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Can A Vegan Diet Prevent Diabetes?

How I Reversed My Diabetes And Stopped All Medications With A Plant-based Diet

How I Reversed My Diabetes And Stopped All Medications With A Plant-based Diet

I grew up at the tip of southern Texas with four brothers and three sisters. When I was eight years old, my father abandoned our family, and my mother was left to raise eight children on her own. In search of better employment, she moved us to the Chicago area in 1982. In high school, I thrived as an athlete and earned a football scholarship to the University of Michigan. In those days, I could eat whatever I wanted and did not have weight issues, because I was so physically active. At twenty-one years old I was 6’2″ and weighed 305 pounds. A Family Medical History Filled With Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Cancer As a young adult, I witnessed my beloved mother, the rock of our family, battle type 2 diabetes and the complications that come with it. She suffered from kidney failure, vision problems, and heart disease. After 33 years of fighting diabetes, she passed away in April of 2002. I miss her dearly. Just two months later, my oldest brother David passed away from pancreatic cancer. Out of eight siblings, my sister Jill is the only one who has not been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. But she, too, has felt its impact personally, since she donated one of her kidneys to our mother. My sisters Carol and Sandra, and my brothers Martin and Joe (my twin), have all struggled with the disease for years. Just two months ago, Joe also suffered a heart attack. Martin suffers terribly: he has had a pancreas and kidney transplant, is legally blind, had his right leg amputated, goes to dialysis three times a week, and takes 25 medications every day. My Own Struggle With Diabetes I have also struggled with diabetes. I was diagnosed with the disease the same year that it claimed my mom’s life. At that time, I began taking five different oral medications including Metformin and Continue reading >>

A Plant-based Diet For The Prevention And Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

A Plant-based Diet For The Prevention And Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Abstract The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is rising worldwide, especially in older adults. Diet and lifestyle, particularly plant-based diets, are effective tools for type 2 diabetes prevention and management. Plant-based diets are eating patterns that emphasize legumes, whole grains, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and seeds and discourage most or all animal products. Cohort studies strongly support the role of plant-based diets, and food and nutrient components of plant-based diets, in reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. Evidence from observational and interventional studies demonstrates the benefits of plant-based diets in treating type 2 diabetes and reducing key diabetes-related macrovascular and microvascular complications. Optimal macronutrient ratios for preventing and treating type 2 diabetes are controversial; the focus should instead be on eating patterns and actual foods. However, the evidence does suggest that the type and source of carbohydrate (unrefined versus refined), fats (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated versus saturated and trans), and protein (plant versus animal) play a major role in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. Multiple potential mechanisms underlie the benefits of a plant-based diet in ameliorating insulin resistance, including promotion of a healthy body weight, increases in fiber and phytonutrients, food-microbiome interactions, and decreases in saturated fat, advanced glycation endproducts, nitrosamines, and heme iron. Keywords: Diabetes mellitus, Insulin resistance, Vegan, Vegetarian Go to: 1. Introduction Type 2 diabetes is a global epidemic, with approximately 422 million cases worldwide and a rapidly rising prevalence in middle- and low-income countries.[1] In the United States in 2011–2012, 12%–14% of adul Continue reading >>

Vegan Diet Endorsed By American Diabetes Association

Vegan Diet Endorsed By American Diabetes Association

Senior Editor, LIVEKINDLY | Featured in VegNews, The Huffington Post, MTV, Reality Sandwich, EcoSalon, and Organic Authority. Los Angeles, CA | Contactable via: [email protected] A vegan diet rich in whole foods — mainly fresh fruits, vegetables, and plant-based proteins including beans, grains, nuts, and seeds, can help to mitigate the onset and effects of type-2 diabetes, the American Diabetes Association says in its 2018 Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes. The comprehensive report cites 35 studies pointing to the benefits of a plant-based diet, and also notes that doctors and nutritionists should “always” include “education on lifestyle management.” According to the Physician’s Committee for Responsible Medicine, “A plant-based diet can prevent, reverse, and manage diabetes.” The group recommends the elimination of animal and high-fat foods, replacing them instead with low-glycemic foods rich in healthy plant-based fiber. Another recent study also found that cutting all carbohydrates from the diet may not be the smartest choice for people wanting to decrease the risk of developing type-2 diabetes. Diets such as paleo and ketogenic that tout their weight-loss benefits avoid fiber-rich plant-based foods such as whole grains, lumping them in unfairly with highly processed and nutritionally void refined grains commonly found in baked goods. But whole grains can play an instrumental role in slowing the body’s absorption of sugars because of their high fiber content. Whole grains are also rich in necessary vitamins, minerals, and amino acids. Type-2 diabetes affects more than 300 million people worldwide, and millions more are suspected of suffering from the disease without an official diagnosis. Continue reading >>

Vegan Diet

Vegan Diet

Tweet Many people instantly recoil at the idea of a vegan diet, but this attitude is gradually changing, particularly amongst people with diabetes. Can people with diabetes use a vegan diet to improve blood glucose control? Absolutely. By eating a healthy vegan diet low in cholesterol and saturated fat, but balanced enough to include fibre and protein, blood glucose levels can be made easier to control. This type of diet, particularly when combined with exercise, can help to lower blood glucose levels and better manage diabetes. What is a vegan diet for diabetes? A vegan diet effectively means cutting out meat, dairy and animal products whether you have diabetes or not. So what do you eat? Vegan diets, whether for people with diabetes or not, are usually based around plants. Particular foods eaten include vegetables, fruit, grains, legumes. Animal products such as meat and dairy are avoided, as are added fat and sugar. People on vegan diets often take vitamin B12 deficiency supplements. Isn’t a vegan diet for diabetics hard to stick to? Eating a vegan diet does require some compromise, but getting the right diabetes recipes and planning your diet well will make following a vegan diet for diabetes easy. When planning your vegan diet, you need to make sure that protein, carbohydrates, fat, vitamins and minerals are balanced. Vegan diets do not usually demand that portions be stuck to or calories counted, making them easier to follow than some diabetes diets. Can I lose weight using a vegan diet? Many people with diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes, have a firm goal to lose weight. Weight loss is well understood as one of the best ways of achieving diabetes control. Vegan diets with a lower glycaemic index and a higher level of fibre are an excellent way of losing wei Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And The Vegetarian Diet

Type 2 Diabetes And The Vegetarian Diet

From the Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center (DJAJ, CWCK, AM, ALJ, and LSAA) and the Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism (DJAJ), St Michael's Hospital, Toronto; the Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto (DJAJ, CWCK, AM, and LSAA); the Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston (DSL); the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Washington, DC (NDB); and the VA Medical Center, Graduate Center for Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington (JWA). Address reprint requests to DJA Jenkins, Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's Hospital, 61 Queen Street East, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5C 2T2. E-mail: [email protected] . Search for other works by this author on: From the Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center (DJAJ, CWCK, AM, ALJ, and LSAA) and the Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism (DJAJ), St Michael's Hospital, Toronto; the Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto (DJAJ, CWCK, AM, and LSAA); the Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston (DSL); the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Washington, DC (NDB); and the VA Medical Center, Graduate Center for Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington (JWA). Search for other works by this author on: From the Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center (DJAJ, CWCK, AM, ALJ, and LSAA) and the Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism (DJAJ), St Michael's Hospital, Toronto; the Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto (DJAJ, CWCK, AM, and LSAA); the Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston (DS Continue reading >>

A Vegan Diet Could Prevent, Treat And Even Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, Say Leading Experts This Diabetes Week (12-18 June).

A Vegan Diet Could Prevent, Treat And Even Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, Say Leading Experts This Diabetes Week (12-18 June).

Diet and lifestyle have long been regarded as the main causes of type 2 diabetes. Now research suggests that vegans reduce their risk of diabetes by 78% compared with people who eat meat on a daily basis. “Type 2 diabetes is almost always preventable, often treatable, and sometimes reversible through diet and lifestyle changes,” wrote Dr Michael Greger, internationally-renowned physician, in his best-selling book How Not To Die. “People who eat a plant-based diet have just a small fraction of the rates of diabetes seen in those who regularly eat meat. By switching to a healthy diet, you can start improving your health within a matter of hours.” This is partly because vegans are better able to control their weight. Carrying excess body fat is the number one risk factor of type 2 diabetes, with around 90% of those who develop the disease being overweight. Vegans, however, have lower levels of obesity on average than any other dietary group. It is also because, Dr Greger explains, the saturated fats found in animal products contribute to insulin resistance – the cause of type 2 diabetes – whereas monosaturated fats found in nuts and avocados may actually protect against the detrimental effects of saturated fats. As a result, people eating plant-based diets appear to have better insulin sensitivity, better blood sugar levels and better levels of insulin, which enables blood sugar to enter your cells. Type 2 diabetes is spreading fast. Over 21 million people have been diagnosed with the disease in the United States, a number that has roughly tripled since 1990, with devastating health implications. Diabetes can lead to blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, and stroke. Sandra Hood, state registered dietitian in the UK, said: “A plant-based diet can be very h Continue reading >>

Diabetes And A Vegan Diet

Diabetes And A Vegan Diet

My husband has recently decided to become vegan (meaning he will no longer include any animal products in his diet). When he told me this I got mad. “I already have to deal with two picky eaters who only eat tacos or spaghetti and meatballs” I told him, “and now I have to cook special meals for you!” Ugh. I was also irritated because I love to eat meat. A blue cheese burger cooked on the grill in the summer is my favorite indulgence. Did this mean my husband wasn’t going to grill burgers anymore? I worried. And if he’s not going to eat meat, what about me? “If you stop eating meat that means you’re going to eat more carbs, and I don’t eat carbs,” I told my husband. OK, maybe there are more than two picky eaters in the house. I knew logically that just because he was changing his diet didn’t mean that I had to change my diet, but I’m the cook in the family and didn’t want to spend all night in the kitchen making different meals for every person in our house. I tend to blame a lot of my “issues” on diabetes, but I think the negative reaction to my husband’s desire to be vegan really does come from having Type 1 diabetes. It also comes from growing up with hippie, vegetarian parents in the woods of Vermont and from my high school field trip, “Mountain Classroom,” to a meat-packing factory in Texas where I emerged from the factory covered in cow’s blood and was unable to eat meat for the next ten years (long and colorful stories we don’t have time for today). Being a vegetarian and a person with diabetes was hard. I was in college and ate what my friends ate, which was bagels, pizza, and cereal. This was not a healthy diet, and my blood sugar probably ran high throughout my time in college, though I’m not sure because I rarely teste Continue reading >>

Should You Go Vegetarian? The Benefits Of A Plant-based Diet For People With Diabetes

Should You Go Vegetarian? The Benefits Of A Plant-based Diet For People With Diabetes

What if you were told you could lose weight, lower your blood glucose and blood pressure, prevent heart disease, and slow the progression of type 2 diabetes—or prevent it if you don’t yet have it? It sounds too good to be true, but more and more research indicates that a plant-based eating plan may help people with diabetes. What the Studies Show In a 72-week study published by Neal Barnard, M.D., president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, people with type 2 diabetes followed either a low-fat vegan diet or a moderate-carbohydrate plan. Both groups lost weight and improved their cholesterol. When people who didn’t complete the study or had medication changes were omitted from the study analysis, there was a significantly greater decrease in A1C and LDL (bad) cholesterol in the vegans. A study of nearly 100,000 members of the Seventh-day Adventist church, which promotes a vegetarian diet, showed that the vegetarians had a lower rate of type 2 than nonvegetarians. “The closer people follow a vegan diet, the more they stay at a healthy weight and prevent type 2,” says Michael J. Orlich, M.D., assistant professor of preventive medicine at Loma Linda University in California. Orlich was involved with the study. Not eating red and processed meats may help prevent type 2 even without factoring in body weight. Two long-term, ongoing studies by the Harvard School of Public Health tracking nearly 150,000 health care providers showed that people who ate an additional half serving of red meat daily for four years had a 50 percent higher risk of developing type 2. Cutting back on red-meat intake by more than a half serving a day reduced this risk by 15 percent. “Study after study has tightly linked eating a plant-based diet with decreasing a number of Continue reading >>

Vegetarian Diets And Diabetes

Vegetarian Diets And Diabetes

More and more people are choosing to follow a vegetarian diet for many different reasons. It’s estimated that two per cent of the population now don’t eat meat or fish. Reasons for switching to a vegetarian diet include: the health benefits ethical and moral reasons religious or cultural reasons concern for animal welfare concern about the environment and sustainability taste – some people just don’t like the taste of meat or fish. A vegetarian diet, based on unprocessed foods, can provide many health benefits for us all, whether or not you have diabetes. If you have diabetes, it’s important to be more aware of how what you eat affects your body and, in turn, you’ll hopefully become more health conscious. So what is a vegetarian diet? Are there any ways it could help manage diabetes? Does it provide any health benefits for people with diabetes? What is a vegetarian? According to the Vegetarian Society, a vegetarian is: "Someone who lives on a diet of grains, pulses, nuts, seeds, vegetables and fruits with, or without, the use of dairy products and eggs. A vegetarian does not eat any meat, poultry, game, fish, shellfish or by-products of slaughter." There are different types of vegetarians: Lacto-ovo-vegetarians eat both dairy products and eggs (usually free range). Lacto-vegetarians eat dairy products, but avoid eggs. Vegans do not any products derived from animals – no meat, fish, dairy or eggs. Why try a plant-based diet? Plant-based foods, particularly fruit and vegetables, nuts, pulses and seeds have been shown to help in the treatment of many chronic diseases and are often associated with lower rates of Type 2 diabetes, less hypertension, lower cholesterol levels and reduced cancer rates. These foods are also higher in fibre, antioxidants, folate and Continue reading >>

Vegan Diet Can Prevent Diabetes, According To New Study

Vegan Diet Can Prevent Diabetes, According To New Study

Vegan Diet Can Prevent Diabetes, According To New Study Patients tried a low fat whole foods plant-based diet A plant-based diet can offer myriad health benefits (Photo:Adam Jaime) A plant-based diet can prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes in overweight adults, according to a new study . As part of the study, overweight patients with no history of diabetes switched to a low-fat vegan diet based on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes with no calorie limit for 16 weeks. A control group made no diet changes. Neither group changed exercise or medication routines. Based on mathematical modeling, researchers from the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine [PCRM] determined that those on a plant-based diet increased meal-stimulated insulin secretion and beta-cell glucose sensitivity, compared to those in the control group. The plant-based diet group also experienced a decrease in blood sugar levels both while fasting and during meal tests. Researchers believe the improvements can be attributed to weight loss (including loss of body fat) of the test group, saying their fasting insulin resistance decreased (i.e. improved), and their beta-cell function improved as a result. Lead study author, Hana Kahleova, M.D., Ph.D, said: "The study has important implications for diabetes prevention. "Type 2 diabetes affects approximately 30 million Americans, with 84 million more suffering from prediabetes. "If nothing changes, our next generation - the first expected to live shorter lives than their parents - is in trouble. "A third of young Americans are projected to develop diabetes in their lifetimes. "Fortunately, this study adds to the growing evidence that food really is medicine and that eating a healthful plant-based diet can go a long way in preventing diabetes." Continue reading >>

Going Vegan Could Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Going Vegan Could Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Going vegan could prevent type 2 diabetes Excess weight is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Recent research, however, suggests one strategy that could help to prevent the condition in people who are overweight, and it involves giving up meat and dairy. Researchers say that a vegan diet could prevent diabetes in people who are overweight. Researchers found that overweight people who switched to a vegan diet for 16 weeks showed improvements in insulin sensitivity plus the functioning of beta cells compared with a control group. Beta cells reside in the pancreas and produce and release insulin. The vegan diet also led to improvements in blood sugar levels, both during fasting and during meals. Lead study author Dr. Hana Kahleova, of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine in Washington, D.C., says that the findings have "important implications for diabetes prevention." Dr. Kahleova and colleagues recently reported their results in the journal Nutrients. Type 2 diabetes arises when the body is no longer able to respond to insulin effectively which is a condition known as insulin resistance or the pancreatic beta cells do not produce enough insulin. Insulin is the hormone that regulates blood sugar levels. As a result of this, blood sugar levels can become too high. This can lead to serious complications, including cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, diabetic eye disease, and nerve damage. It is estimated that more than 30 million people in the United States are living with diabetes, and type 2 diabetes accounts for around 9095 percent of all cases. Being overweight is one of the leading risk factors for type 2 diabetes. In fact, around 80 percent of people who have type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. Making lifestyle changes such as adopting a he Continue reading >>

Going Vegan May Help Prevent Diabetes In Overweight People

Going Vegan May Help Prevent Diabetes In Overweight People

Going vegan may help prevent diabetes in overweight people Going vegan may help prevent diabetes in overweight people "Going vegan can prevent overweight adults from developing type 2 diabetes, an 'important' new study has concluded," reports the Mail Online. Researchers in the US investigated the effects of a 16-week vegan diet on a group of overweight people compared with a group that continued their usual diet. The vegan group showed improvements in beta-cell function. Beta cells play a key role in regulating blood insulin levels, and deterioration in their function is often associated with the gradual onset of type 2 diabetes . People in the vegan group also had a reduction in body mass index (BMI) and fat levels compared with the usual-diet group. Vegan diets tend to have less fat and sugar than a conventional Western diet, and reducing fat and sugar intake is known to reduce diabetes risk, so the results are not particularly surprising. The challenge is getting people to stick to these diets or, for those who don't want to go vegan, a similar balanced diet that contains fish and low-fat dairy products. This study mainly involved women who were health-conscious, which means they may be more likely to adhere to dietary restrictions. Repeating the experiment with groups from different backgrounds would help determine how successful it may be in larger populations. For people with a confirmed diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, a diet-only approach may not be enough to control blood sugar levels. The study was led by researchers from the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) in Washington DC, and researchers from 4 other international institutions in the Czech Republic, Italy and the US. It was funded by the PCRM and published in the peer-reviewed medical jo Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Anti-diabetes Diet

The Ultimate Anti-diabetes Diet

One of America's most common killer diseases, type 2 diabetes, jeopardizes the health, quality of life, and longevity of nearly 24 million Americans, according to the American Diabetes Association, and that number continues to rise. New cases have doubled over the past 30 years, and because the disease occurs gradually and often with no obvious symptoms, many people don't even know they have it. People who are overweight are at higher risk because fat interferes with the body's ability to use insulin, the crux of the disease. But a solution to the problem is within reach: a groundbreaking eating plan not only helps prevent this chronic disease, but actually reverses it while also promoting weight loss. Focusing on plant-based meals,the revolutionary plan was developed by Vegetarian Times former Ask the Doc columnist, Neal Barnard, MD, and is backed by the results of his long-term study. Your doctor may not tell you about this diet: dietitians generally counsel overweight diabetics to cut calories, reduce serving sizes, and avoid starchy carbohydrates that raise blood sugar levels. But Barnard's team at the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine and scientists at George Washington University and the University of Toronto thought this might be the wrong approach, considering that carbohydrate-rich rice, legumes, and root vegetables are staples throughout Asia and Africa, where most people are thin and diabetes rates are low. Barnard and his team studied a group of diabetics, comparing the effects of a diet based on standard recommendations versus a vegan-style diet with no limits on calories, carbs, or portions, and just three rules: eliminate meat, dairy, and eggs; minimize fat and oil; and favor low-glycemic foods (such as beans, vegetables, brown rice, and oatme Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Vegan Diets

Type 2 Diabetes And Vegan Diets

The only prospective study measuring rates of diabetes in vegans, the Adventist Health Study 2, found them to have a 60% less chance of developing the disease than non-vegetarians after two years of follow-up. Previously, a cross-sectional report from the Adventist Health Study-2 showed vegans to have a 68% lower rate of diabetes than non-vegetarians. A number of clinical trials have now shown that a vegan, or mostly vegan, diet can lower body weight, reduce blood sugar, and improve other parameters for type 2 diabetes. 2017 Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies A 2017 meta-analysis reviewed 14 studies published in 13 papers ( 17 ). Two were cohort studies and the other 12 were cross-sectional. Vegetarians had a lower incidence of diabetes in eight of the studies while there was no difference in the other five. Based on the pooled analysis of the studies, vegetarians had a 27% lower risk for diabetes compared to omnivores (OR 0.73, 95% CI: 0.61, 0.87). When the researchers looked at effects in different groups, they found that vegetarian men were less likely to have diabetes than omnivore men, but there was no difference in risk between vegetarian and omnivore women. The researchers also looked at different types of vegetarian diets and found that risk for diabetes was lowest among vegans and lacto-vegetarians. Pesco-vegetarians did not have a lower risk for diabetes compared to omnivores, although semi-vegetarians did. The main limitation of this meta-analysis is that most of the studies were cross-sectional. In addition, the studies were from diverse populations throughout the world where definitions and composition of vegetarian diets may differ. This might explain why among these studies, the findings were stronger in studies from North America, Europe, and the We Continue reading >>

Vegetarian Diet: Can It Help Me Control My Diabetes?

Vegetarian Diet: Can It Help Me Control My Diabetes?

Could switching to a vegetarian diet cure my diabetes? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. A vegetarian diet probably won't cure your diabetes. But it may offer some benefits over a nonvegetarian diet — such as helping to better control your weight, reducing your risk of some diabetes-associated complications and possibly even making your body more responsive to insulin. There's no single vegetarian eating plan. For example, some allow dairy products while others don't allow any animal products (vegans). The benefits of a vegetarian diet depend on the type of diet you choose and the food choices you make when following the diet. For most, however, eating a vegetarian diet: Promotes a healthy weight. Vegetarian diets are often lower in calories than are nonvegetarian diets, which can help with weight management. Also, people following a vegetarian diet tend to have lower body mass indexes (BMIs) than do people who follow a nonvegetarian diet. A healthy body weight can improve blood sugar control and reduce your risk of diabetes complications. Improves blood sugar control and insulin response. Eating vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes and nuts — features of a vegetarian diet — can improve blood sugar control and make your body more responsive to insulin. This may mean taking less medication and lowering your risk of diabetes-related complications. But even a vegetarian diet can have adverse effects on blood sugar if it is rich in simple carbohydrates — especially starches, such as potatoes, white rice and white bread. Reduces your risk of cardiovascular disease. A strict vegan diet is cholesterol-free, low in saturated fat and usually high in soluble fiber. A low-fat vegetarian diet can reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease — a common complication of Continue reading >>

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