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Are Atkins Meals Good For Diabetics?

Choosing A Better Frozen Dinner

Choosing A Better Frozen Dinner

Frozen dinners may not be what comes to mind if you’re trying to eat healthfully. Yet many people (guiltily) admit to eating them, whether for a quick and easy lunch or for those nights when they just don’t have the time or energy to turn on the stove or oven. Some of you might remember the “TV Dinners” from decades ago (among the FIRST frozen dinners). They came in an aluminum tray with compartments for your chicken or meat, mashed potatoes, soggy vegetable, and some type of dessert. While the TV Dinners of yesteryear could hardly be called nutritious, they did help one practice portion control! Today, frozen dinners are a six billion dollar industry. Take a stroll down the frozen food aisle in the grocery store and you’ll be amazed at the number of brands and varieties of frozen meals. And if you’re still turning up your nose at the “un-healthfulness” of these meals, you might be interested to know that some frozen dinner companies now offer choices that are gluten- and allergen-free, organic, and don’t contain any GMOs (genetically-modified organisms). However, there are still plenty of frozen meals that are too high in saturated fat and/or sodium. Perks of frozen dinners There’s really no need to feel guilty about eating frozen dinners as long as you’re making better choices. Frozen meals really do have quite a lot to offer. Here’s the rundown: Convenience. If you’re rushing to get out the door in the morning or rushing home from work after a long day, a frozen dinner may be just the ticket. Needing only minutes to heat up in the microwave, frozen dinners can provide a nutritious, ready-to-go meal with little preparation or clean up. Portion control. The use of “meal replacements,” which include shakes, bars, and frozen meals, has been Continue reading >>

Atkins Diet And Diabetes

Atkins Diet And Diabetes

The Atkins diet and diabetes are closely linked, due to low-carb dieting being widely viewed as an effective way to control diabetes. Dr Robert Atkins is synonymous with the link between carbohydrates and sugar, and is widely hailed as a guru in the control of type 2 diabetes . Dr Atkins was key in making the connection between obesity and insulin more widely spread. At this point, diabetes was often treated with a diet high in starchy carbs and sugar. Atkins played an important role in understanding how restricting carbohydrates could result in more stable blood sugar and is an essential part of managing type 2 diabetes. The Atkins has a number of phases which are intended to be followed in a particular order. The diet starts at a low daily carbohydrate intake of 20 grams per day. This is the induction phase of the diet. The following phases, involve gradually introducing foods with higher carbohydrate levels, as long as these are not hindering your progress to your target weight . The end phase of the diet, lifetime maintenance, is intended to be kept over the long term to maintain the successes achieved in the earlier phases of the diet. The media has a tendency to caricature the diet as being one that includes next to no carbohydrate and begins and ends with fried breakfasts . This would only describe the induction stage of the diet and certainly more dietary choice is available within this first phase. Whilst the Atkins diet has been a very popular diet, the Atkins diet when used as a long-term approach is controversial in some circles. Critics of the Atkins diet claim that the levels of animal protein and fat recommended within the diet are excessive. Critics claim that this diet could cause damage to the kidneys and liver as a result of ketones. Prolonged period Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diets Linked With Type 2 Diabetes

Low-carb Diets Linked With Type 2 Diabetes

Fad diets are clearly not all they are cracked up to be. Most are simply made up of theories that seldom get put to the test other than with the anecdotal evidence of users who swear by them. When put to the test of time, however, they fail those who use them and when carefully scrutinized by scientists and researchers they collapse under the weight of the evidence. Low-Carb diets are the prototype for this. They’ve been around for well over 100 years in one form or another, with the most popular version being marketed by Dr. Atkins over the last 40 years. People do lose weight, but not for the reasons put forth by those who champion such plans. The weight loss comes partly from eating fewer calories and partly because in this day and age, eliminating carbohydrates means eliminating calorie dense, highly processed foods (most of which contain high fructose corn syrup (HFCS)). I can’t imagine why anyone would follow a diet — any diet — that takes entire food groups away from you. There’s no reason to give up great foods like pasta, potatoes, beans and corn to lose weight or to be healthier. Giving up these foods is one of the main reasons that the Atkins diet is not a diet that can be sustained for the long term. Further, such diets seldom prepare people for eating real food: when they go off the diet they usually gain the weight back, and then some. There’s been concern for years about the long term health risks of such diets. We’ve seen that those eating higher protein diets that are also high in saturated fat were more likely to develop heart disease than those whose higher protein diet came from vegetable protein sources. Interestingly, those women eating a strict low-carbohydrate diet weighed more than those eating a more normal diet.(1) Their Body Mas Continue reading >>

Is Atkins Diet Ok For Type 2 Diabetics? | Diabetic Connect

Is Atkins Diet Ok For Type 2 Diabetics? | Diabetic Connect

Simply and respectfully, Atkins never said that it is ok to eat all the fat you want. This is a misinterpetation that has apparently spread like wildfire. He does stress the difference between healthy fats and unhealthy fats! He suggests that if a diet is to restrictive, many people will not stick to it and then go back to their prior unhealthy eating habits. He states that if you are going to cheat and eat bacon, then you are better off eating Canadian bacon, the one with less fat content. Much of what he says is taken out of context and misinterpeted. I do not advocate for or against the Atkins diet. I did speak to medical professionals at his clinic on a few occasions, and they were extremely helpful. It is a clinic that specializes in diabetes amongst other specialties. I suspect that if done correctly, the Atkins diet can be helpful for some. It is not the diet for everyone. I did a modified version for many years and definitely managed my diabetes with some excellent results. After 17 years of living with diabetes, I have no known complications, and remain fairly healthy. I am on a different diet however for many reasons. Eating fat does not make you fat. It is the starchy carbs like bread, potatoes, white rice, sugar and other highly processed carbs which make us fat. Eating good healthy fats like butter, olive oil, coconut oil and yes even lard is actually very good for you. There is lots of research out there that will help. Oh, and by the way, Atkins is not extreme except for the first two weeks. In those two weeks you eat proteins like 4 to 6 oz of meat, fish, or chicken, eggs, and small amounts of cheese along with big green salads, and other non starchy vegetables and lots and lots of water and non caffeinated beverages. if you are on a ketogenic (fat burn Continue reading >>

The Best Diet For Diabetes

The Best Diet For Diabetes

World Diabetes Day, the world’s largest diabetes awareness campaign, is focused this year on Women and Diabetes. According to the International Diabetes Federation, 199 million women have type-2 diabetes, and that is projected to increase to 313 million by 2040. In fact, diabetes is a leading cause of death among women. And that’s a scary fact. Diabetes has always been a hot topic for me, because it’s a worldwide epidemic that affects everyone, not just women: It’s estimated that 552 million people could have type-2 diabetes in the next two decades. Currently, half of the U.S. population is diabetic or pre-diabetic. It’s more important now, more than ever, to get the word out on what causes type-2 diabetes, and what you can do to prevent and control it. What Causes Type-2 Diabetes? There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. In addition, there is gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy in some women when hormone changes prevent insulin from working properly, but the condition usually resolves after childbirth. Meanwhile, both types 1 and 2 are chronic diseases that affect how your body regulates blood sugar, or glucose, which is the fuel that feeds your body’s cells. Insulin is needed to make this happens. People with type-1 diabetes can’t produce insulin at all, People with type-2 diabetes can’t control their insulin levels and eventually may not produce insulin at all. This starts with insulin resistance, and it may happen gradually over time. While type-1 diabetes can’t be prevented or reversed, type-2 diabetes can. The Best Diet for Preventing and Controlling Type-2 Diabetes There continues to be a compelling research-backed argument that shows that cutting back on carbs has the greatest effect on regulating blood sugar lev Continue reading >>

Do Low-carb Diets Help Diabetes?

Do Low-carb Diets Help Diabetes?

diabetesdiabetes follow very low carbohydrate diets? The American Diabetes Association (ADA) says "no", but a small study from Sweden suggests such a diet may be one of the best ways to manage the disease and reduce the need for medication. In the study, 16 obese patients with type 2 diabetes followed a calorie- and carbohydrate-restricted diet for 22 months. Most showed continuing improvements in blood sugar that were independent of weight lossweight loss; the average daily dosage of insulin among the 11 insulin-dependent patients was cut in half. "Many people are essentially cured of their [type 2] diabetes by low-carbohydrate diets, but that message is not getting out," says low-carb proponent and biochemistry professor Richard Feinman, PhD, of the SUNY Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. While agreeing that carbohydrate restriction helps people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar, ADA spokesman Nathaniel G. Clark, MD, tells WebMD that the ADA does not recommend very low-carb diets because patients find them too restrictive. "We want to promote a diet that people can live with long-term," says Clark, who is vice president of clinical affairs and youth strategies for the ADA. "People who go on very low carbohydrate diets generally aren't able to stick with them for long periods of time." In the Swedish study, obese patients with type 2 diabetes were asked to follow two different low-calorie diets for 22 months. Sixteen patients were told to restrict carbohydrates to just 20% of their total calorie intake, with carbohydrate consumption limited to vegetables and salads. Bread, pasta, potatoes, rice, and breakfast cereals were not allowed. Fifteen more patients were asked to follow a low-fat diet, which had the same number of calories -- 1,800 calories- Continue reading >>

Atkins Could Trigger Diabetes

Atkins Could Trigger Diabetes

Doctors yesterday issued another warning about the Atkins diet, saying it might increase a slimmer's chances of developing diabetes. There was a grave risk that following the weight loss regime for a prolonged period could lead to higher blood cholesterol, which might then bring on the potentially life-threatening condition, they said. Hormone specialist Dr Jim Mann said he had some evidence that the high-protein diet creates a resistance to insulin which could spark diabetes. He said doctors should not recommend it because of the lack of long-term data. "I tell my patients under no circumstances do I recommend it." Speaking at a heart specialists' conference in Vienna, Dr Mann admitted: "The majority of people lose weight on the Atkins diet and initially their cholesterol levels seem lower. "But when the weight loss is maintained, we have observed that a lot of people experience a rise in their cholesterol levels to greater than when they started." Dr Mann, of the University of Otago, New Zealand, specialises in treating people with diabetes and insulin resistance. This is a condition in which people develop an impaired tolerance to glucose, which can lead to diabetes unless they change their diet and exercise more. Dr Mann said: "We advise people strongly against the Atkins diet. We believe it may have a powerful effect on increasing insulin resistance." A multi-million-pound book industry has burgeoned on the back of claims that extreme eating patterns work. Sales of Atkins books are currently challenging Harry Potter. Among celebrities who have tried it are Geri Halliwell, Renee Zellweger and Minnie Driver. Invented 30 years ago by Dr Robert Atkins, it recommends eating vast amounts of protein and fat, and severely restricting carbohydrates such as bread, pasta and Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

In this article we will cover what a Ketogenic diet is and if you can manage your diabetes while on this diet. Ketogenic diet for diabetics is a highly controversial topic, but we will break down everything here for you! As a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), I have to tell you from the start I will have a biased view here. Sorry, but I feel that I need to be completely honest right up front! I will however, present all the evidence that is available currently on the subject. As a CDE, I have been taught to follow the American Diabetes Association Dietary Guidelines for Americans which is low in carbohydrates, high in fiber, with fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. The Ketogenic Diet this article will be discussing is much lower in carbohydrates, in order to promote the state of nutritional ketosis, or the fat burning state for weight loss. What is a Ketogenic Diet? The Ketogenic Diet is a low carbohydrate diet, consisting initially of less than 20 carbohydrates per day. Not per meal, yes, you heard me correctly, per day. It is not for the faint of heart and yes I am writing from experience. Of course I have tried it! Hasn’t everybody in America at some point who has wanted to lose weight? Does it work you ask? Of course it does! The problem is how long can you keep it up? Your body uses the carbohydrates you eat for energy, so if we restrict how many carbohydrates we eat, the body has to get its fuel source from fat. A byproduct of this fat burning state are ketones which are produced; this is called nutritional ketosis. You can determine if you are in this fat burning state by purchasing urine ketone testing strips from your local pharmacy. The Ketogenic Diet with Diabetes Some precautions must be made clear; this diet is not appropriate for people with any Continue reading >>

The Skinny On Shakes For People With Diabetes

The Skinny On Shakes For People With Diabetes

1 / 6 Learn All About the Best Weight Loss Shakes for Diabetes Diabetes is an increasingly common condition that causes blood sugar levels to rise higher than normal. There are several types of diabetes, but type 2 diabetes is the most common form. Type 2 diabetes is often linked to being overweight or obese and must be medically managed to prevent serious diabetes complications. Along with making lifestyle changes and taking medication, people with diabetes must keep a watchful eye on their blood glucose levels and the foods they eat throughout each day. Whether you’re watching your weight or looking for a quick diabetes-friendly meal on the go, a meal replacement shake may be a good — or not so good — option for those with diabetes. Of course, a healthy diet of whole foods is always best, but shakes can provide a nice “safety net” for when a healthy meal is not an option. While meal replacement shakes may fill you up, even the best weight loss shakes don’t provide complete dietary nutrition. If you rely on weight loss or meal replacement shakes regularly, you will still need a healthy balance of real food each day, including: Fat-free or low-fat dairy Fresh fruits and vegetables, especially nonstarchy vegetables Lean protein Legumes, like beans and peas Nuts Seafood Soy Whole grains Also, not all meal replacement shakes are created equal; even the best weight loss shakes designed for people with diabetes may fall short when it comes to complete nutrition. For example, the Glucerna Rich Chocolate Shake is gluten-free and great for people who are lactose intolerant. But the Glucerna Shake is only enough to replace a moderate snack or part of a meal — not an entire meal. You will need to read the label and find out what’s missing when it comes to fat, pro Continue reading >>

The Low-carb Diet That Helped One Woman Lose 120 Pounds And Reverse Diabetes | Everyday Health

The Low-carb Diet That Helped One Woman Lose 120 Pounds And Reverse Diabetes | Everyday Health

Tina Marcus, 55, poses for a photo in late 2017 at 140 lbs (right) and about two years earlier at 260 lbs (left). Tina Marcus doesnt have a magic pill. She doesnt have a secret menu or a special culinary hack. But Marcus, 55, has lost more than 120 pounds (lbs) and returned her A1C to prediabetes level by following the Atkins diet and shes maintained those improvements over the last two years. Sheer willpower, a regular exercise regimen, and the low-carb eating plan put her on a track to successfully managing type 2 diabetes , she says. RELATED: 7 Ways to Stay Motivated to Exercise if You Have Diabetes Taking the First Steps Toward Making Lifelong Changes Marcus, a church office manager in Arlington, Virginia, knew it wasnt healthy or effective for her diabetes management to weigh 260 lbs. Shes right: Extra weight can increase insulin resistance (the hallmark of type 2 diabetes), making it harder to control blood sugar and increasing the risk for health complications, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) . But her biggest push toward healthy living started with a jarring doctors appointment, she says. She had been living with prediabetes, the precursor to type 2 diabetes, for a few years, and had put her health on the backburner while caring for her mother, turning to convenient but unhealthy snacks for fuel. She went to the doctor in January 2016 and was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. [My doctor] was very concerned, says Marcus, noting her A1C a two- to three-month average of blood sugar levels was 11, indicating full-blown diabetes. Marcus explained her doctor wanted to put her on a few kinds of medication, including Glucophage (metformin) , right away. I said, Can I have a couple of months and see if I can turn this around on my own? Marcus recalls. Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Do you have type 2 diabetes, or are you at risk for diabetes? Do you worry about your blood sugar? Then you’ve come to the right place. The disease diabetes (any type) means that you have too much sugar in your blood. This page will show you how to best check this. You can normalize your blood sugar naturally as needed – without pills, calorie counting or hunger. Many people have already done so. As a bonus, a normalized blood sugar usually makes you healthier and leaner. Table of contents: A disastrous epidemic Two types of diabetes Normalize your blood sugar Become your own evidence A disastrous epidemic What’s wrong? Why do more and more people become diabetic? In the past, before our modern Western diet, diabetes was extremely rare. The disease is now becoming more and more common. Around the world, more and more people are becoming diabetic: The number of people with diabetes is increasing incredibly rapidly and is heading towards 500 million. This is a world epidemic. Will someone in your family be affected next? Your mother, father, cousin, your child? Or you? Is perhaps your blood already too sweet? Those affected by the most common form of diabetes (type 2) normally never regain their health. Instead, we take for granted that they’ll become a little sicker for every year that goes by. With time they need more and more drugs. Yet, sooner or later complications emerge. Blindness. Dialysis due to faulty kidneys. Dementia. Amputations. Death. Diabetes epidemic causes inconceivable suffering. Fortunately, there’s something that can be done. We just need to see through the mistake that has led to the explosion of disease – and correct it. This can normalize your blood sugar. Many have already succeeded in doing this. If you already know that you are diabe Continue reading >>

Atkins For Diabetics

Atkins For Diabetics

Over the past few years, a significant amount of research- much of it reported in this newsletter- has shown that low-carb diets are effective not only for weight loss, but for improving many measures of risk for heart disease and diabetes. Now a new study from the prestigious Albert Einstein College of Medicine shows that a low-fat diet has no advantage over a low-carb diet modeled on the Atkins Advantage program in the treatment of diabetes. In fact- as we’ve said before- the low-carb diet actually has some significant advantages. This is important news since many conventional doctors have continued to believe- despite considerable evidence to the contrary- that low-carb diets are “dangerous”. In the current study, researchers studied 105 adults with type ll diabetes. The participants had a body mass index of 25 or more (overweight to obese) and Hemoglobin A1C levels between 6-11%. Hemoglobin A1c is a measure of blood sugar control over time, and a reading of over 6% is generally considered problematic and a good indication of diabetes. Half the subjects were put on a low-fat diet modeled after the standard diet outlined in the Diabetes Prevention Program, while the other half were put on a diet modeled after the Atkins program. Both groups lost weight and reduced their A1c levels. The low-fat diet- long considered the ‘gold standard’ in the treatment of diabetes- had absolutely no advantage over the Atkins program. Both groups of patients lost a similar amount of weight, but the Atkins dieters had an additional benefit- their HDL (“good”) cholesterol went up. Both groups saw the most weight loss- and the most reduction in their hemoglobin A1c levels- in the first three months. There was no significant reduction in A1c levels after a year, but this doesn Continue reading >>

A Guide To Healthy Low-carb Eating With Diabetes

A Guide To Healthy Low-carb Eating With Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that has reached epidemic proportions. It currently affects over 400 million people worldwide (1). Although diabetes is a complicated disease, maintaining good blood sugar control can greatly reduce the risk of complications (2, 3). One of the ways to achieve better blood sugar levels is to follow a low-carb diet. This article provides a detailed overview of low-carb diets for managing diabetes. If you have diabetes, your body cannot process carbohydrates effectively. Normally, when you eat carbs, they are broken down into small units of glucose, which end up as blood sugar. When blood sugar levels go up, the pancreas responds by producing the hormone insulin. This hormone allows the blood sugar to enter cells. In healthy people, blood sugar levels remain within a narrow range throughout the day. In diabetes, however, this system doesn't work the way it is supposed to. This is a big problem, because having both too high and too low blood sugar levels can cause severe harm. There are several types of diabetes, but the two most common ones are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Both of these conditions can be diagnosed at any age. In type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune process destroys the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Diabetics must inject insulin several times a day to ensure that glucose gets into the cells and stays at a healthy level in the bloodstream (4). In type 2 diabetes, the beta cells at first produce enough insulin, but the body's cells are resistant to its action, so blood sugar remains high. To compensate, the pancreas produces more insulin, attempting to bring blood sugar down. Over time, the beta cells lose their ability to produce enough insulin (5). Of the three nutrients -- protein, carbs and fat -- carbs have the grea Continue reading >>

Low Carb Vs. High Carb - My Surprising 24-day Diabetes Diet Battle

Low Carb Vs. High Carb - My Surprising 24-day Diabetes Diet Battle

Twitter summary: What I learned from doubling my carb intake: the same average blood sugar, but four times as much hypoglycemia, more work, stress, & danger. As a teenager, I ate a high carb diet that included lots of Goldfish crackers, white sandwich bread, pasta, and white potatoes. It was tasty, but it put my blood sugars on a wild roller coaster every single day. Things turned around in college when I learned about nutrition, got on CGM, and spent time with health conscious friends. I soon realized that eating less than 30 grams of carbs at one time was a complete gamechanger. I’ve stuck with that approach ever since. But is this lower carb method actually better for my blood sugars, or have I just been fooling myself? To find out, I took on a somewhat terrifying self-tracking experiment: 12 days of my usual, lower-carb diet, which averaged 146 grams of carbs per day (21% of daily calories). My carbs were primarily from nuts, seeds, vegetables, and a bit of fruit. 12 days of a higher-carb, high whole-grain diet, which averaged 313 grams of carbs per day (43% of my daily calories). My sources of carbs were NOT junk food: plain oatmeal, whole wheat bread, quinoa, wild rice, and fruit. Neither of these was unrealistic. My lower-carb diet was nowhere near Atkins level (20 grams per day), and the higher-carb diet was consistent with the “average” 45% carb diet in people with diabetes (according to ADA). Even though this was a one-person (n=1) experiment, I wanted to be as scientific and fair as possible: eating whole, unprocessed foods in both periods; counting and tracking every single gram of carbohydrate (LoseIt! app); wearing CGM 24/7 and downloading the glucose data to document what happened (Dexcom G5 and Clarity); taking insulin before meals (5-15 minutes pr Continue reading >>

Is The Atkins Diet Good For Type 2 Diabetes?

Is The Atkins Diet Good For Type 2 Diabetes?

For people with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), losing excess weight can lead to lower blood glucose, triglyceride and cholesterol levels along with reduced blood pressure. Of the many low-carbohydrate diets, the Atkins Diet is among the most restrictive -- allowing only 20 grams of carbs per day in the first of its 4 phases, or 40 grams if you have less than 40 pounds to lose. Other daily calories come from fat and protein. Very-low-carbohydrate diets like Atkins trigger a metabolic state called ketosis, in which the body burns fat for energy instead of blood sugar, or glucose. Understanding the possible benefits and drawbacks of the Atkins Diet is important, especially if you have T2DM. Video of the Day People with diabetes do lose weight with the Atkins Diet, but keeping the weight off in the long run is less certain. A study involving of 34 overweight or obese adults with T2DM or prediabetes published in the June 2014 in "PLoS One" showed that people on a very-low-carbohydrate diet similar to Atkins lost 5.5 percent of body weight in 3 months. These results were consistent with a prior 6-month study of 49 obese adults with T2DM published in the June 2008 "Nutrition and Metabolism," which was funded by the Robert C. Atkins Foundation. However, a November 2014 "Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes" review of 12 studies involving long-term weight loss with low-carb diets reported that much of the weight lost in the first 6 months on the Atkins Diet was regained at 1 year. The Atkins Diet has been consistently shown to lower blood glucose levels people with T2DM. This may be because weight loss itself leads to lower blood glucose levels. The virtual elimination of foods that would contribute to blood glucose due to the strict limitation of carbohydrates would also l Continue reading >>

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