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Broccoli Good For Diabetics

Broccoli Could Be A Secret Weapon Against Diabetes, Say Scientists

Broccoli Could Be A Secret Weapon Against Diabetes, Say Scientists

Broccoli Could Be a Secret Weapon Against Diabetes, Say Scientists Broccoli contains an ingredient that can help those with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar level, according to a new study potentially providing a much-needed treatment option for millions. A chemical in cruciferous vegetables like broccoli and sprouts called sulforaphane is thought to be responsible,having been shown to lower glucose levels in earlier lab experiments on diabetic rats. To identify suitable compounds to examine, researchers used computer models to identify gene expression changes linked with type 2 diabetes, and then sift through thousands of chemicals that might reverse these changes. "We're very excited about the effects we've seen and are eager to bring the extract to patients," one of the researchers, Anders Rosengren of the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, told Andy Coghlan at New Scientist . "We saw a reduction of glucose of about 10 per cent, which is sufficient to reduce complications in the eyes, kidneys and blood." That 10 percent average reduction was across a sample of 97 human volunteers taking part in a 12-week randomised, placebo-controlled trial. The participants who were obese and who had higher baseline glucose levels to begin with benefitted the most. The dose was the equivalent of around 5 kilograms (11 pounds) of broccoli daily a fair few platefuls but the researchers say it could be adapted into a powder to add to food or drinks. It's important to note that all but three of those taking part in the trial continued to take metformin , a drug already used to improve blood sugar regulation in people with diabetes. However, the researchers think sulforaphane could eventually replace metformin for some patients up to 15 percent of those with diabetes can't tak Continue reading >>

Here’s Why All Type 2 Diabetics Should Be Eating More Broccoli

Here’s Why All Type 2 Diabetics Should Be Eating More Broccoli

If you’re among the 29 million Americans who have diabetes and are striving to be healthy, you should definitely be loading up on your veggies, specifically broccoli, according to a recent study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine. In the study, researchers from Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, and the Faculty of Medicine at Lund University in Sweden found that extracts of broccoli—specifically an antioxidant compound called sulforaphane—is beneficial for people who have Type 2 diabetes. Besides being a great source of vitamin C and K, folic acid, potassium, and fiber, broccoli may help people with diabetes manage blood sugar. The first phase of the experiment involved animals. When researchers initially gave a sulforaphane extract to rats with diabetes, it reduced glucose production in their liver cells, lowering fasting blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin and reversing the disease signature in their liver. It also cut “exaggerated glucose production and glucose intolerance by a magnitude similar to that of metformin,” a prescription diabetes medication, according to study coauthor Annika Axelsson of Lund University. This finding is especially significant because metformin is known to cause gastric side effects that can make it intolerable for some people, and it also can’t be used when kidney function is severely compromised, which it often is in people with diabetes. “There are strong indications that this can become a valuable supplement to existing medication,” Anders Rosengren, Docent in Metabolic Physiology at the University of Gothenburg and affiliated with the Lund University Diabetes Centre, said in a press release. After those encouraging results, researchers then gave the concentrated broccoli extract to 97 Continue reading >>

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

Figuring out the best foods to eat when you have diabetes can be tough. The main goal is to keep blood sugar levels well-controlled. However, it's also important to eat foods that help prevent diabetes complications like heart disease. Here are the 16 best foods for diabetics, both type 1 and type 2. Fatty fish is one of the healthiest foods on the planet. Salmon, sardines, herring, anchovies and mackerel are great sources of the omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA, which have major benefits for heart health. Getting enough of these fats on a regular basis is especially important for diabetics, who have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke (1). DHA and EPA protect the cells that line your blood vessels, reduce markers of inflammation and improve the way your arteries function after eating (2, 3, 4, 5). A number of observational studies suggest that people who eat fatty fish regularly have a lower risk of heart failure and are less likely to die from heart disease (6, 7). In studies, older men and women who consumed fatty fish 5–7 days per week for 8 weeks had significant reductions in triglycerides and inflammatory markers (8, 9). Fish is also a great source of high-quality protein, which helps you feel full and increases your metabolic rate (10). Fatty fish contain omega-3 fats that reduce inflammation and other risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Leafy green vegetables are extremely nutritious and low in calories. They're also very low in digestible carbs, which raise your blood sugar levels. Spinach, kale and other leafy greens are good sources of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C. In one study, increasing vitamin C intake reduced inflammatory markers and fasting blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure Continue reading >>

Bad Broccoli? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Bad Broccoli? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community My fbg at 6:15 was 9.2 this morning and I started the day with a coffee and 30ml double cream. Tested again at 10:15 before eating 300g broccoli and 30g butter. I boiled the broccoli in plain water and added no seasoning. Level at this point was 9.7 so it had gone up despite the coffee and cream. When I tested again at 12:10 it was 11.7! I was shocked. Washed hands again and retested using another finger and 11.5. Should I put broccoli on my list of food to avoid? I suspect this was your liver misbehaving and pushing glucose in to your blood stream. I can't see that just broccoli and butter would cause a rise of 2mmol/l at 2 hours. As a lifelong hater, all broccoli is bad broccoli as far as I'm concerned, and everyone should always avoid it But it shouldn't be capable of raising your blood sugar like that. You started off fairly high at 9.2 fasting, then went up to 11.7. Is it possible it was just the morning liver dump continuing to dump for a while? I'd recommend granting the broccoli a reprieve, and maybe giving it a 2nd chance at a different time of day. Goodness! 9.2 is high for fasting. Normal level 4-7. The coffee and cream worked ie, 0.5 increase to 9.7 was fine. The broccoli and butter increase to 11.7 was only an increase of 2.0 so not too bad. The problem was your fasting reading. Try the broccoli again at around the same time on a lower fasting reading. Also if you eat it later in the day, you will do even better! I wouldn't worry about it! I'm going with @Bluetit1802 and guessing this is a rise due to a liver dump. I wouldn't blame the broccoli. You could try experimenting with various breakfasts at various times and see if you can work o Continue reading >>

Broccoli And Diabetes

Broccoli And Diabetes

Bowl of broccoliPhoto Credit: Lars Kastilan/iStock/Getty Images People with diabetes need to take special care with their diet to keep their blood sugar levels within the appropriate range. Although careful planning can make it so you can eat any food, at least in small doses, there are some foods that are particularly healthy for diabetics. Broccoli is among them. The main principles of a diabetes diet are to consume plenty of whole grains, vegetables and fruits and to limit both fat and calories. High-fiber foods, fish and unsaturated fats are recommended, while saturated fats, sodium, cholesterol and trans fats should be avoided as much as possible, according to the American Heart Association. Meals should be planned to keep you from experiencing spikes in blood sugar, as this can bring your blood sugar levels too high. Counting carbs, using the glycemic index or using diabetes exchange lists can make it easier to keep your blood sugar even throughout the day. Broccoli contains 5 grams of fiber for a 1/2-cup serving and contains only 50 calories, but it is also recommended because certain chemicals in broccoli may help prevent damage caused to the blood vessels by diabetes. A study led by Paul Thornalley published in the journal "Diabetes" in 2008 found that the sulforaphanes in broccoli may activate protective enzymes that limit this type of cell damage. The study was conducted in a lab using sulforaphane and blood vessels with damage from high levels of blood sugar, which is still a long way from proving that eating broccoli will prevent this type of damage, according to the U.K. National Health Service. Further studies need to be done to document this effect, including human trials. The sulphurophanes and other phytonutrients in broccoli may also lower your risk Continue reading >>

11 Superfoods For Your Diabetes Diet

11 Superfoods For Your Diabetes Diet

Getty Images What to Eat to Beat Type 2 Diabetes What makes a food “super”? When it comes to type 2 diabetes, it’s not just about foods that pack lots of nutrients. For a diabetes-friendly diet, you also need foods that will help keep your blood sugar levels in check. “Look for items that contain healthy fats and are high in vitamins, minerals, and fiber,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, a certified diabetes educator at Burgess Health Center in Onawa, Iowa. It’s also crucial to eat a wide variety of foods to make sure you’re getting a healthy mix of phytochemicals and essential fatty acids. Add these 11 superfoods to your grocery cart to keep your diet diabetes-friendly. Continue reading >>

Broccoli Compound Could Help Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Broccoli Compound Could Help Treat Type 2 Diabetes

MORE Some people don't like to eat their vegetables, but for obese people with type 2 diabetes, broccoli could hold the key to slowing, and potentially reversing, the disease, according to a new study. Scientists used both computational and experimental research to zero in on a network of 50 genes that cause symptoms associated with type 2 diabetes. They also located a compound called sulforaphane — which is found naturally in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts and cabbages — that could turn down the expression of those genes, according to the findings, published today (June 14) in the journal Science Translational Medicine. In the study, the scientists gave sulforaphane to obese patients, in the form of a concentrated broccoli sprout extract. They found that it improved the patients' systems' ability to control their glucose levels and reduced their glucose production — two symptoms of diabetes that can lead to other health problems, including coronary artery disease, nerve damage and blindness, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "It's very exciting and opens up new possibilities for the treatment of type 2 diabetes," Anders Rosengren, an assistant professor at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, told Live Science. [Science You Can Eat: 10 Things You Didn't Know About Food] Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes, affects more than 300 million people globally. For those with the disease who are obese, the excess fat in the liver makes the body less sensitive to the hormone insulin, which can make it difficult for the organ to help regulate blood sugar levels. Normally, insulin, which is produced by the pancreas, stimulates the liver to pull glucose out of the bloodstream and store it for later use. Pe Continue reading >>

Broccoli Reverses Diabetes Damage

Broccoli Reverses Diabetes Damage

Keeping your heart healthy is extremely important if you have diabetes. Heart disease is actually the most common side effect of the condition, and 65 percent of people with diabetes die from heart attack or stroke. If diabetes is not controlled, it can damage blood vessels, including those leading to the brain and heart. This encourages the formation of plaques (also known as atherosclerosis), which can ultimately make it difficult for blood to flow through the vessels and cause your blood pressure to rise. The Mayo Clinic actually has some revealing statistics on this topic. If you have diabetes you: Are two to four times as likely to have a heart attack or stroke (compared to someone without diabetes) Are more likely to die from a heart attack Have the same risk for sudden death from a heart attack as someone who has already had a heart attack. Tim Russert, the NBC correspondent who recently died without warning of a heart attack, actually had diabetes and coronary artery disease, both of which increased his risk of sudden death. Yet, it’s estimated that 70 percent of people with diabetes are not aware of these increased risks. On the flip side, if you’ve had a heart attack, you should be checked for diabetes or pre-diabetes. One study found that over two-thirds of heart attack patients had blood sugar abnormalities in the form of undiagnosed diabetes or pre-diabetes. How Might Broccoli Help? One of broccoli’s most powerful compounds is the phytochemical sulforaphane. This compound has been found to restore your immune system as you age and increase your liver's ability to detoxify carcinogenic compounds and free radicals. This in turn protects against cell mutations, cancer and other harmful effects. It turns out sulforaphane also protects your heart, via two Continue reading >>

Broccoli Ingredient Found To Reduce Blood Sugar In Diabetics

Broccoli Ingredient Found To Reduce Blood Sugar In Diabetics

There's not much middle ground on broccoli — people either love it or hate it. U.S. President George H.W. Bush, for instance, was not a fan. "I do not like broccoli," he famously said. "And I have not liked it since I was a little kid. And my mother made me eat it. And I am president of the United States. And I am not going to eat any more broccoli." But there's no denying that it's a superfood. And today, there's one more reason to love it: A compound found in broccoli appears to be at least as effective as a widely used drug to treat diabetes, according to Swedish researchers who think the ingredient could be a safe alternative for lowering blood sugar. It turns out the green vegetable contains a chemical, called sulforaphane, that appears in clinical trials to work as well as metformin at reducing blood sugar levels in diabetics. That could be good news for a significant percentage of the 300 million Type 2 diabetics around the world who cannot take metformin, a first-line therapy, because of potential kidney damage and stomach upset. Dr. Anders Rosengren of the Lund University Diabetes Center in Sweden helped discover the potential of sulforaphane in lowering HA1c, a blood biomarker of long-term glucose control. He led a team of researchers who used a computer model to sort through a public database of more than 3,800 promising compounds to find sulforaphane. 'Very exciting' "We think this is very exciting. because there have been so many claims over the years of different food, dietary components having different health effects. We have really scientifically based proof that it has an effect on Type 2 diabetes," Rosengren said. In a 12-week study of 97 patients with Type 2 diabetes, sulforaphane lowered HA1c levels by a relative reduction of 10 percent compared w Continue reading >>

Vegetables In A Diabetes Diet: Is Steamed, Roasted, Or Sauted Best?

Vegetables In A Diabetes Diet: Is Steamed, Roasted, Or Sauted Best?

Vegetables in a Diabetes Diet: Is Steamed, Roasted, or Sauted Best? Help prevent blood sugar spikes and get the most nutritional bang for your buck with this guide. Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . When you're managing diabetes, there are pros and cons involved with each way of cooking veggies. We all know vegetables are good for us, but when you have diabetes, it can be difficult to know whether certain types are better for your blood sugar, and how preparing a veggie may impact its nutritional value. For example, are roasted sweet potatoes as nutritious as steamed kale, or if you saut your spinach rather than steam it, have you lost some essential nutrients? While all vegetables are healthy, it might be difficult to understand why some have to be limited or reduced, says Cara Lowenthal, MPH, RD, a certified diabetes educator at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. Why Veggies Should Be in Your Diabetes Diet Vegetables are an essential part of every diet, but this food group is especially important for people with type 2 diabetes . Nonstarchy vegetables, like spinach, kale, and broccoli, are rich in nutrients like vitamin A and vitamin E, low on the glycemic index , and have lots of fiber, which means munching on them will help you fill up without significantly raising your blood sugar, Lowenthal says. The fiber that many vegetables pack can also slow down how quickly sugar enters the blood, explains Krista Mathews, a dietitian at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, who frequently works with people diagnosed with diabetes. People who have diabetes are at a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease, and Continue reading >>

Is Broccoli Good For Diabetics?- Absolutely The Best Vegetable For You!

Is Broccoli Good For Diabetics?- Absolutely The Best Vegetable For You!

Is Broccoli Good for Diabetics?- Absolutely the Best Vegetable For You! Is Broccoli Good for Diabetics?- Absolutely the Best Vegetable For You! Broccoli is a member of the green leafy vegetables such as spinach, Brussels sprouts, and cabbage. Is broccoli good for diabetics? Anything in the green leafy vegetable category certainly is good for you. It is just about the healthiest food that you can eat. Well learn just how beneficial that broccoli is for you, how it can help to lower your blood sugar, and how it can help you to become healthier. This nutritious plant is found in the Mediterranean region where it is acquired from the very watchful eye of breeding of the cultivation of leafy crops. The actual name broccoli comes from two words, one Italian word Brocco and one Latin word Braccium which means branch, arm, or shoot. Even though broccoli is mainly green in color, sometimes it can have some purple shades similar to the cauliflower and cabbage family. The most common part of the broccoli that is eaten is the flowering heads. It is in the shape of a tree that is the top of a thick stalk that is edible. Broccoli is an excellent source of nutrients that include vitamin A, vitamin C, fiber, selenium, folate, and beta carotene. It is also rich in minerals such as magnesium, manganese, and potassium and these are essential for a healthy body. Broccoli can be eaten raw or cooked. Either way is okay, but really the most beneficial way health wise to eat it is to steam it or raw on your salad with your greens. * Blood pressure-Broccoli has an abundance of the mineral chromium which helps to regulate blood sugar and keeps the function of insulin running properly and in turn controls blood pressure as well. It also contains many vitamins, which also aid in keeping all of yo Continue reading >>

Broccoli Compound Could Offer Obese Diabetics A Drug-free Way To Slash Blood Sugar Levels

Broccoli Compound Could Offer Obese Diabetics A Drug-free Way To Slash Blood Sugar Levels

Love it or hate it, Swedish scientists have found another reason for you to load up on broccoli, or at least finish what's on your plate. As it turns out, sulforaphane, a powerhouse antioxidant found in the vegetable, could be Nature's secret weapon against type 2 diabetes, offering obese patients a way to slash their blood glucose levels and fight the disease. This is not the first time sulforaphane has been in the health spotlight. Found in cruciferous greens such as broccoli and cabbage (though if you want to get the most bang for your bite, broccoli sprouts are the way to go), the compound is known for its cancer-fighting and anti-inflammation properties. However hardly anything was known about its effect on type 2 diabetes until now. Whether it’s breakfast, lunch, or dinner, these six comfort food favorites from Eggland's Best ... Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body isn't able to make enough insulin or to use the hormone to regulate blood glucose levels. This causes a build-up of sugar in the blood and for obese patients, their excess body fat makes it harder for the liver and muscle tissue to absorb this excess blood glucose. At present, type 2 diabetes affects more than 300 million people worldwide and makes up 90 percent of all diabetes cases. While metformin is the industry standard for controlling blood glucose, the drug is not suitable for everyone, in particular those with reduced kidney function, which affects 15 percent of those with the disease. In addition, it has been reported to cause side-effects such as nausea, bloating, abdominal pain, or diarrhea in some 30 percent of patients who take it. In their search for an alternative therapy, researcher Annika Axelson of the University of Gothenburg and her colleagues decided to use a different tactic. In Continue reading >>

Broccoli Juice Could Keep Diabetes At Bay And Even Prevent The Fatal Condition

Broccoli Juice Could Keep Diabetes At Bay And Even Prevent The Fatal Condition

Broccoli pill could 'prevent thousands of stroke deaths' The compound sulforaphane could be a viable alternative for obese patients unable to take metformin - the first line of treatment - because of its effect on their kidneys. Professor Anders Rosengren, of Lund University Diabetes Centre in Sweden, said: We will now work to make broccoli sprout extract available to produce as a functional food. The research also suggests eating or drinking broccoli may help stave off type 2 diabetes in vulnerable individuals. A chemical found in broccoli had a dramatic impact on lowering blood sugar levels, a study found There are claims for lots of foods having health benefits, but here we have shown sulforaphane targets a critical disease process. Prof Rosengren said: Since sulforaphane has very few side effects and can easily be provided as a broccoli shake or drink - for example - it has the potential to become an important compliment to existing treatment options for type 2 diabetes. He said it could also be recommended as a functional food for people with pre-diabetes - meaning their blood sugar level is higher than normal but not yet high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Prof Rosengren said: There are claims for lots of foods having health benefits, but here we have shown sulforaphane targets a critical disease process. The study, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, found the compound had a significant benefit for obese patients whose type 2 diabetes was poorly regulated. Prof Rosengren said: Sulforaphane is highly concentrated in cruciferous vegetables like broccoli which was exciting because that enabled us to provide it as a highly concentrated broccoli extract to the patients. Drinking broccoli may help stave off type 2 diabetes in vulnerable individuals Continue reading >>

Broccoli Extract Shows Promise For Type 2 Diabetes

Broccoli Extract Shows Promise For Type 2 Diabetes

Broccoli Extract Shows Promise for Type 2 Diabetes But supplement only seems to help a certain group of people with the disease WEDNESDAY, June 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Your Mom may have been right about broccoli's goodness. A small study hints that a substance in the crunchy veggy may help some with diabetes get better control of their blood sugar . Researchers found that a concentrated extract of the substance, called sulforaphane, helped obese type 2 diabetes patients rein in their stubbornly high blood sugar levels . The caveat, however, is that the study was short-term and small -- involving 97 people with diabetes followed for 12 weeks. And the extract was taken in addition to the diabetes drug metformin, not instead of it. Plus, the extract the researchers used was not like the sulforaphane supplements available at your local health food store. "The way that you produce and process the extract is important to keep the sulforaphane intact," said senior researcher Dr. Anders Rosengren, of the University of Gothenburg, in Sweden. He said his team used a highly concentrated supplement that was tested for purity and side effects. "At this point," Rosengren said, "we cannot recommend that anyone take the currently available extracts on the market to treat type 2 diabetes ." Sulforaphane is a chemical found in cruciferous vegetables such as cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and broccoli. Broccoli sprouts are a particularly rich source. Lab research has suggested that sulforaphane may help reduce inflammation in the body, and possibly fight cancer and fatty liver disease , according to Rosengren's team. But it has not been studied for type 2 diabetes, which arises when the body can no longer properly use insulin -- a blood-sugar regulating hormone . As a result, blood s Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Prevent dangerous blood sugar spikes with the help of these foods. Non-starchy Vegetables Chock-full of vitamins, minerals, and fiber, non starchy vegetables (such as broccoli, spinach, mushrooms, and peppers) are an ideal source of high-quality carbohydrates. Because these low-calorie, nutrient-dense veggies have a low-impact on blood sugar, they’re an integral component of your diabetes food plan. For most people (including those looking to lose weight), this is one food group that’s okay to eat as much as you like! Previous Next More Photos Wild Salmon Almonds Continue reading >>

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