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Best Time To Eat Dinner For Diabetes

What's For Dinner? Diabetic Dinner Menus

What's For Dinner? Diabetic Dinner Menus

Planning dinner doesn't have to be a headache with this personal diabetes menu. Take a look at this list of delicious diabetic meals that are made to fit into the recommended daily carb allowance. Planning dinner doesn't have to be a headache with this personal diabetes menu. Take a look at this list of delicious diabetic meals that are made to fit into the recommended daily carb allowance. Planning dinner doesn't have to be a headache with this personal diabetes menu. Take a look at this list of delicious diabetic meals that are made to fit into the recommended daily carb allowance. Planning dinner doesn't have to be a headache with this personal diabetes menu. Take a look at this list of delicious diabetic meals that are made to fit into the recommended daily carb allowance. Continue reading >>

Dinner Time | Diabetic Connect

Dinner Time | Diabetic Connect

I agree with some of the earlier posts. Just explain to them that with your diabetes you have to stay on a routine and to keep your levels level you may need to have a meal sooner than they wish to eat. If they love you and understand its for your best health, they shouldn't have a problem with it. Gosh I don't know how to help with this one. I've read through the responses and they all seem like sound pieces of advice! I as a rule, try not to eat any later than 7. Don't know if that helps you at all. *Hugs* Cheryl If they get home after you eat, I would tell them where the left over food is, and they are more than welcome to eat then On the other hand, and Ive done this, I would explain that eating late for you isn't good for your blood sugar or over all healthand they should respect that When I stay at my parents houseand my mom is a diabetic, I eat when they doIf Im up earlier than themYesIve have breakfast before them cause Im on insulin and shes on pillsUnless, its necessary, I tell them thank you, I'll eat lateror I'll sit with them and have tea What Im getting at is thishave your dinner at the time you want, you can always, since and enjoy family time laterits a matter of respect for you they should be the ones making the adjustments for meal times, not you Make it for them when you eat, and they will it it cold when they want to eat. In a "people skills" kind of way explain that it's unhealthy for you to eat that late. You will eat with them when you can but many nights, you will need to have supper earlier. You can always sit with them while they eat. Just my opinion. Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Time To Exercise With Diabetes?

What Is The Best Time To Exercise With Diabetes?

by Dr. Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., FACSMThe biggest problem most insulin users face is the risk of their blood glucose going too low for up to two days after they exercise. Given that there are no clear recommendations about the best time to exercise with diabetes, a recent study published in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology early in 2015 tackled this issue head-on1. That study compared blood glucose levels and the number of lows during and following moderate exercise for 36 hours. A total of 35 adults with type 1 diabetes using insulin pumps undertook 60 minutes of moderate exercise on a treadmill at 7 AM (pre-breakfast) and 4 PM (pre-dinner) on different days. During exercise their insulin pumps were turned off completely and then restarted 45 minutes after they stopped working out. How frequently they developed hypoglycemia (defined as glucose values < 70 mg/dl, or3.9 mmol/l) for up to 36 hours post-workout was monitored using both continuous glucose monitor (CGM) and fingerstick tests. Overall, hypos occurred significantly less often following 7 AM exercise compared to 4 PM (5.6 vs. 10.7 hypos per person). This is not a new finding, however, as other studies done previously in both type 1 and type 2 exercisers have found that you’re more likely to get low from exercise done later in the day. Most of the lows occurred 15 to 24 hours after exercise, regardless of the exercise timing, and over half of the adults in the study had at least one low in 36 hours. On days following morning exercise, there were 20% more CGM readings between 70 and 200 mg/dL (3.9 and 11.1 mmol/l) than on the day before they exercised in the morning, meaning that doing pre-breakfast exercise kept their blood glucose levels in a more normal range and improved their overall control, all Continue reading >>

What To Eat, How Much, And When

What To Eat, How Much, And When

Meal planning is one of the most important things you can do to keep your blood sugar in control. Paying attention to what you're eating, how much, and when might seem like a huge challenge at first, but these tips can help make it easier. Quality: What Can I Eat? Having diabetes doesn't mean you can't eat food you enjoy. You can keep eating the foods you like. Just make sure to include lots of nutritious, healthy choices. Healthy, nutritious choices include whole grains, legumes (dried beans, peas, and lentils), fruits, vegetables, non-fat or low-fat dairy, and lean meats, such as fish and poultry. These foods are high in vitamins, minerals, fiber, and lean protein, and low in saturated fat, cholesterol, and refined sugar. Healthier food choices aren't only good for people with diabetes. They're good for everyone. People who eat a variety of these foods every day have a well-balanced diet and get the nutrients their bodies need. Quantity: How Much Can I Eat? Learning about serving sizes is key to meal planning. Food labels on packaged foods and many recipes tell you what a serving size is. These labels tell you how many calories, carbohydrates, protein, and fat are in each serving. You'll need to know serving sizes to help you choose foods that keep your blood sugar from going too high after you eat. If you take fast-acting insulin to control your blood sugar, knowing the serving size will tell you how much insulin you need to take before you eat. Eating carbohydrates affects your blood sugar more than other foods. The more you eat, the faster and higher your blood sugar will rise. Eating fat and protein can affect how quickly your body turns carbohydrates into sugar. When you know the amount of carbohydrate, protein, and fat you're eating at a meal, you can learn to c Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Smart Snacking

Eating With Diabetes: Smart Snacking

Whether you want to lose weight or simply eat healthier, enjoying a couple of snacks each day is a smart habit for many people. Eating a planned snack between meals can help curb your hunger (and therefore prevent overeating at mealtime) and also increase your energy levels when you need a boost. Snacks offer an additional benefit for people with type 2 diabetes: They can help optimize your blood glucose control. So if you haven't incorporated snacks into your diabetes meal plan yet, now may be the time to start. Here's what you need to know to snack smart, along with some carbohydrate-controlled snack ideas you can try today! Our Best Articles, Delivered Get expert advice on Diabetes from our coaches and trainers The number of snacks a person with diabetes should eat during the day depends largely on your eating preferences, your weight-management goals, and the timing of your major meals. People with diabetes can eat snacks throughout the day for a number of reasonssimply enjoying a mid-morning snack or planning them into their day for better blood glucose control. Exactly how many snacks you should eatand when you eat themis very individualized. Meeting with a registered dietitian or certified diabetes educator is the best way to make sure your diabetes meal plan meets your needs. However, here are a few basic guidelines that can be helpful when planning snacks. How many hours pass between your meals? In general, people with diabetes who want to optimize blood glucose control should not go longer than five hours without eating. If you consistently eat your main meals every 4 to 5 hours, then you may not need any snacks between meals. However, if your main meals are generally spaced out at longer intervals, snacking between meals can help you achieve your best blood Continue reading >>

What Diabetics Should Eat For Dinner

What Diabetics Should Eat For Dinner

“Dinner food choices affect morning blood sugars,” says Laura Cipullo, who is both a Registered Dietitian and a Certified Diabetes Educator. “Many individuals notice a high morning blood glucose after a night of high on grams of carbohydrate. Think pasta and dessert at the same meal.” According to the American Diabetes Association, just because you are diabetic doesn’t mean you have to eat “special diabetic foods.” In fact, diabetic and “dietetic” foods are often over-priced and relatively offer no special benefit. Those living with diabetes can even indulge in starches and sweets, the key is to know your limits. “You don't need to avoid anything rather you need to eat small portions of your favorite carbs throughout the day,” confirms Cipullo. “Mixing meals with wholesome carbohydrates like quinoa and even lentils with lean proteins are healthy fats is the way to go.” But to make sure you are living your best dietary life, there are definitely some foods that should be making a regular appearance during meal time. Certain foods, like chicken and tomatoes, can help you slowly break down food without affecting your blood sugar. Of course, you should always take precautions when it comes to your own personal sugar levels. “Always be sure to test your blood sugar at fasting pre-meal and then two hours after to see how your body tolerated a food,” advises Cipullo. “Take into consideration hydration and exercise.” To help you manage your diabetes, Cipullo recommends including a few helpful foods during dinner time so you can enjoy life’s sweeter indulgences without worry. Check out her tips in the accompanying slideshow! Continue reading >>

The Dangers Of Skipping Meals When You Have Diabetes

The Dangers Of Skipping Meals When You Have Diabetes

It's tempting -- and even sounds logical -- to skip meals: You're busy, you're not hungry, you're trying to lose weight, or your blood sugar is too high. Skipping meals, however, may actually increase your blood sugar and cause you to gain weight. Here are seven rewards of eating regularly scheduled meals when you live with diabetes. Reward 1: Improve fasting blood glucose numbers. During sleep, when you're not eating, the liver sends more glucose into the blood to fuel the body. For many people during the early years of having type 2 diabetes, the liver doesn't realize there is already more than enough glucose present. "Your morning (fasting) blood sugars have much more to do with your liver and hormonal functions than what you ate for dinner last night," says Kathaleen Briggs Early, Ph.D., RD, CDE, assistant professor of biochemistry and nutrition at Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences in Yakima, Washington Get more information about why your morning blood sugar is high and tips to help control fasting blood sugar. Real-life example: Until recently, if Cheryl Simpson's blood glucose meter flashed a high reading before breakfast, she might delay eating until midafternoon in an attempt to lower that number. Now Cheryl, PWD type 2, won't leave home without eating breakfast. Her blood glucose numbers have improved. "Plus, eating breakfast makes it a whole lot easier to make good food choices later on," she says. Tip: Pack a grab-and-go breakfast with these 13 quick-fix ideas! Reward 2: Stay off the blood sugar roller coaster. Irregular eating can have you "bouncing back and forth between normal blood sugars and high blood sugars," Early says. A meager meal can give you a meager rise in blood sugar. If you take one or more blood glucose-lowering medications tha Continue reading >>

Altering Meal Times

Altering Meal Times

Knowing how to plan meals is an important part of managing all types of diabetes. Eating meals and snacks at the same time every day helps control blood sugar levels. Sometimes, it is not always possible to do this. Schedules change, special occasions arise or travel plans may make it necessary to change meal times. By using the tips below, you can control your diabetes even when meal times vary. What if your dinner will be later than usual? Usually, you can eat a meal 1 hour before or after your normal mealtime without any effect on your blood sugar levels. If your dinner will be two or more hours later, eat your evening snack close to your usual dinner time. Then, eat your dinner at your usual snack time. This will help avoid low blood sugars at dinner. It will also keep you from getting too hungry. What to do at a brunch? For brunch, it is still best to eat a small "snack-type" meal (fruit and a slice of toast with margarine) at your normal breakfast time. This small meal will keep you from eating too much at the brunch. If you do take insulin or diabetes pills, take your dosage at the normal time. Your doctor can advise you in this matter. After the brunch, eat your afternoon snack at its normal time. What can you do about holidays? Often, the holiday meal is served at noon. Eat your normal breakfast. Have the bigger meal for lunch and a lighter "lunch-sized" meal (sandwich and fruit) for dinner. If you have a bigger lunch, an afternoon snack may not be needed. If the holiday meal is in the middle of the afternoon, eat your breakfast at the normal time. Also, have a late morning snack. An evening snack may or may not be needed. What happens when you have delays at restaurants? If you take insulin or other diabetes pills and your restaurant meal is delayed for one ho Continue reading >>

Food To Eat At Night For Diabetics

Food To Eat At Night For Diabetics

Diabetics should understand the nutritional values of food, especially for nighttime meals and snacks, in order to come up with a strategy to keep blood glucose levels under control. Proper spacing of meals and snacks throughout the day provides a more gradual amount of glucose to your body. A meal plan helps with this by letting you figure out when and how much to eat and what time to eat to keep the blood glucose in your target range. Video of the Day According to the Mayo Clinic, late-night eating is fine for diabetics, but you have to make the right choices at night because snacks have extra calories, which can cause weight gain. Also, an after-dinner snack containing carbohydrates may increase your glucose levels overnight. The Mayo Clinic recommends eating a "free" food as a late-night snack, such as a diet drink, sugar-free gelatin, carrots, saltine crackers or a vanilla wafer. Free foods have few or no calories or carbohydrates. Also acceptable is chewing gum or a piece of hard candy. Taste of Home magazine recommends raw vegetables such as bell pepper strips, cauliflower or broccoli florets, celery, carrots, cucumbers, radishes or even zucchini as a light snack, because these foods have few carbohydrates, which helps you keep blood glucose levels under control. If you don't have fresh raw vegetables on hand, the magazine suggests other snack options, such as a granola bar, six saltine crackers, eight plain animal crackers, a box of raisins, a small bag of reduced-fat potato chips, three gingersnap cookies or five vanilla wafers. Going out to eat at dinnertime can be a challenge for diabetics because what you eat and when you eat it can have an effect on your blood glucose levels. In a restaurant, you have little control over the timing of food delivery. You nee Continue reading >>

Meal Timing

Meal Timing

“Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper,” is a saying attributed to 20th-century American nutrition activist Adelle Davis. Many people, of course, do not follow this advice to eat a large breakfast, a medium-large lunch, and a small dinner. It is commonplace in the United States for dinner to be the largest meal of the day, and some people see no problem in this. Others, however — including many researchers and people with diabetes — question whether timing meals this way produces the best health effects. This has led to some debate over whether a large dinner, or a late dinner, could be harmful to your health. A recent article at Fox News Latino, written by a registered dietitian, claims that eating dinner later in the evening has not been shown to cause weight gain or to produce ill health effects. The author notes that in many Latin countries, as well as in Europe, it is routine to eat dinner at 9 PM. The problem with late dinners in the United States, he claims, is that they are often the main source of food for the day due to hectic schedules and failure to prioritize meals. Thus, people are often starved at dinnertime and overeat. As a guideline to prevent this, he suggests that people should consume 70% of their day’s calories before dinner, but they may eat the remaining 30% as late as they want, except within 90 minutes before bed. A study published last year, however, somewhat contradicts the claim that meal timing makes no difference. Presented at Obesity 2010: The Obesity Society 28th Annual Scientific Meeting, the study found that eating a later dinner produced several metabolic effects. The participants were 10 healthy Japanese men with an average age of 40 and an average body-mass index (BMI) of 23. They were ea Continue reading >>

The Best Time To Walk

The Best Time To Walk

The surprising news is that taking a walk before eating is a great way to keep our blood glucose levels low. But whether we take a walk before or after eating — or both — we will bring down our blood glucose level at the point where it goes highest. Taking a little walk after dinner used to be a tradition in this country. Few people do that any more, and now is the time for those of us who have diabetes to bring it back. While we are at it, we can start a new tradition of even shorter walks before dinner. Walk After Eating A study in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition shows that a little physical activity can be a big help in bringing down our blood glucose level after a meal. Entitled “Breaking prolonged sitting reduces postprandial glycemia in healthy, normal-weight adults: a randomized crossover trial,” the study was written by six researchers at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand. This study focused on helping people with pre-diabetes so they won’t get diabetes. Of course, what works for them will work just as well for those of us who have diabetes. But even before this study appeared we had anecdotal evidence for it. I knew from my own experience and that of my late wife that a brisk walk of half an hour can bring down our glucose level. I well remember when Catherine asked what she could do when her blood glucose meter showed that her level was above 200 about an hour after dinner. I suggested that we take a brisk walk around the block, and when we got back home and she tested again, her level was almost down to normal. Walk Before Eating Another study, this one published last year in Diabetologia, which is the professional journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, looked at what happens when people get their phy Continue reading >>

Does Timing Of Food Matter With Diabetes?

Does Timing Of Food Matter With Diabetes?

Eating certainly affects glucose control. But does the timing of your food intake really matter, as long as you take your medications when you’re supposed to? What about European cultures who favor a larger midday meal? What time of the day should you eat for optimal glycemic control? Glycemic Control Certainly, regularly scheduled meals and snacks are best for glycemic control. This is a long well-known principle. Standard of care recommendations are three meals, 4-5 hours apart, same or similar times of the day every day. Setting your meal times and medication times on a regular schedule will result in improved glucose control throughout the day, and over time, evidenced by improved HbA1c values and improved insulin sensitivity. A sample daily meal schedule would be: 7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. breakfast + 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. lunch + 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. dinner. Regular recommendations are 60 grams of carbohydrate at each of these meals, but that should be individualized by working with a Registered Dietitian (RD) or Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE). Individuals on long-acting insulin will need a bedtime snack including 15-30 grams of carbohydrate to avoid nighttime hypoglycemia. This can be tricky for people working a night shift, or other lifestyle issues affecting a ‘typical’ schedule. Again, work with an RD or CDE to determine what can work for you. Hunger & Satiety Eating on a regular schedule, with small frequent mini-meals keeps you satisfied. Skipping meals in order to lose weight eventually ends up with overeating at the next meal. Eating the traditional three larger meals each day may lead to hungry spells in between. Hunger scores were significantly improved in human subjects fed a larger morning meal compare to those fed a larger evening meal. A Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

Meal Times And Diabetes: What’s The Connection?

Meal Times And Diabetes: What’s The Connection?

will have diabetes by 2050. With statistics like these, it’s becoming increasingly important that we understand the best way to eat in order to manage blood sugar levels. For well-planned meals to have the most benefit, we must first look at the timing of our meals and understand the impact it has on an individual’s blood sugar levels. Let’s take a closer look at why regular meal times are helpful: Prevent blood sugar fluctuations For individuals that are taking long-acting insulin or oral medications that assist with decreased blood sugar levels, eating at least every 4-5 hours is necessary to prevent low blood sugar, also called hypoglycemia. Promote weight loss When individuals are able to stabilize their blood sugar levels throughout the day, this helps regulate their appetite as well. It is well documented that when people with type 2 diabetes achieve a 5-10 percent weight loss, this will increase insulin sensitivity and help lower blood sugar. Improve overall nutrition The power of planning cannot be ignored when it comes to creating a healthy diabetes meal plan. While sometimes easier said than done, meals planned in advance will likely be more balanced and include better choices. When we arrive to a meal too hungry, we tend to choose whatever food is the closest to us, eat faster and in larger portion sizes. When an individual with diabetes has been encouraged to consume ‘regular’ meals, this can often be confusing if additional guidance is not provided. Generally, it is recommended to eat breakfast within 90 minutes of waking and then eat at least every 4-5 hours during the day after your first meal. Snacks are not necessary, but can be included if hunger is present between meals. In fact, bedtime snacks are very helpful. Since it is recommended to av Continue reading >>

The Best Time To Check Blood Glucose After A Meal

The Best Time To Check Blood Glucose After A Meal

Q: I was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Should I check my blood glucose two hours from when I start eating or after I finish eating my meal? A: Most of the food you consume will be digested and raises blood glucose in one to two hours. To capture the peak level of your blood glucose, it is best to test one to two hours after you start eating. The American Diabetes Association recommends a target of below 180 mg/dl two hours after a meal. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists recommends a lower target: below 140 mg/dl two hours after a meal. Ask your doctor which target is right for you. Postmeal blood glucose monitoring (and record-keeping) is important because it helps you see how your body responds to carbohydrates in general and particular foods. Managing postmeal blood glucose can help reduce your risk of developing heart and circulation problems. Virginia Zamudio Lange, a member of Diabetic Living's editorial advisory board, is a founding partner of Alamo Diabetes Team, LLP in San Antonio. Continue reading >>

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