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Can Metformin Be Taken Once A Day?

Fda Approves Combo Of Januvia Plus Metformin In Once A Day Dosage

Fda Approves Combo Of Januvia Plus Metformin In Once A Day Dosage

The FDA approved JANUMET® XR (sitagliptin and metformin hydrochloride (HCl) extended-release) tablets, a treatment for type 2 diabetes that combines sitagliptin, which is the active component of JANUVIA® (sitagliptin), with extended-release metformin…. JANUMET XR provides a convenient once-daily treatment option for patients who need help to control their blood sugar. JANUMET XR is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes when treatment with both sitagliptin and extended-release metformin is appropriate. JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. JANUMET XR has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis. It is unknown whether patients with a history of pancreatitis are at increased risk for the development of pancreatitis while using JANUMET XR. The FDA approved JANUMET XR based upon a clinical bioequivalence study that demonstrated that administration of JANUMET XR was equivalent to co-administration of corresponding doses of the two individual medications, sitagliptin and metformin HCl extended- release. Extended-release metformin was as effective as immediate-release metformin. The labeling for JANUMET XR contains a boxed warning for lactic acidosis, a rare, but serious complication that can occur due to metformin accumulation. JANUMET XR is contraindicated in patients with renal impairment (e.g., serum creatinine levels ≥1.5 mg/dL for men, ≥1.4 mg/dL for women or abnormal creatinine clearance), which may also result from conditions such as cardiovascular collapse (shock), acute myocardial infarction, and septicemia; hypersensitivity to metformin HCl; acute or chronic metabolic acidosis, including diabetic ketoacid Continue reading >>

One Of The Most Effective Diabetes Drugs

One Of The Most Effective Diabetes Drugs

You may recall that I recently wrote a series on various medicines and how they can affect your diabetes (see "The Ups and Downs of Meds and Diabetes [Part 1]" as well as Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, and Part 5). One kind reader, who happens to be a nurse, asked me to devote a post to metformin with regard to its effects on kidneys and special considerations to keep in mind with this drug. I wrote about metformin back in December 2006 (was it that long ago?) and its link to vitamin B12 deficiency (see “Metformin and Risk For Vitamin B12 Deficiency”). But there are other important facts to know about this very popular diabetes drug. Raise your hand if you take metformin. OK, obviously I can’t see you, but I’ll wager that many of you reading this are on this medication. Metformin is the generic name for Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Fortamet, and Riomet. It also comes combined with other diabetes medications, including glyburide (in Glucovance), glipizide (in Metaglip), rosiglitazone (in Avandamet), pioglitazone (in Actoplus Met), sitagliptin (in Janumet), and repaglinide (in PrandiMet). I’ve read that approximately 35 million prescriptions were written for metformin in 2006, making this one of the top 10 best selling generic drugs. And you may not be aware that the American Diabetes Association, in its 2006 practice guidelines for health-care professionals, recommended metformin over sulfonylureas as the first drug of choice for people with Type 2 diabetes. This really isn’t surprising. Metformin has a long track record for being safe and causing relatively few serious side effects—plus, it also works! Chances are, if you have Type 2 diabetes and need to start on medication, your health-care provider will recommend you take metformin. How It Works Just a Continue reading >>

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

Metformin helps control blood sugar and increase your body's sensitivity to insulin. The drug is available only by prescription and sold under several different brand names, including Fortamet, Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage and Glucophage XR. Your dosage will depend on your normal diet and exercise habits -- too much metformin can lead to low blood sugar and hypoglycemia. Always follow your doctor's directions for taking your medication. Video of the Day Metformin works by limiting your liver's production of glucose and stopping your body from absorbing some of the glucose in your bloodstream. Additionally, metformin increases your body's sensitivity to insulin, allowing your pancreas to produce less insulin. Keeping blood sugar levels stable can decrease hunger and food cravings, leading to weight loss. Metformin is not an appetite suppressant, nor does it boost metabolism; to lose weight, you'll still need to pay close attention to your diet and increase your physical activity. Standard vs. Extended Release Options The amount of metformin you'll take depends on why you are using the medication, how often you take the medicine, other medications you might be taking and the time between doses. The National Institutes of Health explains that metformin is available as a tablet or a liquid solution. Tablets come in an extended release dose -- Glucophage XR -- or in a standard release option. Extended release pills are designed to be taken once daily, with your evening meal. Standard tablet and liquid solutions may be taken once or multiple times daily -- with meals. Metformin should be taken with food. Always follow your doctor's orders. It's typical to start with a 500 milligram dose once daily, then increase both the amount of medication and the frequency. If you're using Continue reading >>

Efficacy Of Once- Or Twice-daily Extended Release Metformin Compared With Thrice-daily Immediate Release Metformin In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Efficacy Of Once- Or Twice-daily Extended Release Metformin Compared With Thrice-daily Immediate Release Metformin In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Abstract BACKGROUND: The extended-release formulation of metformin (MXR) prolongs drug absorption in the upper gastrointestinal tract and permits once-daily dosing in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This newer formulation may enhance patient compliance with oral therapy compared to conventional immediate-release metformin (MIR) in T2DM. OBJECTIVES: To analyse whether a switch from thrice daily MIR to once or twice daily MXR wouldachieve comparable degrees of glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). METHODS: We conducted an open study of the efficacy and tolerability of MXR in 40 patients with T2DM who had achieved moderate or good glycemic control with MIR alone or in combination with other antihyperglycemic agents. After a lead in period of 3 months patients were switched over to a specific brand of MIR at baseline (Visit 0). Patients were subsequently followed for 4 more visits. These visits were done monthly, after taking MIR in a dose of 1-2 g/day (Visit 1); MXR as a single dose at dinner but 0.5 g less than baseline dose of MIR (Visit 2); MXR, 1-2 g/day as a single dose at bedtime, with strength same as that of baseline dose of MIR (Visit 3); and MXR, 1-2 g/day in two divided doses keeping dose same as baseline MIR (Visit 4). Glycemic control was assessed by a four-point glucose profile (fasting and three postprandial levels) at each visit. RESULTS: At visit 2, when patients had been on 500 mg lesser dose of MXR for 1 month, glucose profile worsened. However, glycemic control, at visit 3, returned to earlier levels when dose of MXR was increased back to original dose. Overall the MXR formulation was well tolerated with minor gastrointestinal adverse effects, reported by only 3 patients. CONCLUSION: Patients with T2DM who had Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

Generic Name: metformin (met FOR min) Brand Names: Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet What is metformin? Metformin is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. Metformin is used together with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin is sometimes used together with insulin or other medications, but it is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Important information You should not use metformin if you have severe kidney disease or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking metformin. This medicine may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to metformin: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Some people develop lactic acidosis while taking this medicine. Early symptoms may get worse over time and this condition can be fatal. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness; numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs; trouble breathing; feeling dizzy, light-headed, tired, or very weak; stomach pain, nausea with vomiting; or slow or uneven heart rate. Common metformin side effects may include: low blood sugar; nausea, upset stomach; or diarrhea. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doc Continue reading >>

Metformin Extended Release Tablets

Metformin Extended Release Tablets

Generic Name: metformin hydrochloride Dosage Form: tablet, extended release Metformin Extended Release Tablets Description Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP are an oral antihyperglycemic drug used in the management of type 2 diabetes. Metformin hydrochloride (N,N-dimethylimidodicarbonimidic diamide hydrochloride) is not chemically or pharmacologically related to any other classes of oral antihyperglycemic agents. The structural formula is as shown: Metformin hydrochloride is a white to off-white crystalline compound with a molecular formula of C4H11N5· HCl and a molecular weight of 165.63. Metformin hydrochloride is freely soluble in water and is practically insoluble in acetone, ether, and chloroform. The pKa of metformin is 12.4. The pH of a 1% aqueous solution of metformin hydrochloride is 6.68. Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP contain 500 mg of metformin hydrochloride USP as the active ingredient. Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP 500 mg contain the inactive ingredients sodium carboxymethyl cellulose, hypromellose and magnesium stearate. Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP 500 mg meets USP dissolution Test 3. System Components and Performance- Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP comprises a swellable matrix system. In the aqueous gastrointestinal (GI) environment, the dosage form swells remarkably thereby increasing in size and geometry from where drug is released slowly by a process of diffusion through the gel matrix that is essentially independent of pH. The hydrated polymer system is not rigid and is expected to be broken up by normal peristalsis in the GI tract. The biologically inert components of the tablet may occasionally remain intact during GI transit and will be Continue reading >>

Metformin Wonder Drug

Metformin Wonder Drug

A while back I wrote about why metformin is the number one treatment for Type 2 diabetes. Now new research finds metformin prevents cancer and heart disease and may actually slow aging! Where can I get this stuff? A study from Scotland found that people on metformin had only roughly half the cancer rate of people with diabetes who weren’t on the drug. This is important, because diabetes is associated with higher risks of liver, pancreas, endometrial, colon and rectum, breast, and bladder cancer. Nobody could explain how metformin helped, but then Canadian researchers showed that metformin reduces cell mutations and DNA damage. Since mutations and DNA damage promote both cancer and aging, this is striking news. No one thought we could limit mutations before, but perhaps metformin can do it. A study on mice exposed to cigarette smoke showed that those given metformin had 70% less tumor growth. A small study of humans in Japan showed similar improvements in colorectal cancer outcomes. Metformin is now being studied in clinical trials for breast cancer. The researchers write, “Women with early-stage breast cancer taking metformin for diabetes have higher response rates to [presurgical cancer therapies] than diabetic patients not taking metformin.” They also had better results than people without diabetes. How Does It Work? According to Michael Pollak, MD, professor in McGill’s Medicine and Oncology Departments, metformin is a powerful antioxidant. It slows DNA damage by reducing levels of “reactive oxygen species” (ROS). ROS are produced as byproducts when cells burn glucose. Just as oxygen helps fires burn or metals rust, ROS will oxidize (“burn” or “rust”) the nuclei or other parts of cells. ROS are what the antioxidant vitamins are supposed to block. Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way. You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the Continue reading >>

Efficacy, Tolerability, And Safety Of A Novel Once-daily Extended-release Metformin In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Efficacy, Tolerability, And Safety Of A Novel Once-daily Extended-release Metformin In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

OBJECTIVE—The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of a novel extended-release metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Adults with type 2 diabetes (newly diagnosed, treated with diet and exercise only, or previously treated with oral diabetic medications) were randomly assigned to receive one of three extended-release metformin treatment regimens (1,500 mg/day q.d., 1,500 mg/day twice daily, or 2,000 mg/day q.d.) or immediate-release metformin (1,500 mg/day twice daily) in a double-blind 24-week trial. RESULTS—Significant decreases (P < 0.001) in mean HbA1c (A1C) levels were observed by week 12 in all treatment groups. The mean changes from baseline to end point in the two groups given 1,500 mg extended-release metformin (−0.73 and −0.74%) were not significantly different from the change in the immediate-release metformin group (−0.70%), whereas the 2,000-mg extended-release metformin group showed a greater decrease in A1C levels (−1.06%; mean difference [2,000 mg extended-release metformin − immediate-release metformin]: −0.36 [98.4% CI −0.65 to −0.06]). Rapid decreases in fasting plasma glucose levels were observed by week 1, which continued until week 8, and were maintained for the duration of the study. The overall incidence of adverse events was similar for all treatment groups, but fewer patients in the extended-release metformin groups discontinued treatment due to nausea during the initial dosing period than in the immediate-release metformin group. CONCLUSIONS—Once- or twice-daily extended-release metformin was as safe and effective as twice-daily immediate-release metformin and provided continued glycemic control for up to 24 weeks of treatment. Metformin hydrochloride has been w Continue reading >>

Dosing & Administration

Dosing & Administration

Warnings and Precautions Pancreatitis: There have been post-marketing reports of acute pancreatitis in patients taking saxagliptin, and in the SAVOR cardiovascular outcomes trial. Observe for pancreatitis. If pancreatitis is suspected, discontinue KOMBIGLYZE XR. Heart Failure: In the SAVOR cardiovascular outcomes trial, more patients treated with saxagliptin were hospitalized for heart failure compared to placebo. Patients with a prior history of heart failure or renal impairment had a higher risk for hospitalization for heart failure. Consider the risks and benefits of KOMBIGLYZE XR in patients who have known risk factors for heart failure. Monitor for signs and symptoms. If heart failure develops, consider discontinuation of KOMBIGLYZE XR. Vitamin B12 Deficiency: Metformin may lower vitamin B12 levels. Measure hematological parameters annually. Hypoglycemia: When saxagliptin was used in combination with a sulfonylurea or with insulin, the incidence of confirmed hypoglycemia was increased over that of placebo. Consider lowering the dose of these agents when coadministered with KOMBIGLYZE XR. Hypoglycemia could occur when caloric intake is deficient, strenuous exercise is not compensated by caloric supplementation, or when KOMBIGLYZE XR is used with other glucose-lowering agents or ethanol. Hypersensitivity: Serious reactions have been reported in patients treated with saxagliptin, including anaphylaxis, angioedema, and exfoliative skin conditions. Onset of these reactions occurred within the first 3 months after initiation of treatment with saxagliptin, with some reports occurring after the first dose. If a serious hypersensitivity reaction is suspected, discontinue KOMBIGLYZE XR. Use caution in patients with a history of angioedema to another DPP-4 inhibitor. Severe a Continue reading >>

Glimepiride Side Effects

Glimepiride Side Effects

What Is Glimepiride (Amaryl)? Glimepiride is the generic name of the prescription drug Amaryl, used to treat patients with type 2 diabetes. Glimepiride belongs to a class of drugs known as sulfonylureas. It stimulates the pancreas to produce insulin and helps the body use insulin more efficiently. The drug can also decrease the chances that someone will develop life-threatening complications of type 2 diabetes. The drug was approved by the FDA in 1995 and is manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis. Glimepiride comes in tablet form and is usually taken once a day. It may be used alone, or in combination with insulin or another oral medication such as metformin. Your doctor will probably start you on a low dose of the medication and gradually increase your dose if needed. If you've taken glimepiride for a long period of time, the drug may not control blood sugar as well as it did when you first started the treatment. Your doctor will adjust the dosage as needed. Glimepiride Warnings Glimepiride helps control blood sugar, but it will not cure your diabetes. You should continue to take glimepiride even if you feel well. This medication should not be used to treat patients with type 1 diabetes, a disease in which the body does not produce insulin. Glimepiride will only help lower blood sugar if your body produces insulin naturally. In one study, patients who took a medication similar to glimepiride to treat diabetes were more likely to die of heart problems than those who were treated with diet changes and insulin. Talk to your doctor about the risks of this treatment. While taking glimepiride, you should tell your doctor if you: Are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding Are having surgery, including dental surgery Have ever had G6PD deficiency (a genetic blood diso Continue reading >>

U.s. Fda Approves Once-daily Jentadueto Xr (linagliptin And Metformin Hydrochloride Extended-release) Tablets For Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

U.s. Fda Approves Once-daily Jentadueto Xr (linagliptin And Metformin Hydrochloride Extended-release) Tablets For Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

U.S. FDA Approves Once-daily Jentadueto XR (linagliptin and metformin hydrochloride extended-release) Tablets for Adults with Type 2 Diabetes New formulation of medicines that helps lower blood sugar in type 2 diabetes can be taken once a day Ridgefield, Conn., and Indianapolis, May 31, 2016 The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Jentadueto XR (linagliptin and metformin hydrochloride extended-release) tablets for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in adults. JENTADUETO XR, which is marketed by Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY), is the seventh new treatment from the Boehringer Ingelheim-Lilly Diabetes alliance to be approved by the FDA in the last five years. JENTADUETO XR combines 2.5 mg or 5 mg of linagliptin with 1000 mg of metformin. Linagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, works by increasing hormones that stimulate the pancreas to produce more insulin and the liver to produce less glucose. Metformin, a commonly prescribed initial treatment for T2D, lowers glucose production by the liver and its absorption in the intestine. Adults with type 2 diabetes are often required to take more than one medication to manage their condition, including some that have to be taken multiple times a day, said Paul Fonteyne, president and CEO, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. JENTADUETO XR, the first extended-release therapy to emerge from our alliance with Lilly, offers adults with type 2 diabetes the convenience of a combination pill taken once a day to help lower blood sugar levels. JENTADUETO XR is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with T2D when treatment with both linagliptin and metformin is appropriate. JENTADUETO XR should not be used in patients with type Continue reading >>

Metformin - Taking Daily Dose All At Once?

Metformin - Taking Daily Dose All At Once?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Metformin - taking daily dose all at once? I was prescribed metformin about a week ago, so still learning about it. I'm really struggling to take the four pills spread out throughout the day. Firstly, I am AWFUL at remembering pills (never forgot an injection in 15 years, though!) and second, I sometimes only have two meals a day and I don't want to take them on an empty stomach. A diabetes nurse told me today I can take two at once, with a meal, but now it occurs to me that taking four all at once would be even easier. Even I can remember once a day, and I can have them with my main meal when there's a good amount of food in my stomach. Does anybody do this? Is there any disadvantage to taking them all at once? I had an upset stomach on the first day of taking them, but that quickly disappeared and I have no other side effects. I was afraid that would be the answer! 4 all at once did seem like a bit much. I feel bad asking for the slow release version because it's so much more expensive. If I was having horrible side effects I'd feel justified, but my poor memory with pill-taking is a problem I can control with some effort. I've set up reminders on Outlook for when I'm at work, so 15 minutes after my breakfast and lunch times it will flash up "PILL" at me. Hopefully that will help me remember to take two with one of those meals, and in the evening my family are tasked with reminding me to take two after dinner. Perhaps for weekends I can get my husband to set an alarm on his phone at lunch time as well. Hello PepperTed, yes a bad memory is a pest to deal with. I have to put my tablets out each night, by my bed 3 little cups, with different tablets in Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

What Time Of Day Do You Take Metformin?

What Time Of Day Do You Take Metformin?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I am on two 500 mg. Metformin twice a day. I'm unsure of when to take them, as I've read so many different things. Some people take them before eating, some after. The thing that most concerns me is what time of day should I be taking them? My bottle just says two twice day. Is it best to take them with breakfast early in the a.m. (I eat at 7:00 a.m.) and then wait until dinner (which varies for me--I don't eat "dinner" at a set time, but it is usually around 4 p.m. or so). When do YOU take Metforming (if that is the drug you are using). Thanks for any advice you can give. I've been taking Metformin earlier in the day (around 3 p.m.) and I eat snacks before bed (low carb), and also oftentimes take p.m. pain meds. I have found that my morning glucose reading is often too high (137-140). I can't sleep if my stomach is growling, so I have to eat something before I can sleep! It actually becomes a fairly personal thing as to when it suits you best to take your Metformin and depends on a few things. Some people experience gastric side effects for the first few weeks of taking Metformin, this can range from cramps, wind to diarrhea - for people who experience this, often the advice is to eat something before take the Metformin - the instruction from the Doctor can be "Take with food", which can be translated as don't take it on an empty stomach. I personally was very lucky and had no issues and so that didn't apply to me (I'm on the same dose as you). I generally don't eat breakfast, but take my Metformin just before leaving the house for work in the morning, or at weekends when I get up. The eveni Continue reading >>

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