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Can Diet Soda Cause Diabetes

Diet Sodas May Raise Risk Of Dementia And Stroke, Study Finds

Diet Sodas May Raise Risk Of Dementia And Stroke, Study Finds

People who drink diet sodas daily have three times the risk of stroke and dementia compared to people who rarely drink them, researchers reported Thursday. It’s yet another piece of evidence that diet drinks are not a healthy alternative to sugary drinks, and suggests that people need to limit both, doctors said. While the findings do not prove that diet drinks damage brains, they support other studies that show people who drink them frequently tend to have poorer health. The researchers, led by Matthew Pase of the Boston University School of Medicine and colleagues, studied more than 4,000 people for their report, published in the journal Stroke. “We found that those people who were consuming diet soda on a daily basis were three times as likely to develop both stroke and dementia within the next 10 years as compared to those who did not consume diet soda,” Pase told NBC News. “Both sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened soft drinks may be hard on the brain.” “Our study provides further evidence to link consumption of artificially sweetened beverages with the risk of stroke,” the team wrote. “To our knowledge, our study is the first to report an association between daily intake of artificially sweetened soft drink and an increased risk of both all-cause dementia and dementia because of Alzheimer’s disease.” The team did not ask people which artificial sweetener they used. Some of those in the diet drinks were likely saccharin, acesulfame, aspartame, neotame, or sucralose, the researchers said. To their surprise, the team did not find the same risk for sugar-sweetened beverages. But they found other troubling signs. “In our first study we found that those who more frequently consume sugary beverages such as fruit juices and sodas had greater ev Continue reading >>

Diet Sodas Might Not Raise Diabetes Risk

Diet Sodas Might Not Raise Diabetes Risk

(Reuters Health) - Drinking colas and other sugary drinks is tied to an increased risk of so-called pre-diabetes, a precursor to full-blown disease, but diet soda is not, a recent study suggests. Previous studies on the link between diet sodas and diabetes have been mixed; some research pointing to a potential connection has suggested this relationship may be explained at least in part by soda drinkers being overweight or obese. In the current study, however, adults who routinely consumed at least one can of soda or other sugar-sweetened beverages a day were 46 percent more likely to develop elevated blood sugar levels than people who rarely or never drink cola. “Emphasis should be placed on substituting sugar-sweetened beverages with water, unsweetened teas, or coffee,” said senior study author Nicola McKeown, a nutrition researcher at Tufts University in Boston. “For daily consumers of sugary drinks, kicking the habit may be a difficult challenge, and incorporating an occasional diet soda, while increasing fluids from other sources, may be the best strategy to ultimately remove sugar-sweetened beverages from the diet,” McKeown added by email. Globally, about one in nine adults have diabetes, and the disease will be the seventh leading cause of death by 2030, according to the World Health Organization. Most of these people have Type 2, or adult-onset, diabetes, which happens when the body can’t properly use or make enough of the hormone insulin to convert blood sugar into energy. People with blood sugar levels that are slightly elevated, but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis, are sometimes described as having “pre-diabetes” because many will go on to develop diabetes. In the current study, researchers examined data collected on 1,685 middle-aged ad Continue reading >>

How Does Diet Soda Affect Diabetes?

How Does Diet Soda Affect Diabetes?

Many of us who enjoy fizzy drinks select diet soda as a healthier option than the normal soda. Even if we have with diabetes, we feel that diet soda has less sugar and is therefore not harmful to us. Sadly, that’s not entirely true. Let’s find out how does diet soda affect diabetics. Pros of Drinking Diet Soda with Diabetes: Diet soda contains artificial sweeteners, which are also referred to as non-nutritive sweeteners (NNS) or non-caloric sweeteners. They have a higher intensity of sweetness per gram than caloric sweeteners like sucrose. Popular artificial sweeteners like aspartame, acesulfame-K, neotame, saccharin, and sucralose are regulated as food additives by the US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA). Aspartame and saccharin, commonly found in diet sodas, are both FDA reviewed and approved. Besides FDA, most sweeteners used in diet sodas are approved by World Health Organization (WHO) and/ or Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI). The American Diabetes Association (ADA) lists diet soda as safe for diabetics to consume. Diet soda is typically sweetened with one of five artificial sweeteners. These sweeteners do not contain calories (or have less than 20 calories), and the ADA reports that they do not cause a blood glucose reaction. Furthermore, carbohydrate content in diet soda is less (less than 5 gm) when compared to that of regular soda. Also, the calorie content in diet soda is less than that of regular soda. Risks Of Diet Soda For Diabetics According to Mayo Clinic, a nonprofit medical practice and medical research group based in Rochester, Minnesota, while the artificial sweeteners may not raise blood sugar, the caffeine in it might. A 2004 study at Duke University showed that caffeine consumption can increase blood sugar levels by up to Continue reading >>

Diabetes Rises With Daily Soda -- Including Diet Soda -- Consumption

Diabetes Rises With Daily Soda -- Including Diet Soda -- Consumption

A comprehensive study of European adults has found that compared with people who drink a single sugar-sweetened drink daily, those who drink water, coffee or tea instead are at 14% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The research found that drinking sugar-sweetened milk products was an even more powerful driver of diabetes; compared with those who drank one such beverage daily, people who drank water, coffee or tea instead were on average 20% to 25% less likely to develop diabetes. The British study, which tracked the consumption habits of more than 25,000 Britons (ages 40 to 79) over about 11 years, offered little comfort to drinkers of artificially sweetened beverages. While consumers of coffee, tea and water had a diminished risk of diabetes, the study found consumers of diet sodas to have type 2 diabetes risks on par with drinkers of sugar-sweetened beverages. But when the authors took body mass index and waist circumference into account, they found that consumption of diet beverages was not linked to higher rates of diabetes. This suggests that diet soda drinkers are already more likely to be overweight or obese, and that this - rather than their diet soda consumption - might account for their elevated diabetes risk. While offering some insights into different beverages' contribution to diabetes rates, the study does not test the likely effects of changing established consumption patterns and substituting one kind of drink for another. Instead, it tracked the consumption patterns of a large population over a lengthy period of time to see who was more or less likely to develop diabetes. Such a "prospective observational study" does not establish that sugar-sweetened sodas directly cause diabetes, or that, say, a longstanding consumer of sugary sodas can lower Continue reading >>

Diet Coke Won’t Stop You Getting Diabetes: Two Glasses Of Calorie-free Drinks A Day 'doubles The Risk'

Diet Coke Won’t Stop You Getting Diabetes: Two Glasses Of Calorie-free Drinks A Day 'doubles The Risk'

Many of us have ditched our favourite sugary drinks for their diet alternative in a bid to boost our health and keep off the pounds. But it seems that diet drinks can be just as bad for you, according to a study. Scientists found drinking just two glasses of diet drinks a day more than doubles the risk of developing diabetes. They believe that calorie-free drinks make us feel hungrier, prompting us to crave sugar-laden snacks. And they also suspect that artificial sweeteners interfere with the bacteria in our gut – which may trigger diabetes. The team from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden studied 2,874 adults who had completed a year-long diary about their intake of drinks. Those who had two or more sweetened drinks a day were 2.4 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. This included sugary beverages and artificially sweetened ones, such as Diet Coke or sugar free cordials. Having five or more sugar-free drinks a day increased the risk by 4.5 times. In fact, the researchers found that artificially–sweetened drinks were almost as bad as those laden with sugar. They established that every 200ml glass of a sugary fizzy drink consumed each day increased the risk of type 2 diabetes by 21 per cent. Meanwhile every diet drink increased the risk by 18 per cent, according to the findings published in the European Journal of Endocrinology. Lead researcher Josefin Löfvenborg said diet drinks may ‘stimulate the appetite’, leading to weight gain. She added that artificial sweeteners may cause chemical reactions within fat tissue and with bacteria in the gut. This can lead to the body becoming less tolerant of glucose – a form of sugar – triggering type 2 diabetes. She said: ‘One hypothesis is that consumption of diet soft drinks may stimulate appetite making u Continue reading >>

Does Drinking Diet Soda Raise The Risk Of A Stroke?

Does Drinking Diet Soda Raise The Risk Of A Stroke?

For diet soda fans, recent news reports linking these popular drinks to higher risk of stroke may have been alarming. A closer look at the study behind the headlines suggests there’s no need to panic. But beverages naturally low in calories are probably a healthier option than artificially sweetened drinks. The study included 2,888 people ages 45 and older from the long-running Framingham Heart Study, all of whom filled out diet questionnaires up to three times over a seven-year period. People who said they drank at least one artificially sweetened soda a day were about twice as likely to have a stroke over the following decade when compared to those who drank less than one a week. Drinking regular, sugar-sweetened sodas or beverages did not appear to raise stroke risk. However, these types of studies can’t prove cause and effect, only an association. Also, only 97 people (3%) had strokes during the follow-up, which means only two or three of those strokes could possibly be attributed to drinking diet soda, says Dr. Kathryn Rexrode, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital who co-authored an earlier, larger study looking at soda consumption and stroke risk. Stroke risk from all sodas? That study detected a slightly higher risk of stroke in people who drank more than one soda per day, regardless of whether it contained sugar or an artificial sweetener. Although the latest study didn’t detect a higher stroke risk from sugary beverages, that certainly doesn’t suggest they are a better choice than diet sodas. Many studies have already shown that drinking sugary beverages on a regular basis can lead to weight gain, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke, she notes. Possible explanations In fact, one pos Continue reading >>

Sweetened Drinks, Including Diet Drinks, May Raise Diabetes Risk

Sweetened Drinks, Including Diet Drinks, May Raise Diabetes Risk

"Drinking more than two sugary or artificially sweetened soft drinks per day greatly increases the risk of diabetes, research has shown," The Guardian reports. The research was a Swedish cohort study of sweetened drink consumption over the past year for people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. They also looked at people with an uncommon form of diabetes known as latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) which shares features with type 1 and 2 diabetes. Both groups were then compared with a diabetes-free control group. Drinking more than two sweetened drinks per day was linked with being roughly twice as likely to have diabetes. For type 2 diabetes the link was similar when separately analysing sugary and diet drinks. The link with LADA was a little weaker and did not stand up to statistical significance when separately analysing sugary and artificially-sweetened drinks. However, this study cannot prove that sweetened drinks alone have directly caused these conditions. Other unhealthy lifestyle factors like smoking and poor diet in general were also linked with the two forms of diabetes. Also, one of the hallmark symptoms of diabetes is increased thirst so it could be possible that in some cases the diabetes came first and was then followed by increased consumption of sweetened drinks. These uncertainties aside, the results broadly support our understanding of the risk factors for diabetes, which also apply to several other chronic diseases. To reduce your risk of diabetes, eat a healthy diet, exercise regularly, stop smoking and cut down on alcohol consumption. Where did the story come from? The study was carried out by researchers from the Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm and other institutions in Sweden and Finland. Funding was provided by the Swedish Research Council Continue reading >>

Diet Soda And Diabetes

Diet Soda And Diabetes

In reply to my recent blog entry “Stopping Diabetes Medicines,” Patsy wrote: “I have stop[ped] drinking Diet Cokes, or anything with artificial sweeteners. I can’t tell you what a difference that has made! … I am overweight and have lost 14 pounds. My blood sugar has gone down, too.” How could this be? How could diet sodas, which have essentially no carbohydrates and no calories, raise blood glucose and weight? Or is the whole thing an illusion? Four studies in the last decade have raised concerns about diet soda. In 2005, University of Texas researchers reported that people who drank diet soda were more likely to gain weight than those drank regular soda. Fewer calories = more weight! Strange… In 2006, Dartmouth scientists found that people with diabetes who drank one or more cans of diet soda a day raised their A1C levels by an average of 0.7%, compared to those who didn’t. In 2007, the American Heart Association found that those who drank either regular or diet soda had a higher risk of “metabolic syndrome,” which includes diabetes, high blood pressure, high levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, and obesity, compared to nondrinkers. This is just a correlation; it doesn’t show cause, but it’s still interesting. In the January 16, 2009 issue of Diabetes Care, a group of analysts reviewing the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis found that “Daily consumption of diet soda was associated with… a 67% greater relative risk of… Type 2 diabetes compared to non-consumption.” They said the increased diabetes was not due to increased weight, although that happened too. “Associations between diet soda consumption and Type 2 diabetes were independent of baseline measures of adiposity or changes in these measures,” they wrote. The data was adj Continue reading >>

Why Diet Soda Is Bad For You

Why Diet Soda Is Bad For You

By now you’ve probably heard that the idea of diet soda being healthier than regular soda is nothing more than a myth. Sure, regular soda is far from healthy, but diet soda could be even more dangerous. This news is mind-boggling for most and may leave them wondering “why?” or “how?”. The truth about diet soda Fortunately, we have the truth about diet soda and what makes it so dangerous. It leads to more weight gain Before recent studies were released on the dangers of diet soda, many individuals who wanted to lose weight would swap their regular soda for diet. You can only imagine their surprise when they not only failed to lose weight, but actually ended up gaining more! So, how exactly does diet soda contribute to weight gain? It’s simple: while diet soda doesn’t contain real sugar or calories it does contain a lot of additives and artificial ingredients including sweeteners. These ingredients are full of unnatural chemicals that can cause your body to crave more high-calorie and sugar-laden foods. Artificial sweeteners may also confuse your body into miscalculating the number of calories you are actually consuming which can then cause your metabolism to slow down, making it more challenging to burn off calories and lose weight. It has been linked to type-2 diabetes Think diet soda is safe for diabetics due to the lack of sugar? Think again. The artificial sweeteners in diet soda can actually cause a spike in blood sugar and insulin levels which in turn can lead to diabetic shock for those who have already been diagnosed with diabetes. Don’t have diabetes? You’re not out of danger, either. Diet soda may greatly increase your risk of developing type-2 diabetes. As previously mentioned, diet soda can cause weight gain and a lower metabolism rate. Thes Continue reading >>

Diet Soda May Alter Our Gut Microbes And Raise The Risk Of Diabetes

Diet Soda May Alter Our Gut Microbes And Raise The Risk Of Diabetes

The debate over whether diet sodas are good, bad or just OK for us never seems to end. Some research suggests zero-calorie drinks can help people cut calories and fend off weight gain. But in recent years, the idea that artificial sweeteners may trick the brain and lead to "metabolic derangements," as one researcher has theorized, has gained traction, too. Now, a new study published in the journal Nature introduces a new idea: Diet sodas may alter our gut microbes in a way that increases the risk of metabolic diseases such as Type 2 diabetes — at least in some of us. In the paper, researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel describe what happened when they fed zero-calorie sweeteners, including saccharin, aspartame and sucralose, to mice. "To our surprise, [the mice] developed glucose intolerance," Weizmann researcher Eran Elinav tells us. Intrigued by the findings, Elinav and his colleague Eran Segal set out to determine whether this might happen in people as well. First, they analyzed data collected from a group of about 400 people who are enrolled in an ongoing nutrition study. They found that people who were heavy consumers of artificial sweeteners had slightly elevated HbA1C levels (a long-term measure of blood sugar) — compared with people who rarely or never consumed artificial sweeteners. Next, they recruited seven volunteers — people who were not in the habit of drinking diet drinks — and asked them to start consuming the equivalent of 10-12 of those fake sugar packets during a one-week experiment. "What we find is that a subgroup [four of the seven people] developed significant disturbances in their blood glucose even after short-term exposure to artificial sweeteners," Elinav says. For example, results of a glucose tolerance test found Continue reading >>

Is Drinking Diet Soda A Health Risk?

Is Drinking Diet Soda A Health Risk?

May 5, 2017 -- About one in five Americans drinks diet soda every day, according to the CDC. Is that a good thing? Numerous studies over the past several years have reported links between diet soda and weight gain, diabetes, heart problems, and other health issues. Most recently, headlines sounded alarms about a higher chance of dementia and stroke among diet soda drinkers . That may sound worrisome, but experts say you don’t need to clear the diet drinks out of your fridge just yet. Many questions must be answered before we’ll know whether diet soda raises your chance of health problems. Diet Soda, Dementia and Stroke Boston University researcher Matthew Pase, PhD, and colleagues examined 10 years of health information from nearly 3,000 American adults over 45 to count the number who had a stroke. They did the same for nearly 1,500 American adults over 60 to determine how many developed dementia. After accounting for a variety of things that could influence their health, such as age, physical activity, and waist size, the researchers found that diet soda drinkers nearly tripled their odds of stroke and dementia, compared with those who drank no diet soda. Scary, right? Not necessarily, says Pase. Only 81, or 5%, of the people in the study were diagnosed with dementia, and only 97, or 3%, had a stroke. “At the end of the day, we’re talking about small numbers of people,” says Pase. “I don’t think that people should be alarmed.” Pase also makes clear that his study’s results, published in April in the journal Stroke, don’t explain the link. Do diet sodas cause health problems like stroke and dementia? Or do people who have higher chances of getting such health problems choose to drink diet soda, perhaps to try to cut sugar and calories in their diets? Continue reading >>

Does Drinking Diet Soda Cause Diabetes?

Does Drinking Diet Soda Cause Diabetes?

Ingesting artificial non caloric sweeteners (used in diet sodas) and to a lesser degree Stevia ("all natural" from the leaves of the Stevia plant) cause changes in our intestinal microbiome which correlates with the development of glucose intolerance, predisposing to developing type 2 diabetes (pre-diabetes). Using these artificial sweeteners might even induced weight gain by influencing our brain Gain weight by “going diet?” Artificial sweeteners and the neurobiology of sugar cravings: Neuroscience 2010 and as you know developing diabetes is strongly linked to being obese. In mice the use of non caloric artificial sweeteners has been correlated with changes in their microbiome (the totality of the microbes living in the intestines) corresponding to that of animals with glucose intolerance (pre-diabetes) which the animals did develop, , so artificial sweeteners might be deleterious for your long time health: Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota One dose of saccharin has been shown to cause glycemic (sugar) control problems in humans too even the "all natural" Stevia non caloric sweetener has been shown to cause a lowering of the benefial Lactobacillus reuteri in one's intestinal microbiome see The influence of stevia glycosides on the growth of Lactobacillus reuteri strains. . Continue reading >>

Will Diet Coke Raise Blood Sugar Levels Up In Diabetics?

Will Diet Coke Raise Blood Sugar Levels Up In Diabetics?

People with diabetes often switch to sugar-free products if they want to indulge a craving. For example, they might try sugar-free cookies or diet products that are made especially for diabetics or contain no added sugars. Based on that concept, switching to drinking Diet Coke might seem like the best choice. However, diabetics need to consider certain things before trying diet sodas. Video of the Day Diet Coke contains two sweeteners: aspartame and acesulfame-K, also known as acesulfame potassium. Diet Coke also contains artificial colorings and flavorings that have no effect on blood sugar. Blood Sugar Reactions Both sweeteners used in Diet Coke are considered safe for diabetes, according to Mayo Clinic. However, while the artificial sweeteners won’t raise blood sugar, the caffeine in it might. A 2004 study led by researchers at Duke University showed that caffeine consumption can increase blood sugar levels by up to 8 percent. Scientists are not sure why caffeine has this effect on glucose but are still recommending diabetic patients cut down their caffeine consumption as much as possible. Although the sweeteners in Diet Coke don’t directly affect blood sugar levels, they can still lead to other problems. According to the Harvard School of Public Health, the sweet taste of Diet Coke can confuse your brain. In normal circumstances, sweet foods have lots of calories. When you drink diet soda, your brain is expecting you to consume calories. When you don’t, your hunger will increase, forcing you to eat more to make up for the calories your brain is expecting. The cravings for extra food can be cravings for carbohydrates as well, which would affect your blood sugar. So indirectly, Diet Coke can affect your glucose if you don’t pay attention and give in to the cra Continue reading >>

Daily Can Of Soda Boosts Odds For Prediabetes

Daily Can Of Soda Boosts Odds For Prediabetes

HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Nov. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking a can of sugary soda every day can dramatically heighten a person's risk of developing prediabetes, a "warning sign" condition that precedes full-blown type 2 diabetes, a new study reports. A person who drinks a daily can of sugar-sweetened beverage has a 46 percent increased risk of developing prediabetes, said senior researcher Nicola McKeown, a scientist with the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston. However, a can of diet soda every day does not boost prediabetes risk, the researchers found. The results show how regular sugar intake can batter a person's body on a cellular level, McKeown said. Cells require the hormone insulin to break down sugar into energy, she said. But too much sugar in the diet can overexpose the cells to insulin. "This constant spike in blood glucose over time leads to the cells not becoming able to properly respond, and that's the beginning of insulin resistance," McKeown said. Once insulin resistance starts, blood sugar levels rise to levels that are damaging to every major system in the body. Prediabetes is an important landmark on the way to type 2 diabetes, McKeown said. It means a person has elevated blood sugar -- a sign of increasing insulin resistance -- but has not entered full-blown type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is reversible if a person cuts back on sugar. Sugar-sweetened beverages are the leading source of added sugar in the American diet, the authors said in background notes. These results show cutting back on sugary drinks is "a modifiable dietary factor that could have an impact on that progression from prediabetes to diabetes," McKeown said. For this study, McKeown and her colleagues analyzed 14 years of dat Continue reading >>

Do Diet Sodas Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Do Diet Sodas Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

… or is this just more junk science? It’s been on the news and on the blogs. If you google ‘diabetic diet soda’ you’ll get tons of hits, virtually every one of them reading what they want to read (the modern day, internet version of hearing what you want to hear); diet sodas increase the risk of diabetes. They are even saying it’s worse than real (non-diet) sodas! Here’s just one. I’m not pro diet soda, and I’m definitely not pro soda companies. I think that a product that was once thought to be harmless, possibly helpful, sold in tiny bottles, and enjoyed on special occasions by most, has morphed into a corporate giant that will do what it takes to make it’s profits and gain and keep customers, whether it’s bigger cans, smaller cans, less sugar, added vitamins, more caffeine, less caffeine, a variety of flavors, more bubbly, less bubbly, weird colors… …crazy marketing, celebrity endorsements, and creating an illusion of healthfulness by adding words like ‘recovery’ and ‘vitamin’ to the labels. They’ve also branched out into actually healthy products, like water, and made it very clear that they are the providers of healthy drinks, thus ‘bringing up the brand’ in the eyes of its consumers. Oh please… /rant over (for now) I don’t believe it’s true. This is just another bad study attempting to tell us that diet sodas are worse than regular; this time they say that they might cause diabetes, but before this it was weight gain, cancer, etc. They hate diet sodas, most likely because they hate artificial sweeteners, and this seems to be the latest attempt to demonize them. I’m not a doctor or a researcher, so take my opinion for what it’s worth – This study is awful. My warning signs – 60,000+ surveyed, long term, and wide Continue reading >>

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