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Can Diabetics Use The Paleo Diet?

How I Was Able To Reverse Prediabetes And You Can Too In Just 11 Steps!

How I Was Able To Reverse Prediabetes And You Can Too In Just 11 Steps!

Note: Today’s post was written by Nancy Klein, a natural health enthusiast. Before I discovered these 11 natural healthy tips, I was one of the many Americans walking around with prediabetes and not knowing it. I would consider myself extremely lucky to have gotten this warning sign because I was able to stop the progression and reverse prediabetes that may have eventually led to diabetes type 2. I didn’t believe I had prediabetes, I wasn’t overweight! I found out from a blood test that I had prediabetes and this didn’t make any sense because I thought that I was eating a healthy diet of fruits, vegetables, and limited carbs. I never had a weight problem, at my 40th high school reunion I weighed only 5 lbs over my slim high school weight! My only health concern was being occasionally hypothyroid and for that I was seeing a great homeopathic doctor that kept an eye on my thyroid levels. But when he tested by blood, I found out that my blood sugar was slightly out of normal range. His recommendation–stop eating fruits! I hated to hear this because I had been enjoying eating an orange every day and I thought this was a healthy thing to do. Well, fast forward to one year later and my blood sugar is much improved. I was able to reverse prediabetes! I feel that now, I am the healthiest I’ve ever been because I have followed some simple steps to get my blood sugar in check. You can reverse prediabetes, too! Is Prediabetes Common? Over 79 million Americans have prediabetes according to data from the CDC and many of them are walking around not knowing this! Most importantly, they are missing out on the opportunity to prevent future type 2 diabetes and the resulting multitude of detrimental health effects such as; heart disease, neuropathy, kidney disease, eye damage Continue reading >>

Comparing Three Popular Diet Trends: Paleo Vs Keto Vs Mediterranean

Comparing Three Popular Diet Trends: Paleo Vs Keto Vs Mediterranean

If you’re looking to be the fittest you can be you’ve undoubtedly looked into the diets that are likely to support your goals. You’re interested in being lean, maintaining muscle, peak performance and blowing away your doctor every time at your yearly physical. Unless you really are a cave dweller, you have heard of the Paleo (or similarly named) diets before. If you follow biohackers and scientific diet research, you’ve heard of the Ketogenic diet. And, if you ever watch or read the news, you most certainly have heard of the Mediterranean diet. Have you given any of them a try, maybe skimmed the surface or are considering which one might be best for you? When it comes to these three popular diets, Christopher Gardner, Ph.D. Professor of Medicine and Director of Nutrition Studies at Stanford University says, “the public health community should be open to these, and every other diet. We have an obesity epidemic that we haven’t been able to solve, and this goes hand in hand with a chronic disease epidemic that is crippling the health care system of the US.” So let’s look at these three diet trends, two of which have reliable research to back them up. They all include a moderate to high amount of protein intake which Americans love (a topic Dr. Gardener will be lecturing on this week). They can each give you great results for losing weight and improving important biomarkers. The issue, as with any diet is, can you adhere to one of these long term? Let’s start first with the newest of the trends – the Paleo diet - founded by Loren Cordain, Ph.D. and has branched off into a movement launching many other brands based on Dr. Cordain’s tenets of “eating foods you were designed to eat.” The belief is that when we switched from eating only foods we could Continue reading >>

Can The Paleo Diet Reverse Prediabetes Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Can The Paleo Diet Reverse Prediabetes Or Type 2 Diabetes?

When I was on the blood sugar control diet three years ago, I limited the amount of fruit, grains, dairy, coffee, and alcohol I consumed for a few weeks and then eliminated all of these items except for fruit completely for a month. Over a 6-week period, I got my blood sugar under control, gained more energy, and lost 25 pounds. I realized later that the second phase was essentially the Paleo diet, which comes from the word Paleolithic, a prehistoric era. The diet is based on the idea that our hunter/gatherer ancestors ate lots of grass-fed meat, fish, nuts, seeds and plants. The Paleo diet also eliminates grains and dairy, which followers believe were discovered long after the Paleolithic period ended when people became farmers. Legumes including beans and lentils are not on the Paleo list either, which can contribute to digestive problems in some people. The appeal of the Paleo diet is that it is based on whole foods rather than processed food, which is abundant in our standard American diet. Eating and preparing whole foods eliminates many sources of hidden/added sugars, starches, salt and hydrogenated oils found in packaged food. You also replace refined table sugar and artificial sweeteners with natural sweeteners such as pure raw honey, which have trace minerals. But, it’s still sugar so you need to limit your total daily intake to 6 teaspoons. Eliminating grains and dairy also removes possible sources of allergies/sensitivities, which create inflammation. An estimated 6% of Americans (18 million) are sensitive to gluten and an estimated 13% (about 40 miliion) are lactose intolerant. Although many people refer to the Paleo diet as a low-carb diet, you still eat lots of whole carbs in the form of vegetables, some fruit, nuts and seeds. Eliminating high-glycemic s Continue reading >>

Paleo-mediterranean Diet

Paleo-mediterranean Diet

Which Cooking Oil Can You Use on the HCG Diet? Consuming a healthy diet is the foundation of maintaining your overall physical and mental wellness. Poor dietary habits contribute to the development of the leading killers in America, including heart disease, cancer and diabetes. Numerous diet programs claim the best health benefits, yet conflicting information makes choosing the right nutritional path difficult. The Paleo and Mediterranean style diets are two similar programs emphasizing diet as a way of life, not a temporary solution. Each has benefits and clinically evidenced effectiveness for reducing risk of health complications. Choose what works best for you based on credible information and consultation with your physician. The Paleo diet is based on the concepts of eating foods off the land as the ancestral hunters and gatherers from the Paleolithic period once did. Before industrialization, technological advances and science assisted in farming, slaughtering and packaging foods, the ancient Paleolithic people hunted free range game, fished in seas that were not exposed to toxic dumping and gathered crops from pesticide free land. Emulating this form of diet in modern times is not as difficult as it may seem, and you are not expected to find wild game to hunt and build a farm in your back yard. The basics boil down to fruits and vegetables as the foundation, incorporating lean sources of protein from poultry or fish and obtaining healthy fats from nuts, seeds or grass-fed meat sources. Grains are not emphasized in this diet plan. The Mediterranean diet is modeled after the eating habits and cooking styles of people living in countries that border the Mediterranean Sea, including Greece and Italy. This diet emphasizes more daily servings of fruits, vegetables and Continue reading >>

Guest Blog Post: Paleo And Type 1 Diabetes

Guest Blog Post: Paleo And Type 1 Diabetes

Guest post by Lindsay Swanson. This Guest Post includes information that does not conform to the Joslin nutritional guidelines. We have received a number of inquiries about the Paleo diet, and requests for examples of people who follow this diet, so we asked Lindsay to share her experiences. Her opinions are her own and not those of the Joslin Clinic. I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when I was 25 years old – a challenging and life changing experience. Looking back, I’m just thankful I survived the diagnosis. Now, I’m thriving with diabetes, and more so in recent years, as a result of transitioning to a paleo lifestyle. In addition to the technology and medical devices I use to manage my diabetes, I’ve worked diligently over the last three years to overhaul my lifestyle. Through an introduction from a close friend, I decided to try the paleo lifestyle not because of type 1 diabetes, but because of years of undiagnosed chronic GI issues. I didn’t know a lot about it, so the journey began with a lot of reading and research, and the more I read, the more that I realized I firmly believed in the foundation of what paleo is; nourishing my body and mind by eating the foods and nutrients I was intended to. Step-by-step, I started eliminating different groups of foods, a slow transition over time and I continued to feel increasingly better. I removed grains, then soy, then legumes, then corn, then rice, etc. I started trying different kinds of foods, experimenting in the kitchen, cooking with different methods, and became increasingly passionate about food. I admit, when I first decided to make this transition living with type 1 diabetes, I was terrified. I had long believed that I had to take at least a minimum amount of insulin to survive and not become ill, via Continue reading >>

Reverse Your Type 2 Diabetes By Going Paleo

Reverse Your Type 2 Diabetes By Going Paleo

Reverse Your Type 2 Diabetes by Going Paleo Today the word diet carries the connotation that youre restricting your food in some way, but Paleo nutrition doesnt feel as though youre dieting at all. This is because Paleo-style eating is really returning to a nutrient-dense way of eating. Paleo meals are packed with nutrition and leave you feeling satiated. When youre on a Paleo food plan, youre eating in one of the healthiest ways possible for your body. The Paleo approach is backed by biology and biochemistry to include the best foods for a healthy life, while ridding you of the worst offenders in the modern diet. I recommend Paleo eating to my patients because Ive seen how it positively impacts not only how they feel, but their biomarkers and laboratory tests as well. One study even allowed patients to eat as much as they want as long as it fell within the parameters of the Paleo diet, and found it had a positive impact on their overall health. After five weeks, those on the Paleo diet saw reduction in their waist/hip ratio, abdominal circumference, improved blood pressure, blood sugar, triglycerides, and inflammatory markers. Ive seen first-hand the positive impact of Paleo eating on autoimmune disease, pain conditions, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease . Studies have found the Paleo diet improves insulin resistance, dyslipidemia (elevated cholesterol or fats in the blood), decreases hypertension, and reduces the risk of age related illnesses . Im excited to share with you that Paleo eating also carries the possibility of reversing Type 2 diabetes, a condition which has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. While Type 1 diabetes is technically an autoimmune disease, Type 2 usually develops later in life when your body becomes resistant to insulin. Usu Continue reading >>

Can The Paleo Diet Help Diabetes?

Can The Paleo Diet Help Diabetes?

After 55-year-old Steve Cooksey was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2009, he knew he wanted to approach the disease differently from the way his two diabetic family members had. “I went home and realized that to eat their way required more and more insulin," he says. For some reason, "My blood sugar should have been going down, but it wasn’t.” A few months after he was diagnosed, Cooksey abandoned the traditional diabetes diet in favor of the so-called paleo diet — a high-protein, low-carb food plan, likened to a “caveman diet,” that minimizes processed foods and emphasizes meats and vegetables. Within a month, Cooksey was able to stop taking all his medications, including those for diabetes, hypertension, and high cholesterol. He still checks his blood sugar regularly, and it’s always within normal ranges. “I have normal blood sugars for normal people, not just normal blood sugars for a diabetic,” says Cooksey, whose website, Diabetes Warrior, explains the benefits of a paleo diet for diabetes. The Potential Benefits of a Paleo Diet for Diabetes Cooksey isn’t alone. In recent years, the popularity of the paleo diet has skyrocketed, with many of its proponents touting the approach as an effective way to improve health and lose weight. A study published in August 2015 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (ECJN) suggests that people with type 2 diabetes who followed a "caveman diet" were able to improve their blood pressure, blood sugar levels, and cholesterol by significant amounts in just two weeks. Other study participants who followed a traditional diet recommended by the American Diabetes Association saw little to no improvement. The participants were given enough food to prevent them from losing weight, eliminating the possibility that Continue reading >>

Paleo Diet May Reduce Insulin Resistance

Paleo Diet May Reduce Insulin Resistance

Courtney Major and Martin Hensel June 10, 2016 A recent study has found that a paleo diet may lower insulin resistance. According to a Healio report , the Boston-based study found that obese, postmenopausal women with Type 2 diabetes and prediabetes who followed a paleo diet experienced a reduction in fatty acids that can lead to insulin resistance. For the study, the 70 study participants were split at random into two diet groups. Those in the paleo group followed a diet consisting of food that was 30 percent protein, 30 percent carbs, and 40 percent healthy fat. The second group followed a low-fat diet of food that was 15 percent protein, 55 percent carbs, and 30 percent unrestricted fat. The women were put on the same regime of physical activity. Both groups saw the same amount of weight loss. Over the two years of the study, though, those on the paleo diet also saw a 19 percent decrease in levels of fatty acids, which are commonly found in elevated levels in people with insulin resistance. Fatty acid buildup has been associated with insulin resistance, a condition in which the body uses the insulin it produces less efficiently. Eating paleo has become a new diet trend, one reminiscent of the early hunter and gatherer lifestyle. This diet mainly includes meat, fish, fruit, and vegetables, while opting out of processed food, dairy, and grains. It should be noted that those on the paleo diet did experience a 47 percent increase in monosaturated fatty acids and a 71 percent increase in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Paleo is an old-is-new diet, and there has been little research done on the long-term health impact of eating this way. This study has limitations, and the findings should be viewed as preliminary. One problem is that the report doesnt mention changes in bloo Continue reading >>

Fight Diabetes With Paleo Power

Fight Diabetes With Paleo Power

The foods you’re offered today as part of the American diet put you at risk for diabetes, plain and simple. It’s getting so bad that 1 out of three of us can now be considered if not diabetic, then pre-diabetic. Fortunately, returning to a more natural, ancestral way of eating, which we now call the paleo diet, can help you escape this health danger. It helped me reduce my hypertension and arthritis, and I’ve shared my story with you. I’m especially excited to share another huge success story with you… Consider the experience of Lt. Col. Robert Oh who has been a family physician specializing in sports medicine in the U.S. Army for over 16 years. Oh says that even though he’s always been physically fit, a few years ago, in his thirties, he was diagnosed as pre-diabetic. He blamed his pre-diabetes on the fact that he was taking a statin drug, a pharmaceutical that lowers cholesterol but that also places you at increased risk of diabetes. But at around the same time that he stopped taking a statin, he decided to try the paleo diet. He also changed his exercise program to one that incorporated high intensity training (HIT). HIT uses interval training to boost fitness: Brief periods of intense exertion alternating with short periods of rest. Low-carb paleo He followed a low-carb paleo diet described in The Paleo Solution, a book by Robb Wolf. The results, says Oh, were dramatic: “Even though I started at 150 lbs. on my 5’7” frame, at the end of 30 days, I had lost eight pounds of body fat and felt great. Most importantly, my hemoglobin A1C, a marker of glucose control, dropped back to normal.” Oh notes that the 2014 Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes published by the American Diabetes Association now admits that low-carb diets (many versions of the pal Continue reading >>

On The Paleo Diet And Diabetes

On The Paleo Diet And Diabetes

The Paleo Diet, otherwise known as the “Caveman Diet,” is hugely popular at the moment. And lots of folks want to know how it plays with diabetes... The DiabetesMine Team has taken a deep dive here into what this eating plan entails, and what nutrition experts and research have to say about it. What is Paleo? The basic idea of the Paleo Diet is returning to our dietary roots. That is, the name is short for “Paleolithic” referring to the Stone Age, when humans had a very simple diet of whole, unprocessed foods. The theory here is that if we go back to eating that way, we’ll all be healthier and toxin-free. This diet is super-trendy at the moment as almost a modern “cure-all,” but the premise is based on scientific evidence about what early humans ate. Established by health scholar Loren Cordrain, Paleo assumes that humans were genetically and evolutionarily designed to eat foods that were available during the Paleolithic era, versus the agriculturally-based diet that was only developed in the last 10,000 years -- and even more so the processed and chemically-based diet of the last hundred years. The diet consists of lean meats, vegetables, fruits, and nuts. What’s missing are all processed foods, grains, dairy, and legumes, along with simple sugars and artificial sweeteners. Because, you know... cavemen didn’t eat that stuff. According experts, the Paleo Diet is high in protein, fiber and healthy fats; high in potassium salt intake and low in sodium salt (healthier option); and provides dietary acid and alkaline balance as well as high intake of vitamins, minerals, plant phytochemicals and antioxidants. It’s also quite low-carb -- a plus for those of us with diabetes, to be sure! But for many people, it is difficult to make a long-term commitment to s Continue reading >>

Diabetes And A Paleo Diet

Diabetes And A Paleo Diet

Every minute, three people in the U.S. are diagnosed with diabetes, for a total of 20.9 million people living with the disease (as of 2011, so that number is probably even higher now). That’s up from just 5.6 million in 1980. Currently, about 7% of people in the US have diabetes, but that doesn’t actually tell the whole story. An estimated 86 million more have pre-diabetes (blood sugar high enough to be dangerous, but not enough to be diabetes. Diabetes is sometimes called a “lifestyle disease,” meaning that it’s caused by lifestyle factors like diet and exercise, rather than a particular germ or gene. It’s often (but not always!) associated with other lifestyle diseases like obesity, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure, because the same kinds of lifestyle patterns tend to cause more than one of those problems. When the Paleo crowd starts talking about diabetes, we typically start from the fact that it’s almost unknown in traditional cultures, even among people in later middle-age. The natural suggestion from there is to eat like people in those cultures – minimal processed and refined foods. But there are a few problems with this: All those traditional groups eat differently, so who do you want to imitate, the ultra low-carb and diabetes-free Maasai, or the high-carb and equally diabetes-free Kitavans? Diet isn’t the only difference. Lifestyle factors like sleep and exercise also have a huge effect on diabetes: it’s not just food. A diet that works in the context of one lifestyle might not work in another. Prevention isn’t the same as cure. People who’ve lived in the modern world their whole lives might need more intensive intervention than people who’ve always been healthy. For a really comprehensive look at diabetes, we need to get bey Continue reading >>

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

David Kendall, M.D., is the chief scientific and medical officer of the The American Diabetes Association. The group’s 71st Scientific Sessions begin Friday in San Diego, California, with presentations of the latest research, treatment recommendations and advances toward a cure for diabetes. Each year diabetes accounts for more deaths than breast cancer and AIDS combined. While diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) is ever more manageable because of advances in medication, a better understanding of blood glucose monitoring and new technologies for delivering insulin, uncontrolled or undiagnosed diabetes still remains the leading cause of blindness in adults, kidney failure and amputation. There are many myths about diabetes - myths that can do much harm. Many believe that diabetes is “just a touch of sugar,” or only something we develop in later life. Although diabetes is manageable, the diabetes epidemic continues to grow; every 17 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes and at the current rate, one in three people in the U.S. will have diabetes by the year 2050. Knowing the facts (and your own risk) can help all of us fight the misconceptions associated with this awful disease and ultimately stop diabetes. So take a minute to learn the facts about diabetes. The more we know, the better equipped we are to detect, prevent and treat diabetes and its deadly complications. 1) Myth: Diabetes is really no big deal. Fact: As I’ve already noted, diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. The risk of heart problems is more than twice as high in people with diabetes and two out of three people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. Uncontrolled diabetes also leads to a host of other complications. 2) Myth: Eating too much sugar cause Continue reading >>

Diabetics Should Think Twice Before Starting The Paleo Diet

Diabetics Should Think Twice Before Starting The Paleo Diet

There is no long-term evidence showing the benefits of the Paleo diet for those with type 2 diabetes, and it may actually do more harm than good. Associate Professor Sof Andrikopoulos of the University of Melbourne Department of Medicine, stated in the Medical Journal of Australia that those with type 2 diabetes should not get too hyped up about the Paleo diet that is being promoted in social media on dozens of websites. There have been only two trials worldwide of less than 20 participants, each with type 2 diabetes. One had no control diet, and neither of the trials lasted more than 12 weeks. Therefore, the long-term effects on diabetes sufferers and solid conclusions about the impact of glycemic control on weight were not determined. Andrikopoulos states that the Paleo diet insists that people avoid refined sugar and processed food, which would be a positive benefit and consistent with worldwide dietary guidelines. However, it also advocates cutting out dairy and whole grains, which are important sources of calcium and fiber. Some celebrities make matters worse, by also making the diet zero-carb and high-fat, which could cause rapid weight gain and increase the risk of heart disease. If a person is already overweight, or lives a sedentary life, it could be risky to adopt a high-fat diet and could actually be dangerous if he or she has diabetes. Andrikopoulos believes that diabetes sufferers benefit most from exercise and the Mediterranean diet with its fats from fish, olive oil, legumes and low refined sugar. Additionally, extra virgin olive oil has been shown to beneficially impact post-meal blood sugar and cholesterol levels, as well as to reverse metabolic syndrome. A knowledgable academic, Professor Andrikopoulos is also the President of the Australian Diabetes S Continue reading >>

Meal Plan You Can “live” With

Meal Plan You Can “live” With

The meal plan you decide to use is THE single most important factor in winning the war with diabetes. The diabetes meal plan below has worked for everyone who has followed it, and it can work for you. successful diabetes meal plan and diabetic food chart list of low carb foods to eat and what to avoid Many factors influence how you manage diabetes. Exercise, stress reduction, supplements and drugs (if needed) are all important. However, the number one factor is what you consume. Your journey to reducing blood sugars is literally moments away! In February 2009, I was obese, chronically sick, diagnosed with diabetes, taking 4 insulin shots and drugs just to survive! Today, I have the normal blood sugar reading of a non-diabetic. I am drug and insulin FREE! My Diabetes Meal Plan As of August 2009, I have stayed below 30 grams of total carbohydrates per day. I feel best in the 10-15 gram range of total carbohydrates per day. This low carb meal plan is not just for diabetics. Anyone taking medication, or suffering from a disease or illness should try this meal plan for 30 days. This meal plan is full of low inflammatory foods. The low inflammatory foods will give your body a chance to heal itself. I eliminated diabetes drugs and insulin when my overnight fasting blood glucose levels were consistently in the 70-90 range. Carb Planning Successfully living with diabetes is all about “rationing” carbs. Obviously, if your insulin production is reduced and you require insulin or diabetes drugs, diabetes management becomes more complicated. Warning: Consuming even moderate amounts of carbohydrate makes managing your diabetes exponentially more difficult! Following a diabetes meal plan that is truly diabetes-friendly is so important! This is the diabetes meal plan I have been fo Continue reading >>

Paleolithic Diet May Help Control Diabetes

Paleolithic Diet May Help Control Diabetes

By Jeffrey Norris Caveman cuisine is all the rage. Way back in the day, it was just what everybody ate. Now it’s called the Paleolithic diet. Devotees dine on lean meat. They consume a cornucopia’s worth of fruits and vegetables. They eschew grains and dairy products. They chew on raw nuts, but forego legumes such as beans and peanuts. Beyond those broad guidelines, people disagree on the finer points of Stone Age eating habits. The diets of our ancient forebears undoubtedly varied depending on what was available in the part of the globe they inhabited. But think “unprocessed.” Two UCSF physicians and some of their patients with type 2 diabetes are hoping that the Paleolithic diet will merit more than fleeting popularity as just another futile food fancy. The initial research findings are striking. Without losing weight, participants in a preliminary study improved blood sugar control, blood pressure control and blood vessel elasticity. They lowered levels of blood fats such as cholesterol. And most amazingly, participants achieved these results in less than three weeks -- simply by switching to a Paleolithic diet. Human Evolution Lags Changing Lifestyles The original Paleolithic diet dates back to before the advent of agriculture. That’s a milestone humans reached 10,000 or more years ago. Advocates reason that humans evolved to live healthily as hunter-gatherers. They say our species hasn’t evolved quickly enough to adapt metabolically to changes in our diet due to agriculture – and certainly not fast enough to thrive on the new, processed creations of the food industry. According to the current crop of would-be hunter-gatherers, that’s why we suffer the chronic diseases of modern society. Among the metabolic afflictions, diabetes now is epidemic. Two Continue reading >>

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