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Can Diabetics Eat Salads?

Lettuce And Diabetes

Lettuce And Diabetes

Lettuce greens for sale at a farmers market.Photo Credit: Christina-J-Hauri/iStock/Getty Images Dieters often eat plenty of lettuce because it fills you up and provides essential nutrients, such as folate and vitamins A and K, without providing a lot of calories. Likewise, other nonstarchy vegetables, including lettuce, can be a good choice for diabetics due to their low carbohydrate content and minimal effects on blood sugar levels. A study published in "Diabetes Care" in December 2004 found that people who ate more green, leafy vegetables, such as lettuce, were less likely to develop type-2 diabetes than people who didn't eat these vegetables often. Legumes, dark yellow vegetables and fruits were also associated with a decreased risk for diabetes. The glycemic index estimates the effect of a food on your blood sugar levels, with foods having a low score being less likely to cause spikes in blood sugar levels than those with a high score. Lettuce and most other nonstarchy vegetables have very low glycemic index scores, according to the American Diabetes Association, so you don't have to worry about them greatly increasing your blood sugar levels. A cup of lettuce only contains about 5 to 10 calories and 1 to 2 grams of carbohydrates, depending on the type. When counting carbohydrates, one serving of vegetables is considered 5 grams of carbohydrates, which you wouldn't reach unless you ate more than 2 cups of lettuce. This is why the American Diabetes Association says you don't need to count the carbohydrates in nonstarchy vegetables like lettuce unless you eat more than 2 cups of raw vegetables or 1 cup of cooked. The American Diabetes Association recommends diabetics eat at least three to five servings of nonstarchy vegetables each day. Choosing a type of lettuce tha Continue reading >>

Lunch Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Lunch Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a progressive disease with many potential complications. These include blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, stroke, and loss of toes, feet, or legs. Roughly 1 in every 11 people in the United States currently has diabetes, but although the condition may be familiar, it is hardly harmless. It is the country's seventh leading cause of death, and people with diabetes have a 50 percent higher risk of death than those without the condition. Fortunately, even though diabetes is a chronic disease, it can be managed. One way that complications can be prevented is by following dietary guidelines. Classic lunch ingredients that are good for people with diabetes With planning and conscious eating, people with diabetes can safely enjoy a satisfying and varied diet. The following common lunch items can also be part of a healthful lunch for people with diabetes: canned tuna or salmon hard-boiled eggs salads with dressing on the side low-salt soups and chili whole fruit, such as apples and berries cottage cheese plain, unsweetened Greek yogurt peanut or almond butter Lunch ideas People who need to control their blood sugar can still select from a wide variety of options when they are looking for a tasty lunch. The following lunch ideas provide about 3 servings of carbohydrates each, or about 45 grams (g), or less: soup and salad, such as tomato soup with a kale-apple salad whole-wheat wrap (tortilla = 30 g carbs or less), such as turkey with hummus, cucumber, tomatoes, feta cheese, and olives spinach salad with canned tuna, ½ mayonnaise, ½ Greek yogurt, celery, and lemon juice, served over greens and diced apple hard-boiled egg served with five whole-wheat crackers, string cheese, a piece of fruit, and veggie sticks with peanut butter smoothie made with 1 cup frozen Continue reading >>

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

There are many misconceptions that people with diabetes must follow a strict diet, when in reality they can eat anything a person without diabetes eats. Amy Campbell, MS, RD, LDN, CDE, nutritionist at Joslin Diabetes Center and co-author of 16 Myths of a "Diabetic Diet," debunks some common food myths for people with diabetes. 1. People with diabetes have to eat different foods from the rest of the family. People with diabetes can eat the same foods as the rest of their family. Current nutrition guidelines for diabetes are very flexible and offer many choices, allowing people with diabetes to fit in favorite or special-occasion foods. Everyone, whether they have diabetes or not, should eat a healthful diet that consists of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein foods, and heart-healthy fats. So, if you have diabetes, there's no need to cook separately from your family. 2. People with diabetes should never give in to food cravings. Almost everyone has food cravings at some point, and people with diabetes are no exception. It's not uncommon for people with diabetes to cut out all sweets or even cut way back on food portions in order to lose weight. In turn, your body often responds to these drastic changes by creating cravings. Nine times out of ten, your food choices in these situations tend to be high in fat and/or sugar, too. The best way to deal with food cravings is to try to prevent them by following a healthy eating plan that lets you occasionally fit sweets into your diabetes meal plan. If a craving does occur, let yourself have a small taste of whatever it is you want. By doing so, you can enjoy the flavor and avoid overeating later on. 3. People with diabetes shouldn't eat too many starchy foods, even if they contain fiber, because starch raises your blo Continue reading >>

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the four healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up our Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taking in less of both Continue reading >>

Your 5-week Diabetic Diet Meal Plan

Your 5-week Diabetic Diet Meal Plan

The Outsmart Diabetes Diet is based on new research that found four specific nutrients—fiber, vitamin D, omega-3s, and calcium—work together to help balance blood sugar and encourage weight loss. Build your daily diabetic diet meal plan by choosing one breakfast, one lunch and one dinner, plus two snacks—any combination gets you approximately 1,400 calories a day and a healthy dose of the "Fat-Fighting 4." Remember to eat about every 3 hours and practice portion control. Prevention Premium: What Every Woman Knows About Erectile Dysfunction Follow this mix and match diabetic diet meal plan—adapted from The Outsmart Diabetes Diet—for the next five weeks to help fight fat, maintain healthy blood sugar levels, boost energy, and reduce your diabetes risk. BREAKFAST Fruity bagel breakfast: Spread 1 Tbsp light cream cheese and 1 tsp 100% fruit spread on ½ of a whole grain bagel. Serve with 1 c fat-free milk. Crunchy yogurt: Combine 6 oz fat-free light yogurt, ¼ c granola cereal, 1 Tbsp ground flax seed, and 1 Tbsp chopped nuts. Add ground cinnamon and/or sugar substitute to taste. Eggs and English muffin: Scramble 1 egg in a pan coated with 1 tsp canola or olive oil; top with ¼ c chopped tomato, onion, and chile salsa. Serve with toasted 100% whole grain English muffin, spread with 2 Tbsp low-fat (1%) cottage cheese, and 1 c fat-free milk. Instead of scrambled eggs, try poaching an egg: Good Morning Blend: Stir together 6 ounces fat-free yogurt, 2 Tbsp dried mixed fruit, 2 Tbsp ground flax seed and 2 Tbsp chopped almonds, walnuts, or pecans. Nutty Oatmeal: Top ½ c cooked oatmeal with ¼ c walnuts or other nuts; add ground cinnamon and/or sugar substitute to taste. Serve with 1 c fat-free milk or calcium-enriched soy or rice beverage. Bagel and cream cheese: Sprea Continue reading >>

28 Popular Restaurant Dishes That Are Great For Diabetics

28 Popular Restaurant Dishes That Are Great For Diabetics

Dining out with diabetes Contrary to popular belief, a diabetes diagnosis doesn't mean you have to spend your days eating flavorless fare. It's completely possible to enjoy delicious food—even at a restaurant, as long as you know exactly what to order, how it's prepared, and what an appropriately sized portion looks like. Since not everyone with diabetes has the same meal plan or health goals, we set out to create the most comprehensive list of diabetes-friendly restaurant dishes, whether you're cutting calories or keeping salt, carbs, or fats to a minimum. Read on for nutritionist-approved orders from Chinese and Italian restaurants, delis, smoothie shops, and other popular eateries. Plus, don't forget to be on the lookout for these menu words to avoid. At American restaurants: Turkey burger with steamed broccoli When you're dining at your local sports bar or diner, Isabel Smith, MS, RD, CDN, says that a turkey burger is the way to go. "Remove the top bun, which doesn't typically contain much fiber and swap fries for a green veggie. This will add fiber to your meal and help slow blood sugar spikes and promote satiety," she explains. Here's how to get more fiber in your diet. At American restaurants: Beef burger with a salad If you prefer a beef burger, Smith suggests pairing one with a salad (sorry, no fries) and a vinegar-based dressing on the side. Ditch the top bun to keep empty carbs off your plate and say "no thanks" to cheese to keep excess salt and fat to a minimum. At American restaurants: Filet mignon Feeling fancy? Order a filet with a sweet potato and side of non-starchy vegetables such as spinach or broccoli, suggests Miriam Jacobson, RD, CDN. "Sometimes a steak can be the healthiest item on the menu. Just beware of portion sizes. It should be the size of Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Shot Up When Eating Salad :(

Blood Sugar Shot Up When Eating Salad :(

D.D. Family T2 for a few years-diet, exercise, Metformin So I eat at Applebee's a few times a month (it's one of the few sit-down restaurants in our mall - I go to the mall with my MIL every Saturday). I used to eat their chicken Caesar salad, but I was kind of sick of it. I do generally eat low-carb but also trying to eat low-fat and low-calorie. So I tried the low-fat Asian chicken salad, which was really good. I should have checked out the carbs first. My blood sugar jumped and I only had half of it. Turns out that the whole salad has 121 grams of carbs! Yikes! Must be a really sweet dressing. It does have mini wonton strips, too. I had no idea, though. The site I went to, to check the carbs, says that their fried chicken has fewer carbs!! It sucks when you try to eat healthy and it still doesn't work, you know? LOL! D.D. Family T2 - late Jan, 2009 Avandamet 500 mg twice daily Many low fat foods I have found are loaded with carbs. I guess the people that make them add sugars, etc to compromise for the low fat taste. That does stink but thanks for telling us so we all know to keep away from it. That is one of the bad things about eating out. You try and you try and then get sideswiped. I think there are a lot of hidden carbs in salad dressing. So if you don't know for sure avoid it. I also think those little strips are pretty high carb. How did you find the carb count. Was it online. It is probably good to investigate before you eat. Get the dressing on the side - I usually ask for Oil & Vinegar and apply it myself. Sorry about that suprise - 121g of carbs is quite a salad! So I eat at Applebee's a few times a month (it's one of the few sit-down restaurants in our mall - I go to the mall with my MIL every Saturday). I used to eat their chicken Caesar salad, but I was Continue reading >>

Egg Salad Sandwich (diabetic)

Egg Salad Sandwich (diabetic)

Cut each egg in half. Carefully remove the yolks. Discard one yolk. In a small bowl, mash the remaining egg yolk. Add the sour cream, pickle relish, mayonnaise, mustard, and salt (if desired). Stir to mix well. Stir in the celery. Spread the mixture on each slice of bread. Serve as open-faced sandwiches. If desired, garnish with a light sprinkling of paprika. Serving size: 1/3 cup egg salad with 1 bread slice. Exchanges Per Serving: 1 Medium-Fat Meat, 1 Starch. Nutrition Facts: Calories 148; Calories from Fat 62; Total Fat 7g; Saturated Fat 2g; Cholesterol 215mg; Sodium 296mg; Carbohydrate 14g; Dietary Fiber 3g; Sugars 4g; Protein 9g. Advertisement Continue reading >>

Healthy... Or Not? Yogurt And Salad - Diabetes Self-management

Healthy... Or Not? Yogurt And Salad - Diabetes Self-management

Grocery shopping can be a daunting task for anyone, even dietitians. Keeping up with label reading and trying to decipher the ingredients list practically requires a PhD. (OK, perhaps thats an exaggeration, but it can often be confusing.) Whats frustrating for me is the sneaky, stealthy way that some (not all) food manufacturers package and advertise their foods to make them seem healthy and good for you. I sometimes have to pause when Im shopping to figure out if the product is really too good to be true. I can imagine how confusing it can be for people who are honestly trying to make better food choices without spending hours in the supermarket. So this week, Im highlighting a few of those health foods that maybe are thinly disguised. I should point out that the definition of healthy is somewhat subjective. For example, you may decide that a healthy food is one that is low in calories or low in carbohydrate. Others may define healthy as being free of artificial sweeteners or food colorings. Im a big fan of yogurt. Its a great source of calcium, protein, and good-for-you bacteria called probiotics. The downside of some yogurts is that they can be filled with sugar. Many people dont care for the tangy taste of plain yogurt, so food companies doctor up their yogurt by adding fruitalong with high fructose corn syrup. And to get kids to eat their yogurt, the companies have added even more sugar in the form of those little crunchy-things (such as cookies) to stir in, essentially making a highly nutritious food not much better than a sugary dessert. Lets take Dannon Fruit on the Bottom Raspberry yogurt: A 6-ounce cup contains 150 calories, 1.5 grams of fat, and 1 gram of saturated fat. Not too bad in terms of heart health (low-saturated-fat foods have no more than 1 gram pe Continue reading >>

Salad Dressings

Salad Dressings

A wide variety of dressings and marinades are available these days - but are we really aware of what's in them? A closer look at what's in the bottle... Salads can give us a lighter, lower calorie option for a quick meal at home, or at a restaurant. But what about the dressing we often drizzle liberally onto salads and side dishes?Oil-based dressings with added flavourings like sugar, salt, cheese and egg yolk can really bump up the calories, fat and sugar in your meal.With so many options out there,how can you be sure you’re making a healthy choice? We looked at 10 popular salad dressings to see how they perform, and offer some balanced dressing recipe ideas to help you at home. Think you’ve made a good choice? If you stick to the suggested tablespoon serving, dressings may not cause too much of a problem, but most of us will consume more than this. Could choosing a ‘light’ option be any better? Although the calories and/or fat have been reduced, is it enough to make give those dressings a green - or even amber -traffic light? Why is fat, sugar and salt so bad? Most of us are aware of the health messages around fats, sugars and salt. Dressings are usually made with oil, meaning high amounts of total fat and calories. Although most dressings use vegetable oil, added ingredients like cream, cheese and egg yolk increase the saturated fat content. Many of the dressings we looked at had added sugar, molasses, or concentrated fruit extracts. These add to your 'free sugar' intake, and we all need to reduce how much sugar we eat. There was only one dressing we chose that was categorised green for salt. As most of our salt comes from manufactured foods, this is worth thinking about. Under the spotlight Focusing on 10 well-known salad dressing brands, we give you the tra Continue reading >>

6 Easy Salad Recipes To Help Control Diabetes

6 Easy Salad Recipes To Help Control Diabetes

“I don’t want to eat like a rabbit!” This is what I hear when I encourage increased leafy greens and vegetables to people with diabetes. However, there is a proverbial goldmine of nutrients in salad that can help people with diabetes decrease blood sugar and get needed nutrients. Salad doesn’t have to be boring! We can help with 6 easy salad recipes to help control diabetes and make you love eating your greens. According to The American Diabetes Association, as of 2012 over 29.1 million people in the United States were diagnosed with diabetes. This is over 9.3% of the American population. These numbers are shockingly on the rise all because of the way we are choosing to eat. Our diets are too high in fat cholesterol, sodium, and processed foods. Go to your cupboard. Take out a box of packaged food. Turn it over and read the ingredients. Are there things on there you can’t read or understand? Should you really be eating it? Fresh Is Best Think about where you shop. If you go around the perimeter of your local grocery store, all of the fresh non-processed items are around the perimeter of the store. Here you will find all the best ingredients for wholesome and fresh foods. Bare salad would be best for people with diabetes, because it is actually the toppings and dressings that make it bad for you. Choosing the right ingredients can still keep things tasting good and good for you. Our expert taste team found six of the best tasting and easy to make salads that are diabetes friendly. Actually, they are good enough for the whole family to enjoy right along with you! We’ve even included recipes for people watching gluten intake and vegetarians too. Let’s take a look. For more diabetes related information read the following: 1. Salmon Topped Spinach Salad and Lem Continue reading >>

How I Eat Out With Type 2

How I Eat Out With Type 2

Have one bite! my friend said, pushing a bowl of sugar-filled tiramisu in my direction. Dont you want to taste this? asked my other dinner companion, handing me a blueberry bread pudding draped in whipped cream. Eating out is not impossible when you have type 2 diabetes, but sometimesit can be challenging. Interestingly, it seems to me that what often makes it toughest is your companions, who can order anything they want, while you sit, trying to find the most acceptable appetizer or entre. In ordering shared desserts for the table, my mostly well-meaning friends werent exactly helping. But since I had prepared a strategy for attacking the meal before I stepped foot in the restaurant, I wasnt really bothered. One strategy, for example, is that once I know where Im headed for a meal, I immediately go online and check out the menu, to see what the restaurant is offering. If nothing looks acceptable, I examine what raw ingredients the cooks are using that can be made acceptable for a type 2 low carb diet. If I spot a separate Caesar salad and a grilled chicken dish on the menu, for example, all I have to do is ask the staff to nix the croutons, put the dressing on the side, drop the chicken on top, and Im good to go. It does take a little bit of nerve to ask for special orders (no risotto, please, but twice as much broccoli rabe), but in my experience restaurants have been glad to comply. At a time when food allergies and gluten-free diets proliferate, type 2 diabetes is simply another variation on a theme that tests a chefs ingenuity. Ive even recently read that some chefs see such special requests as a welcome challenge. Another possible strategy is to take a diabetes break. Some days and at some restaurants, its too hard to stick to your diet, and though you know you s Continue reading >>

Corn Salad

Corn Salad

Ingredients Directions Boil the corn in a large pot of water for 3 minutes. Remove and allow to cool to the touch. Cut off kernels and place in a large bowl. You should have about 2 cups. Lightly coat a non-stick skillet with cooking spray and sauté the onion until wilted. Add the chili powder and cumin; sauté another minute. Combine with the corn. Add the red and green bell pepper, tomato, and cilantro to the corn mixture. In a small cup, combine the oil, vinegar, salt (if using), and pepper. Drizzle over the salad. Serve at room temperature. Nutrition Information Per serving: 129 calories (27% calories from fat), 3 g protein, 4 g total fat (0.6 g saturated fat), 23 g carbohydrates, 4 g dietary fiber, 0 cholesterol, 16 mg sodium Diabetic exchanges: 1 1/2 carbohydrate (1 bread/starch, 1 vegetable), 1 fat Welcome to the Type 2 Diabetes Center! This is your launching pad for living better with type 2 diabetes. We’ve gathered all the latest type 2 diabetes information, research updates, and advances in devices and medications. And because diabetes impacts every facet of your life, you’ll also find practical advice from leading experts and other people living with type 2 diabetes featured here. That includes mouth-watering, healthy recipes; money-saving tips; advice to help navigate social, professional, and relationship issues; and inspiring personal stories from people just like you. Explore the resources here and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be alerted to new additions. Continue reading >>

Salad Bar Savvy: How To Make A Healthy Salad

Salad Bar Savvy: How To Make A Healthy Salad

Diabetic Living / Food to Eat / Nutrition Salad Bar Savvy: How to Make a Healthy Salad Salad bars make it easy and tasty to meet your vegetable quota, but even a salad can ruin your diabetes meal plan. Our tips will help you fill your salad plate the smart way. Most spoons and tongs in salad bar ingredient containers hold 2 tablespoons, so you can count as you dish them up. Smaller spoons found in toppings such as nuts and sunflower seeds hold about 1-1/2 teaspoons, which is enough to add crunch without excess calories. *Salad Bar Extra: Sugar snap peas cost 50 percent less on a salad bar than regular retail. Eating these veggies raw, rather than cooked, preserves their abundant vitamin C and B vitamins. Diabetes Meal Plan , Diabetic Diet , What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetes Nutrition , Carb Counting The bottom half of a standard salad bar carryout container holds 4 cups of salad greens (loosely packed). A cup of lettuce or spinach has just 1-2 grams of carbohydrate and fewer than 10 calories, yet its bulk helps fill you up. Go with the darker greens -- they're more nutritious. *Salad Bar Extra: Pumpkin seeds cost 27 percent less on a salad bar than regular retail. Just 1/4 cup packs 10 grams of protein and 25 percent of daily iron needs. Diabetes Meal Plan , Diabetic Diet , What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetes Nutrition , Carb Counting Limit Dressing to 1 Tablespoon per 2 Cups Salad Most salad dressing ladles hold 1-2 tablespoons. Spoon dressing into a small paper condiment cup, which typically holds 2 tablespoons. Beware of salad dressing ramekins and disposable dressing containers, which may hold as much as 4-8 tablespoons (1/4 to 1/2 cup). *Salad Bar Extra: Seek alternatives to prepared salad dressing. A squeeze of fresh lemon juice or a few splashes of vinegar a Continue reading >>

7 Easy Lunches For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Lunches For Type 2 Diabetes

If breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day, lunch can often be the most hurried. A recent survey found that 62 percent of Americans rush through lunch at their desks, and even when we manage to leave the office, fast-food restaurants and food courts often prevail over more healthy options. But they don't have to be your only option — and, in fact, they shouldn't be your first choice if you have type 2 diabetes. In general, try to pack your own lunch whenever possible — the health benefits, not to mention the cost-savings, can be enormous. Short on prep time? Put these quick and nutritious lunch ideas on your menu to fill you up and keep your blood sugar in check. 1. Salads Salad should be in regular rotation for lunch. You can create a different salad every day of the week by varying your toppings. Try grilled chicken, shrimp, or fish, but avoid heaping on a lot of fattening ingredients, such as bacon bits and heavy cheeses. Salads with lots of raw vegetables are best, including carrots, cucumbers, radishes, celery, and spinach. Sprinkle nuts or seeds on top, add a few dried cranberries, and garnish with some avocado chunks to give it zip. Choose a salad dressing made with vinegar and olive oil to avoid added sugars found in fat-free and low-fat versions, and limit the serving to one tablespoon for a side salad and two tablespoons for an entrée-sized salad. 2. Sandwiches As with salads, there are many ways to spice up a sandwich. Start with whole-grain bread or a whole-wheat tortilla. Pick a lean meat, such as turkey, ham, or grilled chicken; layer on your choice of veggies; add mustard, low-fat mayonnaise, or hummus to the mix — and you have a filling and tasty lunch. Stay away from greasy chips, French fries, and other fattening sides. Instead choose fr Continue reading >>

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