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Best Foods To Regulate Blood Sugar

Diabetes & Diet: 7 Foods That Control Blood Sugar

Diabetes & Diet: 7 Foods That Control Blood Sugar

When you have type 2 diabetes, what you eat can help you control your blood sugar, stave off hunger, and feel full longer. “Diabetes is when your blood sugar or glucose levels are higher than normal. It’s carbohydrate foods like breads, cereals, rice, pasta, fruits, milk, and desserts that can cause this rise," says Maggie Powers, PhD, president-elect of Health Care & Education at the American Diabetes Association. Your eating plan should focus on the amount and type of carbs you put on your plate throughout the day, Powers says. But it’s also important to have foods you enjoy. You want to eat enough so you feel satisfied and avoid overeating and poor choices. Here are seven foods that Powers says can help keep your blood sugar in check and make you happy and healthy to boot. These add color, flavor, and texture to a meal. Choose tasty, low-carb veggies, like mushrooms, onions, eggplant, tomatoes, Brussels sprouts, and low-carb squashes, like zucchini. Try them with dips such as low-fat dressings, hummus, guacamole, and salsa, or roasted with different seasonings such as rosemary, cayenne pepper, or garlic. Go beyond your regular salad and try kale, spinach, and chard. They’re healthy, delicious, and low-carb, Powers says. Roast kale leaves in the oven with olive oil for quick, crunchy chips. You can also mix greens in with roasted veggies to add texture and a different flavor, or serve them with a little protein, like salmon. Plain water is always good, but water infused with fruits and vegetables is more interesting. Cut up a lemon or cucumber and put it in your water, or make ice cubes with some flavoring in them. If you’re not a hot tea drinker, try cold tea with lemon or a cinnamon stick. “Not only are these beverages low-carb, they can also help fill y Continue reading >>

5 Foods That Lower Your Blood Sugar Quickly

5 Foods That Lower Your Blood Sugar Quickly

Eating a whole foods, plant-based diet is one of the simplest ways to manage your blood sugar and elevate your health to a whole new level. Your blood sugar controls several different hormonal responses in the body, all of which contribute to your energy, your mood, and even your hunger levels. Healthy blood sugars are also vital to prevent or manage Type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and hypoglycemia. Eating a diet that supports your blood sugar can also help prevent obesity. Plant-based foods are jam-packed with fiber, which is the main reason they’re so supportive of blood sugar levels. Fiber slows down the release of sugar within the bloodstream, which helps steady insulin levels. This prevents those blood sugar “ups and downs” that foods high in refined sugars, animal foods, and highly- processed foods can cause. To take care of your blood sugar, all you have to do is prioritize higher fiber sources of whole foods versus foods lower in fiber, such as foods with refined or added sugars, animal products (which dramatically raise insulin), and most processed foods. To keep things easy and simple, focus on eating foods that do support your blood sugar instead of focusing on those that don’t. As you’ll see, there are some pretty delicious plant-based foods and meals you can make with them that support your blood sugar. These foods will keep you energized, satisfied, provide your body with vitamins, minerals, fiber, healthy fats, and even some protein too! 1. Magnesium-Rich Leafy Greens All leafy greens such as: kale, spinach, romaine, arugula, collards, turnip greens, all lettuces, Swiss chard, dandelion greens, and any other green you can think of, are absolutely wonderful for your blood sugar. However, a few are especially rich in magnesium, which is acts like a Continue reading >>

The 3 Worst Foods For Blood Sugar (& 6 Healthy Foods To Eat Instead)

The 3 Worst Foods For Blood Sugar (& 6 Healthy Foods To Eat Instead)

Blood sugar is a relatively common concept for many Americans. But for those who aren’t actively dealing with diabetes, it can be a bit of a murky subject. Discovering more about blood sugar’s role in the body is key to your health, even if you aren’t currently diabetic. What Is Blood Sugar? Blood sugar, or glucose, is sugar carried through the bloodstream to provide energy to the body. Glucose increases when we eat – particularly foods that contain refined carbohydrates, vegetable oils, and sugar. Protein, but not fat, can be converted to glucose when needed, too. (1) Since organs function best with balance, the body tries to maintain stable blood sugar levels. This internal balance is referred to as homeostasis. When we eat carbohydrates, they are broken down into simple sugars during the digestion process. Glucose is the primary simple sugar that fuels the body. (2) Blood sugar levels rise after eating, but then typically return to homeostatic levels within an hour. Blood sugar is at its lowest levels in the morning after fasting during the night. Are you struggling to lose weight, craving foods you shouldn’t, and finding yourself fatigued and unable to focus? Chances are, your Hormones are out of whack. Get our FREE Guide to fixing your Hormones through the Paleo diet here! After glucose is broken down during digestion, it needs to be received into the cells. Insulin is a hormone that allows glucose to enter the cells for energy. Without insulin, the cells would not be able to receive glucose. Insulin releases when glucose is present. When blood sugar levels are high, like with diabetes, insulin can’t always keep up with glucose absorption. In other cases, the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin to keep up with demands, as is common with type 1, or Continue reading >>

A Natural Way To Help Control Blood Sugar

A Natural Way To Help Control Blood Sugar

Keeping blood sugar levels balanced is crucial for helping maintain energy levels and avoid complications associated with diabetes. Dietary changes, such eliminating certain foods and focusing on others, and lifestyle changes, such as exercise and stress avoidance, can and do make a difference in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. While dietary fiber doesn't supply nutrients or calories, it positively affects your blood sugar. Soluble fiber, which is soluble in water, helps stabilize blood sugar levels by delaying stomach emptying, thus slowing the rate of carbohydrate absorption, improving regulation of blood sugar and lowering your body's insulin requirements. Insoluble fiber, which isn't soluble in water, increases the speed of waste elimination, helping to prevent constipation. The recommended dietary intake is 14 grams for every 1,000 calories you consume. Most fiber-rich foods also contain other types of non-fiber carbs, such as sugar or starch, that you must keep in mind for meal planning. Focus on low-carb, non-starchy fiber sources, such as spinach, kale, broccoli, leafy greens and green beans. Fruits, potatoes, corn, peas, beans, lentils, winter squash and whole-grain breads, cereals and pastas are also rich in fiber, but higher in starchy carbohydrates. Eat Antioxidant-Rich Foods Some clinical studies suggest that people with diabetes have elevated levels of free radicals and lower levels of antioxidants that fight free radicals. Free radicals are molecules containing unpaired electrons that can damage cells and cause disease. Preliminary clinical studies show the antioxidants vitamin E, selenium and zinc may help keep blood glucose levels in a normal range, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Fruits, such as blueberries, cherries and Continue reading >>

7 Healthy Snacks To Manage Blood Sugar

7 Healthy Snacks To Manage Blood Sugar

High blood sugar levels are bad news for your body. So you have to choose carefully when it comes to choosing snacks. You want to keep hunger and hypoglycemia at bay without increasing your blood sugar. High-fiber, slowly digested, healthy snacks will curb your hunger while producing a steady release of blood sugar to help control diabetes. Just remember to balance those… more from this guide Continue reading >>

17 Foods That Positively Impact Blood Sugar

17 Foods That Positively Impact Blood Sugar

If you’re serious about your health, maintaining balanced blood sugar should be a top priority. Blood sugar, otherwise known as glucose, is the primary type of sugar in your blood. Blood sugar is sourced from the foods we eat. It is one of only two ways in which our bodies produce energy. Blood sugar plays such a vital role in the functioning of your body. So, maintaining a balanced blood glucose is critical to maintaining your health in general. In the short term, blood sugar spikes can lead to weight gain and other adverse effects. In the long term, chronically elevated blood glucose can cause serious problems, the most notable of which is diabetes. Studies indicate that diabetes is a national pandemic in the United States. Experts estimate that over 14 percent of the population suffers from diabetes. More than one-third of the entire U.S. population is suspected of having pre-diabetes. Even if you don’t fall within one of these groups, it’s in your best interests to avoid high blood sugar wherever you can. Considering food is the primary source of blood sugar in our bodies, thinking about what we eat can dramatically lower our risk of elevated blood sugar. One of the best ways to keep your blood sugar within a healthy range is to avoid foods which cause blood sugar spikes. Stick to those which have a low glycemic index. Don’t overload your digestive system with a sudden burst of glucose or fructose. Here are 17 foods which impact blood sugar — the right way. 1. Cinnamon Cinnamon is a well-respected spice in the diabetic world, due to it’s ability to significantly and repeatedly lower blood sugar levels. It lowers your risk of developing diabetes in two ways. First, it acts as a natural non-sugar sweetener, meaning you’re less likely to add sugar to food Continue reading >>

Exactly What I Ate To Get My Blood Sugar Under Control For Good

Exactly What I Ate To Get My Blood Sugar Under Control For Good

When Thomas Rupp was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, he was stunned. Despite having a challenging career (he was working in corporate finance and for FEMA), he managed to exercise regularly, and he rarely ate fast food or sweets. Sure, he weighed 245 pounds, but at 6 feet tall that didn't seem so terrible. He didn't consider that his weight pushed his BMI into the obese category—and he didn't realize that many of the "healthy" foods he was eating were actually loaded with tons of sugar and calories. Rupp's doctor started him on four different medications. The side effects were bothersome, but what really kicked him into gear was learning that he'd need to start injecting himself with insulin nightly. Instead, he turned to the Diabetes Reversal Program at Tufts Medical Center, where he met with the founding director, Michael Dansinger, MD. They worked together to closely examine Rupp's diet and uncover pitfalls that Rupp had trouble spotting on his own. (You can control your blood sugar with food and without insulin by making healthy lifestyle changes. Try the easy plan in The Natural Way To Beat Diabetes.) For instance, while adding some cream and sugar to a cup of coffee might not be a big deal for some people, Rupp often downed 10 cups of coffee a day to power himself through long days in the office. (Here are 8 physical signs you drink way too much coffee.) And he was putting cream and sugar in each cup. "That's 10 containers of cream and 10 teaspoons of sugar a day I was adding to my diet," he says. And even though he worked out, "I was drinking green juices at the gym, or protein smoothies with mango, once again without realizing the sugar content." Other seemingly healthy choices—like salads—also concealed stealth sugar bombs. "I would add vinaigrette dressi Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar Naturally

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar Naturally

Processed foods like cookies, cakes, and candy (and even starchy plant foods like rice, beans, and potatoes) can cause rapid increases in blood sugar levels. After one meal containing these foods, blood sugar can get so high that insulin can’t keep up. Side effects like fatigue, blurred vision, headaches, trouble concentrating, and frequent urination can result. If you consume high-carbohydrate foods every day, you increase your risk of type 2 diabetes — the medical diagnosis for having chronically high blood sugar levels that are caused by diet and lifestyle. (This is different from type 1 diabetes — a condition where the body produces little to no insulin.) Over 422 million people have diabetes worldwide, and their high blood sugar levels are destroying their bodies. To know if your blood sugar levels are chronically high, many doctors will check your A1C levels. A1C stands for glycated hemoglobin, which is formed when blood sugar attaches to hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells). A1C tests measure the percentage of your hemoglobin that has blood sugar attached to it. If blood sugar levels have been high for the past 3 months, then more hemoglobin will be glycated. Thus, A1C testing provides an accurate measurement of how high your blood sugar has been over the past two to three months. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates that you have diabetes. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 percent indicates pre-diabetes. Below 5.7 is considered normal. Earlier in this article, we explored how you can raise your blood sugar. Just eat cookies, cakes, rice, potatoes, and other high-carbohydrate foods, and you will be on the fast track toward diabetes. Following this logic, won’t eating fewer carbohydrates lower your blood sug Continue reading >>

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

For people with diabetes, balanced blood sugar levels are the holy grail. When blood sugar levels spike, diabetics need to lower their blood sugar. Certain foods and spices are known for their blood sugar balancing properties, and can be used to prevent raised blood sugar and to lower blood sugar.The good news is that it is simple to find these foods and simple to use them. Significance For diabetics, consuming the right kinds of food is critical to good health. Often, the need to maintain balanced blood sugar levels means that the person must make lifestyle changes. Food is at the center of these lifestyle changes. person with diabetes needs to avoid foods that are high in glucose or sugars, or foods that quickly convert to glucose, which obviously will raise blood sugar. Blood sugar control is a primary way to live a longer, healthier life. Function Foods that lower blood sugar levels should be integrated into a healthy diet as well as kept handy for times when blood sugar elevates. Most foods that lower blood sugar have fat content. According to WebMD, good fats lower insulin resistance. When cells are more sensitive to insulin, blood sugar levels drop. Certain nuts and avocados, by virtue of their fat content, make good snacks and the fat keeps hunger at bay. Other foods, such as sweet potatoes, cinnamon, onions and garlic are either high in fiber, high in antioxidants, or have properties that regulate healthy cholesterol. Healthy cholesterol is an element in diabetic health. Features Generally, it is advised to eat a high-fiber diet. Eat raw vegetables and fruits as well as fresh fruit and vegetable juices. Lemons are a healthy addition to meals. Lemons are rich in Vitamin C and their acidity helps to lower other foods' glycemic indexes. Oat and rice bran crackers Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

9 Foods That Lower Blood Sugar Naturally

9 Foods That Lower Blood Sugar Naturally

We live in a day and age where the general consensus is to rely on prescription medications as the quick fix for a variety of ailments, including regulating your blood sugar. But, with a growing concern over how these synthetic options might not be the right first choice, and the issue of how expensive it is to attain them, it’s important to become aware of alternative options to help keep your health in check. Millions of American adults are diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes each year, with the number continuing to grow, making it pertinent that you partake in prevention. (Note: Lifestyle changes can make a difference for Type 2 diabates which is what we’re addressing in this article. We are not addressing Type 1 diabetes.) Many healthcare professionals will tell you that there are specific lifestyle choices that can aid in this process, including physical activity, healthy eating, portion control and low sugar consumption. But there are additional ways you can boost your chances of steering clear of Type 2 diabetes by controlling blood sugar levels, including a variety of herbs, spices and various other common foods. Below are 9 options to get you started: Cinnamon A study conducted at The University of Georgia discovered a direct connection between the phenol content in herbs and spices and their ability to inhibit the production of AGE compounds, or advanced glycation end products, which are proteins or lipids that become glycated as a result of exposure to sugars. Cinnamon has been found to have 18 percent phenol content in dry weight, making it a great option for improving insulin sensitivity and blood glucose control. Blueberries Blueberries are one of the healthiest fruits you can consume, and are recommended by nutrition specialists for dealing with a variety Continue reading >>

12 Healthy Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

12 Healthy Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Make these simple lifestyle tweaks to feel great all day. Whether you have diabetes or prediabetes—or just generally suffer ill effects from crazy blood sugar swings—you want to know what really works to control your sugar levels. It can make all the difference in living well and staying off the blood sugar roller coaster that can drag down your mood and energy and skew your hunger levels. Here are a dozen tips that will help your blood sugar and your overall health. (If you have diabetes, remember you should always work with your health care team first.) Being naturally thin is not license to stay on your butt. Even for adults at a healthy weight, those who classify as couch potatoes have higher blood sugar than those who are more active, according to a 2017 study from the University of Florida. That can put you at risk for prediabetes, even if you have a normal BMI. Take the stairs, head to the grocery store on foot (if possible), keep that promise to your dog to take him on a walk, and go for that weekend bike ride. Aim for 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week. In your effort to eat more quinoa, you might have forgotten about an oldie-but-goodie carb: barley. This whole grain is packed with fiber that tamps down your appetite and can help decrease blood sugar, according to a Swedish study published in the journal Cell Metabolism. Why? Your gut bacteria interacts with barley, which may in turn help your body metabolize glucose (sugar). Besides, 1 cup contains 6 grams of fiber, which helps to mute blood sugar spikes. Don't be afraid to toss it in soups, on a roasted veggie salad, or have it as a side to fish or chicken. Exercise is a great way to boost your body's ability to manage blood sugar, but making sure it's a heart-pumping workout will help e Continue reading >>

10 Ways To Balance Blood Sugar Naturally

10 Ways To Balance Blood Sugar Naturally

Blood Sugar Balance in Plain English Before we get started with tips to balance your blood sugar, I want to cover some basic blood sugar terms that I will be using in this discussion. Blood sugar/blood glucose – Glucose is the form of sugar that is in our bloodstream. Glucose is the body’s preferred source of fuel. Insulin – the pancreas secretes insulin, a hormone that shuttles glucose from the blood into body cells. It knocks on the cell and says, “Open up, I’ve got some glucose that I need to get out of the bloodstream so take it and use it for energy.” Insulin resistance – When we consume a large amount of refined carbs with very little fat and protein, our blood sugar spikes very high and the pancreas frantically overcompensates with insulin release. This overcompensation of insulin eventually causes insulin resistance, which leads to Type 2 Diabetes if poor dietary practices are continued. The good news, however, is that it can an be reversed through a healthy diet that balances your blood sugar. Glycogen – Glucose that doesn’t enter body cells is taken to the liver where it is converted to glycogen. This is a form of stored sugar that is broken down to stabilize low blood sugar levels between meals and during the night. It is healthful for the body store of glycogen, but stress and hormone dysfunction deplete our ability to store glycogen and this can contribute to blood sugar imbalance. Hyperglycemia – Hyperglycemia is another term for high blood sugar. It is normal to have a spike in blood sugar after a meal, but chronically high blood sugar causes severe health issues. Hypoglycemia – Hypoglycemia is low blood sugar. Glycogen, the sugar stored in the liver, is responsible for raising blood sugar in-between meals and should prevent hypoglyc Continue reading >>

Top 10 Foods That Help Regulate Blood Sugar And Prevent Diabetes

Top 10 Foods That Help Regulate Blood Sugar And Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes is a prevalent ailment to scourge society. It is a metabolic disorder that is caused by the inability of the pancreas to produce the hormone insulin. Insulin is required to metabolize the sugar levels in the blood. When insulin becomes deficient, sugar is retained in the blood, and this deficiency can lead to type 1 and 2 diabetes. A misconception about diabetes is that it is a disease without a cure. Though that may be technically correct, the truth is that diabetes is a disease that is a product of culture rather than biology. All people need to do is regulate what foods they choose to eat. In order to reduce your risk of diabetes, try integrating these foods into your diet. Green leafy vegetables Green leafy vegetables, such as kale, spinach and broccoli, are a great dietary addition for people who are trying to cope with diabetes. These vegetables contain water-soluble vitamins B6 and C, and fat-soluble vitamins A and K. The vitamins are necessary for the proper metabolism of nutrients in the body. In addition, green leafy vegetables are known to have a low content of carbohydrates and cholesterol, both of which can help in the buildup of sugars in the bloodstream. Of all the green leafy vegetables, kale is the best due to its high content of calcium, magnesium, and bile acid sequestrants. These substances can significantly reduce high levels of bad cholesterol. Beans Beans rank high in the hierarchy of foods that can help prevent diabetes. Loaded with fiber, even a small amount of beans can make a person feel full. Reducing the amount of food (including carbohydrates) a person ingests causes the body to metabolize the reserves of blood sugar that are in excess, thereby reducing blood sugar levels. For diabetics who are looking for more protein, beans are a Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia And Diet

Hypoglycemia And Diet

What Is Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, is a relatively rare condition. The symptoms include shakiness, weakness, faintness, headaches, mental dullness, and confusion. Such symptoms can be caused by any number of other problems, including stress. The only way to diagnose hypoglycemia is through a glucose tolerance test—the same type of test used to diagnose diabetes. Effects of Hypoglycemia Glucose is a type of sugar found in the blood. Eating a meal causes blood glucose levels to rise. Normally, as levels of glucose in the blood increase, the pancreas produces insulin. The insulin causes body cells to absorb the glucose and a gradual drop in the blood sugar level results. In a person with hypoglycemia, the body produces too much insulin in the presence of glucose. This causes a sudden drop in the blood sugar level. The High-Protein Myth Doctors used to recommend eating sugar-restricted, high-protein meals four or more times a day to help control hypoglycemia. But such treatment may actually impair glucose tolerance in patients.1 The main sources of protein for many individuals—animal products—are also high in saturated fat which can contribute to the development of diabetes,2,3 as well as numerous other health problems, from heart disease to breast cancer. Hypoglycemia and Diet The best way to control hypoglycemia is through a diet similar to that used to control diabetes mellitus: a reduction in simple sugars, a large intake of complex carbohydrates, and frequent feedings. Candy, sodas, and even fruit juices (which manufacturers often sweeten with lots of sugar) are all high in sugar and should be avoided. Foods that are high in soluble dietary fiber slow carbohydrate absorption and help to prevent swings in blood sugar levels. For som Continue reading >>

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