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Are Omelets Good For Diabetics?

Diabetic Breakfast Recipe: Mushroom Omelet - Recipes For Diabetics

Diabetic Breakfast Recipe: Mushroom Omelet - Recipes For Diabetics

2 sprigs of fresh flat-leaf parsley for garnish Spray a small non-stick skillet or omelet pan with cooking spray and heat over high heat for a minute. Add the mushrooms and scallions; cook over high heat until the mushrooms are just cooked through, stirring often (about 3 minutes). Remove from heat and add the thyme, basil, parsley, and pepper. Keep warm. Using the same small skillet, again lightly sprayed with cooking spray, add half of the egg substitute. Cook over medium heat, lifting the sides of the eggs to allow uncooked eggs to flow under. Once the bottom is lightly browned, carefully flip the omelet with a spatula to brown the other side. Spoon half of the mushroom mixture onto the omelet and fold in half. Transfer the omelet to a plate and keep warm (in a warm oven and covered in foil is a good way to do that). Repeat the procedure, making the second omelet. Place a sprig of parsley on each omelet (that's optionalit's just a garnish suggestion). 83 calories (4% calories from fat), 14 g protein, trace total fat (0.1 g saturated fat), 6 g carbohydrate, 1 g dietary fiber, 0 cholesterol, 205 mg sodium Continue reading >>

Spinach And Cheese Omelet | Diabetic Connect

Spinach And Cheese Omelet | Diabetic Connect

4 eggs or 1 cup refrigerated or frozen egg product, thawed 1/4 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese (1-ounce) 1 tablespoon snipped fresh chives, flat-leaf parsley, or chervil (*) Red Pepper Relish (see below on how to make this) Lightly coat an 8-inch nonstick skillet with flared sides or a crepe pan with cooking spray. In a medium bowl beat together eggs, salt, and cayenne pepper with a rotary beater or wire whisk until frothy. Pour into the prepared skillet; cook over medium heat. As egg mixture sets, run a spatula around edge of skillet, lifting egg mixture so that the uncooked portion flows underneath. Continue cooking and lifting edges until egg mixture is set but is still glossy and moist. Top with 3/4 cup of the spinach and 2 tablespoons of the Red Pepper Relish. Using the spatula, lift and fold an edge of the omelet partially over filling. Top with the remaining 1/4 cup spinach and 1 tablespoon of the relish. (Reserve the remaining relish for another use.) Cut the omelet in half. (*) Red Pepper Relish: In a small bowl combine 2/3 cup chopped red sweet pepper, 2 tablespoons finely chopped onion, 1 tablespoon cider vinegar, and 1/4 teaspoon black pepper. Makes about 2/3 cup. Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Eggs?

Can Diabetics Eat Eggs?

Your nutrition plan is one of the most important and potentially effective treatment tools to manage your diabetes. The objectives of your diabetes diet are controlling your blood sugar and reducing the risk of diabetes-related complications. Eggs may be a concern because they contain large amounts of cholesterol and saturated fats, nutrients that may contribute to your cardiovascular risk. When eaten in moderation, as part of a heart-healthy nutrition plan, you can include eggs as part of your diabetes diet unless your doctor recommends otherwise. Video of the Day Having diabetes increases your risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, characterized by cholesterol-laden deposits in the walls your arteries that obstruct blood flow. Abnormal blood fat levels further contribute to your risk of developing atherosclerosis. Your diabetes health care team will monitor your blood fat levels, including triglycerides and good and bad cholesterol. A heart-healthy diet is recommended for all diabetics to help reduce your risk of developing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Eggs are a nutritious food, packed with high-quality protein, vitamins and minerals. The nutritional drawback of including eggs in your diabetes diet, however, is the fat content. A large egg contains approximately 210 mg of cholesterol and 1.6 g of saturated fats; a small egg contains 155 mg of cholesterol and 1.2 g of saturated fats. The good news is that all of the fat in eggs is in the yolk, which means it is easy to separate out. Incorporating Eggs into Your Diet The best option in terms of limiting your fat intake is to use egg whites instead of whole eggs. Egg whites work well for omelets or scrambled eggs. You can also boil whole eggs and remove the yolk after cooking. If you occasionally wa Continue reading >>

Build A Better Breakfast For Diabetes

Build A Better Breakfast For Diabetes

Everyday Solutions are created by Everyday Health on behalf of our partners. More Information Content in this special section was created or selected by the Everyday Health editorial team and is funded by an advertising sponsor. The content is subject to Everyday Healths editorial standards for accuracy, objectivity, and balance. The sponsor does not edit or influence the content but may suggest the general topic area. Eating the right kind of breakfast can help you better maintain your blood sugar the rest of the day. These healthy breakfast foods fit perfectly into a smart type 2 diabetes diet. As the saying goes, breakfast is the most important meal of the day. But some people may skip breakfast because theyre in a hurry or dont care for breakfast foods. However, thats never a good idea, especially if you have type 2 diabetes . The point of breakfast is that it breaks that fast from overnight, says Christie Hust, RD, LD, an instructor with Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Nursing and a diabetes counselor at the Larry Combest Community Health and Wellness Center in Lubbock, Texas. Among the many reasons to eat a morning meal, breakfast matters because if you skip it you may slow your metabolism, which will make it harder for you to lose weight and when you have diabetes, it's important to maintain a healthy weight and put less stress on your body. And since you need to eat at regular intervals to keep your blood sugar levels balanced throughout the day, eating breakfast starts your day off right. If you eat a good diabetes breakfast, you wont be starving come lunchtime and be tempted to overeat the rest of the day, Hust says. Healthy Breakfast Foods for Type 2 Diabetes Build a well-balanced diabetes breakfast from these nutritious foods: Lean me Continue reading >>

Egg-rich Diet Not Harmful In Type 2 Diabetes

Egg-rich Diet Not Harmful In Type 2 Diabetes

Oct. 9, 2014 -- Eggs don't have a bad effect on cholesterol levels in people with type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. Researchers also found that eating an egg-rich diet for 3 months was linked to better appetite control, and may also provide a greater sense of feeling full. The findings suggest that eating two eggs per day, 6 days a week can be a safe part of a healthy diet for people with type 2, according to Nicholas Fuller, PhD, from the Boden Institute Clinical Trials Unit, University of Sydney, Australia. Fuller presented his findings at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes 2014 Meeting last month. He said the study was motivated by the negative perception widely held toward eggs in the diets of people with type 2 diabetes. Studies have also suggested that, although eating high amounts of eggs is not linked to heart problems in people without diabetes, it may be tied to heart problems in people with type 2, he said. National guidelines on eating eggs and total cholesterol limits are inconclusive, though, and guidelines vary between different countries, he said. For example, in Australia, the National Heart Foundation recommends a maximum of six eggs per week as part of a diet low in saturated fats for healthy people and in those with type 2 diabetes. But in the U.S., guidelines recommend cholesterol be limited to less than 300 milligrams per day for healthy people -- and one egg has about 200 milligrams of cholesterol. Those guidelines also suggest that people with type 2 stick to less than four eggs per week. There's a lack of research into the effects of eating high amounts of eggs in people with type 2 diabetes, Fuller said. The study led by Fuller explored health outcomes in people on a high-egg diet who had either prediabetes or type 2 diabet Continue reading >>

Breakfast Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Breakfast Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Sugary cereals, bagels covered in cream cheese, and high-fat bacon breakfasts are the subjects of many food fantasies. However, they are all poor choices for people with diabetes. Diabetes management requires attention to sugar and carbohydrates. To optimize heart health, people with diabetes should also steer clear of high-fat foods that have little nutritional value. This does not mean that people with diabetes have to have dull breakfasts. A number of classic breakfasts are excellent choices. A few minor tweaks to traditional breakfasts can make many of them healthful even for people with type 2 diabetes. Classic breakfasts for type 2 diabetes Breakfasts high in fiber, but low in added sugar, carbohydrates, and salt are excellent choices for people with diabetes. Nutrient-dense foods support feelings of fullness, which can help stop people snacking on unhealthful options. Some healthful breakfast options include the following: Smoothies Fruit juices contain rapidly absorbed sugar and, sometimes, artificial sweeteners that can either trigger blood sugar spikes or affect insulin sensitivity and gut bacteria. Smoothies offer the same sweet taste as juice but contain lots of nutrients that help fight hunger. There are many ways to include different nutrients in a smoothie. Load up on fiber by using spinach, kale, or avocado in a smoothie. Layer on sweetness by adding frozen berries, bananas, apples, or peaches. Make sure to include some fat or protein to make the smoothie as filling as possible. This will also slow down the digestion of the carbohydrates. Adding a scoop of a protein powder or one-half of a cup of Greek yogurt can make a smoothie even more satisfying. Try this diabetes-friendly smoothie: Blend two cups of frozen raspberries, blueberries, and strawberries Continue reading >>

The Best Omelet Recipe | Lori Zanini Nutrition

The Best Omelet Recipe | Lori Zanini Nutrition

High protein breakfasts are my number one strategy when it comes to getting my day on track and powering through my morning routine. Studies have shown that high protein breakfasts can help reduce our cravings throughout the entire day, as well as stabilize our blood sugar levels. For these reasons, I wanted to make sure to includea great variety of protein-packed breakfast options in my new book (officially availablethis Tuesday!), Eat What You Love Diabetes Cookbook . My go-to morning protein choice is eggs. They are so easy and packed full of nutrients. Gone are the days that we should skip the egg yolk, since the newest Dietary Guidelines no longer recommend we only eat the egg whites in an effort to limit the cholesterol. So enter my Mediterranean-inspired omelet. This recipe includes fresh herbs and a simple combination of tomatoes and red onionsso delicious! I love serving this omelet with my favorite fruit or a whole wheat piece of bread. And its completely fine to double or triple the recipe to make meal prep a little easier for you throughout the week. Continue reading >>

Eggs, Heart Disease And Diabetes – Dreams Of An Omelette

Eggs, Heart Disease And Diabetes – Dreams Of An Omelette

It was early Sunday morning. Mr. Mason watched his wife across the kitchen table. She appeared deeply engaged in the daily crossword puzzle. He swallowed his three diabetes pills with a large sip of orange juice. There was a momentary sparkle of light, a glint of sunshine through the clouds. He would give it another try. “I’m told that a highly prestigious nutrition journal published a paper recently showing that eating eggs is fine if you have diabetes. So, maybe I should have my omelette today.” She raised her chin just enough to be able to stare at him over her reading glasses. “William dear. We finished this discussion fifty years ago. The American Heart Association hasn’t changed their mind. You should thank me for not letting you eat all that pipe plugging cholesterol you seem to fantasize about all the time.” A momentary silence. He wasn’t giving up. “But, that didn’t prevent me from getting diabetes though.” “C’mon. You know as well as I do that if you’d eaten all those fats, your belly would be twice the size it is today, and it surely’s big enough. So don’t start that nonsense all over. “Dreams of an Omelet.” A book that never leaves my night drawer is The Lost Art of Healing by Bernard Lown, a respected Boston cardiologist and Nobel Piece Price Recipient. In his book, doctor Lown shortly describes his relationship with a certain Mr. H., “a schoolteacher in his mid-fifties, gentle thoughtful and undemanding.” Mr H. suffered from a heart valve disorder and needed regular check-ups. This was many years ago, when dietary cholesterol was much more dreaded than today. Surprisingly, with many things to be concerned bout, he was culturally in tune by worrying about his cholesterol. Although he was free of risk factors for coronar Continue reading >>

Variations On An Omelette

Variations On An Omelette

Lisa said: Hi Hazeline. Good on your for making an impact with your BGLs... Read More Lisa said: Hi Jessica thanks for sharing your experience... Read More Lisa said: Hi Kandice. This is a store-bought bar and is an Australian example of a packaged snack that works within the GDM diet recommendations... Read More Lisa said: So glad you found us! And best wishes with your pregnancy... Read More Jess Thomson said: Hi there , thank you for the great information i have just been diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes and i wont be seeing my specialist till nxt week and im freaking out... Read More This recipe reminds me that I need to get a new 2-serve frypan thats good for eggs. Im not sure about you, but when I was pregnant with gestational diabetes I lived on eggs in various forms. (I sorely missed soft-boiled variety though.) So here is a reminder of how good and easy a simple omelette can be. I didnt invent it and you dont have to stick to the variations below. And dont forget about this one on those evenings when you cant be bothered to cook. (Main carbohydrate containing ingredients are listed in bold.) 4 slices of low GI seed or multigrain bread, toasted 4 eggs, lightly beaten + any of the following combinations 4 asparagus spears, lightly blanched, cut into small sections 1 bacon rasher, trimmed of all fat, cut into small pieces (optional) 100g/ 3.5 ounces red capsicum, cut into small pieces 1 bacon rasher, trimmed of all fat, cut into small pieces (optional) 5 button mushrooms, slices, lightly pan-fried 100g/ 3.5 ounces fresh or frozen spinach, added to mushrooms and lightly heated Prepare your omelette ingredients and when ready, mix together in a bowl with the egg. Either use a non-stick frypan which doesnt require any oil or lightly spray or grease a medium sized Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Eggs If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Eat Eggs If You Have Diabetes?

To eat or not to eat? Eggs are a versatile food and a great source of protein. The American Diabetes Association considers eggs an excellent choice for people with diabetes. That’s primarily because one large egg contains about half a gram of carbohydrates, so it’s thought that they aren’t going to raise your blood sugar. Eggs are high in cholesterol, though. One large egg contains nearly 200 mg of cholesterol, but whether or not this negatively affects the body is debatable. Monitoring your cholesterol is important if you have diabetes because diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. High levels of cholesterol in the bloodstream also raise the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. But dietary intake of cholesterol doesn’t have as profound an effect on blood levels as was once thought. So, it’s important for anyone with diabetes to be aware of and minimize other heart disease risks. A whole egg contains about 7 grams of protein. Eggs are also an excellent source of potassium, which supports nerve and muscle health. Potassium helps balance sodium levels in the body as well, which improves your cardiovascular health. Eggs have many nutrients, such as lutein and choline. Lutein protects you against disease and choline is thought to improve brain health. Egg yolks contain biotin, which is important for healthy hair, skin, and nails, as well as insulin production. Eggs from chickens that roam on pastures are high in omega-3s, which are beneficial fats for people with diabetes. Eggs are easy on the waistline, too. One large egg has only about 75 calories and 5 grams of fat, only 1.6 grams of which are saturated fat. Eggs are versatile and can be prepared in different ways to suit your tastes. You can make an already-healthy food even better by mixi Continue reading >>

Diabetic Breakfast Ideas

Diabetic Breakfast Ideas

Tweet Breakfast is said to be the most important meal of the day. For people with diabetes, morning is usually the time of day with the highest blood glucose levels so a good breakfast choice will help to improve your control. Whilst putting the breakfast list together, we found some supermarket cereals that were far from the ideal choice for breakfast – with high levels of sugar (with some cereals containing chocolate) and a number of other less than healthy additives. We’ve put together some simple and healthy breakfast ideas to get you started. Greek yoghurt and cottage cheese Greek yoghurt and cottage cheese make good breakfast choices. Quick to put together and easy to tailor to your own desires by adding any of the following: Nuts – always a good source of energy and a low carb favourite Oatmeal or wheat bran for fibre (whole grains) Berries are a popular choice Fruit – cantaloupe is listed as a good accompaniment Smoothies A very simple idea - take a mix of food, stick it in a blender and drink it. Some mixtures work better than others and it can be fun to find out which do work. For the dedicated, making smoothies can be quite an art form to get the colour and consistencies just right. For us with diabetes, we also need to consider the carbohydrate content to our own requirements. Rather than suggest one smoothie, here are some ingredient ideas to get you started for your own smoothies – be they savoury or fruity: Cucumbers Carrots Avocados – help to make your smoothies creamy Berries Citrus fruits –oranges, pineapple, limes etc Bananas – also help to make your smoothies creamy Cashew nuts Yoghurt Cottage cheese Cream Coconut milk If you hit upon a fantastic smoothie mixture, share your find on the diabetes food forum. Scrambled eggs and omelette Continue reading >>

Spinach, Feta And Grape Tomato Omelet

Spinach, Feta And Grape Tomato Omelet

2 cups (2oz/60 g) loosely packed baby spinach (500 mL) 2 Tbsp chopped fresh basil leaves (30 mL) 1/2 tsp chopped fresh rosemary leaves (2 mL) 1/2 cup (2 oz/60 g) reduced-fat feta cheese (125 mL) Combine egg substitute and milk in a medium bowl and whisk until well blended. Place spinach and basil in another medium bowl; set aside. Heat canola oil in a small nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add tomatoes and rosemary, and cook 2 minutes or until soft, stirring frequently. Add to bowl with spinach and basil, toss, and cover to allow spinach to wilt slightly and flavors to blend while preparing omelets. Reduce heat to medium. Wipe skillet clean with a damp paper towel. Coat skillet with canola oil cooking spray and place over medium heat until hot. Pour half of egg mixture into skillet. Cook 5 minutes; as eggs begin to set, gently lift edge of omelet with a spatula and tilt skillet so uncooked portion flows underneath. When egg mixture is set, spoon half of tomato mixture over half of omelet. Top with half of feta cheese. Loosen omelet with a spatula and fold in half. Slide omelet onto serving plate and cover with foil to keep warm. Repeat with remaining ingredients. Recipe Yield: Yield: 4 servings. Serving size: 1/2 omelet. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Egg Breakfast Recipes

Diabetic Egg Breakfast Recipes

Packed with protein, eggs are a great way to start your day. Try one of these diabetes-friendly egg recipes that are carb-smart and delicious. Packed with protein, eggs are a great way to start your day. Try one of these diabetes-friendly egg recipes that are carb-smart and delicious. Packed with protein, eggs are a great way to start your day. Try one of these diabetes-friendly egg recipes that are carb-smart and delicious. Packed with protein, eggs are a great way to start your day. Try one of these diabetes-friendly egg recipes that are carb-smart and delicious. Continue reading >>

Mushroom And Spring Onion Omelette

Mushroom And Spring Onion Omelette

Filled omelettes make a fast, yet substantial, meal, especially served with salad. Each 50g serving contains (excludes serving suggestion) Break the eggs into a bowl, add the pepper, beat with a fork and set aside. Heat the oil in a pan and cook the mushrooms and spring onion for 5 minutes over a medium heat, stirring regularly, until soft. Stir the egg into the mushrooms/onion for 1 minute, then cook gently for 3 minutes, using a spatula to ease the omelette from the sides of the pan. When the omelette is cooked, sprinkle the cheese on top and turn it out onto a plate, folding the omelette in half. Rather than making a plain omelette with a filling, its far tastier to use this method and mix ingredients into the omelette then add a couple of extras into the middle such as cheese or herbs. Almost anything can go into an omelette. Use different cheeses such as goats cheese, or lower fat garlic and herb cream cheese. Add freshly chopped herbs such as basil, chives, parsley or tarragon. You could also add a little curry paste or powder. Most vegetables work, although root vegetables need to be pre-cooked. Cooked leftover vegetables such as broccoli, peas, courgettes and carrots are all excellent additions. Mushroom and spring onion omelette Diabetes UK Someone is diagnosed with diabetes every two minutes. Your donation can change lives. Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Meals For Diabetes-savvy Dining

Best And Worst Meals For Diabetes-savvy Dining

Balance Your Choices When you have type 2 diabetes, you need to eat a good mix of protein, carbohydrates, and healthy fats. So what's a well-balanced dinner? A power breakfast? The following meal examples can help you make better choices. Some people find it helps to count carbs. Keep in mind recommendations from your doctor or nutritionist, too. The Count: 2,060 calories, 276 g carbs No food is off-limits with diabetes, but this brunch will blow your carb and calorie budget in a hurry. Experts suggest that meals for people with diabetes should have 45-75 grams of carbohydrates, depending on individual goals. Your body weight, activity, and medications all matter. This meal packs enough carbs for four to five meals. The Count: 294 calories, 40 g carbs This quick meal delivers protein in a scrambled egg, and just 40 carbs, mostly from fiber-rich oatmeal and blueberries. Fiber slows digestion to help prevent blood sugar spikes. People with diabetes need to watch all types of carbs: cereal, bread, rice, pasta, starchy veggies, sweets, fruit, milk, and yogurt. Spread your total carbs across the day. The Count: 1,760 calories, 183 g carbs. Before one bite of burrito, you can get 98 grams of carbs and 810 calories in a basket of chips and salsa. If you're trying to slim down and eat less sodium, like many people with diabetes, the burrito adds 950 calories. You also get way more than a whole day's worth of sodium. The Count: 443 calories, 48 g carbs Lean beef and black beans make this Mexican dish a good option for a diabetic diet. The fiber in the beans can help lower blood cholesterol and control blood sugar. Go heavy on the veggies and light on cheese. Enjoy 10 small corn chips (1 ounce) with a little guacamole. The Count: 2,510 calories, 83 g carbs This classic Southern m Continue reading >>

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