diabetestalk.net

Always Thirsty And Tired Not Diabetes

Thirst: Symptoms & Signs

Thirst: Symptoms & Signs

Thirst is the feeling of needing to drink something. It occurs whenever the body is dehydrated for any reason. Any condition that can result in a loss of body water can lead to thirst or excessive thirst. For this reason, thirst is a characteristic symptoms of certain medical conditions, most notably diabetes mellitus. Thirst may be accompanied by other signs of dehydration such as decreased urine output, reduced sweating and tear production, muscle cramps, weakness, lightheadedness, and nausea. Dehydration and thirst may be minor or severe, depending upon the amount of water lost by the body. Polydipsia is the medical term that refers to increased or excessive thirst. REFERENCE: Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes symptoms are often subtle. Here's what to look for — and when to consult your doctor. Early symptoms of diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, can be subtle or seemingly harmless — that is, if you even have symptoms at all. Over time, however, you may develop diabetes complications, even if you haven't had diabetes symptoms. In the United States alone, more than 8 million people have undiagnosed diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. But you don't need to become a statistic. Understanding possible diabetes symptoms can lead to early diagnosis and treatment — and a lifetime of better health. If you're experiencing any of the following diabetes signs and symptoms, see your doctor. Excessive thirst and increased urination Excessive thirst (also called polydipsia) and increased urination (also known as polyuria) are classic diabetes symptoms. When you have diabetes, excess sugar (glucose) builds up in your blood. Your kidneys are forced to work overtime to filter and absorb the excess sugar. If your kidneys can't keep up, the excess sugar is excreted into your urine, dragging along fluids from your tissues. This triggers more frequent urination, which may leave you dehydrated. As you drink more fluids to quench your thirst, you'll urinate even more. Fatigue You may feel fatigued. Many factors can contribute to this. They include dehydration from increased urination and your body's inability to function properly, since it's less able to use sugar for energy needs. Weight loss Weight fluctuations also fall under the umbrella of possible diabetes signs and symptoms. When you lose sugar through frequent urination, you also lose calories. At the same time, diabetes may keep the sugar from your food from reaching your cells — leading to constant Continue reading >>

Why Does Type 2 Diabetes Make You Feel So Tired?

Why Does Type 2 Diabetes Make You Feel So Tired?

If you have type 2 diabetes and you’re feeling tired, you’re not alone. Fatigue is a symptom that’s often associated with the condition. There are many possible causes, including everything from diabetes-related complications to underlying conditions. Simply managing diabetes on a daily basis can zap your energy from time to time. However, the most common cause, by far, is uncontrolled blood glucose, says Joel Zonszein, MD, director of the Clinical Diabetes Center at the University Hospital of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Health System in the Bronx, New York. With type 2 diabetes, poor blood sugar control typically results in hyperglycemia or high blood sugar, which can cause fatigue among other symptoms. But Dr. Zonszein notes that high blood glucose isn’t the only cause. “Some people — especially the elderly — get dehydrated because their blood sugars are so high [and this leads to increased urination]. The fatigue, in part, comes from the dehydration,” he says. “It can also come from kidney disease.” Underlying conditions and diabetes-related complications are additional factors that can contribute to tiredness. Dr. Zonszein explains that when people have had type 2 diabetes for a long time, they can develop damage in their kidneys, heart, and liver. “Abnormalities in these organs can also cause fatigue,” he says. When fatigue is a concern, Zonszein will also screen for anemia. Anemia is not caused by diabetes, but it frequently occurs in people with diabetes and is a common cause of fatigue. He will also check the thyroid hormone level. People with diabetes are at increased risk for thyroid diseases, especially hypothyroidism. “A sluggish thyroid together with diabetes can be another cause,” says Zonszein. Medicatio Continue reading >>

Could You Have Diabetes? 5 Hidden Symptoms Of Diabetes That Could Mean You're Suffering

Could You Have Diabetes? 5 Hidden Symptoms Of Diabetes That Could Mean You're Suffering

Thought the only sign of being diabetic is being overweight? Think again... Around 3.7 million people in the UK have diabetes, yet according to Diabetes UK, around 590,000 suffer - but they don't even know about it. And while diabetes - a lifelong condition - can be successfully managed once it’s diagnosed, delaying that diagnosis puts people at risk of serious complications, including amputation and blindness. This is a key concern for Type 2 diabetes, the type associated with weight which accounts for around 90% of all cases. Type 2 occurs when the body can no longer make enough insulin (a hormone produced by the pancreas which enables us to use sugar/glucose), or the insulin being produced isn’t doing its job properly. Type 1, on the other hand, has absolutely nothing to do with weight or lifestyle and tends to develop during childhood when a fault in the body causes insulin-producing cells to be destroyed. “The symptoms of Type 1 and Type 2 are very similar, however they tend to come on a lot quicker in Type 1, and you can end up very poorly and in hospital if not diagnosed straight away,” says Diabetes UK clinical advisor Libby Dowling. “Type 2 is a little different. A lot of people put the symptoms of Type 2 down to getting older, and the condition can sometimes go undiagnosed for up to 10 years, by which time complications could have started to develop.” [Read more: Diabetes Type 1 and Type 2 - Do you know the difference?] But, aside from increased thirst, needing to be more and tiredness, what are those symptoms? Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Continue reading >>

Common Causes Of Thirst

Common Causes Of Thirst

Feeling thirsty all the time and for no good reason isn't normal and should be investigated by your GP. Thirst is normally just the brain's way of warning that you're dehydrated because you're not drinking enough fluid. But excessive and persistent thirst (known as polydipsia) could be a sign of an underlying problem such as diabetes. Dehydration You will usually feel thirsty because you're not drinking the amount of fluid your body needs. This may be because you've been sweating heavily or you've lost fluid because you have diarrhoea and are vomiting. You can soon quench your thirst and restore the fluid balance in your body by having a drink and ensuring you remain well hydrated. It's particularly important to stay well hydrated during hot weather, while exercising and while you're unwell with vomiting and diarrhoea. Read more about how much you should drink. Food In some cases, thirst may be caused by something as simple as a recent meal or snack. Eating salty or spicy foods can cause you to suddenly feel thirsty. Diabetes If you feel thirsty all the time, it could be a sign of diabetes – particularly if you also have other symptoms such as needing to urinate frequently, extreme tiredness (fatigue) and unexplained weight loss. Diabetes is a lifelong condition that makes it difficult to control the level of sugar (glucose) in your blood. The high levels of glucose can mean your kidneys need to produce more urine to help pass the glucose out of your body. This can make you feel thirsty because your brain is telling you to drink more to make up for the fluids you've lost. If you feel thirsty all the time and have other symptoms, your GP will probably carry out a blood glucose test to see whether you have diabetes. Pregnancy Feeling thirsty, as well as urinating more o Continue reading >>

6 Reasons You're Always Thirsty

6 Reasons You're Always Thirsty

On a hot summer day, or after a long workout, it’s normal to be really thirsty. After all, you’ve just lost a lot of water through sweat, so your body is telling you to replenish it ASAP. If you’re always thirsty, though, for no apparent reason, that’s not quite so normal. As long as you’re drinking (and eating) water throughout the day, and making sure to hydrate during and after exercise, you shouldn’t ever feel excessively thirsty. If you are, it can be a sign of a few medical conditions—some simple, others a bit more serious. Natasha Bhuyan, M.D., a family doctor at One Medical in Phoenix, Arizona, tells SELF that you should try to drink enough water throughout the day so that you never feel super thirsty. “When you get to the point that you’re thirsty, you’re already behind the ball,” she says. “The reality is we shouldn’t feel thirsty, and the reason why is we should stay ahead of water intake.” That means not waiting to drink water until your mouth feels like the Sahara, but rather, slowly sipping it throughout the day. You probably don’t ever have to worry that you’re drinking too much: Overhydrating is a medical possibility, and can come with serious side effects, but you’d have to try exceptionally hard to overpower your body’s way of dealing with excess water (e.g. peeing) and ignoring cues it’s sending you that it’s had its fill. “Our bodies are pretty good at regulating our intake,” Bhuyan adds. If you experience that thirsty feeling more often than not, here are some potential reasons why. 1. You’re simply not drinking enough, so you’re dehydrated. “The main reason people feel thirsty is because they’re dehydrated, they’re not drinking enough water,” Bhuyan says. Simple enough. The standard recommenda Continue reading >>

5 Causes For Excessive Thirst You Might Not Know About

5 Causes For Excessive Thirst You Might Not Know About

Excessive thirst or dipsesis is a condition that causes extreme fluid loss while depleting the water from your body, thereby causing excessive thirst. You can lose large amounts of water from your body through excessive urination, diarrhoea, vomiting and sweating. If you have noticed that you have been feeling excessively thirsty off late, here are some of the most common ailments that might be causing these symptoms. Diabetes Mellitus When your blood sugar levels are abnormal, as in the case of diabetes, your kidneys are unable to deal with the sugar overload. When this occurs, sugar enters into the urine while also removing an excessive amount of body water too. This causes the body to remain in a state of water depletion which causes excessive thirst in people suffering from the condition. Therefore, one of the main causes of excessive thirst would have to be an undiagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus. A high number of children and adults have been diagnosed with this condition worldwide. You ay also like to read about Home remedies for diabetes mellitus. Dehydration There are a number of illnesses which can cause dehydration, a condition which leads to the depletion of water from the body. Some of the leading illnesses include food poisoning as well as other diarrheal illnesses, heat exhaustion, infections that cause fever and burns. When the water from your body starts to deplete, you may experience symptoms like dry mouth, fatigue and extreme thirst. Also, in the case of severe dehydration, nausea and vomiting will also take place causing fluid displacement. If one is not able to take in liquids through his or her mouth, intravenous fluids may be required. It should be noted that a severe case of dehydration can have life-threatening results. When a massive loss of t Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop gradually—so gradually, in fact, that it’s possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms. Some people are actually surprised when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they’ve gone to the doctor for something else (eg, fatigue or increased urination). The symptoms develop gradually because, if you have the insulin resistant form of type 2, it takes time for the effects of insulin resistance to show up. Your body doesn’t become insulin resistant (unable to use insulin properly) overnight, as you can learn about in the article on causes of type 2 diabetes. If you’re not insulin resistant—and instead your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process glucose well—the symptoms also develop gradually. Your body will be able to “make do” with lower insulin levels for awhile, but eventually, you will start to notice the following symptoms. Here are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: Fatigue: Your body isn’t getting the energy it needs from the food you’re eating, so you may feel very tired. Extreme thirst: No matter how much you drink, it feels like you’re still dehydrated. Your tissues (such as your muscles) are, in fact, dehydrated when there’s too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Your body pulls fluid from the tissues to try to dilute the blood and counteract the high glucose, so your tissues will be dehydrated and send the message that you need to drink more. This is also associated with increased urination. Frequent urination: This is related to drinking so much more in an attempt to satisfy your thirst. Since you’re drinking more, you’ll have to urinate more. Additionally, the body will try to get rid of the excess g Continue reading >>

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

Diabetes is sneaky. The early symptoms can go unnoticed for months or years. In fact, 1 in 3 people with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it. 1 in 3. Most actually do experience the early signs but don’t realise or understand what they are. Early detection and treatment can have a profound impact on your long-term health. A 3-year delay in diagnosis increases your relative risk of heart disease by 29% (1). Therefore by knowing what to look for, you can take control of the situation before it takes control of you. Diabetes Symptoms In Adults and Children Diabetes is the term given to blood sugar (glucose) levels that are too high for a sustained period of time. The signs or symptoms of high blood sugar are typically the same for both children and adults. Patients with type 1 diabetes usually develop symptoms over a sudden, short period of time. The condition is often diagnosed in an emergency setting. Type 2 diabetes on the other hand progresses quite slowly. Symptoms tend to come on gradually, which is why they are often overlooked. Some don’t experience any early symptoms at all. The following early signs of diabetes are the most common: 1. Increased urination is arguably the most common A significant increase in how often you urinate (Polyuria) is a tell-tale symptom of high blood sugar. As a point of reference, the average person pees 4 to 7 times in a 24-hour period. Waking up during the night to go, even though you already went right before bed, is a common red flag. Why does this happen?: Your kidneys are working overtime to expel the excess sugar in your blood. Sugar that the kidneys are unable to absorb must be urinated out. Therefore high sugar levels leads to more urination. 2. Excessive thirst is one of the classic early signs of diabetes Drinking u Continue reading >>

9 Signs Of Diabetes

9 Signs Of Diabetes

Diabetes is a growing problem in the United States. Around 17 million Americans are diabetic, which is approximately six per cent of the population. The people who are most at risk of type 2 diabetes are those of African-American, Hispanic, Native American and Asian American heritage. At least a third of people with diabetes do not even know that they have the condition. What are the diabetes signs that you should be aware of? 1. You are frequently thirsty Being thirsty a lot is one of the diabetes signs that you should be looking out for. It is usually one of the first indications of type 2 diabetes. The thirst is usually a continuous one. There are two main types of diabetes. With diabetes insipidus, excessive thirst occurs when there is a reduction in the hormone that controls the excretion of water within your body. This causes your kidneys to excrete too much water, which causes you to become dehydrated. This is why you feel the need to drink more to compensate. Thirst also occurs when too much sugar is forced into the blood. This causes you to urinate more frequently. With diabetes mellitus, excess glucose in the blood causes too much water to be drawn out of your tissues, which makes you dehydrated. To combat this, you drink more fluid, which again leads to frequent urination. In both cases, if your excessive thirst is a sign of diabetes, you will often need to wake up during the night because you are thirsty. 2. You need the toilet a lot Frequent urination is another diabetes sign. Most people only need to urinate a few times every day, but diabetics are likely to need to urinate far more frequently. This happens because excess sugar in your blood causes your body to become dehydrated. Your body encourages you to drink more fluid to counteract this, which is why Continue reading >>

Diabetes Self Assessment

Diabetes Self Assessment

Could you be at risk of type 2 diabetes? Diabetes is a long-term condition that can have serious health consequences including heart disease, stroke, amputation, kidney failure and blindness. With early diagnosis the risk of developing these serious complications can be minimised. Please note, this tool may not be accurate for anyone undergoing treatment for diabetes. QUESTIONS The words in italics indicate possible risk factors or symptoms of diabetes and appear in the tool as a list on the results page. 1. Are you? b) Female 2. How old are you? a) Under 25 (0 points) d) 60 or over (4 points) Your age 3. Are you overweight? a)Yes, I’m overweight for my height (2 points) Being overweight b)I’m slightly overweight (1 point) Being overweight c)No, I’m not overweight (0 points) More on weight Type 2 diabetes is often linked to being overweight. If you are overweight, or obese, the cells in your body become less responsive to the effects of insulin. This explains why 80% of people who develop type 2 diabetes are overweight, or obese. If you want to check whether you are a healthy weight for your height you can do this on the NHS healthy weight calculator in the tools library. 4. How would you describe your thirst levels? a) I’m continuously thirsty (2 points) Feeling thirsty all the times b) I’m often thirsty (1 point) Feeling thirsty c) My thirst levels are average (0 points) 5. Do you have a history of diabetes in your immediate family? a) Yes, I have close family members with diabetes (2 points) Having a relative with Type 2 diabetes b) I have a distant relative with diabetes (1 points) c) No, there’s no history of diabetes in my family (0 points) More on genetic factors You are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you have a close family member, such as Continue reading >>

Polydipsia

Polydipsia

Tweet Polydipsia is the term given to excessive thirst and is one of the initial symptoms of diabetes. It is also usually accompanied by temporary or prolonged dryness of the mouth. We all get thirsty at various times during the day. Adequate daily intake of water (several glasses) is very important as water is essential for many bodily functions, including regulating body temperature and removing waste. However, if you feel thirsty all the time or your thirst is stronger than usual and continues even after you drink, it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body. Causes of polydipsia Increased thirst is often the reaction to fluid loss during exercise, or to eating salty or spicy foods. It can also be caused by: Diarrhoea Vomiting Profuse sweating Significant blood loss or Certain prescription medications Increased thirst can also occur as a result of high blood sugar levels in people with diabetes or yet to be diagnosed diabetes. Persistent excessive thirst can be the result of one of the following: Diabetes mellitus Diabetes insipidus - a condition unrelated to diabetes mellitus that affects the kidneys and the hormones that interact with them, resulting in large quantities of urine being produced Loss of body fluids from the bloodstream into the tissues due to: burns or severe infections (sepsis) or heart, liver, or kidney failure Psychogenic polydipsia - compulsive water drinking associated with mental/psychiatric disorders Excessive thirst can be caused by high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), and is also one of the ‘Big 3’ signs of diabetes mellitus. Increased thirst and diabetes Increased thirst in people with diabetes can sometimes be, but certainly not always, an indication of higher than normal blood glucose levels. People with diabetes with access t Continue reading >>

8 Unexpected Reasons You’re Always Thirsty

8 Unexpected Reasons You’re Always Thirsty

Your diet has too much salt in it iStock/Wavebreak Salt pulls water out of cells and forces the body to conserve as much water as possible, which is why you urinate less when you eat too much salt. The water-deprived cells send a chemical message to the brain asking for more water, and you start to feel thirsty. Cut down on your salt intake and make sure you’re drinking enough water. Here are other signs you're eating much sodium. You took a morning walk iStock/Geber86 “You’re going to need to drink more on days when you sweat more,” says Peter Mayock, MD, medical director of the West Town Adult Clinic of the Eric Family Health Center in Chicago. When you exercise, you lose fluids through sweat, and if you don’t replace that fluid, you could end up dehydrated. There isn’t one formula as to how much you should be drinking, but Mayock says listen to your body. Here's why morning exercise will make you thinner. You’ve been out in the sun for too long iStock/StudioThreeDots Now that summer’s finally here, you spend more time in the great outdoors whether it’s in a park, on a beach, or in your backyard. Even if you’re not running around, you can still become dehydrated, especially in the hot sunlight. If you know you’re going to be outside all day, make sure you have a water bottle handy. Here are other signs you've gotten too much sun. You might have diabetes iStock/BernardaSv Some patients mistake dehydration for diabetes. “With dehydration, your body wants to preserve liquids,” he says. “With diabetes, the sugar is spilling and forcing you to urinate more often.” Dr. Mayock says most of his patients exhibit three signs of diabetes: excessive thirst, excessive urination, and blurred vision. If you’re experiencing all three, talk to your doct Continue reading >>

Why Am I Always Thirsty?

Why Am I Always Thirsty?

Thirst is your body’s way of telling you that it’s running low on water, which it needs to work well. It’s normal to feel thirsty when it’s hot or after you’ve powered through an intense workout. But if you’re constantly refilling your cup without relief, it could signal another health problem. Dehydration means your body doesn’t have enough water to carry out normal tasks, and thirst is the main symptom. It can happen for a lot of reasons, such as exercise, diarrhea, vomiting, and too much sweating. Besides wanting water, other signs can include: Dark-colored urine Not needing to pee as often Feeling tired or lightheaded Kids who are dehydrated might also: Have few or no tears when they cry Have a dry, sticky mouth Go to the bathroom less or have fewer wet diapers Be irritable or sluggish Thirst you can’t seem to quench, what doctors call polydipsia, is one symptom of diabetes. When you have this disease, your body doesn’t make enough of the hormone insulin or doesn’t use it properly. It causes too much sugar (called glucose) to build up in your body. Glucose in your urine draws in more water, so you pee more often. That leaves your body wanting to replace the fluid you’re losing. Along with thirst and more visits to the restroom, other symptoms of diabetes include: Despite its name, this condition isn’t related to diabetes. It happens when your body doesn’t make enough of a hormone that helps your kidneys control the amount of water in your body. Excessive thirst is one of the major symptoms. If you have diabetes insipidus, you may also have: When your mouth feels very dry, it can make you thirsty. Usually, it happens because the glands in your mouth make less saliva. You may get it because of medications you take, treatments for other condit Continue reading >>

Are Tiredness And Thirst Connected Symptoms?

Are Tiredness And Thirst Connected Symptoms?

Could these be symptoms of the same thing? I sleep plenty but after work I always have to fall asleep again and I'm always thirsty. I heard that the thirst thing is a diabetes symptom but I don't think it is that. Could these be symptoms of something else though? There are many different conditions that are associated with both fatigue and thirst. All of them are conditions that should be looked into right away. You mentioned one of the most common causes of this problem, diabetes. Diabetes causes blood sugar levels to be too high. Subsequently the sugar in your blood spills into your urine cause you to lose more water. When you lose more water, you become thirsty and drink more. In addition, having diabetes changes your metabolism and can make you feel very fatigued. If you were my patient, I would check you for diabetes by measuring your hemoglobin a1c. This is the current test of choice to screen someone for diabetes. There are other abnormalities that can cause someone to be fatigued and thirsty. Another condition is diabetes insipidus (not the same as sugar diabetes). High calcium in the blood can make you very thirsty and tired. All of these problems can be investigated by a simple blood tests. I suggest that you schedule an appointment with your primary care physician. He or she can take a more detailed history of your symptoms, perform a thorough physical exam, and obtain the above blood tests I mentioned. Your doctor may also test your thyroid function and your adrenal gland function to make sure these are operating well. Good luck. This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek t Continue reading >>

More in diabetic diet