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Can Diabetics Follow A Paleo Diet

Can The Paleo Diet Help Diabetics?

Can The Paleo Diet Help Diabetics?

November is National Diabetes Month, so now is a great time to reflect upon the 26 million people who already have diabetes, as well as the nearly 80 million with pre-diabetes (those on high alert for developing the condition). If you fall into any of these groups, or know someone who does, take the time to consider what kinds of food choices may lead to better health. Sometimes, better health means that weight loss is necessary. Obesity increases the risk for diabetes, and losing weight can help keep your blood glucose level on target. Luckily, it may not be necessary to lose all those excess pounds to improve diabetes outcomes. Losing just 5-10% of your body weight can help lower your blood glucose, total cholesterol, and blood pressure levels. Here, we will outline one eating plan that can help people with diabetes lose weight, among many other possible benefits. Often, people do not make time to prepare their own meals or even monitor their food intake. This can lead to regular intake of packaged, processed foods. Many experts believe that this trend away from carefully prepared whole foods has contributed to the rise in obesity, diabetes, and other chronic diseases. A growing number of nutrition researchers and doctors now suggest that we try a return to simpler diets, based on grass-fed and free-range animal products, fresh seafood, and whole fruit, vegetables, seeds, and nuts. The Paleo (Paleolithic) Diet, also known the Hunter-Gatherer Diet, is a healthy-eating plan based on fresh, unprocessed plants and animals. Even though it is modeled after human diets from thousands of years ago, the Paleo Diet consists of easy-to-find foods, such as fish, eggs, fruit, vegetables, nuts, and grass-fed meats. Most versions of the diet do not include grains (like wheat, rye, Continue reading >>

Paleo, Do We Have A Problem?

Paleo, Do We Have A Problem?

Lots of meat, healthy fats, veggies, and no dairy, grains, or processed sugar of any kind—those are the main principles of the highly popular Paleo diet, which loyal followers credit for everything from losing weight to curing adult acne. With celebs like Jessica Biel and Kobe Bryant embracing the dietary lifestyle, you would think it's a foolproof way to slim down and stay healthy. But not necessarily, says a new study out of the University of Melbourne; it's far from being one of the best 50 zero belly tips ever… A study published in the nature journal Nutrition and Diabetes reveals that researchers found Paleo-esque diets to be a problem for the pre-diabetes mice they tested. Here's how it went down: One group of rodents went from a diet of 3% fat to a diet with 60% more fat and only 20% carbs. The other group ate their normal diet. Although the researchers were testing to see if a high-fat, low-carb diet would be beneficial for those with pre-diabetes (translation: checking to see if a Paleo-like diet could help), they actually found the opposite. The high-fat, low-carb group actually gained more weight than the constant group after eight weeks, doubling their fat mass from 2% to 4%. Their insulin levels rose, and they also had worse glucose intolerance. "This level of weight gain will increase blood pressure and increase your risk of anxiety and depression and may cause bone issues and arthritis," said Professor Sof Andrikopoulos, lead author of the study. "For someone who is already overweight, this diet would only further increase blood sugar and insulin levels—and could actually predispose them to diabetes." The mice examined in the study were, however, sedentary. Any healthy weight-loss program should incorporate at least 30 minutes of exercise several ti Continue reading >>

Paleo Diet And Diabetes (is Paleo The Answer?)

Paleo Diet And Diabetes (is Paleo The Answer?)

Given the skyrocketing popularity of the Paleo diet in the last few years, proponents of the lifestyle have been touting it as a way to improve one’s health and reduce risk factors associated with chronic health conditions. Many scholars, scientists, and health professionals are wondering if the diet of our cavemen ancestors could be a helpful solution to one of our biggest health problems, diabetes. Let’s dive into the basics about diabetes first, and then take a closer look at how the Paleo diet may of benefit to those looking to manage the condition through dietary modifications. Diabetes 101 Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing a number of serious health complications when left untreated or poorly managed. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in the year 2014, 29.1 million people, roughly 9.3% of the population, were living with diabetes. Diabetes develops when your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use the insulin produced properly, causing sugar to build up in your blood; therefore, diabetes is often diagnosed when blood tests indicate higher than normal fasting blood glucose levels. Yourpancreas, an organ that is positioned near your stomach, is responsible for the production of insulin, the hormone that is required to get glucose get into your cells for proper energy production and utilization. There are two types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults. Previously known as juvenile diabetes, only 5% of those diagnosed with diabetes have this form of the disease. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin, and one must supply the body with insulin instead as a prescription medication. Type 2 diabetes is the most common fo Continue reading >>

How Safe Are Paleo Diets?

How Safe Are Paleo Diets?

“Paleo,” or paleolithic diets — named after the ancient era when humans were still hunter-gatherers, before the development of agriculture — have seen a spike in interest in recent years. According to a recent article, “paleo diet” was the most searched-for type of diet on the Internet in 2014. Yet there is still confusion about what such a diet entails (hence the common reference to “paleo diets” in plural, rather than to one single diet), as well as uncertainty about how healthy such a diet is. Many advocates of paleo diets see them as a good choice for people with diabetes or prediabetes, since they’re low in refined and easily digestible carbohydrates. Yet a recent study, published in the journal Nutrition & Diabetes, found that an approximation of a paleo diet had negative effects on metabolism in mice. As described in an article on the study at Medical News Today, two groups of overweight mice with symptoms of prediabetes were followed for eight weeks. The first group was fed a diet designed to resemble a paleo diet, which was 60% fat and 20% carbohydrate. The second group followed its regular diet, which was only 3% fat. At the end of the eight weeks, the high-fat-diet mice had gained an average of 15% of their body weight, and they had higher levels of insulin and other markers of insulin resistance. Their average body-fat percentage also doubled, from about 2% to about 4%. As the study’s authors point out, the weight gain seen in the high-fat-diet mice is equivalent to someone weighing 200 pounds gaining 30 pounds in less than two months. Such weight gain raises a person’s risk of developing prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, arthritis, and other disorders. The main lesson, they write, is that eating too much fat is unhe Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Currently, there are nine drug classes of oral diabetes medications approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Sulfonylureas, for example, glimepiride (Amaryl) and glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL) Meglitinides, for example, nateglinide (Starlix) and repaglinide (Prandin) Thiazolidinediones, for example, pioglitazone (Actos) DPP-4 inhibitors, for example, sitagliptin (Januvia) and linagliptin (Tradjenta) What types of foods are recommended for a type 2 diabetes meal plan? A diabetes meal plan can follow a number of different patterns and have a variable ratio of fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. The carbohydrates consumed should be low glycemic load and come primarily from vegetables. The fat and proteins consumed should primarily come from plant sources. What type of carbohydrates are recommended for a type 2 diabetic diet plan? Carbohydrates (carbs) are the primary food that raises blood sugar. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure the impact of a carbohydrate on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. The main factors that determine a food's (or meal's) glycemic load are the amount of fiber, fat, and protein it contains. The difference between glycemic index and glycemic load is that glycemic index is a standardized measurement and glycemic load accounts for a real-life portion size. For example, the glycemic index of a bowl of peas is 68 (per 100 grams) but its glycemic load is just 16 (lower the better). If you just referred to the glycemic index, you'd think peas were a bad choice, but in reality, you wouldn't eat 100 grams of peas. With a normal portion size, peas have a healthy glycemic load as well as being an excellent source of pro Continue reading >>

The Paleo Diet For Diabetes

The Paleo Diet For Diabetes

Can we improve upon the standard Paleo diet for diabetes? Over the past few decades, diabetes has reached epidemic proportions, skyrocketing from 108 million people worldwide in 1980 to over 422 million people today (according to the most recent World Health Organization data)! That includes 29 million people in the United States alone, which is 9.3% of the entire US population (yes, almost one out of ten people in America have diabetes!). And, if we think about all the additional cases of pre-diabetes and metabolic syndrome out there, those numbers shoot even higher. In fact, pre-diabetes is estimated to affect an additional 87 million Americans. How did we get in this mess? A combination of genetic and modern environmental factors created the perfect storm for type 2 diabetes, as well as autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes (type 2 diabetes happens when the body can’t properly use insulin, whereas type 1 diabetes involves the destruction of beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin). Scientific Studies of the Paleo Diet for Diabetes Lucky for us, diabetes is one of the many conditions that the Paleo diet can help manage or (in the case of type 2!) reverse. In fact, trials of Paleo-style diets on type 2 diabetics (as well as other people with poor glycemic control) consistently show that Paleo can be a powerful tool for reducing both the risk factors and symptoms of diabetes. Multiple studies have shown that the Paleo diet improves glucose tolerance on oral challenge, fasting blood sugar, insulin sensitivity, HbA1c (a measurement of average blood sugar levels over the last 3 months), C-peptide (a marker of insulin secretion), and HOMA indices (measures of insulin resistance and beta-cell function). In fact, the Paleo diet outperforms the American Diabetes A Continue reading >>

Diabetics Should Think Twice Before Starting The Paleo Diet

Diabetics Should Think Twice Before Starting The Paleo Diet

There is no long-term evidence showing the benefits of the Paleo diet for those with type 2 diabetes, and it may actually do more harm than good. Associate Professor Sof Andrikopoulos of the University of Melbourne Department of Medicine, stated in the Medical Journal of Australia that those with type 2 diabetes should not get too hyped up about the Paleo diet that is being promoted in social media on dozens of websites. There have been only two trials worldwide of less than 20 participants, each with type 2 diabetes. One had no control diet, and neither of the trials lasted more than 12 weeks. Therefore, the long-term effects on diabetes sufferers and solid conclusions about the impact of glycemic control on weight were not determined. Andrikopoulos states that the Paleo diet insists that people avoid refined sugar and processed food, which would be a positive benefit and consistent with worldwide dietary guidelines. However, it also advocates cutting out dairy and whole grains, which are important sources of calcium and fiber. Some celebrities make matters worse, by also making the diet zero-carb and high-fat, which could cause rapid weight gain and increase the risk of heart disease. If a person is already overweight, or lives a sedentary life, it could be risky to adopt a high-fat diet and could actually be dangerous if he or she has diabetes. Andrikopoulos believes that diabetes sufferers benefit most from exercise and the Mediterranean diet with its fats from fish, olive oil, legumes and low refined sugar. Additionally, extra virgin olive oil has been shown to beneficially impact post-meal blood sugar and cholesterol levels, as well as to reverse metabolic syndrome. A knowledgable academic, Professor Andrikopoulos is also the President of the Australian Diabetes S Continue reading >>

The Paleo Diet And Diabetes: Preventing And Healing Type 2 Diabetes

The Paleo Diet And Diabetes: Preventing And Healing Type 2 Diabetes

50% of Americans are pre-diabetic. Can getting back to your ancestral roots reduce your risk? We’re in the midst of a diabetes (type 2) epidemic. The global burden of diabetes doubled from 1980 to 2014, and it is rising rapidly in low to middle income families and countries. (1) The World Health Organization predicts that by the year 2030, diabetes will be the 7th leading cause of death in the world. (2) Today, 50% of Americans are classified as pre-diabetic or diabetic, despite experts being in agreement that the standard American diet (SAD) figures centrally in the pathogenesis of “diseases of civilization,” such as diabetes. (3) Can getting back to your ancestral roots and adopting a Paleo diet reduce your risk or reverse pre-diabetes and diabetes? What is Diabetes? After you eat a meal, your food travels from your gut to your liver, and finally into your bloodstream. In order to get blood sugars from your bloodstream INTO the cells, your pancreas releases insulin, which signals cell receptors to take up glucose. Insulin’s job (amongst many other tasks) is to lower your blood sugar levels and deliver the glucose to your tissues to fuel activity and cellular processes. Suffering from Diabetes or blood sugar imbalance? Grab our FREE Diabetes Guide & 7 Day Meal Plan here! Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the beta cells of the pancreas do not produce insulin. This is where the wonders of modern medicine save the day, providing lifesaving insulin that can be delivered after each meal. This condition requires the use of exogenous (i.e., medication) insulin to survive. Although this article will not address type 1 diabetes, there is still a crossover benefit from making the suggested changes (i.e., you use less insulin after each meal). Type 1 dia Continue reading >>

Paleo For Type 2? Pros And Cons

Paleo For Type 2? Pros And Cons

Thinking about “going Paleo” to help manage your diabetes? You’re not alone. Many in the type 2 diabetes community are adopting the Paleo diet in the hopes that it will help increase insulin sensitivity and stabilize blood sugars. The diet is based on the principle of eating as similar to our Paleolithic ancestors as is modernly possible. Although what is “allowed” and “not allowed” varies depending on which version of the diet you’re considering, the overall idea is that you’re eating foods straight from the earth – fruits, veggies, nuts, seeds, eggs, meat and fish – and avoiding foods that were likely not eaten by our primal descendants. So what’s the verdict? Is this just another trendy diet plan that will lose its luster? Or could going Paleo actually work to improve your diabetes management plan? Here are some pros and cons to consider before taking the Paleo plunge: Pro: The focus is on whole, unprocessed foods As a health coach and dietitian, I am typically wary of new diet fads. One reason (among many) is that trendy diets often encourage followers to eat processed foods in the form of shakes, bars, powders or pills – all of which are far from a sustainable (and budget-friendly) approach to healthy eating. This is where I have to hand it to the Paleo diet – it is founded on real food. In fact, the whole premise of the Paleo diet is to eat as nature intended. This means filling up on high-fiber fruits and veggies, high-quality protein sources like grass-fed meats, and heart-healthy fats like avocados and nuts. This style of eating often means less eating out and more cooking at home. When you are cooking, you have more control—control of the ingredients, control of how much you put into your mouth. and control of your blood glucose l Continue reading >>

Paleo Diet For Diabetes- How The Paleo Diet Helps Diabetics

Paleo Diet For Diabetes- How The Paleo Diet Helps Diabetics

My Review of the Paleo Diet Paleo Diet for Diabetes Product: The Paleo Diet Author: Loren Cordain Price: $10.45 USD (Paperback- 266 pages) Cheapest place to buy: Amazon.com- Available on Amazon Prime! Product dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches Personal rating: 9 out of 10 So what is the Paleo Diet? Loren Cordain declares that we should be eating like the primitive caveman. And what’s the number one reason for this? All the sugary, salt, alcohol, dairy products, and processed foods were not there and ready for consumption way back then. So, the first thing I think to myself is, then why were all these foods that are bad for you brought into existence? We would all be thin and healthy and there would possibly not be any overweight people with diabetes and other health issues. But I guess there’s no reason to think about something you can’t change. Or can you? Well you can’t change the fact that foods that are bad for your health are available now. It seems that they are staring you in the face everywhere. But the change we can make is to avoid them and begin eating like the cave people did so long ago. And knowing what eating the wrong foods can do to your health is incentive enough to change your eating lifestyle permanently. The Paleo Diet and benefits for people with diabetes Losing weight is a major factor with any health issues but especially with diabetes. Staying away from refined sugars and processed foods is a must for diabetics. Experts in the field of nutrition declare that by eating a more natural diet of vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds and animal products will result in a much healthier body and lifestyle. To me, it just makes perfectly good sense to follow because we’ve always heard that we should eat and fruits and veggies anyway, so why not follow wh Continue reading >>

Why I Took The Paleo Plunge To Manage My Type 1 Diabetes

Why I Took The Paleo Plunge To Manage My Type 1 Diabetes

As someone who has always loved the comfort foods like pizza and mac and cheese, being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when I was a college student hit me hard. I grew up in a healthy home and there was no history of this auto-immune disease in my family, so my diganosis was a complete suprise! Shortly after being diagnosed, I gained a lot of excess weight, felt sick all the time and was practically fainting at my internship multiple times throughout the day. To say it was a dark and difficult time in my life is an understatment. I knew there had to be a better way to live! After doing a considerable amount of research on the effects of carbohydrates and sugars on my body, I decided to adopt a grain-free, real-food and Paleo way of eating. Almost immediately my health improved. I felt so much better and it gave me much tighter control over my blood sugar levels. This feeling of stability and control was so exciting I jumped whole-heartedly into following the Paleo-centered lifestyle and I have never looked back! Of course, it wasn't easy at first since for me food has an emotional component to it. The elimination of grains, gluten and refined sugars left me longing for many of my favorite foods but when I reminded myself of the benefits of following the diet—and how fabulously I felt each day— it boosted my will power and made it easier to say no to foods like sandwiches and pasta. It also helped that I like experimenting in the kitchen and was prepared to clean up food creativity that got messy. There were definitely failures and yes, endless batches of completely flat cookies and batter spilled all over my oven, too. But I thoroughly enjoyed the process and began to slowly re-create all my favorite foods from classic butter biscuits made with cashews to spaghetti s Continue reading >>

Is Paleo Safe For Type 2 Diabetics?

Is Paleo Safe For Type 2 Diabetics?

In a word, absolutely! Type 2 diabetics can really benefit from this diet! Eating Paleo removes the foods that mess with your blood glucose the most, and it helps people lose weight, often effortlessly. The Paleo diet consists only of foods that are very satisfying and blood sugar balancing, so it usually leaves people feeling less hungry and having fewer cravings. Type 2 diabetes is what happens when you eat too much sugar/carbs and your body’s cells become desensitized to insulin, the hormone that allows glucose to be taken out of your blood stream and released into your cells. In other words, the sugar just sits there in your blood stream, toxic, unable to get into storage or be used by your cells. Why Does Eating Paleo Work? Since eating Paleo eliminates refined sugars and grains (the foods that spike your blood sugar the most) it’s very effective for diabetics. It means you won’t have to use much insulin at all and your cells will start using it efficiently again. It’s like if you worked in a daycare and you had 25 babies crying and screaming all day long. I bet you’d get a little desensitized to all that crying after a week on the job and you’d think to yourself, ‘That baby can wait.’ And I bet some of those babies wouldn’t ever get the attention they needed. But if you send 22 or 23 of those 25 babies home, you’ll be much more sensitive to the needs of those 2 or 3 babies, right? The same goes for insulin. When you flood your body with sugar and/or other carbs every day, your cells get overwhelmed and stop caring so much whether your cells get that sugar. If you reduce the amount of sugar and carbs in your diet, you reduce the need for insulin and your body can then take care of its screaming babies. Does that make sense? A lot of diabetics ac Continue reading >>

Diabetes And A Paleo Diet

Diabetes And A Paleo Diet

Every minute, three people in the U.S. are diagnosed with diabetes, for a total of 20.9 million people living with the disease (as of 2011, so that number is probably even higher now). That’s up from just 5.6 million in 1980. Currently, about 7% of people in the US have diabetes, but that doesn’t actually tell the whole story. An estimated 86 million more have pre-diabetes (blood sugar high enough to be dangerous, but not enough to be diabetes. Diabetes is sometimes called a “lifestyle disease,” meaning that it’s caused by lifestyle factors like diet and exercise, rather than a particular germ or gene. It’s often (but not always!) associated with other lifestyle diseases like obesity, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure, because the same kinds of lifestyle patterns tend to cause more than one of those problems. When the Paleo crowd starts talking about diabetes, we typically start from the fact that it’s almost unknown in traditional cultures, even among people in later middle-age. The natural suggestion from there is to eat like people in those cultures – minimal processed and refined foods. But there are a few problems with this: All those traditional groups eat differently, so who do you want to imitate, the ultra low-carb and diabetes-free Maasai, or the high-carb and equally diabetes-free Kitavans? Diet isn’t the only difference. Lifestyle factors like sleep and exercise also have a huge effect on diabetes: it’s not just food. A diet that works in the context of one lifestyle might not work in another. Prevention isn’t the same as cure. People who’ve lived in the modern world their whole lives might need more intensive intervention than people who’ve always been healthy. For a really comprehensive look at diabetes, we need to get bey Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Paleo Diet Recipes For Diabetics Paperback June 23, 2017

Diabetes: Paleo Diet Recipes For Diabetics Paperback June 23, 2017

"This book is very well written and so informative for $2.99!!. It explains in simple terms what Diabetes is, how Paleo Diet can help diabetics and, most importantly, it contains colorful and tasty recipes detailed in a step-by-step fashion with plenty of pictures. I absolutely love it." - David. "This book is a practical, easy-to-follow guide for both understanding and implementing the diabetic diet lifestyle. It provides realistic expectations along with a simple pathway for transitioning to low sugar,low carb and safe diet. The recipes are simple and delicious, and provide a diversity of options." - w3D. "This book is very organized and exceptionally well written. I particularly loved the detailed step-by-step instructions and the colorful pictures used to guide the user with regards to how the food is supposed to look. I got the kindle edition for free when I bought the paperback. What more? I managed to solve the puzzle (details at the beginning of the book) in 3 minutes and got the author's other ebook for FREE! awesome!!" - Jane. "I love this cookbook. I find it tedious to put together meal plans and this has everything I needed on one page. These dishes leave you full and satisfied. I've made meals from this book for 3 weeks now and I am feeling so much better both about my diabetes diagnosis and how to handle it!. Who knew that I loved parsnips!! I had never had it before. Mashed veggies with parsnips, squash and carrots was so satisfying. Highly recommended." - KT ***Please note that Amazon will give you the kindle version of this book for FREE (that is $0.00) when you buy this paperback version from Amazon. Saving you roughly $19.99!!*** Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (June 23, 2017) Continue reading >>

Paleo Diet For Disease Prevention, Weight Loss?

Paleo Diet For Disease Prevention, Weight Loss?

Proponents of the Paleo diet, which focuses on lean meat, fruits, vegetables and nuts, promote it as a way to avoid many of the chronic diseases present now that were absent in hunter-gatherers of olden times. They may be right, say researchers from the City of Hope National Medical Center. They reviewed 13 studies on the diet, including 4 that looked at people with type 2 diabetes, and call it promising for reducing chronic disease risk and for weight loss and other health improvements.1 "The studies so far showed promising results with declines mainly in weight, and some studies showing a decline in fasting glucose and hemoglobin A1c," says Maximiliano Hyon, DO, MPH, senior endocrine fellow at City of Hope National Medical Center. He presented the findings at ENDO 2017, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Orlando Apr. 3. He stops short of recommending it at this time, however. "These are small studies with short study duration, so we need to have larger and more robust data before we can truly make a recommendation regarding the Paleo diet for people with type 2 diabetes." The studies each included only 10 to 30 people each, he says. Researchers compared the Paleo diet to a variety of other diets. Hyon and his colleagues evaluated the effects of the diet on the potential to prevent type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer risks.1 Paleo Results Results weren't consistent across all studies, Dr. Hyon tells Endocrine Web. Nor did all studies look at the same outcomes. "The mean weight loss in most of the studies was between 5 and 20.5 pounds," he says. This was over a brief study period, usually three months. "In terms of blood glucose and hemoglobin A1C [a three-month look back at blood sugar levels], not all the studies showed a significant decline," he sa Continue reading >>

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