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Can Diet Help Type 1 Diabetes?

Why The Paleo Diet Is Good For Type 1 Diabetes

Why The Paleo Diet Is Good For Type 1 Diabetes

Note: By providing a place for the community to share real life experiences we hope you find inspiration and new ways of thinking about management. We encourage you to approach these offerings as you would a buffet — review the options, maybe try a few new things and come back for what works best for you. Bon Appetit! Check out our library of resources on Food. To me, the term “Paleo” is not a diet or a fad but rather a framework — a framework for building a healthy lifestyle centered around real food, food that is un-refined and un-processed, just as nature intended it to be. Eating real food doesn’t have to be complicated or flavorless, quite the opposite in fact! The basis of the Paleo diet eliminates grains, gluten (even corn and oats), hydrogenated oils, refined animal dairy products, refined sugars, soy and preservatives. Now, that may sound like a lot of foods and you are probably wondering well what do I even eat then?! I prefer to focus on the foods I can eat and enjoy rather than those that I can’t and trust me, there are endless foods, flavors, textures and colors that you can eat! Personally, I believe that everyone can benefit from the framework of the Paleo diet, but personalization is key. Some people will need more good quality sources of carbohydrates depending on their activity level and some people like me do really well incorporating high quality dairy items. Keep in mind that diet is a foundation but not everything when it comes to staying healthy with Type 1 diabetes and other lifestyle factors such as stress, sleep and emotions play a huge role in managing blood sugar. Paleo friendly foods are rich in nutrients, keeping you satisfied and your blood sugar stable. When we remove processed foods and refined carbohydrates we lower the amou Continue reading >>

What To Eat When You Have Type 1 Diabetes

What To Eat When You Have Type 1 Diabetes

It's important to eat a healthy diet when you have type 1 diabetes. That doesn't mean you can't enjoy tasty food, including some of your favorites. With type 1 diabetes, your body stops making insulin. So you take insulin every day either through shots or a pump. It’s also key to track your blood sugar levels. Insulin is only part of the picture. Diet and exercise also play important roles in helping keep your blood sugar levels stable. When you make healthy food choices and eat consistent amounts through the day, it can help control your sugars. It can also lower your chance of diabetes-related problems like heart disease, kidney disease, and nerve damage. Some experts used to think there was a "diabetes diet." They thought people with diabetes had to avoid all foods with sugars or stop eating certain other foods. But when you have type 1, you can eat the same healthy diet as everyone else. Follow some general guidelines: Eat less unhealthy fat. Cut back on the saturated fats you find in high-fat meats like bacon and regular ground beef, as well as full-fat dairy like whole milk and butter. Unhealthy fats raise your chance of heart disease. With diabetes, you face higher-than-average odds of getting heart disease. Make smart food choices to lower that risk. Get enough fiber. It may help control your blood sugar. You can get fiber from whole grains, beans, and fruits and vegetables. Try to get 25-30 grams a day. Those high-fiber foods are always better choices than low-fiber carbs such as refined 'white' grains and processed sugary foods. Carbohydrates are your body's main source of energy. You get them from many foods, like grains (pasta, bread, crackers, and cookies), fruits and vegetables, dairy products, and sugars. Carbs raise your blood sugar levels faster than Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

Paleo And Type 1 Diabetes

Paleo And Type 1 Diabetes

When most people think of “diabetes,” they think of Type 2 Diabetes – that’s the kind that you (usually) get as an adult after a lifetime of eating junk food and sitting on the couch. Type 2 is the “diabetes” that goes along with the rest of the metabolic syndrome (obesity, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol). Type 1 Diabetes is a completely different problem. It’s related to diet (more on this below), but it’s not a “lifestyle disease” and it’s not caused by a poor diet the way Type 2 is. In Type 1, an autoimmune attack on the pancreas prevents them from producing the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary for metabolizing carbs and protein (more on insulin here), so people with Type 1 Diabetes have to inject insulin every time they eat a meal. Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes NOT part of the metabolic syndrome; patients with Type 1 Diabetes are often thin. Part of the metabolic syndrome; closely connected to obesity (although not all people with Type 2 are obese). Not enough (if any) insulin is produced, so your body can’t metabolize carbohydrates or protein on its own. Insulin is being produced (too much of it, actually), but your body is “deaf” to the insulin signal so it doesn’t work properly. Common in children Rare in children; usually develops in adults after a lifetime of bad eating. Not caused by eating junk food and not exercising. Can be caused by eating junk food and not exercising. Autoimmune disease May have an autoimmune component, but is not primarily an autoimmune disease. It’s easy to see how a Paleo approach to diet and lifestyle could be safe and effective for Type 2 Diabetes – if a disease is caused by eating too much junk food and not exercising, then eating real food and taking up a gym habit can only be hel Continue reading >>

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks that need to become part of everyday life – injections, testing, treating a hypo, monitoring and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. Plus, there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. I've just been diagnosed with Type 1 – what can I eat? In one word... anything. It may come as a surprise, but all kinds of food are fine for people with Type 1 diabetes to eat. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a very restrictive diet plan. This was because the availability of insulin was limited and the type of insulin treatment was very restrictive. As insulin treatments have been developed to be much more flexible, the days of “do's and don'ts” are long gone. The way to go nowadays is to try and fit the diabetes and insulin around the same healthy, balanced diet that is recommended for everyone, with lots of fruit and veg and some food from all the food groups. Is there anything I should avoid? Before your diagnosis of diabetes, it is likely that you experienced an unquenchable thirst. It is a good idea to avoid sugary drinks and fruit juices as a way of quenching thirst. They usually put blood glucose levels up very high and very quickly – which is why they can be a useful treatment for a hypo (low blood glucose levels). Instead, drink water, Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And The Ketogenic Diet

Type 1 Diabetes And The Ketogenic Diet

For thousands of years, something has been sneaking up on children and robbing them of their ability to control their blood sugar levels. The culprit is an autoimmune condition called Type 1 Diabetes, and its incidence has been increasing in both the United States and in other western countries. But there is no need to worry. This sneaky disease has left us with enough clues to diagnose it, manage it, and potentially reverse it. How to Know If It Is Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is most commonly diagnosed in children between the ages of 10 and 14, although many children can present with symptoms at ages as young as two years old. The incidence is approximately 1.5 times higher in American non-Hispanic white people compared with African American or Hispanic individuals. Risk Factors for Type 1 Diabetes The three most well-researched risk factors for type 1 diabetes include: Family history. Anyone with a parent or sibling with type 1 diabetes has a slightly increased risk of developing the condition. Genetics. Specific genes can increase the risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Age. Although type 1 diabetes can appear at any age, it is diagnosed in two prominent peaks. The first peak occurs in children between 4 and 7 years old, and the second is in children between 10 and 14 years old. However, these aren’t the only three risk factors. Recent research has found that type 1 diabetics tend to have a different balance of bacteria in their microbiome then non-susceptible individuals. Vitamin D deficiency, gut health issues, and dairy intolerance are also linked to a greater risk of type 1 diabetes as well. Having all of these risk factors, however, does not mean that you will have type 1 diabetes. Its symptoms will provide us with a clearer picture. Symptoms of Type 1 Dia Continue reading >>

For 26 Years, I’ve Managed Type 1 Diabetes With A Plant-based Diet

For 26 Years, I’ve Managed Type 1 Diabetes With A Plant-based Diet

Until age 35, my health was very typical for an American. Then in November of 1988, all that changed: my immune system suddenly decided that my insulin-producing pancreas beta cells were foreign and attacked and annihilated them, leaving me with type 1 diabetes. In less than 30 days, I lost 45 pounds and grew deathly weak. Eventually, I was found barely conscious at my work desk and rushed to the hospital, where I immediately received my first shot of insulin. My doctor’s grim prognosis hit like a ton of bricks: even with the best possible diabetic control, I would still suffer many debilitating, chronic complications of the disease. I envisioned myself disabled, blind, amputated, and living in a wheelchair. More on that later… A few days into my hospital stay, a fill-in doctor literally saved my life with a very simple short statement. He said, “No doctor can manage your diabetes.” He explained that the insulin doses are dependent on metabolism which changes from minute to minute, and so are too variable to be predetermined or managed by any other person. He recommended that I keep a log and learn the effects of everything I ate and did, and adjust my diabetes control and lifestyle accordingly. The geek in me took that advice to heart. Back home, I immediately bought a glucometer, a kitchen scale, a nutrition facts book, and a notebook in which to begin logging my new life. I began to learn how to match up the food I ate, my activity levels, and my insulin intake to keep everything in sync. My Doctors Prescribed a Low-Carb, High-Fat Diet All of the nutritional information from my doctor, diabetes magazines and books, and even diabetes management classes strongly promoted a low-carb, high-fat diet. Confusion started to set in, however, as all my test-and-measure Continue reading >>

Has A British Man Really Been Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes?

Has A British Man Really Been Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes?

I have been living with type 1 diabetes for 25 years now. The relentlessness of type 1, and the fact that I will probably live with this non-preventable condition for the rest of my life never goes away, but I have almost made peace with it. A few days ago, I saw something that gave me pause. “British man with type 1 diabetes to receive tests after coming off insulin,” read Diabetes.co.uk’s headline. The article goes onto say that, “Daniel Darkes, from Daventy in Northamptonshire, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes seven years ago. But his recent tests have baffled doctors as his pancreas has shown signs of working properly again.” My first thoughts upon reading this were, “this can’t be true,” and “what’s the real explanation here?” There are many types of diabetes including type 2, LADA, and monogenic. Maybe he actually had one of those types instead of type 1. Usually, tests can determine this quickly though, so why was it not the case with Dan? I live in the UK and I wanted to get to the bottom of things. I managed to get in touch with ‘Miracle Dan’, as he’s been called by his friends. Although he is saving the specific details of his recent test results from the U.S. for an upcoming exclusive interview with another media outlet, he spoke to me and answered some of my questions about everything that has been happening. Please tell us a bit about yourself and your diabetes. When were you diagnosed? I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes back in February 2011 at the age of 23, after just leaving the army. I started a new engineering job and within two weeks of starting, I noticed the traditional symptoms of type 1 diabetes: thirst, weight loss, blurry vision, and a lot of vomiting. I collapsed and was taken by ambulance to hospital where I wa Continue reading >>

Real Life Testimonial: Controlling Type 1 Diabetes With The Paleo Diet

Real Life Testimonial: Controlling Type 1 Diabetes With The Paleo Diet

Real Life Testimonial: Controlling Type 1 Diabetes with the Paleo diet This is part of an ongoing series of real life success stories from people all over the world who have been impacted by the Paleo lifestyle and The Paleo Solution. Read Kyp’s story below. My name is Kyp and I am a type 1 diabetic born on the 5th of May 1990 and diagnosed early August 2009. I wanted to contact you in regards to how eating a low carb paleo diet has helped me with my type 1 diabetes. Late 2008-August 2009. Over the course of the past nine months I had changed from a chubby 102 kilogram teenager who plays too many video games and ate too many Big Macs to several months later becoming a muscular and active (6 gym sessions per week) 92 kilogram young man. I thought that by adhering to the nutritional recommendations I was doing everything in my power to achieve an enlightened state of health. I simultaneously continued to lean out, six months later becoming a frail and disturbingly lean 70 kilogram male who looked like he needed to be sat down, force fed and watched to ensure he did not try to regurgitate what he had just swallowed. I had been losing weight at a steady pace, somewhere in the vicinity of none at all to half a kilo per week until June. Once June hit my weight began to drop at an alarming rate, anywhere from 1 to 2 and a half kilos per week. Me being me I put this down to my increased effort with my highly intensive physical labour in the mornings, eating a ‘healthy’ diet full of whole grains, milk for calcium and protein, lots of potatoes and pasta in the evenings with some red or white meat, and an increased frequency of cardio vascular exercise. I was drinking gallons of water per day which I thought was due to the amount of exercise I was doing and I had began to Continue reading >>

Cooking For The Type 1 Diabetic

Cooking For The Type 1 Diabetic

If you are a caregiver for someone with type 1 diabetes, you know that a healthy diet and proper food preparation are an important part of controlling diabetes. "You don't need to buy special foods,” advises Sue Tocher, MS, RD, dietitian and diabetes clinical program coordinator at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta. “You should prepare the same healthy foods that would be recommended for someone without diabetes. That means plenty of whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and a low concentration of fats and sweets." Diabetes: Food and Blood Glucose Levels It's important for diabetics to keep their glucose from getting too low or too high. This is achieved by regularly checking blood glucose levels and regulating insulin dosage and carbohydrate intake. It's best to eat about the same amount of carbohydrates each day, eat and snack at regular hours, and avoid skipping meals. "Carbohydrates are the most important food group for diabetics,” says Tocher. “These are the foods that impact glucose levels. Fats and proteins supply calories but have little effect on blood glucose." Foods that contain lots of carbs include bagels, crackers, dried beans and peas, fruit, pasta and rice, and of course, sweets. Diabetes: The Food Pyramid The diabetes food pyramid illustrates how to make the best food choices. The pyramid has six color-coded categories, each representing a different food group. "The idea of the food pyramid is to get you to eat from a variety of food groups,” says Tocher. “The foods closest to the bottom are the foods that are closest to their natural state, such as whole grains, fresh vegetables, beans, and fresh fruit. You want to get your calories from the bottom up." Foods from the bottom also provide vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Moving up the pyramid, as t Continue reading >>

Superfoods For People With Type 1?

Superfoods For People With Type 1?

We take a look at 14 foods that may help you maintain blood sugar levels. Craig Idlebrook contributed to this article. Every adult with Type 1 knows, at least basically, how to count carbs and estimate the amount of insulin needed to cover those carbs. Fewer know how to seek out the foods that may help in maintaining good blood glucose levels. We’ve done some research to compile some food news for people with Type 1 diabetes. One word of caution, however: Most of the available research on food and diabetes has been done on mice and/or is focused on Type 2 diabetes. Your Shopping Cart Should be Filled with These 10 Things The American Diabetes Association has designated 10 invaluable foods for people with diabetes, based on glycemic index score and nutritional value: 1. Beans 2. Dark-green leafy vegetables 3. Citrus fruit 4. Sweet potatoes 5. Berries 6. Tomatoes 7. Fish high in Omega-3 fatty acids 8. Whole grains 9. Nuts 10. Milk and yogurt. Protein: The Jury’s Still Out The Paleo diet is all the rage now, and protein would seem like a natural choice of something to load up on in your diet, especially since there is evidence that the glucose from protein doesn’t make it into your bloodstream to mess with your blood sugar levels. However, for a long time now, scientists have warned that there is no body of evidence that suggests people with diabetes should consume more protein than people without diabetes. That being said, there is a pair of recent studies which suggest that protein may one day be suggested as a way to help control blood glucose levels: A study published in the journal Nature found that mice with the equivalent of diabetes achieved great glucose levels with daily injections of a protein called FGF1. Meanwhile, a 2014 Tel Aviv University study found Continue reading >>

Meal Planning For Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Meal Planning For Children With Type 1 Diabetes

When you have a child with type 1 diabetes, it's easy to get carried away with the notion of a diabetic diet. But in reality, your child's dietary needs are no different from a child who doesn't have diabetes. Of course, there are certain considerations you need to be aware of, and understanding the carbohydrate content in food is arguably the most important. In this article, you will learn about the importance of carb counting, with a special emphasis on how fiber and sugar alcohols may also affect your child's blood glucose (blood sugar) levels. Nutrition Basics There's really no such thing as a diabetic diet. That's why you should focus instead on providing your child with balanced nutrition. A good nutritional resource to consult is the Food Pyramid. In recent years, the United States Department of Agriculture has made some updates to the standard Food Pyramid that most of us grew up knowing. Instead of being a set-in-stone guideline, now you can create personalized eating plans that are flexible and balanced. To refresh your memory on healthy eating, visit ChooseMyPlate.gov. There are 3 main nutrients in foods—fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. These essential nutrients affect blood glucose in different ways. Fats: Fat typically doesn't break down into sugar in your blood, and in small amounts, it doesn't affect your blood glucose levels. But fat does slow down digestion, and this can cause your blood glucose to rise slower than it normally would. After a high-fat meal, your child's blood glucose may be elevated up to 12 hours after the meal. Proteins: Protein doesn't affect blood glucose unless you eat more than your body needs. In most cases, you need only about 6 ounces or less (which is about the size of 2 decks of cards) at each meal. Carbohydrates: Carbohyd Continue reading >>

Lose Weight With Type 1 Diabetes

Lose Weight With Type 1 Diabetes

WRITTEN BY: Cliff Scherb Editor’s Note: Cliff Scherb, Founder of Glucose Advisors and TriStar Athletes LLC, is a nutrition and fitness expert. He consults through virtually teaching his decision support system – Engine1 the app and its methodologies to aspiring T1 individuals and athletes. Cliff also creates custom training programs and insulin plans for endurance athletes, using Training Stress Modeling and real-time coaching. To inquire about coaching openings, FB LIVE sessions, and general questions please email [email protected] Losing weight can be difficult — add Type 1 diabetes to the mix with its daily management demands — and it’s even more of a challenge. I know, because I’ve been a Type 1 diabetic for 29 years and I’m also an endurance athlete. The internet is saturated in advice on how to lose weight with or without Type 1, so it’s hard to know what is worth while and what will just waste your time — or worse, can negatively impact your health. I’m not going to declare all out war on carbohydrates, or tell you can or can’t drink your calories in the form of olive oil, or feast and fast with cayenne peppers and maple syrup. No, the real distilled learning from my years of consulting and data analysis shows that a balanced, low-insulin diet with nutrient timing and activity is the best way to lose weight with Type 1 diabetes. It also helps you maintain brain and body function as well as energy levels. If you are reading this you’ve probably already given this some thought and know why it’s important to lose weight and/or lean out, but I maintain it’s all about performance! Performing means living a longer or healthier life or if you’re an athlete, it can also translate to beating out your competition. Things that Impact w Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Maintaining a healthy diet is important for type 1 diabetes management. A type 1 diabetes diet is designed to provide maximum nutrition, while also monitoring intake of carbohydrates, protein, and fat. However, there’s no single universal diabetes diet. It involves being mindful of how you eat and how your body will respond to certain foods. People with type 1 diabetes need to monitor their blood sugar levels. Without proper diet, exercise, and insulin therapy, a person with type 1 diabetes could experience health complications. Complications associated with type 1 diabetes include: high blood pressure, which increases risk for heart attack, stroke, and poor circulation kidney damage nerve damage skin sores and infections, which can cause pain and may lead to tissue death Following proper dietary guidelines can help mitigate the difficulties of type 1 diabetes and help you avoid health complications. It can also improve your overall quality of life. Just like there’s no standard treatment for type 1 diabetes, there’s no standard diet for diabetes. A nutritionist or dietitian can help you come up with meal plans and create a diet that works for you in the long term. It’s easy to reach for fast food and other processed foods when you’re short on time and money. However, these foods offer minimal nutrients and are high in fat, sugar, and salt. Planning your meals ahead of time and grocery shopping regularly can help cut down on any “emergency eating.” A well-stocked kitchen of healthy food can also cut down on unnecessary sugar, carbohydrates, sodium, and fat that can spike blood sugar. An important aspect of any diabetic diet is consistency. To maintain blood sugar levels, don’t skip meals, try to eat around the same time each day, and pay attention to foo Continue reading >>

There’s No Such Thing As A ‘diabetic Diet’

There’s No Such Thing As A ‘diabetic Diet’

For years, people with type 1 diabetes were told they needed to eat three meals and three snacks a day to keep their blood glucose levels from swinging too high or too low. Thankfully, with modern insulin analogues and regimens, you no longer need such a regimented diet. You can eat a little or a lot depending on what you feel like doing. Your diabetes care team can help you tailor your insulin treatment around your lifestyle. To make sure you’re getting the correct amount of insulin, you will need to consider what and how much you eat, so you can match the glucose entering your bloodstream with the insulin dose you take. Beginning to think about what is in your food and drink is often confusing at first, but your diabetes care team are there to help and it will become easier over time. It’s often recommended that you get tailored advice for your diet from a registered dietician. If you don’t have one already, ask your diabetes team to refer you. You can eat sugar Like anyone, it’s important to ensure you’re eating a healthy diet, but living with type 1 diabetes doesn’t mean you need to cut sugar out of your diet completely. In fact, sugar can often be your friend when you’re having a hypo and need to boost your blood glucose levels. Carb counting Carb counting is an important part of managing your type 1 diabetes. When you eat carbohydrates (both starches such as potatoes, rice and pasta and sugars such as fruit, milk, honey and table salt), it’s broken down into glucose and absorbed into your bloodstream where it can be used for energy. It’s important to have a good understanding of how much, and what type, of carbohydrate is in the foods you eat as this will help you work out how much insulin you need to give with meals and snacks. There are structu Continue reading >>

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