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Best Time To Eat Dinner For Diabetes

What Is The Best Time To Exercise With Diabetes?

What Is The Best Time To Exercise With Diabetes?

by Dr. Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., FACSMThe biggest problem most insulin users face is the risk of their blood glucose going too low for up to two days after they exercise. Given that there are no clear recommendations about the best time to exercise with diabetes, a recent study published in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology early in 2015 tackled this issue head-on1. That study compared blood glucose levels and the number of lows during and following moderate exercise for 36 hours. A total of 35 adults with type 1 diabetes using insulin pumps undertook 60 minutes of moderate exercise on a treadmill at 7 AM (pre-breakfast) and 4 PM (pre-dinner) on different days. During exercise their insulin pumps were turned off completely and then restarted 45 minutes after they stopped working out. How frequently they developed hypoglycemia (defined as glucose values < 70 mg/dl, or3.9 mmol/l) for up to 36 hours post-workout was monitored using both continuous glucose monitor (CGM) and fingerstick tests. Overall, hypos occurred significantly less often following 7 AM exercise compared to 4 PM (5.6 vs. 10.7 hypos per person). This is not a new finding, however, as other studies done previously in both type 1 and type 2 exercisers have found that you’re more likely to get low from exercise done later in the day. Most of the lows occurred 15 to 24 hours after exercise, regardless of the exercise timing, and over half of the adults in the study had at least one low in 36 hours. On days following morning exercise, there were 20% more CGM readings between 70 and 200 mg/dL (3.9 and 11.1 mmol/l) than on the day before they exercised in the morning, meaning that doing pre-breakfast exercise kept their blood glucose levels in a more normal range and improved their overall control, all Continue reading >>

What Diabetics Should Eat For Dinner

What Diabetics Should Eat For Dinner

“Dinner food choices affect morning blood sugars,” says Laura Cipullo, who is both a Registered Dietitian and a Certified Diabetes Educator. “Many individuals notice a high morning blood glucose after a night of high on grams of carbohydrate. Think pasta and dessert at the same meal.” According to the American Diabetes Association, just because you are diabetic doesn’t mean you have to eat “special diabetic foods.” In fact, diabetic and “dietetic” foods are often over-priced and relatively offer no special benefit. Those living with diabetes can even indulge in starches and sweets, the key is to know your limits. “You don't need to avoid anything rather you need to eat small portions of your favorite carbs throughout the day,” confirms Cipullo. “Mixing meals with wholesome carbohydrates like quinoa and even lentils with lean proteins are healthy fats is the way to go.” But to make sure you are living your best dietary life, there are definitely some foods that should be making a regular appearance during meal time. Certain foods, like chicken and tomatoes, can help you slowly break down food without affecting your blood sugar. Of course, you should always take precautions when it comes to your own personal sugar levels. “Always be sure to test your blood sugar at fasting pre-meal and then two hours after to see how your body tolerated a food,” advises Cipullo. “Take into consideration hydration and exercise.” To help you manage your diabetes, Cipullo recommends including a few helpful foods during dinner time so you can enjoy life’s sweeter indulgences without worry. Check out her tips in the accompanying slideshow! Continue reading >>

Meal Times And Diabetes: What’s The Connection?

Meal Times And Diabetes: What’s The Connection?

will have diabetes by 2050. With statistics like these, it’s becoming increasingly important that we understand the best way to eat in order to manage blood sugar levels. For well-planned meals to have the most benefit, we must first look at the timing of our meals and understand the impact it has on an individual’s blood sugar levels. Let’s take a closer look at why regular meal times are helpful: Prevent blood sugar fluctuations For individuals that are taking long-acting insulin or oral medications that assist with decreased blood sugar levels, eating at least every 4-5 hours is necessary to prevent low blood sugar, also called hypoglycemia. Promote weight loss When individuals are able to stabilize their blood sugar levels throughout the day, this helps regulate their appetite as well. It is well documented that when people with type 2 diabetes achieve a 5-10 percent weight loss, this will increase insulin sensitivity and help lower blood sugar. Improve overall nutrition The power of planning cannot be ignored when it comes to creating a healthy diabetes meal plan. While sometimes easier said than done, meals planned in advance will likely be more balanced and include better choices. When we arrive to a meal too hungry, we tend to choose whatever food is the closest to us, eat faster and in larger portion sizes. When an individual with diabetes has been encouraged to consume ‘regular’ meals, this can often be confusing if additional guidance is not provided. Generally, it is recommended to eat breakfast within 90 minutes of waking and then eat at least every 4-5 hours during the day after your first meal. Snacks are not necessary, but can be included if hunger is present between meals. In fact, bedtime snacks are very helpful. Since it is recommended to av Continue reading >>

Morning To Night Diabetes Management

Morning To Night Diabetes Management

Good diabetes management depends on following a routine that runs throughout your day — from the time you get up until your head hits the pillow again at night. That's because blood sugar levels are in constant flux during the day. They rise after meals and taper off during physical activity. The key to successfully managing type 2 diabetes and its symptoms is to keep your blood sugar levels as stable as possible. That's where a routine comes into play. Here are diabetes management tips to help cover every part of your day: In the Morning Check your blood sugar. If you have type 2 diabetes, you should check your blood sugar level every morning before you eat anything, says Marjorie Cypress, CDE, president of health care and education at the American Diabetes Association. This gives you a good baseline idea where you stand and allows you to make adjustments throughout the day. Eat breakfast. If you skip breakfast, you're already starting your day on the wrong foot. "Many people tend to skip breakfast, and it's one of the most important meals of the day," Cypress says. "You skip breakfast and you get hungrier and hungrier, and that's one of the reasons people tend to overeat later in the day." Eating regular meals will help keep your blood sugar levels steady, but skipping meals and then binging will cause spikes. Give your feet a once-over. Diabetes can cause your feet to lose feeling because of nerve damage. In extreme cases, a person with diabetes can end up having to have a foot amputated if an unnoticed cut becomes severely infected. Check your feet for any sores or cuts each morning. Also check your shoes before putting them on to make sure there's nothing in your shoe that could cause a sore. You might want to check your feet at bedtime, too. In the Afternoon Tak Continue reading >>

Best Time To Have Dinner ......

Best Time To Have Dinner ......

I was wondering could eating late like before going to bed course DP.......Should I be eating early and give my food time to start Digesting or will this not make a difference...... I tend to eat very late and I have been told this is not good. thanks for any Help. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control I think your idea is sound, if you eat late you have those carbs sitting there for the body to work on, a non diabetic would not have an issue with this. I think its not good for two reasons, weight gain and bs levels but that is just my thinking I think your idea is sound, if you eat late you have those carbs sitting there for the body to work on, a non diabetic would not have an issue with this. I think its not good for two reasons, weight gain and bs levels but that is just my thinking So Around 7pm would be a perfect time...... I'll try that tonight All of us have a body clock. Turns out diabetics and overweight people tend to be more insulin resistant in the late evening through to morning. So eating late in the evening makes it that much tougher for a diabetic body to use it's insulin effectively to process the carbs from dinner. I find I can eat nearly anything in the afternoon. I am less insulin resistant, and am still running around to burn off some glucose. A late dinner is really awful for me. It get much better fasting numbers if I eat at a reasonable dinner hour. So I eat lunch at noon and dinner at 6 PM, and I am pretty determined to stick to that schedule. I won't say that's the optimum schedule for you, because you are you and not me. But do try an early dinner and see what happens. And do it more than just once. You're going to have to try this for a while to really see if it helps you. low carb diet, moderate exercise, 2500 mg metformin I tend to e Continue reading >>

Making A Diabetic Meal Plan Work For You

Making A Diabetic Meal Plan Work For You

How a Diabetes Meal Plan Can Help You Knowing how to plan heart healthy meals is important for managing all types of diabetes diets. Food can raise blood sugar levels. The type and amount of foods that are eaten will affect how high and how fast blood sugar levels will rise. It is important to make healthy eating choices about when to eat, what to eat and how much to eat. When should a diabetic eat? Eat your meals and snacks at about the same time each day. By doing this, your blood sugar levels may stay under control. Space your meals 4-5 hours apart. Eat in-between snacks as needed. If you take insulin or diabetes pills, keep the right balance between food and these medicines. You should understand how long your pills or insulin take to work to lower blood glucose levels. Find out when they work the best you plan when to eat. Snacks between meals are very important if you go more than five hours from meal to meal. What should a diabetic eat? Eat about the same size meals and snacks every day. Most people eat a small breakfast, a medium sized lunch and a larger dinner. This forces the body to process most of the day's food at the end of the day. A better idea is to eat all meals that are about the same size. You will be eating balanced meals throughout the day. Make healthy food choices rich in vitamins, minerals, lean protein like white chicken and fiber such as brown rice. The fiber takes longer to break down. Blood sugars rise slower. This will keep blood sugar levels better controlled. It will help your body better process the sugar coming from your food. Do not skip meals. If you take insulin or diabetes pills, do not skip meals. This can cause your blood sugars to drop too low. Skipping one meal could cause you to overeat at the next meal. Even if you do not take Continue reading >>

11 Diabetes Dinner Mistakes To Avoid

11 Diabetes Dinner Mistakes To Avoid

Evening meals can be stressful and rushed, echoing our lives that are chaotic and overscheduled. In light of this, people with diabetes unintentionally make some common mistakes when approaching their dinner meals. This article will help you learn strategies to overcome these mistakes. Are you making these 11 mistakes? 1. Too Many Carbs Carbs aren’t bad for you, assuming you’re eating them in moderation and eating the right kind of carbs. It’s common to prepare a dinner meal with a heaping side of rice, bread or potatoes. We do it because it’s easy to cook and it’s incredibly filling – especially after a long, hard day. However consuming too many carbs can easily affect your blood sugar levels and can contribute to long-term medical complications such as heart disease, obesity and diabetes. It’s easy to overload on carbs. To put it into perspective, a ½ cup serving of pasta contains 15 grams of carbohydrate. Chances are you’re probably eating more than ½ cup of pasta at your meals. 2. Not Planning Ahead The busy lifestyles we lead have a negative impact on our food intake. Meal planning is essential for optimal diabetes care. Set aside some time once a week to plan meals for the upcoming week. Make your shopping list according to your meal plan and stick to that list. If you know what you’re going to have for dinner on Tuesday evening, you won’t get caught running through a fast food drive-thru or heating up high-carbohydrate frozen meals. For more interesting diabetes articles see below: 3. Carb-Loaded Beverages Milk, juices, soda pop, sports drinks, coffee drinks and energy drinks – all of these will work against your efforts for optimal glucose control. You will hear time and time again that water is the optimal beverage. It is calorie free an Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Smart Snacking

Eating With Diabetes: Smart Snacking

Whether you want to lose weight or simply eat healthier, enjoying a couple of snacks each day is a smart habit for many people. Eating a planned snack between meals can help curb your hunger (and therefore prevent overeating at mealtime) and also increase your energy levels when you need a boost. Snacks offer an additional benefit for people with type 2 diabetes: They can help optimize your blood glucose control. So if you haven't incorporated snacks into your diabetes meal plan yet, now may be the time to start. Here's what you need to know to snack smart, along with some carbohydrate-controlled snack ideas you can try today! Our Best Articles, Delivered Get expert advice on Diabetes from our coaches and trainers The number of snacks a person with diabetes should eat during the day depends largely on your eating preferences, your weight-management goals, and the timing of your major meals. People with diabetes can eat snacks throughout the day for a number of reasonssimply enjoying a mid-morning snack or planning them into their day for better blood glucose control. Exactly how many snacks you should eatand when you eat themis very individualized. Meeting with a registered dietitian or certified diabetes educator is the best way to make sure your diabetes meal plan meets your needs. However, here are a few basic guidelines that can be helpful when planning snacks. How many hours pass between your meals? In general, people with diabetes who want to optimize blood glucose control should not go longer than five hours without eating. If you consistently eat your main meals every 4 to 5 hours, then you may not need any snacks between meals. However, if your main meals are generally spaced out at longer intervals, snacking between meals can help you achieve your best blood Continue reading >>

The Best Time To Walk

The Best Time To Walk

The surprising news is that taking a walk before eating is a great way to keep our blood glucose levels low. But whether we take a walk before or after eating — or both — we will bring down our blood glucose level at the point where it goes highest. Taking a little walk after dinner used to be a tradition in this country. Few people do that any more, and now is the time for those of us who have diabetes to bring it back. While we are at it, we can start a new tradition of even shorter walks before dinner. Walk After Eating A study in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition shows that a little physical activity can be a big help in bringing down our blood glucose level after a meal. Entitled “Breaking prolonged sitting reduces postprandial glycemia in healthy, normal-weight adults: a randomized crossover trial,” the study was written by six researchers at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand. This study focused on helping people with pre-diabetes so they won’t get diabetes. Of course, what works for them will work just as well for those of us who have diabetes. But even before this study appeared we had anecdotal evidence for it. I knew from my own experience and that of my late wife that a brisk walk of half an hour can bring down our glucose level. I well remember when Catherine asked what she could do when her blood glucose meter showed that her level was above 200 about an hour after dinner. I suggested that we take a brisk walk around the block, and when we got back home and she tested again, her level was almost down to normal. Walk Before Eating Another study, this one published last year in Diabetologia, which is the professional journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, looked at what happens when people get their phy Continue reading >>

Does Timing Of Food Matter With Diabetes?

Does Timing Of Food Matter With Diabetes?

Eating certainly affects glucose control. But does the timing of your food intake really matter, as long as you take your medications when you’re supposed to? What about European cultures who favor a larger midday meal? What time of the day should you eat for optimal glycemic control? Glycemic Control Certainly, regularly scheduled meals and snacks are best for glycemic control. This is a long well-known principle. Standard of care recommendations are three meals, 4-5 hours apart, same or similar times of the day every day. Setting your meal times and medication times on a regular schedule will result in improved glucose control throughout the day, and over time, evidenced by improved HbA1c values and improved insulin sensitivity. A sample daily meal schedule would be: 7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. breakfast + 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. lunch + 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. dinner. Regular recommendations are 60 grams of carbohydrate at each of these meals, but that should be individualized by working with a Registered Dietitian (RD) or Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE). Individuals on long-acting insulin will need a bedtime snack including 15-30 grams of carbohydrate to avoid nighttime hypoglycemia. This can be tricky for people working a night shift, or other lifestyle issues affecting a ‘typical’ schedule. Again, work with an RD or CDE to determine what can work for you. Hunger & Satiety Eating on a regular schedule, with small frequent mini-meals keeps you satisfied. Skipping meals in order to lose weight eventually ends up with overeating at the next meal. Eating the traditional three larger meals each day may lead to hungry spells in between. Hunger scores were significantly improved in human subjects fed a larger morning meal compare to those fed a larger evening meal. A Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Stabilize Blood Sugar With Meal Timing

5 Ways To Stabilize Blood Sugar With Meal Timing

When it comes to stabilizing your blood sugars, timing can be everything. From the hour of your first meal of the day to how late you eat at night, the timing of your meals can heavily dictate how well your blood sugars are managed on a daily basis. When my clients are in the habit of eating healthy still see peaks and valleys in their numbers, we sit down to re-evaluate when and how often they are eating. Here are five strategies to help you with better meal timing and keeping blood glucose in check: 1. Eat within the first few hours of rising Among the majority of my new clients, breakfast is the most-skipped meal of the day. Many people feel they don’t have time for breakfast, which is unfortunate because it truly is the most important meal – especially if you have diabetes. When you’re sleeping, your body is in a fasting-like state. When you wake up, eating within the first couple of hours can help break that fast (hence the name “breakfast”). And although it may seem like you’re saving yourself from extra calories or spiking your blood sugars, skipping breakfast can end up backfiring. You may find yourself over-eating at your first meal or gravitating more toward starchy or sugary foods. What’s worse, if blood glucose levels indeed drop too low, the body will send out hormones to release stored glucose into the blood stream, spiking your sugars and making it even harder to regulate your numbers throughout the day when you do finally eat. If you’re strapped for time, try to at least grab a small, balanced bite – pair a bit of protein with a high-fiber carbohydrate like peanut butter and whole-wheat toast, or a hard-boiled egg and fresh fruit. 2. Avoid Eating Right Before Bedtime It may be tempting to sneak in that late-night snack right before bedt Continue reading >>

What's For Dinner? Diabetic Dinner Menus

What's For Dinner? Diabetic Dinner Menus

Planning dinner doesn't have to be a headache with this personal diabetes menu. Take a look at this list of delicious diabetic meals that are made to fit into the recommended daily carb allowance. Planning dinner doesn't have to be a headache with this personal diabetes menu. Take a look at this list of delicious diabetic meals that are made to fit into the recommended daily carb allowance. Planning dinner doesn't have to be a headache with this personal diabetes menu. Take a look at this list of delicious diabetic meals that are made to fit into the recommended daily carb allowance. Planning dinner doesn't have to be a headache with this personal diabetes menu. Take a look at this list of delicious diabetic meals that are made to fit into the recommended daily carb allowance. Continue reading >>

What To Eat, How Much, And When

What To Eat, How Much, And When

Meal planning is one of the most important things you can do to keep your blood sugar in control. Paying attention to what you're eating, how much, and when might seem like a huge challenge at first, but these tips can help make it easier. Quality: What Can I Eat? Having diabetes doesn't mean you can't eat food you enjoy. You can keep eating the foods you like. Just make sure to include lots of nutritious, healthy choices. Healthy, nutritious choices include whole grains, legumes (dried beans, peas, and lentils), fruits, vegetables, non-fat or low-fat dairy, and lean meats, such as fish and poultry. These foods are high in vitamins, minerals, fiber, and lean protein, and low in saturated fat, cholesterol, and refined sugar. Healthier food choices aren't only good for people with diabetes. They're good for everyone. People who eat a variety of these foods every day have a well-balanced diet and get the nutrients their bodies need. Quantity: How Much Can I Eat? Learning about serving sizes is key to meal planning. Food labels on packaged foods and many recipes tell you what a serving size is. These labels tell you how many calories, carbohydrates, protein, and fat are in each serving. You'll need to know serving sizes to help you choose foods that keep your blood sugar from going too high after you eat. If you take fast-acting insulin to control your blood sugar, knowing the serving size will tell you how much insulin you need to take before you eat. Eating carbohydrates affects your blood sugar more than other foods. The more you eat, the faster and higher your blood sugar will rise. Eating fat and protein can affect how quickly your body turns carbohydrates into sugar. When you know the amount of carbohydrate, protein, and fat you're eating at a meal, you can learn to c Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

Dinner Time | Diabetic Connect

Dinner Time | Diabetic Connect

I agree with some of the earlier posts. Just explain to them that with your diabetes you have to stay on a routine and to keep your levels level you may need to have a meal sooner than they wish to eat. If they love you and understand its for your best health, they shouldn't have a problem with it. Gosh I don't know how to help with this one. I've read through the responses and they all seem like sound pieces of advice! I as a rule, try not to eat any later than 7. Don't know if that helps you at all. *Hugs* Cheryl If they get home after you eat, I would tell them where the left over food is, and they are more than welcome to eat then On the other hand, and Ive done this, I would explain that eating late for you isn't good for your blood sugar or over all healthand they should respect that When I stay at my parents houseand my mom is a diabetic, I eat when they doIf Im up earlier than themYesIve have breakfast before them cause Im on insulin and shes on pillsUnless, its necessary, I tell them thank you, I'll eat lateror I'll sit with them and have tea What Im getting at is thishave your dinner at the time you want, you can always, since and enjoy family time laterits a matter of respect for you they should be the ones making the adjustments for meal times, not you Make it for them when you eat, and they will it it cold when they want to eat. In a "people skills" kind of way explain that it's unhealthy for you to eat that late. You will eat with them when you can but many nights, you will need to have supper earlier. You can always sit with them while they eat. Just my opinion. Continue reading >>

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