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Can Diet Soda Cause Diabetes

Diet Coke Is Not Killing You

Diet Coke Is Not Killing You

As a time-honored Diet Coke lover, I’ve heard every reason why I should give up my delicious, crisp, delightfully caffeinated, aspartame-enriched beverage of choice: It’s giving me cancer. It’s as addictive as cocaine. It depletes nutrition from my body. According to a recent article in the New York Post, Diet Coke is definitely making me fat. If I give it up, my tastebuds will come to life, and my headaches will disappear. My bones will strengthen, and my attitude will even get better. My dog and my cat will start getting along. I’ll be able to hold warrior three, and I’ll finally understand why my most “spiritual” friends are addicted to Keeping Up With the Kardashians. If there was any truth to these claims, I probably should have sprouted a third nipple by now. But I haven’t even gotten one of those mega-zits that the internet attributes to this magical, calorie-free elixir. So what gives? What’s the truth, and what’s just a clickbait headline on a website with no scientific credibility? Let’s have a look at the most common claims about Diet Coke’s toxicity and then decide if you can safely drink one with a 3,000-calorie mega meal. Diet Coke deadens your taste buds I’ve seen this one floating around on a few listicles and natural blogs: Diet Coke kills your sense of taste. Either by virtue of its acidity levels or the artificial sweeteners, some chemical mischief causes your taste buds to not be able to taste food as well anymore. And when you quit the evil demon Diet Coke, food tastes like gossamer whispers once again. Too bad this isn’t even slightly true. People have reported anecdotally upon giving up diet soda that “naturally” sweet things like fruit taste sweeter to them, but that’s exactly how far the evidence goes; an anecdo Continue reading >>

Does Drinking Diet Soda Raise The Risk Of A Stroke?

Does Drinking Diet Soda Raise The Risk Of A Stroke?

For diet soda fans, recent news reports linking these popular drinks to higher risk of stroke may have been alarming. A closer look at the study behind the headlines suggests there’s no need to panic. But beverages naturally low in calories are probably a healthier option than artificially sweetened drinks. The study included 2,888 people ages 45 and older from the long-running Framingham Heart Study, all of whom filled out diet questionnaires up to three times over a seven-year period. People who said they drank at least one artificially sweetened soda a day were about twice as likely to have a stroke over the following decade when compared to those who drank less than one a week. Drinking regular, sugar-sweetened sodas or beverages did not appear to raise stroke risk. However, these types of studies can’t prove cause and effect, only an association. Also, only 97 people (3%) had strokes during the follow-up, which means only two or three of those strokes could possibly be attributed to drinking diet soda, says Dr. Kathryn Rexrode, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital who co-authored an earlier, larger study looking at soda consumption and stroke risk. Stroke risk from all sodas? That study detected a slightly higher risk of stroke in people who drank more than one soda per day, regardless of whether it contained sugar or an artificial sweetener. Although the latest study didn’t detect a higher stroke risk from sugary beverages, that certainly doesn’t suggest they are a better choice than diet sodas. Many studies have already shown that drinking sugary beverages on a regular basis can lead to weight gain, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke, she notes. Possible explanations In fact, one pos Continue reading >>

Is Drinking Diet Soda A Health Risk?

Is Drinking Diet Soda A Health Risk?

May 5, 2017 -- About one in five Americans drinks diet soda every day, according to the CDC. Is that a good thing? Numerous studies over the past several years have reported links between diet soda and weight gain, diabetes, heart problems, and other health issues. Most recently, headlines sounded alarms about a higher chance of dementia and stroke among diet soda drinkers . That may sound worrisome, but experts say you don’t need to clear the diet drinks out of your fridge just yet. Many questions must be answered before we’ll know whether diet soda raises your chance of health problems. Diet Soda, Dementia and Stroke Boston University researcher Matthew Pase, PhD, and colleagues examined 10 years of health information from nearly 3,000 American adults over 45 to count the number who had a stroke. They did the same for nearly 1,500 American adults over 60 to determine how many developed dementia. After accounting for a variety of things that could influence their health, such as age, physical activity, and waist size, the researchers found that diet soda drinkers nearly tripled their odds of stroke and dementia, compared with those who drank no diet soda. Scary, right? Not necessarily, says Pase. Only 81, or 5%, of the people in the study were diagnosed with dementia, and only 97, or 3%, had a stroke. “At the end of the day, we’re talking about small numbers of people,” says Pase. “I don’t think that people should be alarmed.” Pase also makes clear that his study’s results, published in April in the journal Stroke, don’t explain the link. Do diet sodas cause health problems like stroke and dementia? Or do people who have higher chances of getting such health problems choose to drink diet soda, perhaps to try to cut sugar and calories in their diets? Continue reading >>

Does Diet Soda Cause Diabetes?

Does Diet Soda Cause Diabetes?

The simple answer is clearly “no” – the only good ingredient in diet soda is water, which is very good for you, but water is the basis of any drink, and it comes from the tap, free. On the other hand, it is perhaps better than some other drinking options, and everything’s healthier than a donut. If diet soda helps people avoid other, more harmful foods and drinks, perhaps it is a step in the right direction and it might have a role in improving health in some specific situations. The latest on diet soda and diabetes Soda and other sugary drinks are associated with diabetes. Diabetes affects about 1 in 10 American and is a serious and costly disease. Excess added sugar is an established risk for diabetes, sugary drinks are the leading source of added sugar, and many studies show a clear association between soda consumption and the development of type 2 diabetes. These include randomized controlled studies that showed that sugary drinks aren’t just associated with diabetes – they cause obesity, insulin resistance and chronic inflammation, which are the harbingers of diabetes. The association between diet soda and type 2 diabetes is a little less clear. Several studies showed a link between drinking diet soda and diabetes, stroke, metabolic syndrome, heart disease and hypertension. These were mostly observational studies, and it’s hard to tease out whether people who have early signs of type 2 diabetes switch to diet soda, or if diet soda indeed contributes to glucose intolerance and diabetes. When the answer isn’t clear, we await more data. A new study, just published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition followed a group of about 65,000 postmenopausal women. Over more than 8 years 4675 of them developed diabetes. Both sugary drinks and diet drinks Continue reading >>

Diet Coke Won’t Stop You Getting Diabetes: Two Glasses Of Calorie-free Drinks A Day 'doubles The Risk'

Diet Coke Won’t Stop You Getting Diabetes: Two Glasses Of Calorie-free Drinks A Day 'doubles The Risk'

Many of us have ditched our favourite sugary drinks for their diet alternative in a bid to boost our health and keep off the pounds. But it seems that diet drinks can be just as bad for you, according to a study. Scientists found drinking just two glasses of diet drinks a day more than doubles the risk of developing diabetes. They believe that calorie-free drinks make us feel hungrier, prompting us to crave sugar-laden snacks. And they also suspect that artificial sweeteners interfere with the bacteria in our gut – which may trigger diabetes. The team from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden studied 2,874 adults who had completed a year-long diary about their intake of drinks. Those who had two or more sweetened drinks a day were 2.4 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. This included sugary beverages and artificially sweetened ones, such as Diet Coke or sugar free cordials. Having five or more sugar-free drinks a day increased the risk by 4.5 times. In fact, the researchers found that artificially–sweetened drinks were almost as bad as those laden with sugar. They established that every 200ml glass of a sugary fizzy drink consumed each day increased the risk of type 2 diabetes by 21 per cent. Meanwhile every diet drink increased the risk by 18 per cent, according to the findings published in the European Journal of Endocrinology. Lead researcher Josefin Löfvenborg said diet drinks may ‘stimulate the appetite’, leading to weight gain. She added that artificial sweeteners may cause chemical reactions within fat tissue and with bacteria in the gut. This can lead to the body becoming less tolerant of glucose – a form of sugar – triggering type 2 diabetes. She said: ‘One hypothesis is that consumption of diet soft drinks may stimulate appetite making u Continue reading >>

Does Drinking Diet Soda Cause Diabetes?

Does Drinking Diet Soda Cause Diabetes?

A reader wrote to say, “I just read a story in the news that said research published by the ADA shows diet soda can make you obese. Should I stop drinking diet soda?” I saw that report, too, and at first it’s hard to know what to think. But before you start to empty your fridge, here’s some background to that report. Diatribes against diet soda have been all the rage for the last few years. It has been linked with an increased risk of weight gain and of getting diabetes. Now, drinking diet soda has been associated with increasing abdominal girth, (the type that often coincides with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes). The results of the San Antonio Longitudinal Study of Aging, which was presented at the June meeting of the American Diabetes Association, linked diet soda consumption with increasing waistlines. The study followed 474 participants aged 65 to 74 over an average of 9 years and looked at their change in waist circumference over time in comparison to their diet soda consumption. Soda drinkers had a 70% greater increase in waist girth than abstainers. Those drinking the most diet sodas had the greatest gains in girth. Those drinking 2 or more diet sodas a day had 5 times the increase in waist circumference as their non-imbibing peers. The results were controlled for initial waist circumference, diabetes status, leisure-time physical activity level, neighborhood of residence, age and smoking status at each measurement period, as well as sex, ethnicity and years of education. The study expands the findings of a previous study by the same authors in 2008 where consuming more than 21 diet sodas a week was associated with almost double the risk of becoming overweight. Does this prove you should raid your refrigerator and throw out all the cans and bottle Continue reading >>

Question: In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes, Does Diet Soda Consumption Contribute To Decline In Blood Sugar Control?

Question: In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes, Does Diet Soda Consumption Contribute To Decline In Blood Sugar Control?

Go to: SUMMARY OF THE EVIDENCE As the effectiveness of substituting ASBs for SSBs for weight loss and improvement of glucose control in type 2 diabetics has been called into debate, the obvious question arises: could these compounds have the opposite of their intended effect and actually negatively influence blood sugar control? Relatively few high powered randomized controlled studies have been done to study this. Hence, the most reliable articles tend to be meta-analyses. According to a 2014 meta-analysis by Christopher Gardener et al, the body of evidence for the direct effects of ASBs on glycemic control is severely limited.4 Many studies have compared Non-nutritive Sweeteners (NNS) to placebo looking for any ill effect on glycemic control with null results. However, these studies fail to address the potential effect of replacing SSBs with ASBs in the diet. The studies that directly compare NNS to sugars are limited by low sample size and other potential confounders. Although weight does not directly affect glucose control in diabetics, it is commonly accepted that a decreased BMI is correlated with a lower HgbA1C. A meta-analysis (by Paige E Miller et al) of 15 randomized controlled trials evaluated weighted mean differences in body weight and body composition between a study group using low-calorie sweeteners (LCS) such as aspartame, saccharin, steviol glycosides, or sucralose in experimental groups and full-calorie control groups. The differences were consistent with the conclusion that substituting LCS for sugar (full-calorie) resulted in a modest decrease in body weight (−0.80 kg; 95% CI: −1.17, −0.43) and may be useful in weight management.5 LCSs were also correlated with modest improvements in BMI, fat mass, and waist circumference. A double-blind cross Continue reading >>

Diabetes Rises With Daily Soda -- Including Diet Soda -- Consumption

Diabetes Rises With Daily Soda -- Including Diet Soda -- Consumption

A comprehensive study of European adults has found that compared with people who drink a single sugar-sweetened drink daily, those who drink water, coffee or tea instead are at 14% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The research found that drinking sugar-sweetened milk products was an even more powerful driver of diabetes; compared with those who drank one such beverage daily, people who drank water, coffee or tea instead were on average 20% to 25% less likely to develop diabetes. The British study, which tracked the consumption habits of more than 25,000 Britons (ages 40 to 79) over about 11 years, offered little comfort to drinkers of artificially sweetened beverages. While consumers of coffee, tea and water had a diminished risk of diabetes, the study found consumers of diet sodas to have type 2 diabetes risks on par with drinkers of sugar-sweetened beverages. But when the authors took body mass index and waist circumference into account, they found that consumption of diet beverages was not linked to higher rates of diabetes. This suggests that diet soda drinkers are already more likely to be overweight or obese, and that this - rather than their diet soda consumption - might account for their elevated diabetes risk. While offering some insights into different beverages' contribution to diabetes rates, the study does not test the likely effects of changing established consumption patterns and substituting one kind of drink for another. Instead, it tracked the consumption patterns of a large population over a lengthy period of time to see who was more or less likely to develop diabetes. Such a "prospective observational study" does not establish that sugar-sweetened sodas directly cause diabetes, or that, say, a longstanding consumer of sugary sodas can lower Continue reading >>

What Everyone Must Know About Coke Zero And Diabetes

What Everyone Must Know About Coke Zero And Diabetes

If you have diabetes you may be thinking quitting your regular Coke and opting for Coke Zero is going to do you a big favor. After all, it's sugar free and therefore healthier, right? Wrong! Once you read this, you'll understand that the scientific research shows quite the opposite. What is Coke Zero? Coke Zero was launched in 2005 as a sugar free, low calorie alternative to regular coke. One thing that's quite funny is that while Diet Coke has been around since the 1980’s, many men thought the title “diet” sounded a little too feminine and they weren’t interested in buying it. So as a result, Coke Zero was born. It was marketed mostly towards men who wanted to enjoy the taste of a classic Coke with zero guilt. Coke Zero comes in several different flavors, including classic, vanilla, and cherry. You might be thinking that a sugar free soda sounds too good to be true. And you would be right! Unfortunately, Coke Zero and other sugar free sodas are not a soda lover’s dream come true. And you'll soon see why… Nutrition Facts You probably already know that regular soda has a ton of sugar in it, which means you should steer clear of it at all costs – diabetic or not. For example, a 12 ounce can of regular Coke contains 39 grams of sugar, all derived from high fructose corn syrup, which makes that a double no, no. That can of soda also packs 140 empty calories – meaning, you don’t get any nutrients from it. It’s easy to see why so many people were thrilled when diet sodas hit the market. After all, the promise of cutting down on sugar to lose weight, and reduce your risk of obesity and diabetes – that sounds like a good deal, right? Well, unfortunately those promises aren't all they're cracked up to be. The sweetener in Diet Coke is called ‘aspartame,' Continue reading >>

Does Drinking Diet Soda Cause Diabetes?

Does Drinking Diet Soda Cause Diabetes?

Ingesting artificial non caloric sweeteners (used in diet sodas) and to a lesser degree Stevia ("all natural" from the leaves of the Stevia plant) cause changes in our intestinal microbiome which correlates with the development of glucose intolerance, predisposing to developing type 2 diabetes (pre-diabetes). Using these artificial sweeteners might even induced weight gain by influencing our brain Gain weight by “going diet?” Artificial sweeteners and the neurobiology of sugar cravings: Neuroscience 2010 and as you know developing diabetes is strongly linked to being obese. In mice the use of non caloric artificial sweeteners has been correlated with changes in their microbiome (the totality of the microbes living in the intestines) corresponding to that of animals with glucose intolerance (pre-diabetes) which the animals did develop, , so artificial sweeteners might be deleterious for your long time health: Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota One dose of saccharin has been shown to cause glycemic (sugar) control problems in humans too even the "all natural" Stevia non caloric sweetener has been shown to cause a lowering of the benefial Lactobacillus reuteri in one's intestinal microbiome see The influence of stevia glycosides on the growth of Lactobacillus reuteri strains. . Continue reading >>

Food For Thought: Do Diet Drinks Cause Diabetes?

Food For Thought: Do Diet Drinks Cause Diabetes?

Sodas and fizzy drinks are full of sugar, which is why many of us choose the diet versions for their low-sugar, or even zero-sugar, claims. But new research suggests that our good intentions could actually be leading us down the path toward diabetes at an alarming rate. Evidence published in the American Diabetes Care Journal suggests that the artificial sweeteners used in diet drinks change the way our body processes sugar. As explained by the website What Doctors Don’t Tell You, sweeteners have been shown to “cause a sudden blood insulin and glucose rush”. Too many diet drinks could lead to insulin resistance, they suggested. Previously, besides the toxicity argument surrounding artificial sweeteners, they were thought to have no affect on metabolism, providing a calorie-safe way to enjoy soda. New evidence puts this into doubt, according to a study by researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine. They have discovered “receptors in the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas are almost identical to those in the mouth and they respond to anything sweet, artificial or natural by releasing hormones such as insulin”. A French study carried out at Inserm, in February 2013, that is to be published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, has also found an association between diet sodas and an increased risk of diabetes. The study followed 66,118 women with their beverage habits having been documented over a 14-year period. By the end of the study, 1,369 of the women were diagnosed diabetic and researchers were able to identify a correlation between both their diets and sugar-sweetened sodas and diabetes. The study also showed that when comparing this established increased risk of diabetes between the soda drinkers, it was the diet soda group that Continue reading >>

The Awful Truth About Diet Soda And Weight Gain, According To Science

The Awful Truth About Diet Soda And Weight Gain, According To Science

Does diet soda make people gain weight? originally appeared on Quora: the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights. Sweet taste without the calories sounds like a perfect example of no pain, all gain but unfortunately cumulative data suggests otherwise. A poster child for unintended consequences, diet soda (Diet drink) typically contains a type of non-caloric artificial sweetener, a sugar substitute called Aspartame, e.g., NutraSweet or Equal (sweetener). Unintended consequences in the form of not just weight gain but also increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus type 2, hypertension and metabolic syndrome, all vigorously disputed, of course (see some examples in references 1, 2), which brings us to the glaring caveat we need to keep front and center when considering the science about artificial sweeteners. Historically the food and beverage industry has funded nutrition research so substantially that the ensuing entrenched conflict of interest renders the phrase "nutrition science" an oxymoron (3). North America currently leads in sales and consumption of diet beverages (see below from 4): Artificial sweetener consumption patterns tend to change rapidly in response to widespread perception of harm attendant to one type of artificial sweetener or another. U.S. artificial sweetener consumption, for example, moved from cyclamate in the 1960s to saccharin, e.g. Sweet'n Low, to aspartame, which reigned supreme for several decades until being upstaged in the 2010s by sucralose, e.g. Splenda, mainly because it's highly stable in food (5) while acesulfame potassium (Ace-K), e.g., Sunett, Sweet & Safe, Sweet One, is also increasing in use. Pepsi embodies such rapid change. In 2015 it changed its U.S. Die Continue reading >>

Think Your Eliminating Diabetes With Diet Sodas? Think Again!

Think Your Eliminating Diabetes With Diet Sodas? Think Again!

Most people already know that drinking a lot of sugary sodas could increase their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. For that reason, many soda drinkers have turned to the diet versions of their favorite fizzy beverages as a way to stay healthier while still enjoying that great flavor. Well, a new diabetes clinical study conducted by Inserm could have many people rethinking the benefit they are getting from drinking diet soda. The results of this study have been published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, and they have been generating a bit of hype in the medical community. It seems that there could be a legitimate association between the consumption of diet soda and an elevated risk of type 2 diabetes. Tracking Women’s Beverage Habits for 14 Years For this diabetes clinical trial, researchers enrolled 66,118 women and tracked their beverage habits for more than 14 years. In order to do this successfully, they asked all of their participants to inform them whenever they would drink any 100 percent juice, sugar-sweetened sodas, and artificially sweetened drinks. By the time the study was completed, 1,369 of these women had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Researchers discovered that these women would drink more diet sodas than sugar-sweetened drinks on average. On a weekly basis, this was broken down to 328 milliliters of sugar-sweetened beverages and 568 milliliters of artificially sweetened beverages. Diet Soda and an Elevated Risk of Diabetes It now seems that the consumption of both diet and sugar-sweetened beverages has been linked with an elevated risk of developing diabetes. While this may be surprising on its own, researchers have discovered that the dietary habits of these diet drinkers could lead to an even higher risk of diabetes when compa Continue reading >>

New Study Says Diet Soda Linked To Stroke, Dementia05:15

New Study Says Diet Soda Linked To Stroke, Dementia05:15

A new study has found an association between frequent drinking of diet sodas and an increased risk of both stroke and dementia. Here & Now's Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Dr. Matthew Pase, the study's lead author, about what it means for the average soda drinker. Pase is a visiting postdoctoral fellow at Boston University School of Medicine, and an investigator at the Framingham Heart Study. Interview Highlights On the study’s findings "It's important to note that our results are observational, which means we observe trends amongst a large group of people, but our results certainly do not suggest causality. In other words, we can't be sure that diet sodas are causing stroke or causing dementia. But we are seeing associations between those who more frequently consume diet soda, and a higher risk of both stroke and dementia within the next 10 years.” "Those who were drinking diet soda on a daily basis, their risk for stroke and dementia was about three times as high. As compared to someone who was not drinking diet soda." On whether the study looked at other possible variables behind the elevated risk "Now that we're showing this association, it's going to be important to understand why that association might be there to try and understand it in more detail. It's possible that diet sodas are associated with risk factors like obesity and diabetes. This might be linked to a higher risk of stroke, or a higher risk of dementia. But on the other hand, it's also possible that those people who are unhealthy to begin with — say, those who already have diabetes, who already have obesity — gravitate more towards the diet sodas to begin with. So now this is something we really need to understand in more detail, to understand which way the association is going." On the utili Continue reading >>

Do Diet Sodas Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Do Diet Sodas Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

… or is this just more junk science? It’s been on the news and on the blogs. If you google ‘diabetic diet soda’ you’ll get tons of hits, virtually every one of them reading what they want to read (the modern day, internet version of hearing what you want to hear); diet sodas increase the risk of diabetes. They are even saying it’s worse than real (non-diet) sodas! Here’s just one. I’m not pro diet soda, and I’m definitely not pro soda companies. I think that a product that was once thought to be harmless, possibly helpful, sold in tiny bottles, and enjoyed on special occasions by most, has morphed into a corporate giant that will do what it takes to make it’s profits and gain and keep customers, whether it’s bigger cans, smaller cans, less sugar, added vitamins, more caffeine, less caffeine, a variety of flavors, more bubbly, less bubbly, weird colors… …crazy marketing, celebrity endorsements, and creating an illusion of healthfulness by adding words like ‘recovery’ and ‘vitamin’ to the labels. They’ve also branched out into actually healthy products, like water, and made it very clear that they are the providers of healthy drinks, thus ‘bringing up the brand’ in the eyes of its consumers. Oh please… /rant over (for now) I don’t believe it’s true. This is just another bad study attempting to tell us that diet sodas are worse than regular; this time they say that they might cause diabetes, but before this it was weight gain, cancer, etc. They hate diet sodas, most likely because they hate artificial sweeteners, and this seems to be the latest attempt to demonize them. I’m not a doctor or a researcher, so take my opinion for what it’s worth – This study is awful. My warning signs – 60,000+ surveyed, long term, and wide Continue reading >>

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