 Well-Known Member Is it down to my Metformin? (500g twice daily) Probably not, most people may experience the opposite effect. Some people might get away without worrying about calories but not everyone. It's as good a way as any to measure what you're eating and if you're already seeing that your Continue reading >>

Metformin, Weight Loss & Pcos – Does It Actually Work?

Metformin, Weight Loss & Pcos – Does It Actually Work?

Did you know that one of the main reasons you can't lose weight with PCOS is because of your hormones? It's true, and that's why many women (and physicians) turn to using Metformin to try and help with weight loss. But just because it works for some people doesn't mean it will necessarily work for YOU. Find out why metformin helps with weight loss, but more important what works better and how to finally lose weight if you have PCOS. ​ Insulin & PCOS: Why It's so Important One of the most common medications prescribed for PCOS is metformin. But, PCOS is a hormonal condition which results in weight gain, hair growth on the face, infertility, acne and estrogen/progesterone imbalances. So why is metformin, a medication used to lower blood sugar and treat insulin resistance, used to treat estrogen/progesterone imbalances in women? The logic is quite simple: Most of the symptoms of PCOS (all those listed above) stem from insulin resistanc e! In fact many physicians recommend that ALL women with PCOS should be treated for insulin resistance regardless of what their fasting insulin and fasting blood sugar levels are. This means that the root cause of PCOS (at least the majority of it) is insulin resistance, and this is why metformin is so commonly used to treat. Insulin resistance causes a block of glucose uptake in your skeletal muscles which results in a lower metabolism (and weight gain), insulin also directly acts on your ovaries and adrenals increasing androgens like testosterone and DHEA. It's also the action of insulin on your pituitary that results in increased LH production which over stimulates your ovaries resulting in the characteristic "cysts" of PCOS. ​ High levels of DHEA and testosterone lead to acne and hair growth (hirsutism). ​ But one simple question r Continue reading >>

Gaining Weight? Your Medication May Be To Blame

Gaining Weight? Your Medication May Be To Blame

Gaining weight or struggling to lose weight is frustrating. You might feel like you’re doing all the “right” things: eating healthful foods, exercising, keeping food records, getting enough sleep, and so on. Yet despite all of your efforts, the scale doesn’t seem to budge. What gives? There are so many factors that affect our weight, and food isn’t always the culprit. One of the factors that may, in part, be contributing to some weight gain is medication. The link between medication and weight If you have diabetes, chances are, you’re taking some form of medication. It might be medication to help you manage your blood sugars. You might also be taking medication to keep your blood pressure or your cholesterol numbers in check. And you might even be taking a medication to help you better cope with the stress of having a chronic condition. While all of these drugs are effective (or else why would you be taking them?), the reality is that, like all medications, some of them have side effects that can make it difficult to reach your weight goal or can even lead to weight gain. To be more specific, these meds might: • Jump-start your appetite, causing you to eat more than you usually might • Slow your metabolism so that you burn fewer calories • Affect how glucose is stored in the body, leading to increased fat storage • Cause fluid retention • Make you feel tired or sluggish, which can prevent you from being as active as you might like The likely culprits The following drugs are those that are mostly likely to affect your weight. However, it’s important to keep in mind that not everybody will gain weight while taking them. And, as with any medication, don’t stop taking it without first talking with your health-care provider. Diabetes medications Ins Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Metformin is a drug prescribed to manage blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. You may have heard that metformin can also help you lose weight. But is it true? The answer is a resounding maybe. Here’s what you should know about what metformin can do for weight loss, as well as why your doctor may prescribe it for you. According to research, metformin can help some people lose weight. However, it’s not clear why metformin may cause weight loss. One theory is that it may prompt you to eat less by reducing your appetite. It may also change the way your body uses and stores fat. Although studies have shown that metformin may help with weight loss, the drug is not a quick-fix solution. According to one long-term study, the weight loss from metformin tends to occur gradually over one to two years. The amount of weight lost also varies from person to person. In the study, the average amount of weight lost after two or more years was four to seven pounds. Taking the drug without following other healthy habits may not lead to weight loss. Individuals who follow a healthy diet and exercise while taking metformin tend to lose the most weight. This may be because metformin is thought to boost how many calories you burn during exercise. If you don’t exercise, you likely won’t have this benefit. In addition, any weight loss you have may only last as long as you take the medication. That means if you stop taking metformin, there’s a good chance you will return to your original weight. And even while you’re still taking the drug, you may slowly gain back any weight you’ve lost. In other words, metformin may not be the magic diet pill some people have been waiting for. It has been shown to reduce weight in some, but not others. One of the benefits of metformin Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Cause Weight Loss? What To Know Before You Take It

Does Metformin Cause Weight Loss? What To Know Before You Take It

If you’re managing type 2 diabetes with metformin (Glucophage), you might be well acquainted with unwanted side effects of this drug — namely, upset stomach, diarrhea, muscle aches, and sleepiness. These can be a figurative and literal pain, but you might welcome one side effect of metformin with open arms, particularly if you’ve struggled to lose weight. Metformin isn’t a weight loss drug, but researchers have found a link between the drug and weight loss. In fact, a long-term study published in April 2012 in the journal Diabetes Care that was conducted by the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) concluded that the drug could serve as a treatment for excess body weight, although more studies are needed. What Is Metformin and How Does It Work? “[Metformin] has been considered a first-line medication in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, and it mainly acts by lowering the amount of glucose released by the liver,” says Minisha Sood, MD, an endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “It also helps a hormone called insulin to work better by helping muscles use glucose in a more efficient manner. When insulin works better (and insulin sensitivity improves), a person’s insulin levels are lower than they would be otherwise.” There’s no cure for type 2 diabetes, but the right combination of medication and healthy lifestyle can stabilize blood sugar levels, which, of course, is the end goal of any diabetes treatment. As the medication helps your body properly metabolize food and restores your ability to respond to insulin, you’ll not only feel better, you can potentially avoid complications of high blood sugar, such as heart disease, kidney damage, nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy), and eye damage (retinopathy). Why Does Metformin Cause Weight Lo Continue reading >>

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (pcos) And Weight Gain

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (pcos) And Weight Gain

Most women at some point have to contend with weight gain. But for women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), losing weight can become a constant struggle. PCOS is the most common hormonal disorder in women of childbearing age and can lead to issues with fertility. Women who have PCOS have higher levels of male hormones and are also less sensitive to insulin or are "insulin-resistant." Many are overweight or obese. As a result, these women can be at a higher risk of diabetes, heart disease, sleep apnea, and uterine cancer. If you have PCOS, certain lifestyle changes can help you shed pounds and reduce the disease's severity. Why does polycystic ovary syndrome cause weight gain? PCOS makes it more difficult for the body to use the hormone insulin, which normally helps convert sugars and starches from foods into energy. This condition -- called insulin resistance -- can cause insulin and sugar -- glucose -- to build up in the bloodstream. High insulin levels increase the production of male hormones called androgens. High androgen levels lead to symptoms such as body hair growth, acne, irregular periods -- and weight gain. Because the weight gain is triggered by male hormones, it is typically in the abdomen. That is where men tend to carry weight. So, instead of having a pear shape, women with PCOS have more of an apple shape. Abdominal fat is the most dangerous kind of fat. That’s because it is associated with an increased risk of heart disease and other health conditions. What are the risks associated with PCOS-related weight gain? No matter what the cause, weight gain can be detrimental to your health. Women with PCOS are more likely to develop many of the problems associated with weight gain and insulin resistance, including: Endometrial cancer Many of these condit Continue reading >>

Are Your Meds Making You Fat?

Are Your Meds Making You Fat?

One of the frustrations of diabetes is the way everyone tells you to lose weight. Then they give you medicine that makes you gain weight. Some of the worst offenders are insulin and the thiazolidinedione drugs, pioglitazone (brand name Actos) and rosiglitazone (Avandia). Why do these drugs cause weight gain, and what can you do about it? To recap: As you know, Type 2 diabetes is a disease of insulin resistance. Your muscle and brain cells don’t want the glucose that the insulin is trying to bring, so they resist. The glucose stays in the bloodstream. At first, the beta cells in the pancreas try to compensate by pumping out extra insulin to overcome the resistance. When the beta cells can’t keep up, or when the resistance gets too severe, you start running high blood sugar and developing symptoms of diabetes. When Insulin is Low People with Type 1 diabetes don’t make enough insulin, period, and people with Type 2 develop a low-insulin situation over time. What does that do to you? With insufficient insulin, glucose can’t get into your muscle and brain cells to be burned as fuel. It can’t get into the liver to be stored as starch, and it can’t get converted into fat. Why not? Because insulin does all those things. So, when you don’t have enough insulin, you won’t gain weight, because your body can’t do anything with the glucose, and you wind up urinating it away. That’s why weight loss is a classic symptom of Type 1. Then You Inject Now this is the tricky part—if you have Type 2, and you are given insulin, the fat storage will resume full speed. Insulin resistance doesn’t affect fat storage. But because of insulin resistance, you will get only a partial improvement in glucose uptake by your muscle and brain cells. So the glucose starts to get store Continue reading >>

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